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FREE • Friday, May 5, 2017

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BE C A U S E CO M M U N I T Y MAT T E R S .

COLLABORATION CHARTS SUCCESSES FOR TACOMA STUDENTS

HEADSTONES FINALLY INSTALLED FOR CIVIL WAR VETERANS

ENROLLMENTS IN SUMMER EDUCATION PROGRAMS HAVE NEARLY DOUBLED GRADUATION RATES REMAIN ABOUT STATE AVERAGE EDUCATION GAP CONTINUES TO CLOSE

PHOTO BY DANIEL BEERS

FINAL HONORS. Mark Stevens of the Sons of

Union Veterans of the Civil War recounts the lives of three brave men. By Dan Beers Special to Tacoma Weekly

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PROGRESS. Graduate Tacoma unveiled its annual Community Impact Report that charts progress on educational programs for all ages of Tacoma Public School students. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

T

he Foundation for Tacoma Students and Graduate Tacoma released the 2017 Community Impact Report toward the communitydefined goals for all grades and all

Tacoma schools at an unveiling event that about 200 community boosters attended April 28 at Metro Parks Tacoma’s STAR Center. A collection of Gray Middle School eighth graders punctuated the fact that data points represented real students by parading through the audience to the stage to state their future. Some will be lawyers. One

would be a surgeon. Another plans to be an industrial designer. Yet another will be a software designer, while another will repair cars. One will be a teacher and another will be a forensic scientist. The takeaway was that the good numbers are up and the bad numbers are down for the most part in the 17

See GRADUATE / page 11

AT 107 YEARS OLD, RUTH HOFTO REMAINS AS FULL OF LIFE AS EVER By Jackie Fender Special to Tacoma Weekly

The times, they are a-changin’. Think back to a decade ago – the world has undergone some big transitions even in such a short period of time. On a large scale, there are technological advances and monumental political and societal shifts, and on a more hyperlocal scale, think about where you were 10 years ago, 20, 100 years. Ruth Ayers Hofto could tell you some tales, and she’s lived it, over a century even. She turns 107 on May 13. Hofto is a University Place resident, mother and artist born in Black Diamond in 1910. Her father was a coal miner who moved the family often to migrate to other mining towns. The family spent some time in Issaquah and later she graduated from Cle Elum High School. In 1928, the family set down their roots in the city of Tacoma. It’s here where she found love. Jacki Hofto, Ruth’s only child, tells me with a laugh, “My mom met my dad, Henry, through a friend on a street corner in Tacoma. She wasn’t wearing any shoes, maybe slippers.” During the Great Depression years, jobs were scarce but both Henry and Ruth found work and helped support their families. Mrs. Hofta had a job at a JC Penney department store and remembers shaking Mr. Penney’s hand when he made a visit to the Tacoma location. The couple officially became the Hoftos when they wed in 1934. Both Henry and Ruth had a love of the arts. Mr. Hofto was a musician and a builder and Mrs. Hofto helped him with his business as a bookkeeper, while she pursued her love of arts and crafts. Her love of the arts wasn’t new, as Ruth began painting and drawing when she was only 6 years old. Hofto says, “I started drawing flowers in first grade in Issaquah grade school in 1916. I painted a bowl of pansies; my dad always had flowers and a vegetable garden. When he took me with him

PHOTO BY PHIL RASCHKE

to shop for groceries, the butcher would give me a wiener and a large piece of butcher paper and say to go home and draw, which I did just as if it was my school lesson. My dad was my critic. So that butcher really helped me get a good start in art. In the later years, I wanted to go to art school but the Depression years kept me from it. So, I tried every See HOFTO / page 11

On April 29, three Civil War veterans finally received the military honor they are entitled to. At the Western State Hospital Historic Patient Cemetery at Fort Steilacoom Park that day, members of the Lakewood City Council, Grave Concerns Association, Laurel and Rosemary, and Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War joined together to cast aside the stigma of mental illness and provide the brave soldiers the dignity they deserve. The soldiers recognized that afternoon were Sergeant Oliver W. Bean (Company D, 5th Wisconsin Infantry), Private Thomas Blanchard (Company I, 4th New York Heavy Artillery), and Sergeant Charles Wesley Cooley (Company G, 49th Ohio Infantry). This ceremony was in large part due to the dedicated work of James Dimond, historian for the Department of the Columbia, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW). One of the projects the SUVCW invests in is their gravestone registration project. “We are attempting to locate the burial site of every Civil War veteran in the state of Washington and beyond,” said Dimond. “In the course of research, I found that these two veterans, Bean and Blanchard, were buried at the Western State Hospital Cemetery.” The previous markers were just numbers. According to Graves Concerns Association, this was due to the social stigma of the mental illness. “By omitting the patients’ names, the surviving families did not have to bear shame of having a mentally ill relative,” Dimond said. Sergeant Bean and Private Blanchard received new headstones from Grave Concerns. Sergeant Cooley’s headstone was placed by his family in September 2009, but was rededicated on April 29 along with the other two. The dedication ceremony included the release of doves, the laying of wreaths from members of Allied Orders of the Grand Army of the Republic, and military honors that included a black powder rifle salute followed by the playing of “Taps.” This ritual, performed by the Co. B 71st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, Sons of Veterans Reserve, was designed to be very similar to the ceremonies performed by the old Grand Army of the Republic (GAR). “The importance here is remembering and honoring the sacrifice and service of these men to help preserve the Union,” said Loran Bures of the SUVCW. “And we want to recognize them doing that.” Bean, a Vermont native, joined the Fifth Wisconsin Infantry in 1864 as a private. The unit was in reserve until nearly the end of the war, where they saw heavy combat around Richmond, Va. After the war, Bean left the army as a sergeant, and returned to civilian life as a farmer. He married, had children, and lived in Wisconsin. The marriage did not last long, and he eventually ended up in Washington in 1905. His second wife committed him to Western State Hospital in September 1909. He died 16 days later. See VETERANS / page 11 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly TWITTER: @TacomaWeekly

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Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

Pothole of the Week

AUTHORITIES HUNT FOR COFFEE MAKER CROOK By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

S 2ND STREET AND ST HELENS AVENUE

After so long, we have to assume that Percival our beloved Pothole Pig has simply vanished. However, there are still potholes in the city that need attention, so we simply – and sadly – must hire someone to handle his workload. We decided to give the candidates a trial run to see how they do in the field. This week Carter the Crater Gator gave it another shot by finding a crater that would make Percival proud. But frankly, Carter might just not have the celebrity power to take on such a high-profile role. What are your thoughts? We have other candidates in the works that we might try out: Charles the Chuckhole Chicken and Blighty the Blight-Seeking Beaver, but several people voiced their opinion that a permanent replacement should be one of Percival’s relatives, namely Peyton, who lives in Portland, and Perry, who lives in Parkland. And now a new candidate has entered the running with a resume from Ruddy the Road Rut Reindeer, who is a brother-inlaw of Tacoma Rainiers mascot Rhubarb. Send your thoughts to stevedunkel@ tacomaweekly.com.

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TACOMA’S TOUR OF HISTORIC HOMES COMING MAY 6TH AND 7TH TACOMA POLICE WARN OF ‘SKIMMERS’ ON 7-ELEVEN ATMS EROSA TOO MUCH FOR RUCKUS SR 167 TIMELINE, DETAILS TAKING SHAPE WHAT PUGET SOUND ENERGY IS NOT TELLING US ABOUT LNG PLANT

ATTENTION RENTERS: Stop Wasting Thousands of Dollars on Rent When You Can Own Your Own Tacoma Area Home By Adam Peters Tacoma - If you’re like most renters, you feel trapped within the walls of a house or apartment that doesn’t feel like yours. How could it when you’re not even permitted to bang in a nail or two without a hassle. You feel like you’re stuck in the renter’s rut with no way of rising up out of it and owning your own home. Well don’t feel trapped any more! A new FREE Special Report entitled “How to Stop Paying Rent and Own Your Own Home” has already helped dozens of local renters get out from under their landlord’s finger, and move into a wonderful home they can truly call their own. You can make this move too by discovering the important steps detailed in this FREE Special Report. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been renting, or how insurmountable your financial situation may seem. With the help of this report, it will become suddenly clear to you how you really can save for the down payment and stop wasting thousands of dollars on rent. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-800-5301015 and enter 9001. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report and stop wasting thousands of dollars on rent NOW. This report is courtesy of RE*USA NW. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2017. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Pierce County Sheriff's detectives are asking for help to identify a thief who stole a coffee maker from the South Hill Kohl’s store. DAVID ROSE “Even though it was only a $200 coffee maker that he ran out of the store with, that doesn’t mean he’s not out doing it on a daily basis,” said Pierce County Sheriff's Detective Ed Troyer. The crook took off through the fire exit doors. “So, even though the dollar amount may not seem high, we want to put an end to it, and some-

times it could be a lot more theft than just a coffee machine. Somebody that’s going to continue to do this will continue until they get caught.” If you can tell Pierce County detectives this coffee maker crook’s

name, call Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County at 1 (800) 222TIPS. It is guaranteed to be anonymous and there is a cash reward of up to $1,000 if your information to Crime Stoppers leads to his arrest.

Bulletin Board FOUR FINALISTS SELECTED FOR TACOMA CITY MANAGER POSITION The Tacoma City Council has selected four finalists for the position of city manager. They are: Kristoff Bauer has more than 22 years of management experience and currently serves as deputy city manager for the City of Fayetteville, N.C. He previously served the City of Fayetteville, N.C. as assistant city manager and interim city manager. He also previously served the City of Jacksonville, N.C. as the city manager; the City of Billings, Mont. as the city manager, and the City of Shoreline, Wash. as assistant to the city manager. He has a juris doctor as well as a master of business administration from the University of Washington. Walter Bobkiewicz III has more than 27 years of management experience and currently serves as the city manager for the City of Evanston, Ill. He previously served the City of Santa Paula, Calif. as the city manager; the City of Novato, Calif. as assistant city manager; and the City of Long Beach, Calif. as telecommunications bureau manager for the general services department, administrative analyst for the police and public works departments and assistant to the city manager. He has a master of public administration from Syracuse University. Robert Cowell, Jr. has more than 23 years of management experience and currently serves as deputy city manager for the City of Amarillo, Texas, and as a visiting assistant professor of practice at Texas A&M University's Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning. He also previously served the City of Amarillo, Texas as assistant city manager and interim city manager; the City of College Station, Texas as executive director for planning and development services; Monroe County Plan Commission in Bloomington, Ind. as planning director; McKenna Associates, Inc. in Kalamazoo, Mich. as principal planner; and Jefferson County, Missouri as senior planner and planning division manager for the Department of Land Use, Development and Code Enforcement. He has a master of science in urban planning with a specialization in land use from the University of Tennessee. Belinda Graham has more than 24 years of management experience and currently serves as a special project temporary employee assisting the city manager of the City of Port Townsend, Wash. in identifying development barriers, focusing on city processes, workforce and financing, and assisting in the retention of a firm to create a subarea plan. She previously served the City of Riverside, Calif. as director of the development department and assistant city manager (city manager pro tem). She also previously served the County of Riverside Economic Development Agency in Riverside, Calif., Cherry Valley, Calif. and Indio, Calif. as senior development specialist (regional manager) and assistant director; and the City of Ontario Redevelopment Agency as project manager. She has a master of business administration from the University of Redlands. The finalists will be interviewed by the City Council and the City’s Executive Leadership Team on Thursday, May 11 and Friday, May 12. Community members will have an opportunity to meet the finalists in person during a public forum as well as a community reception at the Tacoma Municipal Building Council Chambers (747 Market St.) on Friday, May 12, from 5:15 to 7 p.m. The public forum will also air live on TV Tacoma. The position of city manager has been open since February 2017, following the departure of former City Manager, T.C. Broadnax. The City Council appointed City Attorney Elizabeth Pauli to serve as interim city manager until Tacoma’s next city manager has been recruited and selected. OPPORTUNITY OFFERED TO LEARN THE TRADES Interested in the trades? Trade Occupations Opportunity Learning (TOOL) Center is now enrolling for classes that start in June at Bates Technical College. To sign up for the pre-class orientation and assessment on May 6, call (253) 301-3938 or (253) 861-3969 – this will be held at the Tacoma Housing Authority Investment Center at 1724 E. 44th St., Tacoma and hosted by Genesis Housing and Community Development Coalition.

Curriculum includes industry awareness, tools and materials, blueprint reading, construction math, welding, financial literacy, labor history, green construction and applied learning, and certifications for OSHA 10, CPR and first aid, flagging and forklift. Eligibility requirements: must be 18 years or older, GED or high school equivalent, Social Security card, stable living condition, seventh-grade level in reading and math, ability to pass a drug test, and have or be eligible to obtain a driver’s license. Duration is 12 weeks, meeting Tuesday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. VIALLE ANNOUNCES RE-ELECTION BID FOR SCHOOL BOARD Citing her commitment to excellence in our public schools, Tacoma School Board member Karen Vialle has announced her campaign for reelection this fall. Vialle, a former mayor of Tacoma and longtime community activist, is completing her first six-year term on the Tacoma School Board. “I’m excited to build on the successes we’ve achieved for the Tacoma schools,” Vialle stated. “Since 2011, graduation rates have increased from 54 percent to 85 percent, universal free pre-school has been established, and achievement gaps have been significantly reduced. I want to continue to work to ensure each child has the opportunity to thrive in our schools.” Over the past six years, the Tacoma School Board, working with parents, students and leaders throughout the community, has made significant strides, including the development of a long-term strategic plan, the setting of innovative learning bench marks, and the implementation of an effective equity policy to close achievement gaps. “We’ve made real progress for kids,” Vialle said. During Vialle’s time as board president, the Tacoma School Board earned a major distinction when named the National Board of Excellence for 2016-2017 by the Council of Urban Boards of Education. Vialle, 73, has held numerous leadership positions throughout her career, including deputy state insurance commissioner, assistant director of the Washington State Office of Financial Management, and executive director of Centro Latino. Karen and her husband, Marvin, are lifelong residents of Tacoma. They have three children and eight grandchildren. For additional information, contact Committee to ReElect Karen Vialle, Tacoma School Board #5, 952 Fairview Dr. S., Tacoma, Washington 98465; (253) 651-8208; krviall@comcast.net; www.reelectkarenvialle.com. CITY INTRODUCES NEW BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE TOOLS As part of its continued efforts to drive economic growth in Tacoma, the City of Tacoma has added two new business intelligence tools on its Community and Economic Development Department webpages, ZoomProspector and SizeUp. The added functionality precedes a broader overhaul of the Community and Economic Development Department’s web presence. ZoomProspector caters to the needs of site selectors and investors, providing robust, high-quality data that drills all the way down to the zip code level, as they assess possible locations. ZoomProspector helps site selectors and investors research hundreds of criteria to find the community that best meets their specific needs, and helps them analyze locations based on more than 1,000 variables to find the perfect one. SizeUp helps business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs make smarter decisions with data that shows how they measure up against the competition in their industry. This tool helps them determine what percentage of businesses they are outperforming in their industry in revenue, size, salaries and more. It also shows them where the typical business owner in their industry is doing best near them, as they consider expanding into a new location or where to target their next marketing campaign. More information on the newly added tools is available through India Adams in the City’s Community and Economic Development Department at iadams@ cityoftacoma.org or (253) 591-5142. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

Browser history, customer data to remain private By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma City Council approved a restriction on Internet Service Providers that lease bandwidth on the municipally owned Click Network, forbidding the companies from selling customer data without permission. It’s something they currently don’t do, or plan to start doing. The resolution forbids, even if business plans change. The resolution, No. 39702, was sponsored by Councilmember Anders Ibsen and requests that the appointed Tacoma Public Utility Board prohibit the companies using Click from collecting or selling customer data without the written approval from the customer. The resolution also requests the board prohibit companies from refusing to provide services to customers who do not approve of the collection or sale of personal information. “It is certainly a safeguard,” Ibsen said, noting that the resolution is also a statement of intent for more discussions about Internet privacy and the benefits of a municipal system. The restriction came after President Donald Trump signed a Congressional resolution that will roll back Internet privacy protections in December that will allow Internet providers to use or sell customer information, allowing them to have targeted advertising currently found on social media platforms in what critics say is a breach of privacy. At the heart of the issue is the larger debate about whether Internet access is a fundamental part of life and therefore should be regulated or a freemarket luxury that operates under “industry guidelines” rather than rules. The council has long sided with the argument that it is essential, most notably with its decision to seek plans for the Click Network to offer telephone, Internet and cable television as a way to promote Internet access through a municipally owned system. The recent privacy resolution only affects the two companies that provide Internet services by wholesale leasing bandwidth on the Click Network that is then retailed to residential and business customers. Those companies, Advanced Stream and Rainier Connect, have pledged not to sell customer data even when it would be allowed when the rules go into effect later this year. The prohibition against the sale of customer data locally could become part of future franchise agreements as those contracts come up for renewal, Ibsen said if the state fails to take action. The other major players in the local Internet access marketplace, namely Comcast and Century Link, provide service through their own fiber optic system, and therefore, not bound to the city’s restrictions. But they have their own pledges to secure and protect customer information. “There’s been a lot of attention and questions about consumer privacy in recent days,” Comcast’s Senior Vice

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

INTERNET. Tacoma City Council approved a resolution that would prohibit the sale of information from customers of Internet companies that use Click Network’s fiber optic system. The effort came as the federal government voted to loosen the use of customer information.

President and Chief Privacy Officer Gerard Lewis wrote in a response to the federal action. “At Comcast, we respect and protect our customers’ personal information. Always have, always will. We do not sell our broadband customers’ individual web browsing history. We did not do it before the FCC’s rules were adopted, and we have no plans to do so.” He continued by saying that customers must opt in to targeted advertising through the release of “non sensitive” information and noted the company is working on ways to more clearly state its privacy policy. “The bottom line: Comcast values our customers’ trust, and we will continue to protect the privacy and security of their personal information.” CenturyLink takes a similar stance in its privacy pol-

icy that includes when, how and why it shares customer information. “CenturyLink is made up of a number of companies and we share information among them as permitted by applicable law,” according to the policy. “We also use other companies to help us market, sell and bill for our services, and we necessarily share information with them and we require these companies to keep your information confidential and secure.” Several states around the nation are primed to pass their own customer protection laws, following the federal change. Two bills in the state’s special session would require all Internet providers in the state to ask for permission before releasing or selling the browser history and personal information of their customers.

UNSOLVED HOMICIDES Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to identify the suspects responsible for the murders of Travis Dennis and Jeffrey Poling. At 8:45 a.m. on Monday, May 28th, 2012, a family member discovered the bodies of victims Travis Dennis and Jeffrey Poling inside of Dennis’ house in the 9400 block of 176th St. Ct. E. in the Puyallup area. Both of the

victims had been shot in the head by unidentified suspects. There were no signs of forced entry or a struggle. Investigators have determined that a computer and numerous firearms were missing from the victim’s residence, including several handguns, a shotgun, an assault rifle and a semiautomatic rifle. Detectives are looking for information on any Fridays at 10:30pm on

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

Indian Education/TCC powwow enjoys biggest turnout ever

By David Syth For Tacoma Weekly

The 11th annual Tacoma Indian Education/Tacoma Community College powwow was held on Saturday, April 15 on the campus of TCC. This has been an ongoing, successful partnership between the Tacoma Indian Education program and TCC. This was the most successful powwow to date with more than 500 people in attendance. The event opened with a welcome from Indian Education Director David Syth (Crow), powwow emcee Anthony Bluehorse, TPS Superintendent Carla Santorno, acting co-presidents of TCC Mary Chikwinya and Bill Ryberg, TPS Board Director Karen Vialle, TCC Dean of Student Development Dr. Valerie Robertson, and TPS Indian Education Parent Committee President George Zantua. Tacoma Public Schools Native American seniors as well as Native American TCC graduates were recognized and honored. There was a community dinner, drumming, singing, dancing, as well as concessions and vendors selling Native American crafts. I would like to thank my staff – Myrna Fisher, Orlonda Rodriguez, Liz Leines – and all of the staff at TCC who made this event happen. A special thank you goes out to the Puyallup Tribe of Indians for their support of the TPS Indian Education Program to assist in providing this local cultural event for our families and the greater community at large. Their support makes this possible. We are currently debriefing and getting ready to start planning for next year and hope everyone will put on your calendar to attend.

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Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

FROM COMBAT TO APARTMENT FLAT:

Veterans Resource Fair has got your back By Tami Jackson For Tacoma Weekly

The fifth annual Veterans Resource Fair marches into this city on May 13 and runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. inside the Tacoma Dome’s Exhibition Hall. The event is a great place for military-affiliated individuals living in Pierce, King, Kitsap, and Thurston counties to network and learn about their Veteran’s Administration (VA) related benefits. Event Director Shawn Durnen said the Veterans Resource Fair aims to get everyone under one roof, volunteers, veterans, and veteran family members alike. The event has their backs better than a flak jacket, or a heavy vest, as it protects against proverbial social shrapnel when veterans go through significant life changes. Durnen said all veterans struggle with enormous life shifts. Some seem to be continually marching to the cadence, “I had a good home, but I leftâ€? when they return home and can’t seem to fit in with their new surroundings. According to this January’s annual Point in Time count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless people living in Pierce County, 10 percent were veterans. In 2015, the count declared that the majority of homeless veterans were male while nine percent were female. Durnen himself was homeless off and on for more than three years when he returned home from 4 ½ years of active duty service. His experiences from living on the streets inspired his getting involved with the premiere Veterans Resource Fair five years ago. For the Army, Durnen had worked for OIF (Operation Iraqi Freedom) as a combat vet and did engineering, construction, and demolition work. “Sustainability was not in my vocabulary at the time,â€? he admitted, alluding to his mindset when he first returned home. Because Durnen knows the social neglect that veterans feel on an intimate basis, he speaks up for his comrades in transition and said when individuals get out military service they have lost their identity and must suddenly rediscover who they are as civilians. That means they must transition into civilian housing rules, which are quite different than what the military offered. Durnen said the returning vet must also navigate many other cultural expectations. “You’re talking about a population of individuals who have gone from being told what to do every day of their lives. When they get out of the military, they’re learning how to dress, how to eat, when to be places, and are now having to rediscover who they are,â€? Durnen said. The Veteran’s Resource Fair is not dictated by any governing organization and the event is staffed mostly by volunteers. Yet Durnen said the Veteran’s Resource Fair works in affiliation with the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs (WDVA) and with

As sembl e! if you like staying informed about local politics, policies, neighborhood issues and trends and also have the drive to tell interesting stories and informative, newsyou-can-use articles, give me a call at 253-922-5317. I might just have a spot for you on my team.

Nine9Line Veteran Services, a non-profit organization. “What started out as a labor of love now serves 1,500-2,500 veterans in a single day,� Durnen said. “These past five years since the event started they’ve served somewhere between 7,000-to-8,000 families, offering support and connections.� The Veterans Resource Fair attracts somewhere between 150 and 160 providers who offer veterans and their families a wide array of community services including education benefits, medical screenings, dental resources, family counseling and legal services, as well as housing assistance and disability claims. There will also be resources specific to female veterans, widow/ widower benefits and active duty transition assistance available.

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Event Director Shawn Durnen said the Veterans Resource Fair aims to get everyone under one roof, volunteers, veterans, and veteran family members alike.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

Our View

TACOMA ROCKS! An otherwise simple concept has taken hold in Tacoma and reaches areas far and wide on this big, blue marble called Earth. Tacoma Rocks! started last fall as an idea to promote outdoor activities, local pride, art and the wonder of random discovery. Members of the Facebook group Tacoma Rocks! – WA Official, simply paint rocks with cartoon characters, inspirational messages, scenes or whatever comes to mind on otherwise ordinary rocks that then become works of art with the message: “Post my photo on Facebook @ Tacoma ROCKS!� Those bits of granite goodness, sandstone salutations and marble merriment are then hidden around town, although some rocks have found their way to the far flung regions of the world when local rock painters take their limestone lovelies on business trips and vacation getaways. Folks happen across the rocks and post an image of their find on the Facebook group and either keep it for their collection, leave it for another explorer to find, or replace it with a rock of their own. It’s all free and up to the goodwill of strangers to enjoy their finds. The group now has 17,000 members, with some people posting photos of their works in process, their finished rocks waiting to be placed along sidewalks or under trees or on park benches. Others offer tips and advice about what paints or pens work best on particular rocks and how best to seal their works to avoid smears, smudges and messes. Some people post “best practices� tips like not leaving rocks in businesses without permission, not putting them in places that would hamper lawn or garden tenders, or not taking rocks from displays or parks only to replace them with painted ones. People should provide their own rocks. Still others post photos of their finds alongside with their own painted rock creations in an effort to “Spread the Joy.� Friends are made somewhere along the way as a rock painter chats with a rock finder about the latest creation. Some people could use a little bit of that friendship and joy. Unfortunately, as with all ventures on social media, there are the haters who blast the whole concept and get rather brutal with their threats of violence regarding their distain for finding the painted offerings on their trails and benches. Frankly, bullying and threats of violence over a painted rock left on a park bench just illustrates why the Tacoma Rocks! group is so needed. Can’t we just love a little more and hate a little less? And pass the paint, please!

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com Duncan Rolfson / duncan@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Josh Reisberg, Randy Rutledge COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran, Miguel Douglas

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Guest Editorial

BLIND SLOGANS AND SHALLOW GREATNESS By Rivera Sun The airplane is packed shoulder to shoulder. In my row sat a young couple from Texas. She is wearing a red “Make America Great Again� T-shirt. My laptop bears a bumper sticker for my novel, “The Dandelion Insurrection,� about a nonviolent movement is a (slightly) fictional United States. Her boyfriend – who has the build of a football player – is reading a romance novel with his ball cap pulled low over his brow. Out of mischief and curiosity, I asked her, “So what makes America great?� Flustered, she deferred to her boyfriend. I inwardly rolled my eyes at a woman who would defer to a man to articulate an answer about the slogan she was wearing. "Well," he answered, “I think everyone should support the president no matter what.� A dozen counter-remarks popped into my head about the dangers of blind devotion, totalitarianism, dictators, and how dissent is essential for democracy, but before I can sort out how to begin, he continued. “And, I think the ability to work one’s ass off and get ahead in the world – you know, like rags-to-riches. That makes America great. A lot of countries don't have that.� Before I can tell him that India has a higher upward mobility than the United States, he clams up, reopening his book and clearly closing the conversation. Does he realize that the rags-to-riches story of Horatio Alger was fiction? The notion was always more mythological than metaphorical, hinging on our ideals rather than our reality. Even in the best of times, the journey from rags to riches was not an equal opportunity employer due to sexism, racism, and other forms of discrimination that stacked decks of fortune in favor of some more than others. A real-life Horatio Alger story might involve some hard work, but they often rely on access to capital, networks of social and business connections, illegal maneuvers (such as Bill Gates stealing time on government computers to build his first software program), the helping hand of government programs like the GI Bill, or the homeowner lending programs that excluded Hispanics and African Americans. I wonder if the young man realizes that Trump built his fortune with millions of dollars inherited from his father. If we all received millions to fund our businesses and projects, I have little doubt that most of us would rapidly advance up the social and economic ladders of our world. On the other hand, there’s an honest grievance to the young man’s comment, one with which I can largely agree. The notion that we should be rewarded for hard work is an honorable concept, one that emerged out of centuries of class injustice wherein serfs, peons, slaves, indentured servants, and forced or conscripted laborers were denied advancement both socially and economically. To be born poor was to live poor, work hard, and die poor, often buried in a pauper’s grave. The idea that hard work could improve one’s lot in life is a form of resistance to such widespread

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. For questions or concerns about delivery, please call Josh at (253) 228-1709.

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Author/activist Rivera Sun, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of “The Dandelion Insurrection� and other books, and co-hosts “Love (and Revolution)� radio.

TRUMP KLEPTOCRACY

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class injustice. Had he not stuck his head back in his book (ironically, a romance novel about impossible love between a nobleman and a peasant woman), I might have taken the opportunity to agree with his view that we should be able to work hard and get ahead . . . with a few qualifications. First, we shouldn't have to “work our asses off.â€? A sustainable, eight-hour workday ought to provide a living wage, including our current social necessities such as cellphones and Internet access, transportation, healthcare, and higher education. This requires that the standard wage for the 40-hour workweek be significantly higher than our current low and minimum-wage jobs provide. Second, the ability to work should not be a requirement for survival. A society should be able to provide and care for those who cannot work – such as children, elders, the infirm, injured, disabled, or ill. A social safety net should be set in place to ensure basic needs for everyone in our society. Third, the inequities and injustices that plague our nation must be addressed. It does not “make America greatâ€? to allow advancement for some people, but not others, based on distinctions of race, gender, sexuality, political views, or age. Equality and justice for all has been a longheld, much cherished, and largely unrealized American deal for a long time‌which brings me to my last point. What “makes America greatâ€? needs to be a longer list than merely working hard and making money. It needs to contain an analysis of what doesn’t make America great, where we need to be critical and sharply observant of our behaviors, policies, and beliefs. It needs to include stark understandings of the Grand Canyon-wide gap between our slogans and our realities. Trump's slogan on the T-shirt demands long, hard conversations, not blind loyalty and unquestioned patriotism. Our discussion about what makes America great (or doesn’t make it great) could have lasted the entire three-hour flight. But it didn't. He closed the conversation. She squirmed uncomfortably. I eyed her for a moment then decided to try asking for her opinion again. Turning to the blonde-haired, bluejeaned 20-something year old, I asked, “Do you have any thoughts to add? You're wearing the T-shirt after all.â€? She waved her hand in denial of the question. “Oh, I’m not political,â€? she said. Yes, you are, my silent thoughts answered in a steely tone. We all are. Our T-shirts, words, silence, assumptions, myths, lies, inaccuracies, fears, policies – all of it is political. She avoided the look in my eyes and studied her phone. He read his romance novel. I gritted my teeth. We flew in silence across the vast distance of our nation.

By Tom H. Hastings The Trump budget – pure profit for Pentagon corporate contractors. The Trump tax “reform� – massive tax cuts for the rich. Really? We are going to stand for this? Compared to last year, if his corporations truly paid the going corporate tax rate, Trump would “richly benefit,� in multiple ways when his proposed cuts kick in. His corporate tax burden would be cut by at least 4.9 percent – millions of dollars – and his personal taxes would likely be cut even more massively, although since he alone amongst modern presidents has refused to let the American people see his returns, we cannot pin a number on his projected undeserved gains. This is the textbook definition of corruption. Fortunately for him, the senators are wealthy too and love these ideas, as are most of the members of the House of Representatives. Corrupt Congress, corrupt president – and somehow the white male voters generally suppose this will all work out for them, since a reported 96 percent of his voters say they would vote for him again (and white males voted for him in overwhelming numbers, with white males without a college education voting for him at a 72 percent rate). This is not working out for those uneducated white men, but they love him. Could it be that blowing off a Mother of All Bombs on Afghans, deporting Mexicans, ending Department of Justice investigations of police killings of people of color, and banning many Muslims from entering

the U.S. is more important than getting totally hosed by a kleptocratic kommander-in-chief and kongress? Interesting priorities. Just to further pound in the financial punishment to the very voters who put him and the other Republican lawmakers into office, they are gutting healthcare to millions of the least well off Americans as the Tea Partiers are now lining up to repeal Obamacare – unless enough moderate Republicans save the day, which will only happen by ongoing constituent pressure. Meanwhile, in a regime just as Orwellian as his BFF Putin’s, Trump keeps tweeting and repeating that CNN, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and other evidencebased mainstream media are “fake news.� If Donald Trump tripped and fell he would blame it on CNN and call gravity fake science. When will we all be embarrassed enough or properly terrified enough to halt this charade? Will we get this charlatan impeached before he launches a Wag the Dog nuclear war? Before Miami and Manhattan are inundated from rising seas due to his sheaf of anti-environment executive orders? When does that 25th Amendment kick in? Since our “leaders� seem incapable, we will need to lead ourselves, it appears. This is our democracy and we want it back. These are our children and grandchildren and we want them protected. We cannot allow this to continue for 1,300 more days. Tom H. Hastings is founding director of PeaceVoice.


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

GOODWILL’S ‘READY TO WORK’ LUNCHEON INTRODUCES NEW PRESIDENT AND CEO

PHOTOS BY DUNCAN ROLFSON

Barista program graduate Christel Beaver is just one of many whose lives have been changed through Goodwill programs. New Goodwill President and CEO Lori Forte Harnick (center) chats with Jessica Ide (left), a cashier turned manager of a retail store, and Kenyetta Isom (right), a participant in Goodwill’s Seafarer/Culinary Program and soon to graduate. By Duncan Rolfson duncan@tacomaweekly.com

On Tuesday amongst the classic Northwest sunbreaks, the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center slowly filled with an exemplary group of individuals celebrating Goodwill’s “Ready To Work” annual luncheon. It’s an opportunity for Pacific Northwest businesses, individuals, donors and community members to come together to recognize the impacts that their participation in Goodwill’s plethora of programs actually has on individuals in need. This year also held something particularly special – the opportunity, the first one publicly, to meet Lori Forte Harnick, the new President and CEO of Goodwill of the Olympics and Rainier Region. Formerly of the Microsoft Corporation, Harnick brings a proven business mind set to bat for an organization that is expanding its reach at an astounding rate over the coming years. Rest assured, she can handle the expansion well. At Microsoft, she led the $1 billion-plus annual giving branch and was also general manager of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

Among the crowd were individuals gathered for one purpose, and that was to show support for this organization that cares so deeply for everyone in the community. “This is an amazing organization and we are glad to be able to participate and assist with programs tied to this community,” said Chase Bank Commercial Bank Manager Mike Evans. Of the many beneficial programs that Goodwill has set-up over the last 20 years, one highlighted this year was truly a success – Goodwill’s culinary program. Bob Tuilaepa is a local man who turned tragedy to triumph with the outpouring of support from Goodwill, the Seafarers Union, and all of the companies tied to Goodwill through programs and financial assistance. After developing issues with his eyes, Tuiaepa’s ability to support his family became impossible. Truck driving is what his occupation was when his degenerative eye condition grew worse, leaving him unable to safely drive distances needed to keep him busy, and keep him paid. Fortunately, Tuiaepa’s friends and family noticed an opportunity to guide him into a career that he would love, instead of another typical 9 to 5 job.

“I just really love to cook, and one day my friends sat me down and told me about a program Goodwill offered that would give me the skills and paths to find a career in culinary arts,” he said. His journey has led him all over the globe with his certifications, and education, that he received in Goodwill’s culinary program. Panama Canal and even Scandinavia are both checked off his list! This is just one of many examples of incredible chances of hope provided by an organization headed up by a woman with relentless drive to improve, progress and expand opportunity. Since its inception in the early 1900s, Goodwill really has focused on uplifting those around the community who could benefit most from it. You may be grand, but what about the ones on the street who may benefit from a warm meal, a shelter with an open bed, or even a school with an extra seat? Can we really afford to turn them away? Supporting companies like Goodwill that have such a resounding effect on changing people's lives should be a no-brainer, so head on over to www.goodwillwa.org and see how you can participate in affecting positive change in your city.

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Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; then Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

TRIBE HONORS ALL VETERANS WITH MEMORIAL WALL Under a beautiful, sunny sky on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2015, the Puyallup Tribe held the formal dedication ceremony for its new Veterans Memorial Wall. Gathering outside of Takopid Health Center with men and women in dress uniforms representing many branches of military service, tribal members mixed with friends and family, visitors and honored guests for this important occasion. A number of honored guests were present for the dedication, including U.S. Senator Patty Murray; U.S. Representative Denny Heck; Jim Baumgart, policy advisor on behalf of Washington State Governor Jay Inslee; and Steven J. Gill, tribal liaison and administrator for the Veterans Services Division of the Washington State Dept. of Veterans Affairs. “Every time I come here, I always see something new and exciting happening in your community,” Murray said. “Many people may not realize that nationwide, Native Americans have one of the highest representations in the military, so the memorial is well deserved to say the least, and it’s wonderful to see one that so beautifully reflects the Tribe’s connection to our natural environment.” The memorial features benches to sit on, new landscaping to admire including young evergreen trees and eight bronze medallions, 36-inches in diameter and representing the eight branches of service: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Merchant Marines, National Guard and Air National Guard. Six flag poles line the outer rim of the memorial to fly the American flag, Puyallup Tribe of Indians flag, Canadian flag, Washington State

Six flags were raised for the first time on the day of the dedication ceremony.

flag, Tribal Veterans flag and the POW/MIA flag. Puyallup Tribal Council Chairman Bill Sterud gave the opening remarks before inviting the rest of the Tribal Council up to the podium. “Today, here, we have a place of peace – a place to think of our veterans in a good way, a place of honor for a special group of men and women, a place to give special recognition for without our veterans and their sacrifices, what would our world be?“ he said. “I’m honored and humbled to be a part of this Veterans Day celebration and the dedication of this amazing Veterans Memorial Wall.”

Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove described the memorial as “a sacred circle filled with a lot of blood, sweat and tears that was constructed with love, with gratitude and most of all with honor.” “When you come, we invite you – our veterans invite you – to come within this circle and pray, recognize and most of all honor all of our veterans, all of our ancestors, for the fight that they have gone through to get us to where we are today,” she said. “Please, whenever you come don’t just pass by – enter and remember those that fight for our freedom, Native and non-Native alike.”

STEWARDS OF THE LAND AND WATERS Puyallup Tribe dedicates resources to protecting steelhead Caring for the environment and all living creatures has always been a way of life for the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. Going back untold centuries before the first settlers arrived and up to the present day, the Tribe has never faltered in being caretakers of the natural world, and this is shown admirably in the Tribe’s efforts to protect our waterways and the varieties of fish that live there. Most recently, one of the Tribe’s two fisheries has taken proactive measures to save a disappearing run of wild steelhead by installing an acclimation pond on the White River, one of six acclimation ponds installed and operated by the Tribe’s Fisheries Department. With wild steelhead stocks thorughouth the Northwest showing less than stellar survival, this new and different approach will hopefully improve return rates of wild steelhead. The acclimation pond was added in 2016 and is the only one dedicated to bringing steelhead out of the hatchery and into the wild in order to boost their numbers and bring more adults back. “Twenty years ago, we had strong numbers with upward of 2,000 adults returning to the White River alone,” said the Tribe’s Resource Protection Manager Russ Ladley, “and now their numbers have averaged around 300 over

When filled with water, this acclimation pond can hold between 25,000 and 50,000 juvenile steelhead and should produce between 200-300 adults.

the past decade. That’s when we decided we’ve got to do something.” One of the proven methods of improving survival is to take fish away from a totally artificial environment and put them in a more natural environment during the early

imprinting stage of their rearing. This is what an acclimation pond achieves, and in this case the new acclimation pond moves juvenile steelhead up to the headwaters in a more natural water temperature regime. This removes the young fish from the water provided from ground water wells at the hatchery and places them in a “real world environment,” as fish behavior is greatly influenced by water temperature. “In this case, we typically move the fish in January or February and rear them in those ponds for about four to five months and then cut them loose,” Ladley said. “They’re allowed to volitionally move out so you basically open up a screen where they can move out into the creeks which then go to the mainstem White River and then into the Puyallup on their way to Commencemnt Bay.” The pond can hold between 25,000 and 50,000 juvenile steelhead and should produce between 200-300 adults back to this operation. It will take three years to determine returning numbers. As Ladley explained it, “You get the water’s natural chemistry going to the fish, the fish imprint on that as their home and two to three years from now will hopefully head back there to spawn.”

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Section A • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

STOP LNG NOW!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL

Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the West Coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

ways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG

The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned. r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another.

The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!”

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER

r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleanerburning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY

Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our road-

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.


Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

t Hofto From page A1

kind of art and craft. I have been self-taught but have won many awards, which did help me to go on as I am today. You go on learning all your life.” In 1945, the Hoftos welcomed daughter Jacki into their lives. Jacki tells me, “They were busy raising me and taking me to dance and music lessons. When I was growing up here in Tacoma, my mother was very active in Lakewood Artists, Tacoma Arts and Crafts, Allied Artists and exhibited her multimedia works extensively in several juried shows, winning many awards.” Jacki goes on to say, “She loved doing oils and acrylic landscapes, paper collage, woodcuts and copper enamels. She has an amazing gift and ability to transfer her life experiences

and travels around the world into her artwork directly from her memories. Some of her paintings hang in Black Diamond Historical Museum and Issaquah Museum, depicting how it looked long ago. Ruth was also a horticulturist, gardener and was state bird chairman for the National Council of Garden Clubs.” At 97 years of age, Ruth was asked to show her work at the Lakewood Library. Friends and family helped with the hanging of her pieces. Though she still has several in her personal collection, many pieces have been sold over the years and reside with their new owners. Ruth continued to craft new pieces up until a stroke she had in 2008, which has impaired her vision and hearing as well as resulted in some loss of speech. After her mother’s health issues, Jacki returned home to University Place to help care for her mother. While not painting any longer, Ruth stays active with regular visits to the Senior Center Community Connection Place in U.P.

and loves to listen to audiobooks she checks out from the library. Jacki says, “She only likes Western stories written by authors like Louis L'Amour and they have to have good narrators or she won't listen to them. She also spends time sorting through her artwork and organizing it, especially the note cards that she made. Most of her artwork has been sold other than our personal collection.” What’s the secret to a long and healthy life? Ruth attributes it to a combination of “good genes, a zest for life surrounded by art and beautiful scenery, gardens (she was a gardener and orchid grower) and travels through United States and Europe with family.” She is celebrating this monumental milestone of 107 with a big shindig on May 12 hosted at the Community Connections Senior Center in University Place with a more private gathering hosted by her daughter at home the following day on her birthday. Both are bound to be beautiful celebrations of a life that has been well lived, impacting others through art.

t Veterans From page A1

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PROGRESS. Tacoma Public Schools Superintendent Carla Santorno encourages everyone to stay engaged in education, while program staffers outline ways to help.

t Graduate From page A1

different student and community indicators used to chart progress, but more work needs doing to reach the cradleto-career goals set seven years ago as the 2020 target nears. The overall achievement gaps between white students and minority students and those in poverty are closing. Students seeking education after high school is on the rise, with a 92 percent increase in the number of seniors submitting formal plans to enroll in college or certification programs. Enrollment in summer programs grows in an effort to stem the educational loss during summer vacations that is known in educational circles as the “summer slide.” The number of students who attend summer programs is now, 6,400, an almost doubling since 2014. High school graduation rates are up. Specifically, the district’s high school graduation rate is 85 percent, six points higher than the state average and one point

away from the goal of 86 percent by 2020. “We are a few years ahead of schedule, but we aren’t there yet,” Foundation for Tacoma Students CEO Eric Wilson said. The non-profit foundation serves as the umbrella organizer of the citywide group of parents, educators, business owners and elected officials under the Graduate Tacoma campaign banner. Some of the effort’s goals are lagging or even losing ground, however. Chronic absenteeism in elementary and high school is increasing, for example, while absences of middle school students are dropping. The readiness gap between white and Hispanic and multiracial children entering kindergarten, for example, has grown since 2013. “What this data says is that we have to dive deeper to figure it out,” Wilson said, noting that information will then drive the work to reach the cradle-tocareer goals set seven years ago. Community members set those goals in a call-to-action after Tacoma schools were labeled a “drop out factory,” with a graduation rate of just 55 percent. That effort quickly morphed

into Graduate Tacoma, a partnership of some 250 groups and organizations to boost educational achievements at all levels by all students under the mantra of “what gets measured, gets done.” Tacoma Schools Superintendent Carla Santorno had much to celebrate in the community impact numbers, but she reminded everyone to continue to be engaged and focused on the goals. “There is something special going on in Tacoma,” she said. “We’ve got a lot of work to do.” Detailed reports about programs, partnerships and achievements in educational efforts can be found at GraduateTacoma.org.

Blanchard was born in England in 1844. After arriving to the United States sometime before 1863, he joined the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery battery. During the war, Blanchard’s battery saw a lot of combat, including the Siege of Petersburg. In August of 1864, he was taken as a prisoner of war, but was released in February 1865. He rejoined the Union Army, and was present during Lee’s surrender at the Appomattox Court House. He moved to Washington as a logger, but was hurt on the job. He then lived at the Washington State Soldiers’ Home in Orting until his physical and mental health failed. In 1917, he was transferred to Western State Hospital and died two days later. Ohioan Cooley enlisted in the 49th Ohio Infantry. During the Battle of Stones River, he was captured in 1862, where he remained a prisoner of war for over a year. After his release, he saw more combat along the western front. At the Battle of Nashville, Cooley was wounded in action. He moved to the Washington Territory with his family in 1878. In 1889, Cooley had a stroke and was admitted to Western State Hospital. He died in 1891 following a second stroke. For Dimond and the rest of the SUVCW, the work is not done. “Identifying veterans, buried and unburied, is an ongoing process,” said Dimond, “even of the Civil War. Our goal is to make sure they receive the full military honors they deserve, befitting honorably discharged veterans of the American Civil War a dignity owed by a grateful nation.”

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Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2017

TACOMA SETTING A FAMILIAR PACE

SECTION A, PAGE 12

HOT PITCHING LIFTS RAINIERS TO DIVISION LEAD

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

CRUNCH TIME. (top) Stadium senior

pitcher Kyle Folsom winds up to let one fly. (bottom) Lincoln senior pitcher Caleb Ford has put in some strong work for the Abes. Stadium (15-3) will play Capital (11-9) in the first round of the 3A district tournament on Saturday, May 6 at Heritage Park in Puyallup at 10 a.m. The Lincoln Abes (5-9) will be heading south to either Lacey or Vancouver to face either Gig Harbor (16-3) or Timberline (15-5) in the first round. The WCD district will send a total of five teams to the state tournament.

IT’S PLAYOFF TIME FOR TACOMA’S BEST By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

LEADERS. The month of May has quite a bit in store for baseball fans flocking to Cheney Stadium to take in some Rainiers' action. Saturday, May 6, the Rainiers begin their annual "Throwback Weekend." For the evening, Tacoma will wear the baby blues of the 1966-71 Tacoma Cubs and the first 1,000 fans to the ballpark will receive a replica, snapback baseball cap. The following Sunday afternoon, Tacoma will don the 1978 duds of the one-year Tacoma Yankees. Another lucky 1,000 fans will take home a free cap. The Rainiers will offer up a fireworks show after games on Friday, May 12 and May 26. By Josiah Rutledge Tacoma Weekly Correspondent

I

f this Tacoma Rainiers baseball club has an identity, it’s been the pitching so far this season. While their offense ranks dead last in the Pacific Coast League in both runs and hits, they’ve managed to stay at the top of the PCL Pacific Northern Division standings due to their exceptional pitching, which has put together a 3.55 ERA over the first 22 games of the

season (all the more impressive given the extremely hitter-friendly environment in the PCL). Four times they’ve held their opponents scoreless. With an assortment of strike hurlers who have combined for the lowest walk total in the Pacific Coast League, the Rainiers have thus far succeeded due to their ability to keep their opponents off of the scoreboard, rather than their ability to rack up the runs on their own. That reliance on pitching made last week’s rough stretch (44 runs allowed over seven games against El Paso and

Albuquerque) all the more concerning. Fortunately, the pitching came back into form over the recent five-game set against the Sacramento RiverCats, allowing just 11 runs (and only five in the first four games of the series). Leading off the bounce back series by the pitching staff was veteran righthander Christian Bergman. In a Thursday, April 27 game shortened to five innings due to rain, Bergman was magnificent, allowing just two hits and no walks while striking out six in a

u See RAINIERS / page A14

It has been a rough spring for baseball and fastpitch teams around the Tacoma area this year. While many teams have put together win totals that will ultimately send them to the postseason, it has been close to a miracle that the teams have been able to cobble together something close to a full slate of games. For the past two months (and longer), the worst four-letter word around the Puget Sound is not the sort of thing that will get a mouth washed out with soap. Without a doubt, the worst of the worst has easily been a constant torrent of rain falling from the skies and dashing hopes of getting a baseball or fastpitch game finished. Forget trying to get in the usual doubleheader or two this season. There are several teams that spent an entire week without facing an opposing pitcher, more than once. Many teams have seen almost all of their non-league games completely wiped off of the slate, and it even looks like a few squads will be unable to get their full league schedule completed. On the flipside, the constant postponements of games have wreaked significant havoc on the ability of athletic directors and coaches to reschedule these games within a workable structure for a student-athlete. It’s one thing to play several games over a few days in the various district tournaments, but that usually encompasses games over a weekend. The constant wet weather has forced schedulers to roll out four straight days of games during the school week, in a handful of cases, and there’s just no way that this sort of combination of travel and activity can’t be rough on a student-athlete’s homework schedule, let alone allowing for some rest and recovery. The good news is that the playoffs have arrived and if the local climate prognosticators are even close to being correct, there’s going to be some excellent days ahead for

u See BEST / page A14


Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

Sportswatch SOUNDERS TO HOST OSA AT MEMORIAL FOR US OPEN CUP

The Sounders U23 team will face the Olympic Soccer Academy (OSA) in the first round of the 2017 Lamar Hunt US Open Cup on May 10 at Seattle Memorial Stadium. Kick off for the game will be 7:30 p.m. Winner of the first-round matchup hosts Reno 1868 FC of the USL in the second round on May 17. For the third time since inception in 2012, the Sounders U23 will compete in the Lamar Hunt US Open Cup. In 2013, the defending PDL Western Conference Champions fell to the Charlotte Eagles of the USL in Charlotte, N.C. after advancing to play professional competition. The 2015 run in the cup stopped at Kitsap SC after dispatching Outbreak FC from the USASA ranks in California. OSA is a NPSL team playing primarily out of French Field in Kent after playing games in Pierce County during the 2015 NPSL season. The 2016 NPSL NW Conference Champions will look to build on a successful 2016 season with the addition of former PDL club Kitsap SC joining the NPSL along with FCM Portland, PDX FC, Pierce County FC, and the Spokane Shadow. OSA is coached by Paul Aur and Giuseppe Pezzano is the owner of the team. “The Open Cup is always an honor to be a part of and we will look to create an entertaining game against OSA as our college players make their way here in May,” said Darren Sawatzky, Sounders U23 head coach and general manager, “OSA has done well in the NPSL and we look forward to the competition.” To find the PDL schedule and purchase tickets to the Sounders U23 regular season, go to www.soundersu23. com.

main event between light heavyweights Cameron Sevilla-Rivera (7-4-2, 5 KOs) and undefeated Issac Tadeo (8-0-0, 4 KOs). Also fighting at Battle at the Boat 111 will be undefeated Richard Vansiclen (3-0-0, 2 KOs) and Andres Reyes (6-2-1, 1 KO). Battle at the Boat 111 will feature the VIP experience with third row seats being discounted to $75 per ticket. All fans seated in the VIP section (rows 1-3) will have an exclusive access point and a dedicated server to help create a true VIP experience. Battle at the Boat 111 is brought to you by Brian Halquist Productions. For more information, please visit www.halquistproductions.com and the Battle at the Boat Facebook page. Battle at the Boat 111 Card 10 Round Main Event – 173 pounds Mike Gavronski (22-2-1, 14 KOs) vs. Quinton Rankin (12-3-2, 9 KOs) Five Round Semi-Main Events: 170 pounds: Cameron Sevilla-Rivera (7-4-2, 5 KOs) vs. Issac Tadeo (8-0-0, 4 KOs) 147 pounds: Andres Reyes (6-2-1, KO) vs. Will Hughes (5-5-0, 3 KOs) Four Round Undercard Bouts: 177 pounds: Richard Vansiclen (3-0-0, 2 KOs) vs. Justin Milani (1-4-0) TBD pounds: Andre Keys (3-1-0, KO) vs. TBD 140 pounds: Niko McFarland (0-3-0) vs. Shae Green (debut)

PLU’S SWANSON NAMED NWC GOLF COACH OF THE YEAR

The Northwest Conference unveiled its Coach of the Year award for men’s golf on Friday with Pacific Lutheran University Head Coach Kris Swanson securing the accolade. Swanson earns the award for the second time in his seven-year tenure with the Lutes after guiding the squad to the Northwest Conference Championship and a berth to the NCAA Division III Championships. Under his direction, PLU won four tournaments in 2016-2017, while finishing first or second in seven of the team’s eight competitions. The Lutes hoisted the team title at both the NWC Fall Classic and NWC Spring Classic while finishing second at the NWC Tournament on Sunday to secure the NWC title and the league’s automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. Two of Swanson’s five golfers secured All-NWC honors with Mitchell Baldridge winning medalist honors at both the NWC Spring Classic and NWC Tournament to earn NWC Player of the Year. Swanson has turned the Lutes into a regional power, finishing in the top three of the NWC standings in each of the last five seasons, including an NWC title in 2014, the same season he secured his first NWC Coach of the Year honor. The Lutes are idle until May 16, trekking to Howeyin-the-Hills, Fla. for day one of the NCAA Division III Championships.

PACIFIC KNOCKS OFF PLU IN LUTES’ SEASON FINALE PHOTO BY ERNIE SAPIRO PHOTOGRAPHY

GAVRONSKI RETURNS FOR BATTLE AT THE BOAT MILESTONE

Brian Halquist Productions will celebrate its 20th year of promoting professional boxing at the Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma with Battle at the Boat 111 on Saturday, June 3. Headlining the card will be a light heavyweight main event between rising division stars Mike Gavronski (22-2-1, 14 KOs) and Quinton Rankin (12-3-2, 9 KOs). Tickets are available through the EQC box office and all Ticketmaster outlets. Preliminary bouts will start at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Battle at the Boat is the nation’s longest-running tribal casino boxing series, holding its inaugural event on July 9, 1997 at the Emerald Queen Casino. Prior to promoting the record-holding tribal casino boxing series, Brian Halquist Productions first began in 1989 promoting heavyweight Joe “The Boss” Hipp. In 1995, Halquist Productions promoted Greg Haugen to his fourth world title fight. The first Battle at the Boat card featured a main event between Emmett Linton and Jose Flores for the IBA super welterweight championship, while the undercard had future WBA super bantamweight champion Enrique Sanchez and Eric “Butterbean” Esch both notching victories. A total of 23 world champions have fought on a Battle at the Boat card, including Vernon Forrest, Yonnhy Perez, Vic Darchinyan, Aber Mares, Sergey Kovalev, Joseph Agbeko and Evgeny Gradovich. “It really is overwhelming to think we have been doing this for 20 years at the Emerald Queen Casino,” promoter Halquist said. “Our history is something we are extremely proud of. We went from just wanting to survive our first show to now putting on Battle at the Boat 111. It’s going to be an incredible night of boxing.” The 10-round main event between Gavronski and Rankin features two boxers right on the cusp of cracking the world top 20 rankings. Battle at the Boat fans should be very familiar with local product Gavronski. A multiple-time Tacoma Golden Gloves champion as an amateur, Gavronski has fought 10 times at the Emerald Queen Casino, winning nine of those matches. Gavronksi defeated Thomas Awimbono (25-4-1) in his last bout on Nov. 19, 2016. That win came on the heels of his triumph over previously undefeated Australian champion Jake Carr on Sept. 10, 2016. “It’s fitting that Mike is fighting in the main event on our 20th anniversary show because no active boxer has fought more at Battle at the Boat than he has,” Halquist said. “He made his pro debut here in 2010 and we’ve seen him mature into a fighter who is right on the verge of entering the top 20.” Battle at the Boat’s 20th anniversary show will also feature special guest, Dori Monson of KIRO FM’s 97.3, stepping in as the event’s official ring announcer. The undercard sports an equally intriguing semi-

The Pacific Lutheran University baseball team’s offense struggled to score runs in Sunday’s regular season finale, dropping a 7-2 contest against Pacific University at Chuck Bafaro Stadium. The Lutes’ (25-14) Cole Johnson started the afternoon where he left off on Saturday as he singled home Jacob Bockelie in the bottom of the first inning. Unfortunately for the Lutes, it would be the only run they scored until the bottom of the ninth. The host Boxers (14-23) quickly seized the lead with two runs in the bottom of the first before adding five more in the fourth inning. Pacific continued to pad its lead with single runs in the sixth and eighth innings. Casey Dawes scored PLU’s second run of the day, coming home on a Boxer fielding error. PLU tallied just six hits with two coming off the bat of Landon Packard. The Lutes patched their pitchers together for the game, with no pitcher throwing more than three innings. Chaz Lopez got the start and went 2/3 of an inning and was tagged with the loss. Tanner Zuber threw 2 2/3 innings and struck out two batters while Tanner Williams tossed 3 2/3 innings with one strikeout. Janson Pederson closed the game, allowing just one baserunner and no runs in one inning of work.

UPS WALKS OFF WITH A WIN IN BASEBALL FINALE

Jack Gries delivered a memorable parting gift to his senior teammates when the sophomore belted a walk-off double in the bottom of the ninth inning to give the Puget Sound baseball team a 4-3 win over Whitworth in the final game of the 2017 season on Sunday, April, 30. The Loggers won two out of three non-conference home games against the Pirates on the weekend. James Dejesus scored the game-winning run after he ripped a two-out double down the left-field line. Whitworth (24-17) broke a 2-2 tie with a run in the seventh inning, but the Loggers (14-24) answered right back in the home half of the stanza. Connor Dunn led off with a single and stole second base. An errant throw on the steal allowed Dunn to take third, and the shortstop sprinted home on a wild pitch to tie the game, 3-3. Four Loggers finished the afternoon with two hits: Dejesus, Dunn, Gries, and Ian Hughes. Puget Sound starting pitcher Eric Crispell worked a season-high seven innings, and he allowed just two earned runs while striking out four. Kian Kurokawa earned the win after facing just four batters in the top of the ninth inning. Prior to the game, Puget Sound honored its nine senior student-athletes – and their families – playing in their final collegiate game: Eric Crispell, Layne Croney, Ryan Darrow Ian Hughes, Kian Kurokawa, Ehn Nishioka, Javin Nohara, Matt Shelhamer, Alex Wojtysiak.

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS MAY 4 – 21 THURSDAY, MAY 4 – FASTPITCH Lindbergh vs. Foss Heidelberg Complex – 3:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – FASTPITCH Wilson vs. Stadium Peck Field – 3:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – FASTPITCH Lakes vs. Lincoln SERA Field – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – BASEBALL Lincoln vs. Wilson Wilson HS – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – BASEBALL Life Christian vs. Clover Park Clover Park HS – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – FASTPITCH Franklin Pierce vs. Washington Washington HS – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – FASTPITCH Bonney Lake vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 5 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 4 – SOCCER Bellarmine vs. Puyallup Sparks Stadium – 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 5 – FASTPITCH Curtis vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 4 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 5 – FASTPITCH Franklin Pierce vs. Foss Heidelberg Complex – 4 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 6 – BASEBALL Capital vs. Stadium Heritage Park, Puyallup – 10 a.m. SATURDAY, MAY 6 – BASEBALL New Orleans vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 5:05 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 7 – BASEBALL New Orleans vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 7 – SOCCER Seattle Stars vs. South Sound FC Washington Premier Complex – 4 p.m. MONDAY, MAY 8 – BASEBALL New Orleans vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. TUESDAY, MAY 9 – BASEBALL NPSL #7 vs. Curtis Art Wright Field, Kent – 4 p.m. TUESDAY, MAY 9 – BASEBALL New Orleans vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 6:05 p.m. TUESDAY, MAY 9 – SOCCER NPSL #9 vs. Curtis (WCD Playoffs) French Field, Kent – 7 p.m. TUESDAY, MAY 9 – SOCCER TBA vs. Fife (WCD Playoffs) Curtis Viking Stadium – 7:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 10 – SOCCER OSA vs. Sounders U23 Memorial Stadium, Seattle – 7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 11 – BASEBALL Round Rock vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 11 – SOCCER NPSL #6 vs. Bellarmine (WCD Playoffs) Curtis Viking Stadium – 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 12 – BASEBALL Round Rock vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, MAY 13 – BASEBALL Round Rock vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 5:05 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 14 – BASEBALL Round Rock vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 14 – SOCCER Spokane Shadow vs. South Sound FC Washington Premier Complex – 4 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 19 – SOCCER Portland U23 vs. Sounders U23 Bonney Lake HS – 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 21 – SOCCER Calgary Foothills vs. Sounders U23 Sunset Stadium, Sumner – 2 p.m.


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

t Best From page A12

some action on the baseball diamonds. Let’s take a look at who will be heading into the postseason from the Tacoma-area high schools. Right out of the gates, we have to put the Stadium Tigers out there. The historic high school is having a banner season across several sports this spring, and the two teams playing with bats and mitts are no exception. The Stadium girls’ fastpitch team has put together a 12-2 record on the way to locking up a second-place finish in the 3A Pierce County League behind first-place Bonney Lake. Don’t be surprised if the Lady Tigers advance to the 3A state tournament, because they’re well coached and have a ton of talent. Five teams from the West Central District will advance to state. District play begins on Friday, May 19 at Sprinker Fields. The Stadium baseball team has also been taking care of business on the diamond, on their way to a 15-3 record, which is also good enough for second-place in the 3A PCL. A well-built combination of pitching, fielding and hitting could push these Tigers to the 3A state tournament as well. Stadium will open district play against Capital on Saturday, May 6, at Heritage Park in Puyallup. Game time is set for 10 a.m. A win would advance the Tigers to a 4 p.m. quarterfinal matchup the same day. Should the Tigers prevail, they will have already punched a ticket to state before the district semifinals on Saturday, May 13, at Foss High School at 11 a.m. The district

t Rainiers From page A12

complete-game shutout. A former member of the Colorado Rockies, Bergman has been a revelation thus far for Tacoma, posting a 1.96 ERA and earning four wins in as many tries. In the batter’s box, the Rainiers were able to muster just two hits (both singles by Mike Freeman, fresh off a stint with the Mariners as an injury replacement for shortstop Jean Segura), but drew six walks en route to four runs. The following night saw a different man on the mound in right-hander Ryan Weber, but the results were similar: Weber allowed just one run over five innings. Spotted a 2-1 lead by DJ Peterson’s two-run double, Weber struck out five before turning the ball over to the bullpen. Mark Lowe, Dean Kiekhefer and Dan Altavilla combined to toss three scoreless innings, setting up closer Jean Machi, who allowed a single to former Rainier Justin Ruggiano, but was nonetheless successful in converting his fourth save of the season. The run allowed by Weber was his first of the season, after beginning the season with a streak of 16 scoreless innings. Earning the win, Weber received his first decision of the season. Machi would be recalled by the Seattle Mariners just a few days later. With the success of the pitching staff in this series, it can become easy to forget that the Rainiers are capable of explosive offensive innings of their own. They provided a reminder of that early on in Saturday’s contest, putting up six runs in the first two innings. All six runs came via the home run, with Tyler Smith, Dario Pizzano and Mike Freeman each

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wizard in the field for the Ages against Stadium on Monday, May 1. The lanky outfielder made two spectacular, diving catches to rob Tiger batters.

championship game is set for 2:15 p.m. at Heidelberg Field on the same day. Both Wilson Rams squads should be considered dark horse picks going into districts. The third-place Wilson baseball team (10-6) has shown the ability to put a hurting on the opposition, and they’ve got the line-up to also make a run at a state berth. The Wilson Lady Rams (6-5) are trying to hold onto third place, but have sewn up a district berth. Fielding a team heavy on freshmen, it will be interesting to see how the Lady Rams hold up under

cranking one out of the ballpark. With a nice cushion courtesy of the Rainier offense, Sam Gaviglio pitched adequately, allowing three runs over 5.1 innings of work to pick up his first win of the season. Gaviglio has pitched better than his 1-3 record would indicate, so it was nice to see him finally receive some run support. The Rainiers pitching staff was able to post another dominant outing on Sunday, with Chris Heston (5.1 IP, win), Nick Hagadone (0.2 IP), Machi (1.1 IP), Dan Altavilla (1.0 IP) and Lowe (0.1 IP, save) holding the RiverCats to five hits and no runs, while Leonys Martin went 3-4 with a run and Freeman continued his hot hitting by reaching base twice in three plate appearances (1-2, BB), giving him a hitting streak of five games and giving the Rainiers a 2-0 victory. Looking to extend a nine-game home winning streak and complete a five-game sweep of Sacramento, the Rainiers turned to right-hander Rob Whalen on Monday, making his first start as a member of the Mariners organization. Along with Max Povse (currently pitching for DoubleA Arkansas), Whalen was acquired in the trade that sent Alex Jackson to the Braves. He pitched 4.2 scoreless innings while striking out four Bees. Trailing 2-1, the Rainiers sent eight men to the plate in the bottom of the eighth, plating four runs with a parade of three singles and two walks to take a 5-2 lead. Tacoma then turned the ball over to Lowe for the save opportunity. Unfortunately, Lowe’s season-long struggles continued as he allowed four runs over 0.2 innings, surrendering four hits and a walk, and exiting with the bases loaded and the score tied at five runs each, leaving quite the mess for Sumner High School graduate Nick Hagadone to clean

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the postseason spotlight. They could be spoilers. The Lincoln Abes (5-9) have shown the ability to hang close to strong opponents, while having a bit of trouble closing the deal. After pushing Stadium to the brink in a late 5-3 loss on Monday, May 1, it looks like the Abes are starting to click. Fifth and sixth place in the 3A PCL have not been finalized yet, so we are not sure where Lincoln will be playing in the first round of the district tournament. One thing is for sure, they will be heading to either Lacey or Vancouver on Saturday, May 6. As of press time, the Bellarmine Prep fastpitch team (8-5) had five games remaining on their schedule. The Lady Lions currently reside in fourth place in the 4A South Puget Sound League, leading Curtis (8-7) by a half game in the standings. Should Bellarmine remain in fourth, they will bypass the district play-in game and will begin play on Friday, May 20, at the Kent Service Club Ballfields against Camas (11-1), the Greater St. Helens League champions, at 4:30 p.m. Should the Lady Lions slip to fifth place in the league, they would face the 10th-place team from the North Puget Sound League on Tuesday, May 16, at Curtis High School at 4 p.m. On the small-school side, the Life Christian Eagles (7-7) are in a heated battle with Ilwaco and South Bend for a third or fourth seed to the 2B district tournament. A slip-up could see the Eagles fall to fifth place and out of postseason play. If they finish third or fourth, the Eagles will be taking their mitts south to either Mossyrock or Adna on Saturday, May 6, for the play-in round of districts. The winner advances, while the loser heads back home. Altogether, the district will be sending six teams to the state tournament

up. Hagadone was unable to do so, as his wild pitch to Trevor Brown skipped by catcher Steve Baron, allowing Wynton Bernard to score the go-ahead run. Later in the same at-bat, Hagadone again threw the ball by Baron, but Baron was able to get the ball back to Hagadone in time for the latter to apply a tag on RiverCat outfielder Austin Slater, who was called out by home plate umpire John Bostwick. Slater vigorously protested the call, leading to his ejection. Now trailing 6-5, the Rainiers were unable to get anything going in the bottom of the ninth, going down in order to drop the series finale versus Sacramento. With the 4-1 series win, the Rainiers keep providing more evidence that, while they are respectable when on the road, with a 4-6 record, they play on another level inside the confines of Cheney Stadium, where they have posted a remarkable 10-2 record, including the nine-game home winning streak they saw snapped on Monday. Tacoma would kick off a fourgame road trip against Las Vegas with a 5-3 win over the boys from Sin City that saw the Rainiers knock around 11 hits on the game. The division-leading Rainiers (15-9) will return to Cheney Stadium on Saturday, May 6 for “Throwback Weekend” and the beginning of an eight-game home stand beginning with the New Orleans Baby Cakes for four games, followed by a four-spot against the Round Rock Express. Up with the big club: Due to injuries (particularly those to Felix Hernandez and Mitch Haniger), the Mariners have seen an influx of call-ups from Tacoma, including outfielders Ben Gamel and Boog Powell, right-handed starting pitcher Chase de Jong, and relief pitch-

ers Dillon Overton, Machi, and Emilio Pagan. Meanwhile, slugger Dan Vogelbach was sent back down to Tacoma and Rainier infielder Gordon Beckham has been placed on the disabled list. The Mariners’ play has been hit and miss over the last week, winning two out of three against Detroit, but losing two out of three against Cleveland for a 3-3 record over the seven day stretch. Nelson Cruz led the offense with a scorching week that saw him post a .474 batting average with four home runs and a double while driving in nine runs over the sixgame stretch. Hard-throwing left-hander James Paxton continued his domination with seven scoreless innings and nine strikeouts on the road against Detroit. Elsewhere on the farm: The Double-A Arkansas Travelers have struggled as of late, dropping six of their last eight, but that doesn’t mean they’ve been devoid of excellent individual performances: Ian Miller went 11-24 on the week, pushing his season average all the way up to .359. Andrew Moore turned in another quality outing for the Travelers, tossing six innings of two-run ball on Friday, April 29, giving him a season ERA of 1.76. The Class A-Advanced Modesto Nuts have had better recent results than the Travelers, winning four of their last six. Jordan Cowan continued to swing a hot bat for Modesto, going 7-17 on the week. The 22-year old Cowan, a 37th round pick in the 2013 MLB draft, has posted a .351 batting average on the season, with more walks (14) than strikeouts (12), and four doubles. Though they’ve struggled to get games in due to rain and have dropped four of their last five when they did play, the Single-A Clinton Lumber Kings have seen fantastic performances thus far from Joe Rizzo (.375) and Nick Thurman (.364).


Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 15

WILSON HOOPS LEGEND GOES D-1

PHOTO BY JUSTIN GIMSE

WINNER. (Left - Arvella Jenkins, David Jr. and David Jenkins Sr.) On Monday, May 1, a gathering of family, friends and supporters of Wilson High School basketball got together for a celebration. With a few swipes of a pen, one of the greatest basketball players to ever lace up the sneakers in the city of Tacoma, inked the next step for his future. David Jenkins Jr. may have scored an astronomical 1,753 points in his career as a Ram, but it was his determination, motivation and focus that probably factored into his signing a letter of intent to play basketball at South Dakota State University more than anything. "One thing that really comes to mind with Dave is his loyalty," said Wilson Head Coach Dave Alwert. "He's completely loyal to his town, to his family, to me, to the high school that he went to... he stayed loyal to his craft and stayed loyal to everybody. That's a word that doesn't go around much anymore. He's left a legacy."

SOUTH SOUND FC CHRISTEN NEW HOME, PARTNERSHIP

PHOTO BY SARA HINES

SHOCK! The South Sound FC will begin their fourth year of play in the Evergreen Premier League (EPLWA) soon with a new name and some new digs. Gone are

days at Lakewood's Harry Lang Stadium, where it felt like the players were several hundred yards away from the fans. Now, the Shock will be calling the Washington Premier Soccer Complex their home. On Sunday, April 30, the current roster squared off against a team made up of Shock alumni and it felt like a playoff game. The alums took the lead on a Nate Ford goal in the first half, only to have SSFC's Isidro Prada-Huerta knot things up early in the second. A late foul in the box set up a successful penalty kick by veteran SSFC caption Micah Wenzel and the fans went home happy with a well-fought 2-1 victory for the young squad, now known as Washington Premier South Sound FC. The closeness of play for fans at the new field is remarkable. Head on out for the home opener on Sunday, May 7 at 4 p.m. as the Shock open EPLWA play against the Seattle Stars FC.

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Section A • Page 16 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

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B5

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

OLD AND NEW AGAIN

REOPENED AIRPORT TAVERN ADDS TO RESURGENT SOUTH TACOMA WAY

PHOTOS BY BILL BUNGARD

AIRBORN! Sheet metal and bomber art add to the aesthetic at the newly reopened Airport Tavern. (Right) A new accent wall is made of recovered cedar planking. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

O

pening a new bar may be hard work, but at least Dan Rankin could skip the odious process of coming up with a name. For the better part of a century, Tacomans have known the space at 5406 South Tacoma Way (built in 1927) as the Airport Tavern. “Naming a business is almost the hardest part,” Rankin joked as he gave a tour of the venue he bought last year with his wife, Jessica, and their business partner, Matt Church. They have been open for business since April 7. “It’s always been the Airport,” he said. “Whether it was a sports a bar or whether it was a gay bar or whether it was a speakeasy, it’s always been this name. The sign is what caught my eye when we were rolling around and looking for places.” The vintage signage remains, as recognizable a landmark as any in South Tacoma. The bar inside, however, has gotten a substantial makeover. Aeronautic imagery abounds, from red sheet metal that underscores the room’s hangar aesthetic to the World War 2 bomber mural that dominates the north wall and remote control airplanes that dangle from the ceiling. “This place was pretty well trashed when we got into it,” Rankin said. “So slapping a coat of paint on the walls wasn’t going to cure our problems. We really had to dig in and get our hands dirty. The first three months we were in respirators.” Coming up with a weekly rotation was easier, though not without its challenges. Rankin is best known as the former talent buyer for Sixth Avenue hot spot, Jazzbones, and for his concert production business, Danno Presents. The latter has brought critically acclaimed blues-rocker Walter Trout and Seattle rap legend Sir Mix-A-Lot to Tacoma in

ONE EMBLEM SHALL RETURN

Tacoma’s club scene was dealt a serious blow when downtown’s Emblem closed it’s doors last weekend. The venue – initially opened at 1025 Pacific Ave. as Encore was shuttered to make way for apartments; but owner Jon Tartaglia said he is actively looking for a new spot to reopen. “Plans are in the works to bring Emblem back to a new space very soon,” he announced on Facebook. “So stay tuned. I can’t thank my staff enough for sticking it out and making this club the best place to party in the city, even when they knew its eventual fate.”

recent months; but with the Airport’s capacity at just under 100, Rankin has had to adapt his focus to a cozier space. “It’s been a little bit of a challenge to me to create niche events that don’t draw out over 300 people,” he said. “That’s always been kind of my focus, large scale events. So it’s kind of a challenge to bring it back down to earth and do something that entices small groups of people.” Among the new Airport’s initial offerings will be “Mondazed,” a Monday night electronic dance event put on by Tacoma promotion company Ocean Grooves. Wednesdays will be dedicated to comedy with live band karaoke on Thursdays and an eclectic rotation of bands on weekends. “I’ve watched a lot of places come and go because they’ve pigeonholed themselves as a certain type of entertainment destination,” Rankin said. “So we don’t like to pin ourselves down to doing one thing. The weekends could be anything, from acoustic Ethan Tucker to Strangely Alright full band.” Rankin has also moved forward with plans that he announced last year for bringing a large-scale music festival to South Tacoma. Reggae on the Way will take over South Tacoma Way – along the bar strip, from 54th to 56th streets - on July 30. “It’ll be a ticketed event with national touring reggae bands,” he said. The reopening of the Airport Tavern is the latest sign that the South Tacoma entertainment district could finally bounce back to something approximating its 1970s heyday, something locals have been predicting since disco hot spot Steve’s Gay ‘90s went dark four decades ago. Among the latest crop of promising venues is neighboring Real Art Tacoma, which has hosted all-ages rock and hiphop shows since 2015; Edison City Ale House, a popular destination for craft beer around the corner at 5602 S. Lawrence St; and the Mule Tavern which has evolved into

TWO OPERA OPENER Two chances remain to catch Tacoma Opera’s season-opening production of Jacques Offenbach’s “La Périchole.” The story opera – which debuted in Paris in 1868 – is set in South America with its titular character based on 18th century Peruvian entertainer Micaela Villegas. She and her lover, Piquillo, are poor street singers who are trying to raise enough money for their marriage license. Performances are scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 5, and 2 p.m. Sunday at Broadway Center’s Rialto Theater. Tickets are on sale now with prices ranging from $25 to $85; www.broadwaycenter.org.

THREE COLOR TACOMA A release party for “The Coloring Book of Tacoma Buildings” will be held at 7 p.m.

one of the city’s hippest watering holes since it opened last summer. “I got into South Tacoma Way much more blindly than any of the other new businesses down here did,” said Mule Tavern owner Sam Halhuli who was living in New Orleans when he found his bar (formerly the Oasis Tavern) on Craig’s List. “I didn’t know what I was getting into necessarily,” he said. “But when I got here, everyone was talking about South Tacoma Way (as being) the new place to go. Then I started talking to people more about it, and some people would say, ‘Oh yeah, but people have been saying that for the last 10 years.’ I think that maybe not being from Tacoma was a little bit of an advantage just because … people were kind of wary of that concept.” Rankin sees great potential in the concentration of so many bars and live music venues within a few blocks. Cultura Event Center, Stonegate Pizza, Dawson’s Bar & Grill and Ah Bada Bing Pizza are also a short stroll away. “With marketing, I’m really going to home in on that,” he said. “The great thing about being down here is all the businesses are really stoked about what’s happening. It’s more of a partnership than everyone being out for themselves. Its seems like we’re all about our businesses; but in the big picture, we all want the same thing.”

The Airport Tavern – located at 5406 South Tacoma Way – is open from 4 p.m. to midnight Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday and 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday. For further details, call (253) 212-0709 or visit the venue’s page on Facebook.

Friday, May 5, at Feast Arts Center, 1402 S. 11th St. Not only will participants be able to get their hands on the new book, created by Jori Adkins, they will be lead by a team of architects as they draw ideas for adaptive-reuse using the Feast building as a model. The event is free and open to the general public. For more information, contact Carol Goforth at (253) 376-3628.

FOUR SMOOTH SOUNDS Catch local smooth jazz favorite Ed Taylor Thursday nights at the Bleu Note, 6008 Mount Tacoma Dr. SW, in Lakewood. Taylor will perform selections from his newest album, “It’s Complicated,” starting at 6 p.m. His weekly show is free, and patrons can enjoy a number of food and drink specials, including

all-you-can-eat fried catfish for $13 until 7 p.m., $5 wine and champagne and half-off martinis for ladies until 10 p.m. Call (253) 433-3974 or visit www.thebleunote.com.

FIVE “GLASSY” EVENT Just in time for Mother’s Day, Hilltop Artists hold their Spring Glass sale from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at Jason Lee Middle School, 602 N. Sprague Ave. Find hand-crafted glassware c r e a t e d by Hilltop Artists students – all locals, ages 12 to 20 – and bring a $10 grocery store gift card or three or more non-perishable food items to the event for a special gift. All proceeds will benefit Hilltop Artists’ tuition-free programs; www. hilltopartists.org.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

STREET WEAR BRAND ETC PUTS TACOMA OF FASHION MAP

PHOTOS BY JOSH REISBERG

STYLISH. Umi Wagoner posses at his Tacoma street wear shop, ETC. The store is located at 907 Pacific Ave. By Josh Reisberg josh@tacomaweekly.com

ETC is a locally owned, small, exclusive street-wear and urban boutique located at 907 Pacific Ave. Best friends Umi Wagoner, who is 27 years old, and Perris Wright, 28, are the owners and creative directors of ETC Tacoma. Wright is the idea guy for graphics and design. He did the logo, works with printing techniques and embroidery. The two owners have been involved in the fashion industry since they were both 16. During their junior/senior year of high school the two friends began designing and producing original clothing. It was not until their second year out of college that they debuted the ETC brand to the world. The two attended the same high school together. However, after high school they went away to different colleges. Wagoner had a job in the fashion industry at Saks 5th Avenue. He then got a job at the street-wear brand based out of Los Angeles called The Hundreds. So, Wagoner had the knowledge of the market. Wright designed the brand’s logo and he also hunted down their first and only angel investor. Wright also located their first Art Director Matthew Headley. Wagoner and Wright had the ideas and Headley did all the other work. Even though Wright was working at State Farm at the time, the two decided to open their store four years after their college graduations. I interviewed Wagoner in front of their store. As we sat on the bench and watched the city go by, he explained some of the advantages of having their own store to showcase their collections. Wagoner said, “Now we can put out a full collection in three weeks instead of waiting three months.” When they were younger they were unimpressed with the fashion choices in Tacoma. The two often went to Seattle to do their shopping at smaller, more exclusive boutiques that Tacoma just did not have. They would come

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back to Tacoma and always get props on their clothes. They often looked to Complex to find good places to shop. “This was before Complex was big and commercial,” Wagoner said. “At the time Complex really offered good information on fashion. It was still grassroots.” They knew, though, that if they were to open a shop in Tacoma, they wanted it to be more of a hang-out than just a store. They knew Tacoma was not quite ready for avant garde fashion. Wagoner explained, “Tacoma comes late. So, now we are transferring out other brands and eventually we will only have ETC clothes. We’ll still carry a few items from other brands, but only smaller accessories such as socks, pins, and stickers” The owners envision Tacoma residents having pride in ETC just as New York people love Supreme and L.A. folks love the Hundreds. This has definitely happened. Wagoner and Wright have made ETC much more than just a clothing store. It is a place of community and gathering. There are regular open-mics that serve to get people into the shop. These open-mics follow in the tradition of other local open-mics that have served as stepping-stones for many an artistic and musical career. Wagoner and Wright realized local hip-hop groups ILLFIGHTYOU and Sandlot met and formed at open-mics. The open-mics where these introductions occurred were at Vinnum, which is now closed. The continuation of alliances and groupforming has continued with the ETC open-mics, which are now frequented by a newer and younger crop of M.C.s such as the Peasant Boys which consist of twin brothers named Josh and Jeremy. Wagoner and Wright knew there was quality hip hop in Tacoma. They knew that if they threw an open-mic it would be well received due to their connection to ILLFIGHTYOU, an extremely popular local hip hop crew. However, they wanted it to be a diverse place so they did not just want to do hip hop shows. That is why they chose the open-mics, so that they can also have bands, dancers, etc. They also invite more established acts to the openmics to perform such as Bruce Leroy and James Bond. Another way ETC grows in the community is by having art shows. Some of their first, successful art shows featured Jason Gamboa and Ian Wheelock. Wheelock is a nationally recognized artist who knew Gamboa and is a School of the Arts student. Jason wanted to shine a light on Wheelock’s work along with other quality artists that also attended SOTA and nearby Stadium High School. The art shows are successful and have turned into an annual show now run, planned, and managed by Stadium High School students. Photography is another medium that has been featured in ETC. There have been some high profile photographicexhibits from photographers such as T. Parris, Dion Thomas, and David Rivera from L.A. This show even had a large corporate sponsor, Hennessey, and was titled “Quiet.” Artwork by adults are often featured at ETC as well. Perry Porter had a water-color show titled “Candy

Paint” at the shop recently. Nowadays community is more than just a brick and mortar building where like-minded individuals gather. Today there are even communities online. This is why ETC also decided to have a weekly podcast. Hosting this podcast is none-other-than Tacoma hip-hop taste maker A Hyp, real name Andy Hyppa. The podcast is a good way for listeners to be exposed to local hip-hop. Many people cannot get out to attend shows so podcasts are there for them. Wagoner explains, “Even local newspapers who cover regional hip-hop are often overlooked due to the fact that readership is low. We hope the podcast will reach those ears.” The podcast features local music and stories. The ETC podcast is pretty accessible and artists are encouraged to contact ETC and their podcast in order to get their music or stories heard on-air. The podcast has featured Dion Thomas, Leonerd White, Justin Holt, Bruce Leroy, 1st Born, Chris Hyppa, Chris Crayzie, Cally Reed, and many others. It is broadcast every Tuesday at 5 p.m. The podcast is recorded by well-known Seattle audio-engineer GMK, who works with nationally-known hip hop artist Choice, who is signed to DJ Mustards record-label based out of L.A. Currenlty the podcast is looking for local sponsors. They have struck some deals with local brewers to feature beers made in Tacoma and the Pacific Northwest. ETC is growing as we speak, becoming a nationally celebrated clothing line. ETC even had a pop-up store in Los Angeles and are often featured in fashion blogs online. ETC has also been featured in Nylon magazine. When ETC gets national recognitition, Wagoner and Wright are always quick and happy to shout-out Tacoma and to let everyone know they come from here. Their long-term goal is to be around for 10 plus years and to have lots of local supporters who have a closet full of the ETC brand. ETC stays away from fancier fashion magazines, because they know Tacoma does not care about that, and their main concern is representing their city and making clothes for us. Artists can rent the store for listening parties and it is a great place to network. Wagoner was upfront with me as he admitted ETC suffers from somewhat of a “Cool Guy” image. ETC recognizes this and is using its store, podcast and name to become accessible to the entire community. This July 19 will be their three-year anniversary. To order ETC clothing, find out more about their podcast, and to read their album and clothing reviews, visit www. etctacoma.com. Also follow and friend them on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Soundcloud all under etctacoma, and snapchat at etctacaoma907 to find out about ETC’s open-mics, upcoming shows and their annual hip hop compilation titled “Soundwaves,” an album full of Tacoma, Federal Way, and Seattle hip hop that ETC Tacoma cosigns. They are always looking for new artists and songs to be featured on their compilation and podcast so feel free to send them your music.

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Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

UPS ART SENIORS DELIVER Culture Corner THOUGHT PROVOKING EXHIBIT A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA ‘1984’ by George Orwell May 7, 7 p.m. Dukesbay Theater, 508 6th Ave., Tacoma One night only staged reading of the Orwell classic. Based on the novel by George Orwell, “1984” is a terrifying and breathtaking view of a world controlled by a totalitarian government. Orwell asks what is left when freedom of speech, the press, love, and even the past are subject to authoritarian whims? Big Brother is watching. “I do not believe that the kind of society I describe necessarily will arrive, but I believe that something resembling it could arrive. The moral to be drawn from the dangerous nightmare situation is a simple one: Don’t let it happen. It depends on you.” - George Orwell Pay-what-you-can – tickets available at the door. Info: www.newmuses.com/1984.html Salish Sea Early Music Festival, Baroque in Transition: 1600-1700 May 10, 7 p.m. Mason United Methodist Church, 2710 N. Madison, Tacoma

PHOTO COURTESY OF KITTREDGE GALLERY

WAKE UP! Detail from “Lipton,” Morgan Travieso’s self portrait that seeks to convey a state of perpetual fatigue. The work painted in acrylic. By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

Springtime is unfolding all around us. Tender green life is budding forth. Birds are busy building their nests, and soon there will be newly grown fledglings ready to spread their wings, exit the cozy, comforting place in which they’ve been hatched and nurtured. So it is with the local schools and universities. Spring quarter is a time for seniors to leave the safe and nurturing atmosphere of the academy and move on toward adulthood with all of the triumph and tragedy involved. Among the students of the art departments, it is time for the seniors to have one final exhibition. At the University of Puget Sound, it is the custom for the graduating art seniors to show off their thesis projects: a collection of work that is presented as a crystallization of their artistic endeavors. Their artistic concerns and interests are coalesced into one final flourish before they leave their alma matter behind. The 14 artists exhibiting in the show dazzle the eye and trigger neurons and synapses with a show that makes for some fascinating exploration. The unhurried viewer can step into UPS’s Kittredge Gallery and become deeply absorbed in viewing the art and reading the thoughtfully crafted art statements presented by each artist. While work in the show is diverse, a number of common themes emerge. Several of the artists note an interest in making their art function as a vehicle by which to explore feelings, emotions and states of mind. Printmaker Molly Agan and painter/ sculptor Mary Brehove, for example, have used their respective media as a means to plumb the grief, sorrow and pain at the unexpected loss of a close friend. Similarly, Gaby Berman does thick, wonderfully murky oil paintings of various meals. These are a result of the observation that food can express a multitude of feelings like celebratory joy, the comfort of shelter or stark loneliness. Lauren Hecker uses canvas panels to create narrative pictures, transforming the gallery wall into an enlarged comic book page. Via pictorial narrative, she is able to examine her own subjective states of being. “Meditation May Help Reduce Anxiety” illustrates the artist’s use of a meditative technique to center herself in the classroom environment, which is often an arena of stress. Morgan Travieso‘s cartoonish style is at times reminiscent of that of Big Daddy Roth, the creator of Rat Fink and grotesque characters driving hot rod cars. Travieso deploys her paint to make wildly exaggerated self-portraits that are expressive of states of being that come from problems like commuting by car, feeling homesick, feeling fatigued or even gaining weight. Hailey Shoemaker’s mixed media/collage compositions explore, critique and seek to realign power relationships that

are unbalanced by outdated racial and gender assumptions that seem to persist long after their validity is no longer considered believable. Done on wooden panels, they read like pages of a manifesto written in color, gesture and image. Ethan Ziemba’s “Masks Off” is a collection of masks, each one wildly different from its fellows. Ziemba uses the mask as a way to uncover the linkage, or lack thereof, between our faces and our self-conception. The concealment of one’s face with a mask, observes Ziemba, can actually be an avenue via which an individual more honestly expresses some aspect of themselves. Artists through the ages have utilized their gifts as a means to express the beauty and the profundity that they experience in the world and in their lives. Maggie Langford’s lush, velvety oil paintings of salmon eggs, honey combs, and berries are the artist’s way of celebrating the miraculous, life-creating power of the diving feminine. Rory Wong Jacobs takes inspiration from the spiritual painter Marc Chagall to create musical screenprints in which the mystical world intersects with the world of everyday life. Katherine Etsell’s screenprints make the cranes and shipping containers of Tacoma’s busy port a source for images that are wonderfully poetic. Artists like Lianna Hamby show an interest in matters that are almost purely aesthetic. Her long frieze of beach scenes, created in oil paint using a pallet knife, explore the three dimensionality of paint. Owen Putz uses enamel and ink – some of it florescent and illuminated with a black light – to depict deep sea creatures, which, he notes, are the basis for many of the design concepts used in contemporary science fiction as a way to imagine alien life forms and alien technology. Bryce Philpott Monser’s “Wrap Shack,” meanwhile, is all about texture and is a physical meditation on the ways in which the use of our own bodies is a means for maximizing the quality of life. Olivia Sherman is also fascinated by our enfleshment. Sherman’s brilliant paintings are of “statues:” big, meaty figures engaged in various activities that involve them in consumerism, mass entertainment and titillating erotica. Sherman brings together a loose, gestural painting style with electric colors, glitter and collage elements that art over-the-top chintzy (in a good way) to explore the profane ironies of the condition of contemporary human beings: namely, that we are enfleshed, mortal beings, yet the culture around us, with its propensity towards a shallow but all-pervasive over stimulation, works to continually distract us. We are thus prevented from coming to any kind of peaceful resolution with our lives as embodied organisms that are subject to disease, old age and death. Sherman has latched onto something hefty and has the means to drive the message home. The UPS 2017 Senior Show runs through May 13 at the Kittredge Gallery. For further information visit pugetsound. edu/Kittredge.

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The sixth 2017 Salish Sea Early Music Festival performance, “Baroque in Transition: 1600-1700,” will highlight the evolving musical perspective and instruments in Italy and France during the 17th century with Seattle Baroque Orchestra founder Ingrid Matthews on baroque violin, Indiana UniversityBloomington professor Elisabeth Wright on harpsichord, and flutist Jeffrey Cohan playing both the one-piece renaissance flute and the baroque onekeyed flute. The Salish Sea Early Music Festival again provides new perspective on early performance practice with early 17th-century works for two soprano MATTHEWS instruments and harpsichord performed most likely for the first time in centuries by a combination of instruments that was familiar when the music was written but has rarely been heard since the flute underwent a drastic evolution shortly thereafter. Although the Baroque period in music is said to begin around 1600, some instruments, notably the transverse flute, were slower than others to assume their more modern form as influenced by stylistic currents and expressive requirements of the day. This program provides an opportunity to WRIGHT hear the “renaissance” and “baroque” flute types as they relate to these evolving musical styles of the 1600s, which differed greatly in France and Italy. The program will include works from early 17thcentury Italy by Giovanni Legrenzi, Marco Uccellini, Giovanni Battista Buonamente, Tarquinio Merula and Girolamo Frescobaldi, and from late17th-century France and Italy by Louis Couperin, Marin Marais, Jean-Baptiste Lully and Archangelo Corelli. Info: www.salishseafestival.org/tacoma

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Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

BLUNTLY SPEAKING

LET’S HAVE A CANNABIS CHAT By Duncan Rolfson duncan@tacomaweekly.com

Hello, our sincerest hope is that you are well. Not knowing you, or the potential of things you may or may not have done in life remains mildly irrelevant to the introduction of this article, yet remains at the heart of it, as well. We want to chat about cannabis. Yes, we want to chat with you, your neighbor and anyone else who’ll listen to me. However, this would ideally be an open conversation; after all, we are a democracy. So I’d like your input on the subject. If you or someone close to you has feelings, studies, or anything cannabis related, propot or not, please reach out to us.

As cannabis is being proliferated at a monumental rate these past five years, we have lost a bit of honest media coverage of the herb, and my hope is to offer some small restorative shot to the chin of the issue. Also with things like, I don’t know, Attorney General Jeff Sessions swinging his rusted axe around like an oaf, we may need to do this while we’ve still got the time and a platform. My experience in the cannabis industry is vast, and winding, as most of the cannabis industry professionals’ past 20 years or so has been. I’ve seen amazing California cannabis grows, done solely for medicinally focused therapies. Starting at the tender age of 15, I spent hours after school mixing soil and transplanting

seedlings, or clones; learning cannabinoid names, and uses. Genetics were also top of my priority list, early on. In my early 20s, cancer patient after cancer patient sought refuge in my office while delivering cannabis therapies and providing consulting at a cannabis clinic in Seattle for more than two years. While I kept my hands close to the plant, and even closer to the patient community, much of my recent works have been more publicly recognizable in publications like Culture Magazine, Weedmaps and, most recently, Tacoma Weedly, as a seasoned photojournalist and writer. While it’s been my pleasure introducing myself to you, it truly was a call to action. I want you to re-read these words,

and think long and hard about what type of column this would be in your perfect world? Do we need to swing some policy through here, like the sledgehammer she is, or potential legal parameters? A business ticker for local interested parties, or “canna-whisperers,� if you will. No idea is too bad, and we welcome them all. Having input for this article moving forward is our goal. We truly want to tailor this column as tastefully and respectfully as possible. Duncan Rolfson’s work also appears in Pierce County Community Newspaper Group’s Tacoma Weedly publication. His Bluntly Speaking column will appear in this space on the first Friday of each month.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: MARLON WAYANS Marlon Wayans is bringing his standup comedy to the Washington State Fair Concert Series with a scheduled Sept. 23 stop at the Fair’s 11,000-seat grandstand. Wayans is an actor, comedian, writer and producer, best known for films that include the “Scary Movie� series, “White Chicks,� “The Ladykillers� and “Requiem for a Dream.� This year, he can be seen in NBC-TV’s “Marlon,� a family sitcom based loosely on his life. The Sept. 23 show will start at 7:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 6, with prices ranging from $30 to $40; www.thefair.com/concerts for further details. Visit www.ticketmaster.com for more info on these other upcoming shows, except for where otherwise noted.

• Brian Regan: 8 p.m. July 28, Pantages Theater, $62.50; www.broadwaycenter.org.

• Life in Color with RL Grime, 3LAU and What So Not: 8 p.m. May 20, Tacoma Dome, $54 to $89.

• Leroy Bell & His Only Friends: 8 p.m. Aug. 4, Jazzbones, $15-$20; www. ticketfly.com.

• Randy Bachman: 8:30 p.m. May 20, Emerald Queen Casino, $30 to $85. • Soul 2 Soul Tour with Tim McGraw and Faith Hill: 7:30 p.m. May 27, Tacoma Dome, $66.50 to $116.50. 6/24 • Brad Paisley with Dustin Lynch, Chase Bryant and Lindsay Ell: 7 p.m. June 3, White River Ampitheatre, Auburn, $33 to $44.75. • Joan Osbourne “The Songs of Bob Dylanâ€?: 7:30 p.m. June 3, Rialto Theater, $39 to $59; www. broadwaycenter.org. • Christopher Titus: 7:30 p.m. June 15 to 17, 10:30 p.m. June 16 and 17, Tacoma Comedy Club, $22.50 to $37.50. • Vans Warped Tour featuring GWAR, Hawthorne Heights, CKY and more: 11 a.m. June 16, CenturyLink Field, Seattle, $43 to $88. • Cedric the Entertainer: 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. June 23 and 24, Tacoma Comedy Club, $45 to $65; www. tacomacomedyclub.com. • Roger Waters “Us + Themâ€?: 8 p.m. June 24, Tacoma Dome, $55 to $199.50. • KISW-FM (99.9) presents “Pain in the Grassâ€? featuring Korn, Stone Sour and more: 1:40 p.m. June 24, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $29 to $245; www.livenation.com. • B.o.B.: 9 p.m. July 1, Cultura Event Center, $25; www. ticketfly.com. • Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals: 7:30 p.m. July 21, Pantages Theater, $55 to $129; www. broadwaycenter.org. • Bruno Mars: 7:30 p.m. July 24, Tacoma Dome, $45 to $125.

The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is seeking volunteers interested in joining a team of knowledgeable, skilled, & compassionate volunteers dedicated to upholding resident rights & advocacy for vulnerable adults who reside in long-term care communities. If interested, please contact the LTCOP office at

253-798-3789 or kgavron@co.pierce.wa.us

          

• Ed Sheeran: 7:30 p.m. July 29, Tacoma Dome, $36.50 to $86.50 • Kendrick Lamar with Travis Scott and DRAM: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 1, Tacoma Dome, $35 to $96. • Green Day: 7 p.m. Aug. 1, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $41.50 to $81.50.

• Lady Gaga: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5, Tacoma Dome, $46 to $251. • Terri Clark: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 11, Pantages Theater, $29 to $69; www.broadwaycenter. org. • Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers with The Lumineers: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 19, Safeco Field, Seattle, $49 to $149. • Steve Miller Band with Peter Frampton: 7:30 p.m. Aug. 5, White River Amphitheatre, $20.25 to $101. • Metallica with Avenged Sevenfold and Gojira: 6 p.m. Aug. 9, CenturyLink Field, Seattle, $55.50 to $155.50. • Nickelback with Daughtry: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 1, Washington State Fair, Puyallup, $80 to $100; www.thefair.com. • The Beach Boys: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14, Washington State Fair, Puyallup, $30 to $55; www.thefair.com. • Modest Mouse with Built to Spill: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21, Washington State Fair, $58 to $85; www. thefair.com. • Earth, Wind & Fire: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 22, Washington State Fair, $45 to $80; www.thefair.com.

• Jason Aldean with Kane Brown: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 24, Washington State Fair, Puyallup, $100 to $150; www.thefair.com. • Scorpions with Megadeth: 8 p.m. Sept. 30, Tacoma Dome, $65 to $365. • Andre Rieu: 8 p.m. Oct. 28, Tacoma Dome, $39 to $99.

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Friday, May 5, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

IBSEN CLASSIC ‘PEER GYNT’ STAGED BY NEW MUSES TW PICK OF THE WEEK: REGGAE-ROCK BAND TOMORROW’S BAD SEEDS WILL HEADLINE THE ALL-AGES CINCO DE MAYO PARTY AT REAL ART TACOMA ON FRIDAY, MAY 5. TACOMA’S POWER LACES AND DECENT AT BEST WILL ADD SUPPORT WITH MUSIC STARTING AT 8 P.M. TICKETS ARE $13 TO $15; WWW.ETIX.COM.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEW MUSES THEATRE COMPANY

TROLLS. (l to r) Alex Gust, Eric Cuestas-Thompson, Niclas Olson, Emily

Lott Robinson, Austin Matteson, Melannie Schaffer and Katelyn Hoffman star in the New Muses Theatre Company’s “Peer Gynt.� By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

We live in a time of trolls. We live in a time in which we construct ourselves in terms of the media that we consume. We live in a time in which increasing numbers of our fellow citizens seem unable or unwilling to distinguish fact from fiction. “Facts� become a matter of personal preference and are often handed out by the opinion-leaders of one’s particular identity group. We even have an exaggerator (if not an outright liar) occupying the highest office in the land. In this surreal landscape, it becomes more and more difficult to locate one’s authentic self. This alienation from the self is a facet of Western modernity, a process already well advanced when the great Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen was hard at work with his exploration of the human psyche when he wrote his iconic plays in the late 1800s. The difficulty of personal authenticity is one of the main themes of Ibsen’s “Peer Gynt� (pronounced “pier gint�), which is currently being performed by Tacoma’s New Muses Theatre Company. For this play, Ibsen combined a semimythical character, the titular Peer Gynt (a kind of supercharged fool,) with material from Nordic fairy tales. Ibsen added some autobiographical elements and came up with a fantastical epic that follows Peer Gynt on his circuitous travels from the farms, forests and mountains of Norway, through troll-infested caves and then on to exotic lands. The play, here comprising 38 separate scenes, is so large that New Muses’ Artistic Director Niclas Olson (who adapted the play for this production) broke the play into two parts. Parts I and II are to be seen on separate occasions. The two parts are intermingled in the show’s schedule. Olson asserts that either part can be enjoyed as its own separate entity. Peer Gynt is a spinner of wild yarns about himself: a braggart, a liar and an outlaw who abducts brides from their weddings, brawls, seduces and is, in turn, seduced. He involves himself in the slave trade and pedals in idolatry and even tries to put himself across as a prophet. He traffics with trolls and demons and travels without any kind of compass, moral or otherwise, as he imagines that he will one day rule the world. Despite all of this, Peer is loved by many women: his

mother, farm girls, dairymaids, troll princesses and especially by the beautiful and chaste Solveig, who is so utterly selfless that she refuses to denounce Peer even after a lifetime spent waiting for him to return from his feckless wanderings. The New Muses production of the epic utilizes only six actors to portray a bewildering array of characters: cave trolls, Norwegian villagers, sailors, colonial adventurers, Arabian dancing girls, devils and inmates of an insane asylum. Olson stars as Peer Gynt, fleshing the character out in all its mercurial complexity. The role of Solveig is taken up by Katelyn Hoffman, who played Nora in last season’s production of “A Doll’s House,� another Ibsen masterpiece. Hoffman is sweetly demure as Solveig, who forsakes her family in order to dwell in the forest with Peer, only to have him run off to sea and make her wait for decades on end. The play shows her as a kind of Snow White, alone in the woods, singing to herself. Emily Lott Robinson does a great job as Aase, Peer’s widowed mother who is impoverished by her son’s inability to work the family farm or to take the opportunity to marry into money. Despite a state of destitution, Aase is continually overcome with delight at hearing Peer deliver his tall tales. Melanie Schaffer is sultry in her roles as “the woman in green,� daughter of the Mountain King, and as the Arabian dancing girl Anitra in part II of the saga. Schaffer also delivers a crisp and concise portrayal of the devil with whom Peer tries to bargain for a place in hell as a means to cling to his own identity, which he prefers to the alternative of self-obliteration. Austin Matteson tackles his multitude of roles with precision and is especially engaging as “the button molder,� the spectral figure with a ladle that he intends to use to melt Peer’s soul down so that it can be blended with other souls that are deemed not authentic enough to warrant either heavenly bliss or condemnation to hell. Alex Gust, meanwhile, is an agile actor, playing everything from a brittle blacksmith to an American cowboy who has gotten mixed up with a band of expatriats in Morocco. Eric Cuestas-Thompson plays the savvy Dovre King, the chief of the trolls. Cuestas-Thompson also stars as

the head of a gang of wild apes that attack Peer. He voices the mysterious “boyg� against whom Peer struggles at key points in his travels. Within the intimate space of the Dukesbay Theater (on the second floor of the Merlino Building that is also home to the Grand Cinema), shows put on by New Muses always make one feel like an initiate who is privileged to witness secret rites. The whole fantasy is done with very minimal sets. Projections on a fringe of a screen up above give the audience visual clues on what setting it is to imagine for each scene. When “Peer Gynt� was first performed in Oslo, Norway in 1876, the play included music penned by the famous Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg. Some of the material from Grieg’s “Peer Gynt Suite� is sure to be known to contemporary audiences. “Morning Mood� and “In the Hall of the Mountain King� are two examples. The New Muses version makes liberal use of the Grieg score for their production. There is ample opportunity to enjoy both parts of this iconic play through May 21. New Muses’ shows are very affordable at $15 general admission or $20 for a pass to both parts. Ibsen is one of the greats of the stage. His productions are not to be missed. Performances by New Muses Theatre Company are always a treat, classics like “Peer Gynt� especially so. For more information and show schedules visit www. newmuses.com.

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A QUIET PASSION (125 MIN, PG-13) Fri 5/5: 2:20, 5:15, 8:00 Sat 5/6-Sun 5/7: 11:35 AM, 2:20, 5:15, 8:00, Mon 5/8-Thu 5/11: 2:20, 5:15, 8:00

THE LOST CITY OF Z (141 MIN, PG-13) Fri 5/5: 2:30, 5:45, 8:45 Sat 5/6-Sun 5/7: 11:30 AM, 2:30, 5:45, 8:45, Mon 5/8-Tue 5/9: 2:30, 5:45, 8:45, Wed 5/10: 2:30, 8:45, Thu 5/11: 2:30, 5:45, 8:45

THEIR FINEST (117 MIN, R) Fri 5/5-Sun 5/7: 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 8:55, Mon 5/8: 1:00, 3:35, Tue 5/9: 3:40, 8:55, Wed 5/10-Thu 5/11: 1:00, 3:35, 6:15, 8:55

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE (124 MIN, PG-13) Fri 5/5: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Sat 5/6-Sun 5/7: 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15, Mon 5/8: 5:30, 8:15 Tue 5/9-Thu 5/11: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15

THE DEVIL’S CANDY (79 MIN, NR) Sat 5/6: 11:00

BIRTHDAY

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THE KIND WORDS (118 MIN, NR) Mon 5/8: 1:30, 6:30

CHASING TRADE: THE JOHN COLETRANE DOCUMENTARY (99 MIN, NR) Tue 5/9: 1:30, 6:45

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FRIDAY, MAY 5

MONDAY, MAY 8 JAZZBONES: Afroman with Haiku, Bvmmer and DJ Indica Jones (hip-hop, pop, DJ) 9 p.m., $9-$15

AIRPORT TAVERN: Donald Glaude (DJ) 9 p.m., $5-$7

AIRPORT TAVERN: Stay Grounded (reggae) 9 p.m., $7 G. DONNA LSON’S: Little Bill Engelhart and Rod Cook (blues, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: 4 More ( dance) 9 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Crossing Crusades demo release party with 15 Stitches, Lust Punch, Woodshed, Cashing in Karma (rock) 8 p.m., $8, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Tomorrow’s Bad Seeds (reggae, rock) 8 p.m., $13-$15, AA RIALTO: Tacoma Opera presents Jacques Offenbach’s “La PĂŠricholeâ€? (opera) 7:30 p.m., $25-$85, AA THE SWISS: The Royal We (rock covers) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Steve Lemme, Kevin Heffernan (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $25-$32, 18+

G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Michael Langdon (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MAY 9

DAWSON’S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, MAY 6

THE VALLEY: Cloud Person, Mr. Motorcycle, Dunce (indie-rock) 8 p.m.

EMERALD QUEEN: Keith Sweat (R&B, soul) 8:30 p.m., G. DONNALSON’S: Little Bill Engelhart and Rod Cook (blues, jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: 4 More (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Nite Wave (‘80s covers) 9 p.m., $10-$15 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Jar of Flies, Washed in Black, Outshined (grunge tribute) 8 p.m., $15-$20 MARKEE (OLD TOWN): Pete Reed (folk, singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA METRONOME: Gavin Villarreal (classical guitar) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: The Lightweight Champs, Diced Candy, Lenu (alternative, indie-rock) 8 p.m., $7, AA THE SPAR: Oly Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Hairstorm (‘80s arena covers) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Steve Lemme, Kevin Heffernan (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $25-$32, 18+

SUNDAY, MAY 7

REAL ART TACOMA: Tigerhawk, Mortality Rate, Safe & Sound, Crooked Cross, Slog (punk, hardcore, metal) 7 p.m., $7-$10, AA

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Joey Jewell does “Sinatra at the Sands� (Frank Sinatra tribute) 6 p.m., $10 NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 4 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Maia Santell (blues) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: The Drunk Show (comedy) 8 p.m., $10$16, 18+

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: “Tightwad Tuesday� with Sharky Waters, Ese, The Know Nothingz (rock, punk, metal) 9 p.m., NC METRONOME: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m., NC, 18+ THE VALLEY: Aberrance (metal) 8:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 10

G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Lyon Pride Music festival auditions (rock) 8 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Leify Green (open mic) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, MAY 11

DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC

G. DONNALSON’S: Rod Cook (blues) 7 p.m., AA JAZZBONES: DJ Niros (DJ) 10 p.m., NC women, $5 men KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Michael Sommerville (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+ TACOMA ELKS: Terry West (dance) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Seeking Freelance Writer Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along with our flagship publication, the Tacoma Weekly, we publish the University Place Press, Fife Free Press, Milton-Edgewood Signal and Puyallup Tribal News. PCCNG is seeking experienced, dependable, community-minded writers. All areas are needed – news, sports and entertainment. Must be a self-starter capable of following up on assignments and also developing in-depth stories independently in a deadline-driven environment. Photography skills are a big plus, as are copyediting/ proofreading skills (AP style). Will include some evening work and occasional weekend hours. Send cover letter, resume and at least three examples of published work to matt@tacomaweekly.com or via regular mail to PCCNG, 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma WA 98421. Please, no phone calls or walk-ins.


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, May 5, 2017

Coming Events TW PICK: DOWNTOWN TACOMA MARKET Sunday, May 7, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Courthouse Square, 1102 A St., Tacoma You’re invited to the spring edition of the Downtown Tacoma Market, a curated marketplace. Get to know 20-plus local vendors at beautiful Courthouse Square. Vendors will be selling vintage clothing, locally designed clothing, handmade jewelry, apothecary, plants, home goods, art and more. $1 suggested donation to enter will benefit Spaceworks Tacoma.

‘SISTER ACT: THE MUSICAL’ Fri., May 12, 7:30 p.m. OPENING NIGHT Sat., May 13, 7:30 p.m. Sun., May 14, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave. Enter Deloris Van Cartier, a disco diva whose life takes a surprising turn when she witnesses a murder. Under protective custody, she hides in the one place no one would expect – a convent! Disguised as a nun under the suspicious watch of Mother Superior, Deloris helps her fellow sisters find their voices as she unexpectedly rediscovers her own. A five-time Tony winner and sparkling tribute to the universal power of friendship, sisterhood and music. Ages: All ages. Price: Adults $31; senior/ military/students $29; children (12 & under) $22; groups of 10 or more $27. All seating is reserved. Info: (2530 5656867; www.tmp.org ACM 5TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Fri., May 5, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. It’s a whole year of celebration. On the fifth day of each month, ACM will be offering a $5 discount on all admission tickets, 20 percent off Individual through Gold Key memberships and a “special perk” that will change each month. Ages: All ages. Price: $10-$18. Info: (253) 7798490; www.americascarmuseum.org AFROMAN Fri., May 5, 9 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave. Grammy-nominated hip-hop artist Joseph Foreman, aka Afroman, rose to fame on the strength of his smash hit, “Because I Got High.” Price: $9-$15. (253) 396-9169; www.jazzbones.com ‘EXIT LAUGHING’ Fri., May 5, 7:30 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. Winner of the AACT New Play Fest. When the biggest highlight in your life for the past 30 years has been your weekly bridge night out with the “girls,” what do you do when one of your foursome inconveniently dies? Ages: All ages. Price: $24; $22 students, seniors & military; $20 12 and under. Info: (253) 272-2281; www.tacomalittletheatre.com KARAOKE WITH DJ NO PANTS Fri., May 5, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Acme Tavern, 1310 Tacoma Ave. S. Sing your heart out with a great crowd, a fun host and a good sound system. Great drinks and food. Ages: 21+ Price: no cover. Info: (253) 222-6864; www.facebook. com/acmetavern FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., May 6, 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. We make use of AA principles to gain freedom from addictive eating. There are no dues, fees, or weigh-ins at FA meetings. Membership is open to anyone who wants help with food. Price: Free.

Info: (253) 310-8177; www. foodaddicts.org POTTERY CLASSES AT THROWING MUD Sat., May 6, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Throwing Mud Gallery, 2210-2212 N. 30th St. Classes are a mix of beginners to more advanced students, which encourages a cooperative learning environment. Ages: 18+ Price: $210 + tool kit. Info: (253) 2547961; www.throwingmudgallery.com/pottery-classes SPRING FLING VENDOR FAIR Sat., May 6, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fawcett Elementary School, 126 E. 60th St. Shop for Mother’s Day gifts and support Fawcett PTA at the same time. Dozens of vendors, arts & crafts, sports cards & memorabilia, food trucks, free face painting, rock painting, raffle, door prizes, and more. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5714700; www.facebook.com/ events/264582150649556/ TACOMA RUNNERS FREE TIMED 5K Sat., May 6, 8-9 a.m. Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. Looking for a fun, motivating group of runners? Come out for Tacoma Runners free Saturday morning timed 5k in beautiful Point Defiance Park. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 305-1000; www.tacomarunners.com ALL-MOZART: MUSIC FOR ORGAN AND STRINGS Sun., May 7, 3-4 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. An all-Mozart program of scintillating music, a fitting soundtrack for spring. Price: Freewill donation. Info: (253) 248-4384; www. saintandrewstacoma.org MORE THAN PINK AT TACOMA MALL Sun., May 7, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tacoma Mall, 4502 S. Steele St. Donate $10 to Susan G. Komen and receive a special discount card offering 15-25 percent off one item at participating retailers. Price: $10 donation. Info: (253) 475-4566; www.simon.com/ shop-support-save SOUTH SOUND CLASSICAL CHOIR Sun., May 7, 3-4:30 p.m. St. Patrick Catholic Church, 1001 N. J St. The South Sound Classical Choir invites you to their spring concerts featuring composers Gretchaninoff, Whitacre, Brahms, Gjeilo, Sibelius and others. Price: Free. Info: (253) 507-4183; www.southsoundclassicalchoir.org BIBLE DISCUSSION: BOOK OF REVELATION Mon., May 8, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome for a discussion of the Book of Revelation, led by Pastor Martin Yabroff of St. Andrew’s Epis-

copal Church. No background required. Open discussion and practical applications. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; saintandrewstacoma.org HOW TO TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE THROUGH MEDITATION Mon., May 8, 7-8:30 p.m. Tushita Kadampa Buddhist Center, 1501 Pacific Ave. S. Based on Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso’s newly revised text, this course will explore many meaningful topics that will help us improve our life. Ages: All ages. Price: $10. Info: (360) 754-7787; meditateinolympia.org/httyltacoma NEW ORLEANS BABY CAKES AT TACOMA RAINIERS Mon., May 8, 5:05 p.m. Cheney Stadium, 2502 S. Tyler The Tacoma Rainiers take on the New Orleans Baby Cakes in this minor league baseball matchup. Price: $7.50$11.50, not including Ticketmaster fees. Info: (253) 7527707; www.ticketmaster.com MAYFEST Mon., May 8, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lakewold Gardens, 12317 Gravelly Lake Dr. S.W. Lakewold’s MayFest is a great time to enjoy the beauty of the gardens in bloom and also enjoy great displays, exhibits and activities in the Wagner House. Ages: All ages. Price: $7-9. Info: (253) 584-4106; www.lakewoldgardens.org/mayfest.html ‘CHASING TRANE’ AT THE GRAND CINEMA Tues., May 9, 1:30-6:45 p.m. The Grand Cinema, 606 S. Fawcett Ave. “Chasing Trane” explores the global power and impact of the music of John Coltrane and reveals the passions, experiences and forces that shaped his life and revolutionary sounds. Ages: All ages. Price: $8 matinee, $10 general admission. Info: (253) 593-4474; www. grandcinema.com WORSHIP AT HISTORIC OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH Tues., May 9, 10-11 a.m.; 5-5:40 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s first and oldest church, St. Peter’s (est. 1873), invites you to experience Holy Communion every Sunday at 10 a.m., (Sunday School). At 5 p.m. we offer Compline services the first and third Sundays and evening prayer all others. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-4406; www.oldstpeters.org PACIFIC GALLERY ARTISTS MEETING AND DEMO Tues., May 9, 7-9 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Join us for a lecture and demonstration of printmaking techniques using Golden Acrylics. Barbara DePirro will show you many stressfree printmaking processes without using a press. Price: Free. Info: (253) 383-3900; www.pacificgalleryartists.org

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

LINE DANCING Tues., May 9, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this sevenweek program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7-week session. Info: (253) 3833900; funtimelinedancing.com

NEW TECH TACOMA Wed., May 10, 5-7:15 p.m. Court House Square, 1102 A St. New Tech Tacoma is breaking down the silos and bringing together the smart, fun, creative people from across the full spectrum of the Seattle and Tacoma-area tech community. Price: $10. Info: (206) 2505510; www.newtechnorthwest. com/events/new-tech-tacoma

BOOST YOUR BODY IMAGE: CONFIDENCE AT ANY SIZE CLASS Wed., May 10, 7:15-8 p.m. Lean Body Lifestyles, 711 St. Helens Ave., Suite 201 Re-boot and repair your relationship with your body. It is possible to love your body, independent of how much you weigh, or what number appears on the labels of your clothing. Ages: 18 and older. Price: $295; for 6-class sessions, workbook and private Facebook Group. Info: (253) 678-5403; www.leanbodylifestyles.com/events.html

BROADWAY FARMERS MARKET Thurs., May 11, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Broadway Farmers Market, 921 Broadway Come for lunch and shop for dinner at the Broadway Farmers Market. Our farmers provide the freshest food around and the most beautiful bouquets for that special someone. Ages: All ages. Price: Free Info: (253) 272-7077; www. tacomafarmersmarket.com OH, MY GOSH – NOW WHAT? Thurs., May 11, 6-7 p.m. WSU Pierce County Extension Office, 3602 Pacific Ave. Part 3 “How do I start the conversation? How do I cope with the shock?” There is no diagnosis like an Alzheimer or dementia diagnosis. There is a lot of uncertainty before the diagnosis and in the early stages after the diagnosis. Ages: 18+ Price: Free; No RSVP required. Info: (253) 7984600; www.PierceADRC.org

MIKE’S MOVIE RIFF OFF Wed., May 10, 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Acme Tavern, 1310 Tacoma Ave. S. “Galaxy of Terror” – A movie night where you berate, mock and interject on the classiest trash cinema has to offer. All you need is a phone capable of texting, your wit and your comments will appear live on the movie. Ages: 21+ Price: No cover. Info: (253) 5036712; www.facebook.com/ events/193507334492121

THE MURDER MYSTERY COMPANY Thurs., May 11, 7-9:30 p.m. The Old Spaghetti Factory, 1735 Jefferson Ave. The Experts in Mystery Entertainment are now performing live public and private interactive murder mystery dinner shows in Tacoma and surrounding areas throughout Washington. Ages: 13 and up. Price: $60 general admission. Info: (888) 643-2583; murdermysterydinnerseattle.com

FINANCIAL CAPABILITY SUMMIT 2017 Wed., May 10, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. The Financial Capability Summit 2017 will explore what security and choice mean and how financial capability work can change lives for people who have been generationally affected by poverty. Price: $125. Info: (206) 973-2294; www.tacomaartmuseum.org

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3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMsFriday, May 5, 2017

NOTICES NO. PUY-CS-FC-2017-0012 Summons in a civil action and notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION, TACOMA, WASHINGTON WSFC Petitioner, v. JB Jamal Island Respondent, The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons is issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 14, 2017 at 9:15 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated April 12, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez, Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street, Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585 NO. PUY-CS-CS-2016-0059 Summons in a civil action and notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION, TACOMA, WASHINGTON Jennifer Taylor Petitioner, v. Giana Abbott Respondent, The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for June 14th, 2017 at 9:45 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated April 12, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez, Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court, 1451 East 31st Street, Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585 TO: Melody Brown Case Name: C.,M Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0001 Nature of Case: guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appoint the above named Petitioner(s) to be guardian(s) for C., M, a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: May 22nd , 2017 TIME: 10:30 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the court: 1. The right to be present before the court; 2. The right to present written and oral testimony; 3. The right to subpoena witnesses; 4. The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; 5. The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the court has a list of attorneys who are to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and 6. The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date if this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250—DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404

NOTICES

NOTICES

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF GRANT SUMMONS: CASE NUMBER: 15-2-00163-5 URBAN FINANCIAL OF AMERICA, FORMERLY KNOW AS URBAN FINANCIAL GROUP, INC.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE

Vs. ESTATE OF SANTA JIMENEZ, an estate; ESTROBERTO JIMENEZ, an heir; JENARO M. JIMENEZ, an heir; JOSE LOUIS JIMENEZ, an heir; RAUOL JIMENEZ, an heir; UNKNOWN HEIRS SANTA JIMENEZ, heirs; And all other persons, parties, or occupants Unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, Title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property Described in the complaint herein, adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud on Plaintiff’s title to The Property. Defendants. To: JENARO M. JIMENEZ JR. A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by plaintiff’s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense in writing, and serve a copy upon the person signing this Summons within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons if served in the State of Washington, or within sixty (60) days if served outside the State of Washington or if you are a United States government defendant, excluding the day of service, or a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment may be entered. You may demand that the plaintiff file this lawsuit with the court. If you do so, the demand must be in writing and must be served upon the person signing this Summons. Within 14 days after you served the demand, the plaintiff must file this lawsuit with the court, or the service on theyou of this Summons and Complaint will be void. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. THIS SUMMONS is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington. DATED 2/5/2015 Respectfully submitted MALCOLM* CISNEROS, A Law Corporation By: Nathan F. Smith, WSB #43160 Stephen M. Lewis, WSB #47173 Attorneys for Plaintiff MALCOLM * CISNEROS, A Law Corporation 2112 Business Center Drive Irvine, California 92612 Phone: (949) 252-9400 Fax: (949) 252-1032

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE CASE NUMBER: 16-2-11183-7 SUMMONS CIT BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, Vs. EVELYN NETTLETON, an individual; THE LINKS AT NORTHSHORE CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, an association; and all other persons or parties unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien, or interest in the real property described in the complaint herein, adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud on Plaintiff’s title to the Property, collectively designated as DOES 1 through 50, inclusive. Defendants. TO: EVELYN NETTLETON A lawsuit has been started against you in the aboveentitled court by plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claims are stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint by stating your defense in writing, and serve a copy upon the understanding attorney for the Plaintiff within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, excluding the day of service, if served in the in the State of Washington, or within sixty (60) days after the service of this summons, excluding the day of service, if served outside the State of Washington, or if you are a United States government defendant, or a default judgment may be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where plaintiff is entitled to what is asks for because you have not responded. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned attorney, you are entitled to notice before a default judgment may be entered. You may demand that the Plaintiff file this lawsuit with the court. If you do so, the demand must be in writing and must be served upon the person signing this Summons. Within 14 days after you served the demand, the Plaintiff must file this lawsuit with the court, or the service on you of this Summons and Complaint will be void. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. THIS SUMMONS is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington. DATED: 9/16, 2016 MALCOM * CISNEROS, A Law Corporation Nathan F. Smith, WSBA #431960 Attorney for Plaintiff MALCOLM * CISNEROS, A Law Corporation 2112 Business Center Drive Irvine, California 92612 Phone: (949 ) 252-9400 Fax: (949) 252-1032 Email: Nathan@mclaw.org

WANTED

If you have any questions, Please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585

VOLUNTEERS

Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 5/9/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 9:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 05182017 Date 05/18/2017 View @ 1 pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

Chambers Creek Foundation 10 Year Anniversary Gala and Auction Saturday, June 24 at 5 PM - 11 PM Chambers Bay Pavilion 6320 Grandview Drive W. University Place, WA Come Celebrate Chambers Creek Foundation accomplishments in the last 10 years since the opening of Chambers Bay Golf and the future plans of trails and bridges at the Properties. chambersckfoundation.org

VOLUNTEERS SPECIAL HABITAT STEWARD TRAINING National Wildlife Federation and Tahoma Audubon Society Partner Up for Educational Workshop Series. Are you interested in creating areas for wildlife? Do you want to do your part to keep Pierce County wild? Now is your chance to become a Habitat Steward™! National Wildlife Federation and Tahoma Audubon Society are offering a specialized 24-hour training program to teach you how to help others create and restore wildlife habitat in backyards, schoolyards, and other community areas. The training will be held on the first four Mondays in May from 6:00-9:00pm at the Adriana Hess Audubon Center (2917 Morrison Rd. W, University Place, WA, 98466). The workshop includes two Saturday field trips on May 6th and 13th. The first trip is in partnership with Tahoma Audubon Society and will be at Morse Preserve to learn all about bird identification and conservation; the second is in partnership with Northwest Trek Wildlife Park and will include hands-on NatureMapping of the Ohop Creek. Plan on full days. This training is engaging, fun and highly informative and you get to meet and interact with local conservation professionals and other similarly interested folks! Expert speakers from University of Washington, Pierce Conservation District, Woodbrook Nursery, WSU Pierce County Master Gardener Program, Taco-

ma-Pierce County Health Department and more will present on topics such as: rain gardens, native plants, habitat restoration, pollinators and birds, mushrooms and fungi, and much more! Cost of the training is $30 to cover classroom materials. Note: scholarships are available! No one will be turned down due to lack of funds. We will provide coffee, tea, and snacks at each training session. To register for the training, please visit http://nwftacoma.brownpapertickets.com or contact Sarah Bruemmer at WAHabitatCoordinator@ nwf.org or (206) 577-7809.

Wanted: Volunteers for groceries. The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740.

City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife.org/getinvolved

CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click “hospice and palliative care� in the “our services� tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.

Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253272-8433

Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686.

Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone

else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253-212-2778.

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.� Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org.

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks. com or 253.305.1025.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253-536-4494

Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT “MEMORY COMMUNITYâ€? What It Is: We are Memory Community (a 501(c) (3) non-profit corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: • helps our senior citizens tell their stories • connects the young and the old • increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are • honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories • All seniors are welcome to volunteer for filming their story! • At most two days of work during daytime – Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day 2: filming, ideally wrapped within half a day What we’d like you to talk about in the film: Use 10 minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http:// memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 360-850-9850 for scheduling a meeting. The filming is free, but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

TO: Haedr Al-Shabani

304 Puyallup Ave.,#1 Tacoma WA 98421

Ad Copy Here:

Case Style: CIVIL Case Number: PUY-CV-CUST-2017-0054 Nature of Case: CUSTODY YOU ARE HEREBY summoned to appear and respond to the Civil Complaint/Petition filed by the above named Petitioner in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, located at 1451 E 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. A(n) INITIAL Hearing is scheduled at the above-named Court on June 13, 2017, at 2:30 p.m. You must respond in writing to the civil complaint/ petition within twenty (20) days after the date of the first publication of this summons. You must serve a copy of your written answer on the Petitioner and file with this Court an affidavit of service. Failure to file a written response may result in a default judgment entered against you. The parties have the right to legal representation at their own expense and effort. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. Copies of the Civil Complaint/Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

  

Name: Address: Phone: Cash

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05: _________________ Check

Visa/Mastercard Card #

Money Order Exp.

Sub Total: ________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

Total Amount: _______________

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

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206-715-1847

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY MASSAGE THERAPY SUCCESSFUL OFFICE 12+ YEARS GREAT LOCATION MILTON-EDGEWOOD YOU PAY FOR THE OFFICE FURNITURE AND ASSUME VERY LOW LEASE AND UTILITIES $1,500 ( OBO ) FOR THE RIGHT LMP

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES UNIV. PL HOME

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230 S 80TH ST #16

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2 BD 1 BA 925 SF. UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT & OWNERSHIP. DON’T MISS OUT ON THIS FIRST FLOOR APT. HOME.

3 BED 2.75 BATH 3280 SF. UNFURNISHED SHORT-TERM RENTAL AVAIL THRU 7/31/17.

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2 BD, 1 BA 850 SF. THIS APT HOME 2 BD 1 BA 871 SF. GREAT MAIN LEVEL 2 WILL NOT BE ON MARKET FOR BD 1 BA APT IS NEAR TACOMA COMMUNILONG!!! ROOMY 2ND FLR APT HOME. TY COLLEGE AND SR 16 & I5 ACCESS.

CALL CHERYL AT 253 568-668

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View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services TREE SERVICE

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First Time Seller Course May 18th 2017 6:00PM - 7:30PM

Kari Cornfield Mortgage Advisor MLO-666886 253.314.2300

Attorney's Title

KCornfield@absoluteloans.com

Karicornfield.com

3906 S. 74th St. Tacoma, WA 98409

Sergio Hernandez

Learn about the selling process! This class will teach you what to expect from your real estate agent when you sell your first home. Learn about what it takes to prepare your home for sale, how to improve buyer traffic and what you can do to show your house!

Better Properties UP/Fircrest

253-431-2308 sergio@betterproperties.com http://betterpropertiesupf.com/ agents-sergiohernandez_17-36s.html

We’ll answer your questions like how long it will take to sell your home, what a contingent sale is and what to expect when it comes to closing!

Reserve Your Spot

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EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail.

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OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease.

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LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR price reduction RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SUCCESSFUL, LONGTIME ESTABLISHMENT. Manufacturer of Award Ribbons and Rosettes with large wholesale customer base. (Local and out of state business) Business is for sale. $60,000 Plus inventory. NON-FRANCHISE COFFEE SHOP & DELI. Great Location. Business for Sale, $100,000. Owners’ Terms Available.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

Name: _______________________________ Address: _____________________________

Tacoma Weekly 304 Puyallup Ave., #1 Tacoma WA 98421

Category: Ad Copy Here:

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

______________________________________ Phone:_______________________________

Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

.

Cash

30 Words and Under: _____________________ Extra words @ .05: ________________________ Sub Total: _______________________________ x Number of Weeks = _____________________ Total Amount: __________________________

Check

Money Order

Visa/Mastercard

Exp.

Card #

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave. Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

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