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Because Community Matters.

TACOMAWEEKLY NEWS FREE • FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 2018

WWW.TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Tacoma-Pierce County headed to Boston for Mayors’ Institute on Opioids

PLANNING PROCESS LAUNCHED FOR TACOMA DOME LIGHT RAIL EXTENSION

PHOTOS BY ANDREW FICKES

PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

Mayor Victoria Woodards delivered her State of the City Address at Lincoln High School, her alma mater, on April 11. By Andrew Fickes

T

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

acoma Mayor Victoria Woodards marked the occasion of her 100th day in office before a full house of friends, family and dignitaries on Wednesday, April 11, at Lincoln High School, her alma mater, for her

first State of the City Address. It was an evening full of pomp and circumstance and positive declarations that highlighted the successful achievements made by Tacoma over the past 100 days. Woodards touted the creation of 1,300 new jobs so far in 2018 and her concerted effort on continuing to diversify the City’s economy to provide more living-wage jobs and

maintain sustainable growth. Woodards said that in the coming several weeks she will spearhead a new economic advisory council to ensure the creation and retention of livingwage jobs. Woodards also stressed her priority policy to generate incentives that will spur affordable housing to support the 16.5 percent of seniors living in poverty in Tacoma, u See OPIOIDS / page A8

REVITALIZATION OF LINCOLN SPROUTS WITH COMMUNITY GARDEN By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The seeds of change in the Lincoln District revitalization effort will involve street trees and road improvements as well as literal seeds in the soil, courtesy of a community garden that is taking shape on an undevelopable parcel of land owned by Tacoma Public Utilities. A planting party is in the works for April 22 at the Lincoln Community Garden, located at 867 S. 34th St., to allow volunteers to plant pear and apple trees and put in landscaping for the location as well as sign up for planting beds of their own. The garden’s design and startup was funded by $6,000 in grants and will be maintained through donations and seasonal rentals of one of the 12 individual beds for $25 each to cover the water bills for each 4-foot by 8-foot soil bed and other associated costs. “We don’t want anyone to be turned away because someone doesn’t have the funds for a bed,” garden organizer Ricky Clousing said. Donations have already covered the costs of the beds if people interested in having a bed of their own can’t cover the plot fee. Future fun-

PHOTO COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

While much of the revitalization of the Lincoln District involves street improvements, an unused parcel of land will provide for a community garden as a pilot program that could expand to other parcels around the district, and potentially the city.

draisers hope to make that policy permanent. “The planning process was very organic as to how it was planned out,” Clousing said. “There is just a lot of diversity in the neighborhood and we wanted the garden to reflect that. We realized that we didn’t want

a traditional community garden with just a bunch of beds.” The Lincoln garden will, for example, have plants that are open to the community at large, so gardeners can swing by to tend to those plants or neighbors could spend an

u See GARDEN / page A8

(Top) Puyallup Tribe Councilmember Annette Bryan expresses excitement for the light rail extension to Tacoma and the new jobs it will create for tribal members. (Bottom) Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, joined by Fife Mayor Kim Roscoe (from left), Puyallup Tribe Councilmember Annette Bryan, Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards and Federal Way Mayor Jim Ferrell, announces the kickoff of the Tacoma Dome light rail extension process. By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

On Monday, April 16, at the transit plaza on East 25th Street across from the Tacoma Sounder station under a torrent of rain, Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, along with the mayors of Tacoma, Federal Way and Fife and Puyallup Tribal Councilmember Annette Bryan, made official statements signifying the start of planning efforts that will eventually lead to completion of the Tacoma Dome Link Extension light rail project in 2030. By 2030, 9.7 miles of new light rail track will extend from Federal Way to Tacoma Dome Station. The project will include the build-out of four new light rail stations: South Federal Way, Fife, East Tacoma, and Tacoma Dome. Rogoff said the average daily ridership on the new line will be upwards of 37,000 by the year 2040. Rogoff reflected on how the new station would be transformational for thousands living in Pierce County, both in terms of economy and mobility. A trip on link light rail, for example, from Tacoma Dome Station to Sea-Tac Airport will take a mere 35 minutes. “This will be a generational change for the region,” said Rogoff, while admitting that some may argue it will take a generation to build the extension. He said the long period of time it will take for completion is due to necessary time for careful planning and deliberation with constituents and partner agencies, as well as the time constraints to do the physical construction. For example, much of the work will have to be done ideally during late night hours, during non-peak traffic. Rogoff also said Sound Transit will be focused on ensuring there are multiple opportunities for public engagement and that partnerships with multiple agencies are leaned on to inform the planning process. “We’re changing the way we do business as we plan for projects,” Rogoff said. One partner agency that is very important to the process is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. Annette Bryan remarked how the Tribe is the only tribe in the U.S. whose reservation is home to a multi-modal transit station. She said the Tribe is looking forward u See LIGHT RAIL / page A8

SOUNDERS 2 GETS A WIN

SCREAMING BUTTERFLIES PRESENT ‘RICHARD II’

TACOMA CONCERT BAND’S ‘CELEBRATION!’

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B4

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GUEST EDITORIAL Having liberated the office of the president from the boundaries imposed by the Constitution, treaties and law, Americans stand indicted of having acquiesced in the triumph of power and corruption. PAGE A5

Pothole of the Week.....A2 Bulletin Board...............A2

Sports..........................A12 Hot Tickets..................A13

Look for daily updates online: tacomaweekly.com

CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly TWITTER: twitter.com/tacomaweekly INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/tacomaweekly

City Life....................... B1 Culture Corner............. B3

Calendar..................B6 Word Search............B6

Two Sections | 26 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

Pothole of the Week

SEX OFFENDER FACES 43 MONTHS IN PRISON By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted – Q13 Fox

SO. 68TH AND FAWCETT

After appearing on the side of area milk cartons for months and months, we’ve come to the realization that our beloved Percival, the Pothole Pig, is not coming home to us. The celebrated swine has either found a new life somewhere else, or perhaps became a delicious and nutritious part of someone’s breakfast at some point. Whatever the case, we will miss him and be forever in his debt as his dedication to the City of Destiny led to so many nasty potholes being filled. This week, Carter the Crater Gator found another impressive road divot to stretch out in. To be honest, we’ve had a difficult time with this critter. He can’t get over the fact that he’ll always be second-fiddle when compared to Percival, and frankly, he’s been getting a little snarky. While we’ve let him know that his replacement could waddle through the front door of the Tacoma Weekly office at any moment, the toothy sourpuss has countered with his own threat of “pulling a Percival” and disappearing. With this in mind, we are still in the process of trying out new pothole seeking varmints. If you’ve got any ideas, please send them to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

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Convicted child rapist Michael West entered a plea of not guilty in Pierce County Superior Court on Tuesday to a charge of failure to register as a level II DAVID ROSE sex offender. Tacoma Police arrested the 43-year-old a few hours after he was featured on “Washington’s Most Wanted” last Saturday night. Officers located him in a car in an AM/ PM parking lot on South Sprague Avenue thanks to anonymous tips to Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County.  “This is the second time he’s been caught through ‘Washington’s Most Wanted’ viewers,” said Pierce County Sheriff’s Det. Ed Troyer.   

In 2014, the Tacoma Police Gang Unit arrested West after receiving a Crime Stoppers tip about the vehicle he was using. West moved to Tacoma from Snohomish County after he was convicted in 1995 of rape of a child in the second degree and rape in the third degree. The victim was a 13-yearold girl. In 2009, West exposed himself to a woman at a bus stop and was convicted of indecent exposure.

Detectives say he has refused to participate in sex offender treatment programs. He’s been convicted of felony failure to register as a sex offender four times since 2007. “As he continues to fail to register, it adds up in points so the prosecutor’s office will decide what, if any, extra time he’ll get,” said Troyer. West has been classified by the Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office as a high priority offender. If he is convicted on the new charge of failure to register as a sex offender, he could be sentenced to 43 months in prison. “Our High Priority Offender program was specifically designed to take repeat offenders off the streets. This is an objective crimefighting tool based on the offender’s history and specific offense to reduce crime by holding career criminals accountable,” said Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. West is being held on $150,000 bail.

Bulletin Board TACOMA DOME CELEBRATES 35TH BIRTHDAY The Tacoma Dome celebrates 35 years of world-class entertainment and events this month. The iconic venue has hosted more than 25 million people at thousands of events including the music industry’s top touring artists, championship athletic events, annual consumer shows, and community gatherings since it opened in April 1983. During its 35th year, the Dome will be enhanced as a 21st-century venue with $30 million in capital improvements focused on improving the fan experience. Beginning in June, all seating throughout the venue will be replaced with modern telescopic seating providing greater comfort for guests and quicker turnaround between events. Additional restrooms will be added and some existing restrooms will be upgraded. Safety and security enhancements will be made throughout the venue. Upgrades to food and beverage hospitality will also be announced. “Everyone we meet has a ‘Dome story’ to tell. Whether they played football here, attended their first concert, met their significant other, graduated with classmates, or established traditions at annual events with their families, the arena has provided a gathering place for memorable moments for so many,” said Kim Bedier, director for Tacoma Venues & Events, City of Tacoma. “With the support of the community and in alignment with Tacoma’s Vision 2025, this infrastructure investment ensures that the Tacoma Dome will continue to be viable, attract world-class touring entertainment and contribute positively to the economic impact and Tacoma community pride for years to come.” The Tacoma Dome opened April 21, 1983 with a fourday exhibition and series of special events called “Celebration ’83.” Entertainment was provided by The Lettermen and Rick Nelson, with free performances in the adjoining Convention Center, now called the Exhibition Hall. The first major full concert was David Bowie in August 1983, and the legendary venue has hosted renowned artists from U2 to Frank Sinatra, George Strait to Prince, Garth Brooks to Lionel Richie, Tina Turner to Lady Gaga, Ed Sheeran to Billy Joel, AC/DC to George Michael, Janet Jackson to Bruce Springsteen, and the list goes on. Owned by the City of Tacoma, the Dome is the largest indoor arena in Washington attracting more than 600,000 people each year with its diverse lineup of events. It has been consistently recognized as one of the top venues in North America and worldwide based on concert attendance by leading industry publications like Pollstar and Billboard. Upcoming events include Tacoma Guitar Festival (April 21-22), Shania Twain (May 3), Chris Young (May 19), Maroon 5 (May 30) and Justin Timberlake (Nov. 12-13). DR. GREGORY PLANCICH RETURNS FROM GUATEMALA MISSION TRIP Plancich Dental’s Dr. Gregory Plancich recently returned from his annual mission trip to Peronia, Guatemala with the nonprofit organization Open Wide Foundation. Open Wide Foundation at Spear Education operates year-round and coordinates dental teams from all corners of the United States for 35 weeks out of the year. This is a journey that Plancich and his son Bryce have embarked on for the past seven years. Open Wide Foundation’s mission is to bring oral health care to underserved communities worldwide. Through Open Wide Foundation, more than 125,000 patients have received dental treatment by more than 500 volunteers. In addition, more than 40 local dentists have been trained by the nonprofit. There are now more than nine open dental clinics in developing world countries. Through this most recent trip, Plancich and his team were able to help individuals like 5-year-old Jose, who had an infected tooth. If you would like to donate or learn more about Open Wide Foundation, visit openwidefoundation.org. HISTORIC PRESERVATION MONTH CELEBRATES ADAPTIVE REUSE Each May, the National Trust for Historic Preservation encourages local communities to celebrate National Historic Preservation Month. The City of Tacoma is excited to announce this year’s Historic Preservation Month theme of “Adaptive Reuse in Tacoma.” “This year’s theme of ‘Adaptive Reuse’ highlights historic preservation’s connections between environmental sustainability, neighborhood revitalization, and maintaining community character,” said Historic Preservation Officer Reuben McKnight. 2018 Historic Preservation Month Calendar Event details can be found on the new Historic Preservation Month website, hpmonthtacoma.com. Key programs include:

• Historic Preservation Month Proclamation: Tuesday, May 1, at 4:30 p.m., at the Tacoma Municipal Building in Council Chambers (747 Market St., first floor)

• Kick Off: Salvage Art Show and Iron Art Com-

petition: Saturday, May 5, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., at

Earthwise Architectural Salvage (628 E. 60th St.)

• Historic Preservation Month Reception and

Awards: Friday, May 18, from 6-8 p.m., at Stewart Middle School (5010 Pacific Ave.) 

• Bringing Tacoma’s History to Life: Youth Historical Fiction Reading: Monday, May 21, from 7-9 p.m., Black Kettle Bites and Brew (744 Market St.)

• Old Places, New Spaces: Adaptively Reused

Trails Bike Tour: Friday, May 25, from 5:15-7 p.m., starting and ending at 7 Seas Brewing (2101 Jefferson Ave.)

Tacoma is a regional and national example of successful adaptive reuse projects, featuring rehabilitated schools, warehouses, and commercial buildings throughout the downtown area and in neighborhoods. The theme also aligns with the City’s sustainability vision to conserve resources and achieve lasting and equitable prosperity. The month’s programming will showcase exciting new twists on Tacoma’s history. The kickoff event, a Salvage Art Show at Earthwise Architectural Salvage, will feature artists who are working with recycled materials – and visitors will have a chance to make their own art during the Iron Art Competition, a family-friendly timed sculpture competition. To register for the Iron Art Competition, visit hpmonthtacoma.com.  The annual bike ride is a partnership with Tacoma/Pierce County Bike Month, and tours adaptively reused trail corridors, including the Water Flume Line and Prairie Line trails. The lineup of events also features the winners of Tacoma’s first youth historical fiction competition, “Bringing Tacoma’s History to Life,” which gives young writers a chance to creatively interpret important moments in the city’s history.  “This year, we’re celebrating the opportunities for the future that Tacoma’s historic resources can offer,” said Assistant Historic Preservation Officer Lauren Hoogkamer. “Together with our city’s cultural and heritage organizations, our slate of programs encourages the public to acknowledge the past as we reimagine Tacoma’s future.” For more information, including a full roster of Historic Preservation Month activities, visit hpmonthtacoma.com or contact Hoogkamer at LHoogkamer@ cityoftacoma.org or (253) 591-5254. BIKE MONTH HOLDS A VARIETY OF EVENTS For more than a decade Bike Month has been raising awareness of local bicycling resources. This month long celebration is back in May 2018 and residents in Tacoma and Pierce County will once again enjoy a wide variety of bicycle-related activities and events.  Bike Month kicks off with the 10th annual Tacoma Bike Swap at University of Puget Sound (North Union Avenue and North 14th Street) on Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is the place to buy, sell and trade new and used bicycles, along with accessories like helmets, trailers and riding gear. Local businesses, nonprofit organizations, and bicycling experts will be on hand to answer questions about bike maintenance, where to ride, and how to connect with other riders. Bike Month events include:

• Bike Month Proclamation: Tuesday, May 1, at 5

p.m., at the Tacoma Municipal Building in Council Chambers (747 Market St., first floor)

• Bike to Market Day: Thursday, May 3, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Broadway Farmers Market (Broadway Street between South 9th and South 11th streets)

• National Bike to School Day: On Thursday, May

10, thousands of students, families, community partners, and elected officials around the country will celebrate the benefits of biking and walking to school during this all-day event.

• Bike to a Better Tacoma: Wednesday, May 16,

from 4:30-6:30 p.m., at 7 Seas Brewing (2101 Jefferson Ave.)

• Bike to Work Day: Friday, May 18, from 7-10 a.m. at People’s Park (900 S. Martin Luther King, Jr. Way)

• Old Places, New Spaces: Adaptively Reused

Trails Bike Tour: Friday, May 25, from 5:15-7 p.m., starting and ending at 7 Seas Brewing (2101 Jefferson Ave.)

Back again is the Bike Everywhere Challenge. Participants are entered to win a number of exciting prizes. This May, ride a bike for a trip to the park, library, grocery store or other destination and log these trips for a chance to win. Visit PierceTrips.com to learn more. To learn about Bike Month programming and how to get involved, visit cityoftacoma.org/BikeMonth, or contact Active Transportation Coordinator Meredith Soniat SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A8


Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

Community comes together for Flames of Recovery open house

TOP STORIES ON

tacomaweekly.com

 KEEP OUR PROSECUTOR KICKOFF CONCERT FOR LINDQUIST  TMP’S ‘CATCH ME IF YOU CAN’ HAS LEGS  TACOMA WELCOMES SISTER CITY FRIENDS FROM FRANCE  EFFORT RAISES DOUGH TO REHAB FORMER BAKERY  NORTHWEST POTTER RICK MAHAFFEY FEATURED AT TCC GALLERY EXHIBIT

PHOTOS BY MATT NAGLE

(Left) Welcoming visitors, like Fife Mayor Kim Roscoe (right) were (from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Member Sylvia Miller, Flames of Recovery Coordinator Linda Dillon, and the tribe’s Community and Family Services Director Jody Brooks. (Above) Despite the falling rain, folks turned out in big numbers to enjoy a barbeque lunch and learn more about the tribe’s efforts to help the homeless. By Matt Nagle

matt@tacomaweekly.com

The Puyallup Tribe’s Flames of Recovery center for the homeless held an open house on April 13 to say hello to the neighborhood. Having officially opened this past summer in the heart of Portland Avenue’s homeless community (1437 E. 31st St.), the Flames of Recovery staff and the homeless clients who access its services have been working hard to transform this residential house into a full-service center offering a wealth of assistance for homeless folks, both Native and non-Native alike. Greeted by the delicious scent of fired-up barbecue grills, visitors to the open house were treated to an amazing lunch, with sandwiches, fried chicken, homemade potato salad, hot dogs, hamburgers…it was indeed a feast as only the Puyallup Tribe can do it prepared by members of the Medicine Creek Riders motorcycle club and its President Anthony Bowen, along with Puyallup tribal members Theresa Villagomez and Ginger Dillon. Visitors mingled and learned about all that Flames of Recovery has to offer. Flames of Recovery is an extension of the Puyallup Tribe’s commitment to helping the homeless, which goes back years, with Puyallup Tribal Councilwoman Sylvia Miller leading the charge. She was at the open house that day, and told the crowd of what a special person Flames of Recovery Coordinator Linda Dillon is – the perfect woman for the job since she had already been caring for the homeless in her neighborhood at her own house, and was once homeless and addicted herself. Now she’s celebrating five years of sobriety, and had dedicated her life to helping others achieve the same life victory. “She knows what their needs are,” Councilwoman Miller said. “She helps build their self-esteem up so they can get back into society. That’s what Linda does and they are so appreciative of her. They’d do anything for her. She is the natural individual for this because she’s been there (homeless). You have to have a lot of compassion to do this.” Puyallup Councilman James Rideout recalled the times when Linda used her own backyard for AA meetings. “Before this was even developed, I watched Linda have so many people in her backyard for recovery – rows and rows of people. We took notice of that as a Tribe to put something together to aid our own community right here in our backyard. Flames of Recovery is an instrumental piece of continuous work.” Community Family Services Director Jody Brooks states that she is, “excited to be working with Linda and to see the passion with which Linda approaches the work

she is doing with the Flames of Recovery. It is truly an answer to prayer for many of our Puyallup Tribal members and tribal community members that find themselves homeless and in need of basic human needs such as a clean shower, a warm meal, a place to gather among compassionate workers and friends. AA meetings are held each week on Friday night from 8-9 p.m.” For her homeless clients, Linda Dillon takes them to get their drivers license or I.D. card; she helps them get haircuts and clean clothes for job interviews; helps them get glasses if needed; she helps them get food handlers permits to broaden their employability; she provides assistance with filing for Social Security; and if clients need and want treatment, they’re given the opportunity to say yes to that and Linda will stay by their side. Whatever their needs are, Linda is there for them. She has the house open every day, serving hot, nutritious food for breakfast and dinner. Guests can visit the clothing bank, wash their clothes, take a warm shower, get hygiene products, rest their weary feet on comfortable couches, eat good meals and take advantage of the many additional resources Flames of Recovery offers as it is an extension of the Puyallup Tribe’s Community and Family Services Department, which assists tribal members in accessing treatment programs and removing barriers to healthy living. Flames of Recovery enhances its program by partnering with other tribal personnel and departments including the Tribe’s Community Domestic Violence Advocacy Program (CDVAP), and PTHA for example. CDVAP staff was there that day and presented Linda with several thoughtful gifts to show their appreciation for her. “We want to gift you…for being that pioneering spirit to do the work that you’re doing because it is much needed work,” said CDVAP Community Domestic Violence Advocate Jennifer Caldwell-Hoskins. “It always takes someone willing to step out of their comfort zone to be that first forefront runner, and that’s been you. We just want to express from our heart how much we appreciate your program and what you do and the collaboration you offer for us to help with the work that needs to be done.” Tribal Council also gifted Linda Dillon, Jody Brooks and Teresa Cruell, Community and Family Services assistant director. Witnesses to the open house also received a special offering for being there. “Too many times, our employees don’t get appreciated enough,” Sylvia Miller said. “I know that sometimes Council gets too busy to say how important you guys are, but you really are and we appreciate you so much. We appreciate everything you do every day to help this community.”

 LEAGUE RACES HEATING UP AROUND TACOMA  DAFFODIL PARADE RINGS IN SPRING DESPITE STORMY SKIES  TACOMA NONPROFITS BENEFIT FROM A BOOST IN DONATIONS, VOLUNTEERISM  MARY MART COMPLETES YOUR 6TH AVE. EXPERIENCE  PROSECUTOR LINDQUIST SPEAKS TO STUDENTS ABOUT SCHOOL VIOLENCE

Tacoma Weekly News® LLC P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma, WA 98417 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Dave Davison / dave@tacomaweekly.com Andrew Fickes / andrew@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chance Pittenger, Josiah Rutledge, Barb Rock COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer WEB DEVELOPERS Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.


Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

BE WELL

inside & out

Cost Less Prescriptions offers neighborhood services, modern convenience Cost Less Prescriptions, located in the heart of the Southside’s business strip of Pacific Avenue, is an unapologetic throwback to a different era, a time before big box stores and national drug store chains. A pharmacy has operated on the site since the 1950s, after all. “We have people who are in their 60s and 70s who come in here and say they remember getting candy here when they were kids,” said Lead Pharmacist Mike Glockling. “We know about 75 percent of our customers by name and often have their prescriptions ready when they walk in the door.” Cost Less is a general store for the modern age that offers community services under one roof, and where the employees know the names of their customers more often than not. The 5,000-square-foot store has a candy counter, purses, costume jewelry, select toys, knickknacks, candles and beauty supplies, a row of greeting cards, baby supplies, novelty and one-of-akind gifts, snacks and over-the-counter medical items, a post office and a copy center as well as a full-service pharmacy that draws customers from as far away as Federal Way and Roy.

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Cost Less Prescriptions not only offers over-the-counter and prescription medications but also gifts, toys, candles and cards.

Pharmacists also give price quotes for people shopping around for their medications, particularly when their insurance doesn’t cover what they need. The pharmacy accepts most health insurance plans as well as also provides a service that mails prescriptions to customers who would rather not drive. “That is something a lot of places don’t do,” Glockling said. “That is

COST LESS

PRESCRIPTIONS TACOMA Where everything actually does Cost Less

Serving the surrounding neighborhood and western Washington since 1981 • United States Post Office substation inside the store • Tremendous selection of greeting cards for all seasons, special occasions, and birthdays • Wide variety of gifts and jewelry

probably something that sets us apart.” The store can special order items too, from medical gloves to a customer’s favorite cough drops or gift, usually with a one-day turnaround. “People like it here because it is homey,” said clerk Sandy Sim, who has worked at the store for 34 years. “They feel comfortable here.” The store’s five-star rating on Yelp includes a collection of customer reviews that talk about why they drive out of their way to get their prescriptions filled there instead of a box store. “Super friendly staff! Waited less than 10 minutes for them to fill my prescription, and there were four other people in front of me,” one reviewer wrote. “I have to say this was way better than waiting forever at Walgreens! Plus there is a great gift shop to browse while you wait!

Prescriptions not covered by insurance really did cost less here – about $40 less than Walgreens! They have made me a happy and loyal customer! Next time you have to wait in line for your prescription, I advise you come check this place out!” Another reviewer wrote: “I cannot say enough nice things about the staff at Cost Less Pharmacy. They have taken customer service to the next level on several occasions. It is so refreshing after countless issues with Target and grocery store pharmacies, where you feel like a number without a voice, to be so well taken care of. I almost don’t know how to react to being treated with kindness and compassion. If I could give them a 10-star rating I would!” Cost Less Prescriptions is located at 5431 Pacific Ave. Call (253) 474-9493 for more information.

With superb customer service, knowledgeable and friendly staff, and great pricing, contact us today so we can help you with your pharmaceutical, gift, and post office needs.

Medication

Our Price

Walgreens

rosuvastatin (Crestor) 40mg #90 sumatriptan (Imitrex) 100mg #9 zolpidem (Ambien) 10mg #30 metoprolol ER (Toprol XL) 50mg #90 quetiapine (Seroquel) 100mg #90 azithromycin (Z-Pak) 250mg #6 aripiprazole (Abilify) 10mg #30 telmisartan (Micardis) 40mg #30 Lantus insulin vial #1

$54.99 $18.99 $12.99 $49.99 $35.99 $18.99 $19.99 $23.99 $255.99

$575.69 $159.99 $53.99 $104.89 $521.99 $36.99 $953.99 $159.99 $283.99

**Cash prices effective on date of publishing and may be subject to change

Stop by or call us today for a cash price quote and to transfer your prescriptions to our pharmacy! 5431 Pacific Ave. Tacoma, WA 98408 Phone: 253-474-9493 | Fax: 253-474-2369 email: costlessrx@hotmail.com

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Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor,

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY MILT PRIGGEE • WWW.MILTPRIGGEE.COM

Guest Editorials

THE MOB BOSS ORDERS A HIT AND A PARDON

By Kary Love

Well, it appears Syria and Russia were on the verge of defeating the USA-backed “rebels” and the U.S. mob boss had stated the USA was leaving when Assad decided to use chemical weapons on his “own” people. How curious. On the verge of victory, Assad decides to cross the “red line” and use chemical weapons on his own people and give the U.S. mob boss an excuse to reinvade. So, Assad is not only a cruel dictator but incredibly stupid as well. On the verge of victory and U.S. standing down, Assad shoots himself in the foot with chemical weapons! Who woulda thunk it? Or maybe Assad was just relying on the old saw that to rally “your” people a leader needs a foreign threat or invasion. So, by using chemical weapons on his “own” people, Assad was able to renew the threat of U.S. invasion. Maybe Assad ain’t so dumb. The U.S. mob boss, in possession of the world’s largest chemical weapons arsenal in violation of the laws of humanity, is so offended by Assad’s stupidity, acting in complete disregard of U.S. and international law (not to mention his “solemn” pre-election promises), decided to order a hit on more Syrian people because pre-emptively killing them would protect them from Assad killing them. Being dead, they were beyond the reach of their “animal” leader. Killing the people of Syria in order to save them, the U.S. mob boss continued a long and noble practice of the USA beginning at least in Vietnam and possibly stretching back as far as the extermination of the “red man” domestically. And, like all mob bosses, the capo de capo did not get his hands dirty, relying instead on his minions to carry out the crime, just in case “law enforcement” actually came for him, the minions would take the fall while the boss skates. Meanwhile, the U.S. mob boss took advantage of the distraction caused by the hit on Syria to “pardon” Scooter Libby, Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, from his felony conviction by a jury for four counts of perjury, obstruction of justice, and making false statements. Hoping no one would notice, the mob boss made it clear that he does not know Scooter and really had no dog in the fight regarding his “pardon.” The U.S. mob boss wanted it known this magnanimous act was simply

kingpin “mercy” with no ulterior motive. Like noble kings of old, the U.S. mob boss simply wanted to do justice. The fact that the special prosecutor appeared to be getting closer and closer to the boss, indicting associates, searching the offices and home of the capo’s consiglieri, had nothing to do with the “pardon.” Sending a message to his loyal compatriots that they should keep their oath of silence and loyalty to the Boss despite the special prosecutor’s threats would result in their own pardons down the road had absolutely nothing to do with it. No, the mob boss was merely doing the right thing out of the magnanimity of his own soul. Yes, James Comey, former Director of the FBI, has publicly identified the U.S. mob boss as a nuevo cosa nostra kind of guy, but others had discerned the similarity long before. And, if we are being honest, the latest Godfather is just another in a long line of U.S. mob bosses running “the business” while violating the Constitution and international law with impunity. Nothing new here. It is sort of a “the Emperor’s New Clothes” moment in that so many for so long have refused to see the truth. It is actually refreshing to see this moment of actual news among the “fake news” so long extant: the “fake” news that somehow the U.S. mob boss was a creature of law, of the Constitution, and the chief law enforcement officer of the republic, while in fact running a criminal enterprise with its many arms reaching into corrupt undertakings all around the world. It is actually a relief. Rather than having to pretend that the USA is a “nation of law, not men,” with all the legalistic contortions that has required, Americans are now free to admit the truth. Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Having liberated the office of the president from the boundaries imposed by the Constitution, treaties and law, Americans stand indicted of having acquiesced in the triumph of power and corruption. The emperor has no clothes. The gloves are coming off. And “all options are on the table.” Is this a great country or what? Kary Love is a Michigan attorney who has defended nuclear resisters, including some desperado nuns, in court for decades and will on occasion use blunt force satire or actual legal arguments to make his argument.

The April 6 editorial by Sally C. Pipes employed a worn out scare tactic to dissuade public interest in broadening affordable access to healthcare. While it was disclosed that Pipes is CEO of Pacific Research Institute, a California-based free-market think tank, my Google search revealed more. An article in Public Forum in 2012 cited investigative work published in Mother Jones that discussed her extraordinary spending of $ 1 million (¼ of the institute’s annual budget) to employ a public relations firm to write books, papers, and articles in her name. Mother Jones also mentioned she holds no known academic credentials that are customary for a prominent member of a “think tank.” So, the editorial published in our little hometown newspaper was not submitted by a neighbor down the street but is instead part of a massive, well-funded, propaganda machine that places messages (in a coordinated fashion) in media of all sorts - local, regional, and national. Why? Money! As of August 2017, “Combined, the nation's top six health insurers reported $6 billion in adjusted profits for the second quarter...far outpacing the overall S&P 500 health care sector’s growth….” (www. cnbc.com/2017/08/05/top-health-insurers-profit-surge29-percent-to-6-billion-dollars.html) Yes, you read that correctly...profits for one quarter! The scare-tactic story of a single-payer healthcare system being overwhelmed due to a national flu crisis misplaces blame on the source of funding rather than disease. To prevent and treat disease we needed “universal” access, not limited access only for those who can afford it. Further, Pipes fails to mention the multitudes of patients who wait for hours and hours to receive emergency care in our for-profit, market-based system. Speaking of funding a healthcare system, according to an April 2017 report, annual salaries of top paid CEOs in the “market-based” business of health insurance were paid: $22 million, $19.7 million, $18.7 million, $17.8 million, $16.5 million, $15.3 million, $10 million, and the last place winner was paid a paltry $9.3 million. (www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/health-insurance-ceopay-tops-out-at-22m-2016) Perhaps Sally Pipes can afford to chip-in on these salaries but most folks I know struggle to pay their insurance premium to these “for-profit” companies. While the investor class and big corporations are poised to reap the benefits of the recent tax cuts, the rest of us remain subjugated by their “free market.” By-the-way, whatever happened to Obama’s idea of a not-for-profit, co-op insurance company? I supposed the lobbyists and “research institutes” worked to make that idea disappear. Readers should consider Pipes’ position as part of a much larger agenda to privatize Medicare, U.S. Post Office, Veterans Administration, Dept. of Defense, Dept. of Education and much more – this, under the banner of free-market capitalism (read: transfer of taxpayer monies to the wealthy). Remember, “free” is not necessarily “fair” and “access” to healthcare is not necessarily “affordable.” Thomas Brooks Tacoma, WA

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DOING JUSTICE AND UNDOING INJUSTICE EVERY DAY, ALL DAY

By Paul Pastor Pierce County Sheriff

The following are the comments Pierce County Sheriff Paul Pastor gave at the department’s annual awards ceremony recently. “We are here today to recognize and honor people who have especially distinguished themselves over the past year – people who serve in an agency full of people who regularly distinguish themselves. People in this department, those who carry badges and those who do not, show a level of dedication that is recognized and respected throughout the state and the region. It is a level of dedication that tremendously benefits the residents of Pierce County. Does this mean we are a perfect agency? No, it does not. But I have worked for five different agencies and I have worked among dozens of others throughout the United States. I have never worked with better, stronger, more dedicated people. Today we acknowledge and honor the strength of character and resolution of action that make the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department what it is. We are here today to recognize 48 people. They include: • Corrections deputies, who recognized inmates in distress and intervened quickly to save their lives. • Corrections deputies, who prevented inmates from committing suicide and who chased down inmates bent on escape.

• Deputy Daniel McCartney, who chose to intervene to

stop perpetrators in a home invasion robbery. As well as those who assisted him after he had been critically wounded. And a chaplain who guided the McCartney family through the terrible loss of a husband and father. • A detective who is at the cutting edge of solving major crimes cases using information technology. • A deputy who went above and beyond to help a mentally ill, homeless individual get off the street. • Honor Guard deputies stood up to help Tacoma Police Department when their officer was killed in late 2016. These people advanced our department mission, which is: “To protect life and property, to uphold rights and to build stronger, more civil and livable communities partnering with the people we serve.” And, they moved us closer to our ultimate mission of doing justice and undoing injustice. They displayed our core values of integrity, responsibility, respect, courage and compassion. Values.... Now there is a term that seems almost old fashioned. In today’s civic and business and political environment, we might ask, “Where do we find real values in America?” If you want to see values in action then look at the people we acknowledge today, because values of integrity and responsibility and respect and courage and compassion are alive and well in the way they serve this community. We know that this is a difficult time to carry out our mission. This is a time when we face regular challenges to what we do and how we do it. This is a time when our demand is growing locally. We do not live in a sleepy

little rural county. We serve in a large, complex urbanized county with more than its share of crime. We have seen a spike in serious crime over the last 12 weeks. While I do not expect this spike to continue, our large volume of work is likely to grow as the population of the county grows. Through it all, some people tell us that we have a difficult, and thankless and heart-wrenching job. To be sure, we have all encountered hard and heart-wrenching incidents. We all have stories. But do not ever view us as victims. We are people who have volunteered for and accepted a special level of responsibility. We have all asked for the privilege of standing up for people in the communities we serve. We have asked for the difficult and complex and absolutely necessary work of making a moral difference in the community. True, this involves exposing ourselves to risk. It involves sorting out the right thing to do often under chaotic...and, too often, under very dangerous circumstances. Is it a hard job? Oh yes, it is. It is at once difficult and heart wrenching and a deeply honorable privilege. Today, you will hear about people who rise above challenges – people who, often, don’t have time or resources or sufficient staffing but they step up anyway. They work long hours, they stretch themselves to the limit, they face all of this in order to avert crisis, to provide help and to save lives. Today you will hear about people who have stepped up on behalf of others – people who, in the face of difficulty, do tremendous things. People who show tremendous dedication and heart on a regular basis; on the street and in the jail and at all points in between. Today you will hear about honor, and hope and values-based accomplishments.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

TRUMP COMMITS TO HANDSOFF POLICY TOWARD CANNABIS Puyallup Tribe praises senator for helping ensure that medicinal treatments and research can continue unimpeded

He continued, “Our country’s very essence is based on states’ rights. Both Washington and Colorado have led the way on the legalization of cannabis, which has been an economic boon for both states.” There is a backstory to this response from Trump in that Gardner had placed a hold on all Department of Justice (DOJ) nominees until he received a commitment that Colorado’s rights would not be infringed. After positive discussions with DOJ, Gardner lifted some of his holds but kept the rest in place until he received a full commitment that the guidelines of the Cole Memo would be respected. “Because of these commitments, I have informed the Administration that I will be lifting my remaining holds on Department of Justice nominees,” Gardner said in his statement. “My colleagues and I are continuing to work diligently on a bipartisan legislative solution that can pass Congress and head to the President’s desk to deliver on his campaign position.”

By Matt Nagle

matt@tacomaweekly.com

In 2013, former U.S. Attorney General James M. Cole issued what came to be called the “Cole Memorandum” regarding enforcement of federal drug laws in the wake of states legalizing cannabis. In short, the Cole Memorandum called for a hands-off approach toward states that vote for legalization, rather than spend federal dollars enforcing cannabis prohibition under the Controlled Substances Act. In early 2018, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded the Cole Memorandum. As Sessions wrote in a memo to federal prosecutors: “In deciding which marijuana activities to prosecute under these laws with the (Justice) Department's finite resources, prosecutors should follow the well-established principles that govern all federal prosecutions. These principles require federal prosecutors deciding which cases to prosecute to weigh all relevant considerations of the crime, the deterrent effect of criminal prosecution, and the cumulative impact of particular crimes on the community.” While not directly calling for prosecutions, Sessions certainly did nothing to appease fears that the Trump administration would crack down on legalized cannabis. That notion has existed as a sort of dark cloud over the industry lately, borne on fears of the unknown as far as which way Trump would ultimately swing on the issue. Now good news has come to light in that Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado received a commitment from President Trump to leave cannabis-friendly states alone. “Since the campaign, President Trump has consistently supported states’ rights to decide for themselves how best to approach marijuana,” Gardner wrote in a statement. “Late Wednesday (April 11), I received a commitment from the President that the Department of Justice’s rescission of the Cole memo will not impact Colorado’s legal marijuana industry. Furthermore, President Trump has assured me that he will support a federalism-based legislative solution to fix this states’ rights issue once and for all.” This was later confirmed by White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders. “I applaud Senator Cory Gardner,” said Puyallup Tribal Chairman Bill Sterud, who has been a lifelong champion of cannabis legalization and a vocal advocate of its medicinal properties. “The medical research in all the different areas that cannabis can help is just beginning, and that’s what I’m really excited about. It will save lives.”

During his trip to Washington, D.C. last month, Chairman Sterud discussed the future of cannabis with Senator Cory Gardner (shown here) and other elected officials.

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TRIBE BRINGS NATURAL HEALING In addition to the Tribe’s highly successful Commencement Bay Cannabis retail shop in Fife, the Tribe has established Qwibil, Inc., a new corporation founded as a natural healing, consultation and research center for all-natural healing, including medical cannabis. “Qwibil” is a word from the Tribe’s indigenous language Lushootseed meaning “to fix oneself mentally, physically or spiritually.” According to the Qwibil statement of purpose, patients are eagerly seeking education and direction in using their cannabis medicine, and many would prefer ongoing, professional oversight to safely treat their medical conditions. The Qwibil Clinic is being created, in part, to provide patients with direct access to providers who are not only extensively knowledgeable in cannabis medicine, but compassionate in their approach and commitment to helping patients in their pursuits of achieving optimal wellness through cannabis therapies and other natural lifestyle issues. To fulfill this commitment, the Tribe has hired Dr. Xochitl Palomino, ND for one day per week to see patients. He hopes to begin seeing patients starting June 7. (For those who would like to schedule an appointment once the doctor begins seeing patients, call (253) 5737850 to sign up.) This Research Center side of Qwibil will provide publishable medical evidence on the efficacy and safety of the methods being used in the treatment of cannabis for all medical conditions starting with alcohol and opiate tapering for withdrawals.

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Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

Changes afoot in Tacoma Mall neighborhoods

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

The draft of a subarea plan for the Tacoma Mall area of the city faces a public hearing next week as the city tries to balance commercial growth in the area with residential living. By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Residents, businesses and owners of property around the Tacoma Mall can learn more about, and comment on, the city’s subarea plan to manage growth and livability in the area at a public hearing on April 24. Tacoma City Council will hold a public hearing on the 280-page plan at 5:15 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, in the Tacoma Municipal Building Council Chambers. The draft plan is then set for a study session and first vote on May 1, with a final adoption the following week. The draft plan, which has been developing over the last four years, includes a vision for that 575-acre neighborhood of the city as well as goals and action plans to boost economic growth in the area as well as curb congestion and increase quality of life for its residents. The Tacoma Mall neighborhood is home to 4,650 people and supports some 9,749 jobs, making it the fastest growing economic area of the city. The plan sets the targets of adding 8,385 new jobs and 8,887 additional residents in the next 20 years. That translates into about 3 million square feet of new commercial space and 4 million square feet of residential space in a neighborhood that has few vacant lands available. Key goals include promoting job growth and the area economy, providing transportation choices, improving livability and community health, protecting the environment, and empowering stakeholders to craft their own community solutions. What makes the Tacoma Mall subarea plan is that the comprehensive look at planned changes in the area actually dives deep into the four distinct neighborhoods within the area: the mall, Lincoln Heights, Northwest and Madison. The planning area is bordered by South Tacoma Way to the west and north; Interstate 5 to the east; and South 48th and South 49th Streets to the south. “There are some aspects that hold all the areas together and some that are very specific to the particular neighborhood,” said Associate Planner Elliott Barnett. “This is really trying to do a lot in one document.” Suggested street redesigns, buffer-

“The vision is for a compact, pedestrian-friendly, urban mixed-use neighborhood with a high quality of life, which includes access to healthy lifestyle choices, services and efficient multimodal transportation options. In addition to accommodating growth, the proposals include actions to address long-standing neighborhood issues.” – Elliott Barnett, Associate Planner

Proposed subarea plan character districts.

MAP COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

zone landscaping, population and job projections and zoning changes are detailed for each of the neighborhoods as well as the planning area in general. In general, the draft plan reduces the Regional Growth Center boundary along the northwestern boundary, increases building heights and residential density in the Madison neighborhood, calls for bike and walking paths as well as supports efforts for more parks and open spaces while expanding the job-center boundaries around the Tacoma Mall. In total, about $100 million in capital improvements in the area are in the works during the next 20 years. “By 2040 the Tacoma Mall Neighborhood will be a thriving center of regional significance and a distinctive, connected, livable and healthy place with a wide range of opportunities for all people to live, work, invest and fulfill their potential,” according to the draft plan. “Already an important employment and population center, the neighborhood is expected to receive a significant portion of the city’s future housing and employment growth. The vision is for a compact, pedestrianfriendly, urban mixed-use neighborhood with a high quality of life, which includes access to healthy lifestyle choices, services and efficient multimodal transportation options. In addition to accommodating growth, the proposals include actions to address long-standing neighborhood issues.” The largest single new development is the Tacoma Mall, built in 1965 and slated for changes as shopping trends around the nation shift away from enclosed retail hubs to more lifestyle and entertainment hubs. The Sears store at the Tacoma Mall, for example, has announced plans to leave as the iconic national retailer faces struggles with connecting with modern shoppers. The mall itself is working on redevelopment plans. To review the draft Tacoma Mall Neighborhood Subarea Plan, visit tacomamallneighborhood.com or call (253) 591-5389. Written comments may also be submitted at the hearing, or beforehand to the City Clerk’s Office at cityclerk@ cityoftacoma.org or 733 Market Street, Room 11, Tacoma, WA 98402, by 4 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24.


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2 at MSoniat@cityoftacoma.org or call (253) 591-5380. TACOMAN USES SPECIAL NUMBERS TO WIN POWERBALL A man from Tacoma is celebrating a $50,000 Powerball win from the drawing on Saturday, April 7. He purchased the ticket from QFC in Parkland (11104 Pacific Ave. S). The winner said that he had to check the numbers three or four times to believe he had actually won. Once the initial shock wore off, he shared the news with his granddaughter. The winner told lottery officials that has a very special set of numbers that he uses when he plays Powerball. “I use the numbers that my late wife picked. I’d like to think she was looking down on me and helped out a little on this win,” he said. The longtime Tacoma resident, who is now retired, spent time in the military as well as working for the post office and railroads. The winner plans to use his winnings to help pay for his granddaughter’s college tuition. Proceeds from Washington’s Lottery benefit the Washington Opportunity Pathways Account, providing grants to college students statewide. To learn more about Washington’s Lottery, its beneficiaries and to review all up-todate winning numbers, please visit walottery.com. STUDENTS RESEARCH HISTORIC AREAS FOR PROJECT The City of Tacoma’s Historic Preservation Office is partnering with the University of Washington on a Livable City Year project to identify historic resources in South and East Tacoma.  For this project, graduate and undergraduate students are researching the histories of two neighborhoods: McKinley Hill in East Tacoma, and the Edison neighborhood along South Tacoma Way. Students will identify and research historic buildings, sites, and context in these two neighborhoods. As a culmination of their research, they will make recommendations about the potential for National Register Historic District or individual landmark nominations. “This is an exciting opportunity to highlight the rich histories of South and East Tacoma,” said Assistant Historic Preservation Officer Lauren Hoogkamer. Currently, Tacoma has seven National Register Historic Districts, all in downtown, North, or West Tacoma. National Register District status acknowledges the historic significance of a neighborhood, but does not impact design review at the local level. In addition to archival research, the community is invited to share neighborhood photos and history at two upcoming events: EAST TACOMA WALKING TOUR AND COMMUNITY MEET AND EAT Saturday, April 14, from 1-3:30 p.m. From 1-2:30 p.m., attend a walking tour of McKinley Hill in East Tacoma, led by Pretty Gritty Tours. Meet outside of Top of Tacoma (3529 McKinley Ave. E.) From 2:30-3:30 p.m., share information about the neighborhood with student researchers at a Meet and Eat event. Bring neighborhood photos or stories to share. Destiny Middle School (1301 E. 34th St.) To learn more, visit the Historic East Tacoma Walking Tour event page.   SOUTH TACOMA WAY WALKING TOUR AND COMMUNITY MEET AND EAT Saturday, April 28, from 3-5:30 p.m. Attend a walking tour of the Edison neighborhood along South Tacoma Way, led by Pretty Gritty Tours. Meet outside of Edison City Alehouse (5602 S. Lawrence St.).

t Opioids From page A1

and other low-income families at risk of homelessness. The theme of the evening was “Our City, Our Success,” exemplifying Woodards’ approach to life and leadership. She closed the address by asking audience members: What will you do to help make Tacoma successful? “I challenge all of you to harness the unparalleled power of your passion for Tacoma,” Woodards said. One of the significant announcements that carried a lot of weight, and may have gone unnoticed in the moment because of its rosecolored delivery, was when Woodards mentioned the City’s participation in the City-County delegation headed to Boston in May for the National Mayors’ Institute on Opioids, hosted by the National League of Cities. A press release issued by the City the day after Woodards’ address explained Tacoma’s participation further and shed more light on the significance of this partnership. The City of Tacoma will be part of a five-member delegation representing organizations in Tacoma and Pierce County.

t Light Rail From page A1

to collaborating with Sound Transit to develop a link light rail system that respects the Puyallup Tribe’s fish, land and people, and ensures the sustainability of its natural resources. For example, Bryan said the link rail will cross over the Puyallup River, which is a significant resource for the Tribe. In terms of economic impacts that a link light rail will have on the Tribe, Bryan said the new line will be a real jobs creator. Already, the Tribe is the sixth largest employer

Joining the delegation are Conor McCarthy, at-large Tacoma City Councilmember, who, along with Pierce County Councilmember Derek Young, has been part of the County-City Opioid Task Force convened last year; Dr. Anthony L-T Chen, director of health at Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department; Patti Jackson-Kidder, chief of Pierce County Sheriff’s Department Corrections Bureau; and Jason Escareno, Young’s designee and senior human services legislative analyst. The Tacoma-Pierce County delegation is one of six delegations selected nationwide by the National League of Cities, and the only delegation located west of the Mississippi. Tacoma-Pierce County’s participation underscores the gravity of the opioid crisis in the region. In 2016, the county experienced a rate of 10.8 opioid overdose deaths per 100,000, a figure that surpassed the statewide rate of 9.4. Research shows high school seniors in the county are some of the hardest hit by the crisis, indicating 5 percent in 2016 citing they used pain medication to get high. In that same year, 8 percent of high school seniors admitted to using someone else’s prescription. Tacoma-Pierce County will join the cities of Knoxville, Tenn.; Madison, Wis.; Huntington, West

Virginia; Manchester; New Hampshire; and New Bedford, Mass. The immersive three-day event taking place May 9-11 will be followed by 12 months of professional assistance tailored to each participating city’s needs. Woodards and others in the delegation are hoping the outcome will help to enhance local efforts already underway. “Tacoma Councilmember McCarthy and Pierce County Council Member Young have demonstrated great leadership on the CountyCity Task Force convened last year, and I hope the resources provided by the Mayor’s Institute on Opioids will support the good work they are doing with other leaders to address the harm caused by opioids in Tacoma and Pierce County,” said Woodards in a written statement. Dr. Chen at the health department is encouraged by this opportunity to partner with other communities in the nation rattled by the opioid crisis. “Public health interventions such as secure medicine return, access to treatment, and safe needle exchange support safe communities and save lives, but they are only the beginning,” he said. “We must work together to overcome this epidemic that is hurting our community.”

in Pierce County. “This station will provide new jobs to tribal members,” Bryan said. “Hundreds of tribal members are ready to work on this project.” Finally, Bryan said the Tribe plans to consider the link light rail extension and its impacts as it plans the ongoing expansion of its entertainment properties. Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards, in her remarks, said the arrival of link light rail to Tacoma could be part of the solution to improving affordability to city residents. No longer, she said, will residents have to commute long distances for work and waste time and money on congested roadways. Woodards

said link light rail will also attract new employers to the area, providing living-wage jobs to individuals who need it most. She urged all Tacoma residents to be involved in the planning process by attending open houses or commenting online. The first two open houses were held Tuesday at the Best Western Plus Tacoma Dome Hotel and Wednesday in Federal Way at Todd Beamer High School, respectively. A third will be held from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, April 24 at Fife Community Center, 2111 54th Avenue East. Those who cannot attend may comment online at tdlink.participate.online.

Share information about the neighborhood with student researchers at a Meet and Eat event. Bring neighborhood photos or stories to share. Venue and other event details will be announced on the event page. To learn more, visit the Historic South Tacoma Walking Tour event page at www.facebook.com/ events/1833820953584809. Contact the Historic Preservation Office at landmarks@cityoftacoma.org, or call Hoogkamer at (253) 591-5254. PANEL TO DISCUSS PUBLIC DEFENDER CRISIS The mounting crisis in funding of public defense in Pierce County and Washington will be the subject of a panel discussion at the University of WashingtonTacoma. It takes place on Thursday, April 26, 7 p.m. at the University Y Student Center Room 303, 1710 Market St. The event is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested at http://events.uw.edu/defenders. The headlines are alarming: “The human toll of America’s public defender crisis,” “A ‘Constitutional Crisis’ in Missouri’s Public-Defender System,” “Public Defender Meltdown in Louisiana.” The challenges of an under-funded public defense system are present here in Washington, according to Pierce County Councilmember Derek Young from Gig Harbor. “Washington is near the bottom in funding trial court public defense,” said Young. Washington’s counties, according to Young, are struggling with mounting costs of providing public defenders. “Twenty three states fully fund trial court public defense carried out at the local level. Most states provide more than 50 percent of the cost. In Washington, however, the Legislature has appropriated just 4 percent of the cost, leaving counties with the rest of the tab, regardless of the ability to pay,” said Young. The panel discussion, entitled “Funding Public Defenders: An Unfunded Mandate?” is organized by the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences’ Division of Politics, Philosophy & Public Affairs. Panelists will include Washington State Senator Steve O’Ban, Young, Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office Chief of Staff Dawn Farina, Pierce County Legal Assistant (and UW-Tacoma graduate) Kanani Palafox, Pierce County Superior Court Judge Elizabeth Martin, and Mary Kay High, the chief deputy of Pierce County’s Department of Assigned Counsel. The discussion will be introduced by Salvador A. Mungia, a partner at Tacoma law firm Gordon Thomas Honeywell, and moderated by Dr. Sarah Hampson, UWTacoma assistant professor of political science. In addition to spotlighting problems with Washington’s funding of the public defender system, the organizers hope the night’s conversation will generate concrete proposals for change. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Lincoln community garden site plan.

t Garden From page A1

afternoon picking from the fruit trees or blueberry and strawberry bushes without the need of a green thumb of their own. “We wanted the garden to serve the spectrum of interest,” Clousing said, noting that some neighbors already have gardens in their backyards while others have no green spaces of their own but have interest in working the soil while others just want access to fresh fruits and vegetables. The site itself was designed so

that TPU’s water main under the graden could be repaired or replaced in future years without much disruption to the garden itself. If this pilot project proves successful, the garden could expand to two nearby parcels and even similar utility-owned sites around the city. Tacoma is already home to more than 35 community gardens, including 11 on city-owned property. Gardens are managed by Metro Parks, churches, community groups, schools and universities, and many other organizations. The pilot project in Lincoln could expand that number. Change is also in the works elsewhere in the district, with traffic circles becoming flower beds

DIAGRAM COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

and landscaped patches as well as streets gaining flowers and signs to further create the sense of community pride and fuctionality. The second phase of the traffic revisions of South 38th Street, for example, will run through the fall and end with better traffic flows, utility improvements, curb and gutter additions, sidewalks, landscaping, lighting, pedestrian amenities and artwork to promote an economically thriving business district as well as reflect the diversity of the neighborhood. Community members interested in getting involved are asked to e-mail lincolndistrictgarden@ gmail.com.


Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

Home & Garden

LOOKING FOR A LOCAL FULL SERVICE NURSERY AND FIRST CLASS GIFT SHOP?

Look no further than Willow Tree Gardens in University Place Don’t miss Willow Tree Gardens’ annual Spring Open House, a weeklong event starting Saturday, April 21 and running through Sunday, April 29. Fantastic specials abound! In the gift shop all spring and summer clothing, scarves and purses are 20 percent off. Also, all jewelry will be 20-75 percent off. The nursery is offering 30 percent off a fantastic selection of everyone’s favorite plants – lavender, Miss Kim lilac, variegated dogwood, lemon cypress, alpine strawberry, hydrangeas and so many more. The nursery offers a vast array of plants, everything from the tried and true to fun and funky tropicals. Their succulent selection is phenomenal, with a myriad of varieties to choose from. All their plants come from local growers in Washington and Oregon and all are acclimated to our climate before going up for sale. If the plant you are looking for is there, it’s ready to be planted in your yard no matter what time of year. What to say of the gift shop? It’s been around for 35 years, starting out as the Apple Crate. When the mother and daughter team of Marilyn and Jenny Zimmerman bought the nursery, they changed the name and combined the two. The weeping willow at the entrance to the gift shop was their inspiration, hence Willow Tree Gardens. Both have a studied eye for creating displays that will inspire your imagination and turn your home into an oasis. Christmas at Willow Tree Gardens is a spectacular event, with more than 40 adorned Christmas trees and

PHOTO COURTESY OF WILLOW TREE GARDENS

As the Willow Tree Gardens motto says, “Where good taste and Mother Nature combine!”

thousands of Christmas decorations to choose from. The farmhouse and greenhouse are transformed to a winter wonderland. For all you ladies out there, Christmas Ladies Night is an extravaganza you must not miss! You’ll not find a more engaging staff than the fine folks at Willow Tree Gardens – talented, friendly, knowledgeable and always happy to make your Willow Tree Gardens experience the best ever. Their nursery crew of Jenny, Aimee, Parker, Cori, Beth and Ginny can’t be beat! Need help in the gift shop? Just ask Berta. You’ll not find a better designer with an eye for excellence than she. Willow Tree Gardens offers a design and land-

scape service year round. Stop in and speak with Jenny; she will go over the details with you, or email her at rhodydodie@gmail.com. Don’t miss out on upcoming events, like Sip and Plant classes and the annual Customer Appreciation Weekend! As the Willow Tree Gardens motto says, “Where good taste and Mother Nature combine!” Put Willow Tree Gardens on your bucket list today. Located at 7216 27th St. W., University Place. Phone: (253) 565-8079 or e-mail: willowtreegardens1@gmail.com. Open seven days a week yearround!

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Section A • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

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Sports

RAINIERS

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 2018

SECTION A, PAGE 12

RETURN HOME TACOMA OPENS A SIX-PACK AT CHENEY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF NANCY HAACK

(Top) Devon Bryan may only be 12 years old, but there's obviously not a lot of fear in this youngster. Flying down the mountainside at Snowbird Mountain Resort in Utah, the Puyallup Tribal member got things started at 11,068 feet. (Bottom) Bryan celebrates with his coach, Nater Youngchild, and proud mother, Nancy Haack. The second-place trophy represents his 12 to 14-year old age group finish, while the third-place trophy represents a bronze finish in the overall standings. Bryan is the leading snowboarder in the 12-14 division in the Pacific Northwest. Keep your eyes peeled on what this kid has in store next time down the mountain.

I

Puyallup Tribal snowboarder makes national splash

By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

t wasn’t necessarily warm or sunny, but the lack of falling rain felt like a proper welcome home for the Tacoma Rainiers following a road trip to Fresno and Sacramento. After a cold and wet season-opening home stand that felt like a test of endurance for fans and players alike, the overcast skies above Cheney Stadium were a friendly sight on Tuesday, April 17, as the Rainiers opened a four-game series with the Albuquerque Isotopes. What began as a bit of a pitcher’s duel ended up being a blowout for the Rainiers, following a six-run outburst in the eighth inning. The 8-2 victory also lifted Tacoma back to .500 on the season at 6-6. Erasmo Ramirez took the mound for the Rainiers to start the game and put in a solid 5.2 innings of rehabilitation work. Ramirez gave up just one earned run, while surrendering just one walk and scattering four Isotope hits. The Major League Baseball veteran also struck out six batters before giving way to Ryan Cook, Casey Lawrence and Erik Goeddel, who gave up just four hits, while keeping Albuquerque scoreless. The teams were tied at 2-2 going into the bottom of the eighth inning when lightning struck for the Rainiers. Designated hitter Kirk Nieuwehnuis drew a base-loaded walk to bring in left fielder Ian Miller, putting Tacoma on top 3-2. Catcher Chris Hermann then slapped a single into center field to bring right fielder Cameron Perkins across the plate for a fourth run. First baseman Matt Hague then scored on a sacrifice fly off the bat of third baseman Danny Muno. Center fielder John Andreoli continued the onslaught with a double to left field, scoring Nieuwenhuis and Hermann to put the score at 7-2 Tacoma. Following an Albuquerque pitching change, second baseman Gordon Beckham doubled to center field, scoring Andreoli to make it 8-2 Tacoma. While the eighth inning was magic for most of the Tacoma lineup, it proved to be a little rough on Taylor Motter, fresh from a send-down from the Seattle Mariners. Motter recorded the u See RAINIERS / page A15

By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Top) Hoping to work his way back into the Seattle Mariners' lineup, right-hander Erasmo Ramirez put in a solid outing for the Rainiers on Tuesday, April 17. The MLB veteran game up just one earned run over 5.2 innings of work, while striking out six batters and yielding just four hits. (Second-left) The Seattle Mariners have been missing Ben Gamel's defense, as well as his bat. Meanwhile, the folks in Tacoma are more than happy to see him in a Rainiers' uniform for the time being. (Second-right) John Andreoli has been making the most of his time in the field and at the plate. The center fielder is batting .395 this season. (Bottom) Kirk Nieuwenhuis takes a cut.

If you are interested in the world of international snow sports, or just pay attention to successful athletes from the Tacoma area, we have a name that you’re going to want to keep an eye out for in the years to come. His name is Devon Bryan, and he’s fast-becoming a star on the national snowboarding scene. However, we’re not talking about the controlled confines of the half-pipe and big air snowboard scenes. No, this 12-year old kid drops in at the top of mountains and finds his own way down. It’s called “freeriding” in the world of snowboarding, and you’d better pay attention as it’s becoming more popular with every snowy season. While it’s not an Olympic event yet, the international scene boasts some of the most popular snowboarders around, such as Travis Rice and Jeremy Jones. If you’ve ever seen an iconic Warren Miller movie with snowboarders in it, you’re bound to have seen these intense athletes flying through the air and down the mountain side. While the legendary Mr. Miller has passed away, his snowy, film work will continue through the generations. Don’t be surprised if you happen to see Devon Bryan in one of these flicks down the road. The kid is good, and he’s got a drive that is already pushing him into the elite levels of the sport. The son of Puyallup Tribal Councilmember Annette Bryan and Nancy Haack, Bryan has

u See FREERIDING / page A15


Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

Sportswatch TACOMA AREA PREP SCORES BOYS SOCCER WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 FIFE - 3, WASHINGTON - 0 FRANKLIN PIERCE - 3, FOSS - 0 LINDBERGH - 1, WHITE RIVER - 0 RIV. RIDGE - 4, EATONVILLE - 2 RENTON - 4, CLOVER PARK - 3 THURSDAY, APRIL 12 MT. TAHOMA - 1, BONNEY LAKE - 1 STADIUM - 4, LAKES - 1 WILSON - 4, SPANAWAY LAKE - 2 LINCOLN - 2, BETHEL - 0 CURTIS - 1, GRAHAM-K - 1 OLYMPIA - 3, ROGERS - 2 PUYALLUP - 7, EMERALD RIDGE - 1 GIG HARBOR - 2, CENT. KITSAP - 2 PENINSULA - 1, NO. THURSTON - 1 CHARLES WRIGHT - 7, ELMA - 0 FRIDAY, APRIL 13 SOUTH KITSAP - 2, SUMNER - 1 SHELTON - 1, CAPITAL - 0 FOSTER - 1, EVERGREEN - 0 HIGHLINE - 4, EATONVILLE - 1 RIV. RIDGE - 5, STEILACOOM - 2 ORTING - 4, TYEE - 1 VASHON - 12, SULTAN - 0 CHARLES WRIGHT - 2, OVERLAKE - 0 SATURDAY, APRIL 14 NO. THURSTON - 3, CENT. KITSAP - 1 BLACK HILLS - 4, CAPITAL - 0 ABERDEEN - 3, TIMBERLINE - 0 MONDAY, APRIL 16 WASHINGTON - 2, EVERGREEN - 1 FIFE - 6, FOSS - 2 FOSTER - 5, WHITE RIVER - 1 FR. PIERCE - 2, LINDBERGH - 0 ORTING - 5, RIV. RIDGE - 1 RENTON - 2, STEILACOOM - 1 CLOVER PARK - 4, EATONVILLE - 0 HIGHLINE - 0, TYEE - 0 VASHON - 13, CASCADE CHR. - 0 TUESDAY, APRIL 17 WILSON - 0, BONNEY LAKE - 0 MT. TAHOMA - 3, LAKES - 0 STADIUM - 5, LINCOLN - 1 BETHEL - 3, SPANAWAY LAKE - 2 BELLARMINE - 3, OLYMPIA - 0 SUMNER - 3, CURTIS - 1 EMERALD RIDGE - 2, GRAHAM-K - 1 PUYALLUP - 2, ROGERS - 0 NO. THURSTON - 3, YELM - 0 CAPITAL - 0, TIMBERLINE - 0 CENTRAL KITSAP - 0, SHELTON - 0 CHARLES WRIGHT - 8, BELL. CHR. - 0

FASTPITCH WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 SUMNER - 15, OLYMPIA - 4 GIG HARBOR - 15, NO. THURSTON - 4 PENINSULA - 15, CAPITAL - 1 YELM - 16, SHELTON - 0 CENT. KITSAP - 14, TIMBERLINE - 8 WHITE RIVER - 10, EVERGREEN - 0 STEILACOOM - 15, CLOVER PARK - 0 THURSDAY, APRIL 12 STADIUM - 10, MT. TAHOMA - 0 BONNEY LAKE - 10, LAKES - 0 OLYMPIA - 8, EMERALD RIDGE - 4 STEILACOOM - 11, RIVER RIDGE - 8 FRIDAY, APRIL 13 BONNEY LAKE - 11, WILSON - 5 YELM - 5, NO. THURSTON - 0 SATURDAY, APRIL 14 FIFE - 6, THUNDER MTN - 2 PT. ANGELES - 4, WHITE RIVER - 1 MONDAY, APRIL 16 CENT. KITSAP - 7, SHELTON - 6 BELL. CHRISTIAN - 19, VASHON - 1 TUESDAY, APRIL 17 WILSON - 12, MT. TAHOMA - 11 BELLARMINE - 4, SUMNER - 3 GRAHAM-K - 11, OLYMPIA - 8 SHELTON - 14, CAPITAL - 3 WASHINGTON - 11, EVERGREEN - 0 FIFE - 10, FOSS - 0 LINDBERGH - 12, FR. PIERCE - 6 WASHINGTON - 17, EVERGREEN - 1 WHITE RIVER - 24, FOSTER - 0 STEILACOOM - 12, RENTON - 1 HIGHLINE - 12, TYEE - 3 BASEBALL WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 SPANAWAY LAKE - 13, LAKES - 4 YELM - 3, NO. THURSTON - 2 FR. PIERCE - 15, EVERGREEN - 0 WASHINGTON - 20, FOSS - 4 HIGHLINE - 8, CLOVER PARK - 2 RENTON - 8, TYEE - 4 BELL. CHR. - 12, CH. WRIGHT - 2 THURSDAY, APRIL 12 BELLARMINE - 8, OLYMPIA - 2 PUYALLUP - 7, ROGERS - 6 RIV. RIDGE - 12, EATONVILLE - 11 CLOVER PARK - 15, SEA. LUTH. - 1 MR LUTH. - 17, CHIEF LESCHI - 0

CAPITAL - 3, PENINSULA - 2 TUESDAY, APRIL 17 BONNEY LAKE - 12, WILSON - 4 EMERALD RIDGE - 1, BELLARMINE - 0 SUMNER - 18, GRAHAM-K - 2 GIG HARBOR - 5, PENINSULA - 2 GIG HARBOR - 7, PENINSULA - 2 CENT. KITSAP - 5, SHELTON - 0 NO. THURSTON - 1, TIMBERLINE - 0 FR. PIERCE - 14, FOSTER - 0 LINDBERGH - 14, WASHINGTON - 0 HIGHLINE - 5, STEILACOOM - 1 RENTON - 12, ORTING - 8 EATONVILLE - 12, TYEE - 0 CHARLES WRIGHT - 1, SEA. CHR. - 0 TACOMA AREA COLLEGE SCORES FASTPITCH THURSDAY, APRIL 12 GEORGE FOX - 3, PAC. LUTHERAN - 2 PAC. LUTHERAN - 7, GEORGE FOX - 3 SATURDAY, APRIL 14 PAC. LUTHERAN - 15, PUGET SOUND - 2 PAC. LUTHERAN - 16, PUGET SOUND - 1 SUNDAY, APRIL 15 PUGET SOUND - 9, PAC. LUTHERAN - 4 PAC. LUTHERAN - 6, PUGET SOUND - 5 BASEBALL FRIDAY, APRIL 13 PAC. LUTHERAN - 6, CAL. LUTHERAN - 0 SATURDAY, APRIL 14 PAC. LUTHERAN - 9, CAL. LUTHERAN - 7 CAL. LUTHERAN - 20, PAC. LUTHERAN - 1 GEORGE FOX - 5, PUGET SOUND - 3 GEORGE FOX - 12, PUGET SOUND - 2 SUNDAY, APRIL 15 POMONA-PITZER - 17, PAC. LUTHERAN - 16 GEORGE FOX - 15, PUGET SOUND - 9 PIERCE - 4, CENTRALIA - 1 PIERCE - 3, CENTRALIA - 0 MONDAY, APRIL 16 TACOMA CC - 7, LOWER COLUMBIA - 6 LOWER COLUMBIA - 7, TACOMA CC - 1 PIERCE - 15, CENTRALIA - 4 CENTRALIA - 3, PIERCE - 2 TUESDAY, APRIL 17 LOWER COLUMBIA - 9, TACOMA CC - 6 LOWER COLUMBIA - 6, TACOMA CC - 1 PIERCE - 13, GRAYS HARBOR - 3

FRIDAY, APRIL 13 CAPITAL - 8, PENINSULA - 3

BUFFALO SOLDIERS TO HOST FOURTH ANNUAL BOXING TOURNEY The Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club of Sea-Tac will host its fourth annual boxing tournament on Saturday, April 28. The event begins at 7 p.m. at the Al Davies Boys and Girls Club on 1620 S. 17th St. in Tacoma. All proceeds will go to support the Tacoma Boxing Club. A $10 donation for entry is requested. Pre-sale tickets are available through any Buffalo Soldier Sea-Tac chapter member. LUTES CLOSES OUT SEASON WITH FASTPITCH SERIES WIN OVER RIVAL LOGGERS The Pacific Lutheran University softball team wrapped up its 2018 season winning two of three games on Sunday, April 15, as they wrapped up Saturday’s second contest before finishing the weekend with another doubleheader. The Lutes finished with an overall record of 15-23, with an 10-18 record in conference play. The Loggers finished the season 10-24-1 overall, and 9-18 in conference play. PLU took the resumed game 16-1 and game one 9-4 before dropping the season finale 6-5. “We played well, and it was fun to watch us almost come back in that second game,” head coach Brandi Gordon Bennett said. “We had some great at bats, Marissa pitched a great final game and the players were having fun and getting fired up, which was cool to see.” In continuing their Saturday contest, the Lutes boosted their 12-run lead with an additional run in the third with a ground out RBI. The Lutes then added a run in the fourth and fifth innings off Anna Lennox and Rebecca Sorensen’s bats, pushing the lead to 16-1. The game was then called after the Loggers failed to cut into the lead in the fifth. The Lutes continued their dominance into the second game, taking advantage of a wild pitch and a sacrifice fly from Kathryn Hatlen to take an early 2-0 lead. The Loggers responded with a run in the third and two more in the fourth to take a 3-2 lead. The Lutes quickly fought back in front with a threerun fourth, which was kicked off by Kathryn Hatlen single. The inning was capped off on a fielder’s-choice RBI from Anna Overland and a single from Elise Freund. A solo-homer from the Loggers cut the Lute lead in half, but a three-run shot from Samantha Simundson pushed the Lutes ahead 8-4. Finally, Kathryn Hatlen sent another run home on an RBI single, as the Lutes secured the 9-4 victory. An early RBI single from Kennedy Robillard gave the Lutes their first lead in game three, but the Loggers responded with five runs over the next three innings to take a commanding lead. Robillard, Simundson, and Lennox each provided an RBI in the sixth inning to pull the game close, but another UPS home-run pushed the lead back up to 2. In the bottom of the seventh, Delaney Salter delivered a leadoff homer to celebrate her birthday in style and bring the Lutes within a run again. After threatening to tie or take the lead by loading the bases with two outs, an infield popup ended the Lutes’ rally one run short at 6-5. “The thing that stood out to me the most about this year was that, regardless of the situation, this team gave everything that they had in every inning and for every pitch,” Bennett said. “These players always put their Luteball family first, and I hope that our returners are hungry to come back and deal out some damage next year.” For the Lutes’ three seniors, Anna Lennox, Jessica Alcomendas, and Marissa Miller, Sunday’s contests marked the final ones in their storied careers. In the midst

of all of the celebration, four-year starting pitcher Miller welcomed her family onto the field where she had created many fond memories through the years. “It feels great to be able to play here one last time,” Miller said. “I’ve had an incredible four years, and I’m really going to miss my teammates, as well as this whole experience.” As her storybook Lute career ends its final chapter, Miller is already looking ahead to nurture the next generation of softball stars, some of whom may one day become Lutes themselves. “I love helping out younger kids, and I’ll actually be getting back to teaching pitching lessons now that the season has ended,” Miller said. “I just love watching young women succeed in playing softball while helping them get there.” For now, the Lutes 13 returners will take some time to rest before returning to the field to prepare for the 2019 season. - by Jake Bilyeu, PLU Sports PLU’S HODKINSON NABS WEEKLY NWC TRACK HONORS The Northwest Conference office released its men’s track and field weekly award winners on Monday with Pacific Lutheran University student-athlete Brad Hodkinson securing Track Athlete of the Week honors. The junior secured the honor after blowing away the field in the 5,000-meters on Saturday, April 14, at the Jay Hammer Invitational hosted by Saint Martin’s University in Lacey. Hodkinson blew away the field, winning the race in a season-best time of 14 minutes, 55.23 seconds, finishing 25 seconds ahead of the runner-up finisher. Hodkinson, the defending NWC Runner of the Year and league champion in the 1,500-meters, 5,000-meters, and 10,000-meters, currently owns the fastest 5K time in the NWC by 15 seconds. Hodkinson’s honor marks the fourth time a Lute has won NWC Track Athlete of the Week. Sprinter Carson Ketter claimed the honor on April 9 and March 19, while fellow distance standout Kyle Rapacz secured the league award on March 5. The Lutes open day one of the 2018 NWC Championships on Friday in McMinnville, Ore. LOGGERS TOO MUCH FOR LUTES IN WOMEN’S TENNIS The Puget Sound women’s tennis team closed out its 2018 Northwest Conference schedule with a convincing 6-3 home win against Pacific Lutheran Friday, April 13. The Loggers improved to 5-6 overall, and 4-5 in the NWC. Bridget Myers won at No. 2 singles (6-0, 7-5) for the Loggers, while Nicole Bouche won at No. 3 singles (7-6, 6-0). Puget Sound’s great singles play continued when Barclay Fagg won in three sets (6-3, 5-7, 7-5) and Claire Fitzgerald won in three sets (5-7, 6-2, 6-4). Lisa Owen and Bouche teamed up to dominate at No. 1 doubles, 8-1. Fagg and Fitzgerald won at No. 3 doubles, 8-4. UPS’ FRAZER PICKS UP WEEKLY NWC LACROSSE HONORS Playing in her final collegiate lacrosse home game, Puget Sound senior Ella Frazer totaled nine points to earn Northwest Conference Student-Athlete of the Week. Frazer scored six goals and assisted on three others to lead the Loggers to a 17-13 win over Pacific, April 14. She has a team-high 23 points this season (15 goals, eight assists). Frazer and the Loggers conclude the season at Whitman, Sunday, April 22.

APRIL 19 – MAY 6 THURSDAY, APRIL 19 – SOCCER Olympia vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium – 7 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 19 – BASEBALL Albuquerque vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 19 – SOCCER Bellarmine vs. Emerald Ridge Emerald Ridge HS – 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 20 – BASEBALL George Fox vs. Pacific Lutheran NWC Baseball Tournament Pacific Lutheran – 12 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 20 - BASEBALL Linfield vs. Willamette NWC Baseball Tournament Pacific Lutheran - 3 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 20 – FASTPITCH Olympia vs. Curtis Curtis HS – 4 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 20 – BASEBALL Albuquerque vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 7:05 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 21, BASEBALL NW Conference Tournament Pacific Lutheran – TBA SATURDAY, APRIL 21 – SOCCER Curtis vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 12 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 21 – BASEBALL Sacramento vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 5:05 p.m. SUNDAY, APRIL 22 – BASEBALL NW Conference Tournament Pacific Lutheran – TBA SUNDAY, APRIL 22 – BASEBALL Sacramento vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium – 1:35 p.m. TUESDAY, APRIL 24 – BASEBALL Ilwaco vs. Life Christian Heidelberg Field – 3 p.m. TUESDAY, APRIL 24 – BASEBALL Ilwaco vs. Life Christian Heidelberg Field – 5 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 26 - SOCCER Bonney Lake vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl - 7 p.m. THURSDAY, APRIL 26 - BASEBALL Puget Sound vs. Pacific Lutheran Cheney Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, APRIL 27 - SOCCER Stadium vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 6:30 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 28 - BASEBALL Linfield vs. Pacific Lutheran Pacific Lutheran - 10 a.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 28 - BOXING Fourth Annual Buffalo Soldiers Benefit Al Davies Boys & Girls Club - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, APRIL 28 - MMA CageSport 50 Emerald Queen Casino - 7 p.m. SUNDAY, APRIL 29 - BASEBALL Linfield vs. Pacific Lutheran Pacific Lutheran - 10 a.m. MONDAY, APRIL 30 - SOCCER Lincoln vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 6:30 p.m. MONDAY, APRIL 30 - SOCCER Stadium vs. Wilson Wilson HS - 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 2 - SOCCER Wilson vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl - 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MAY 2 - SOCCER Bethel vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl - 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, MAY 4 - SOCCER Sumner vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium - 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, MAY 6 - SOCCER Sacramento vs. Sounders FC 2 Cheney Stadium - 1:30 p.m.


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

MUCH-NEEDED WIN FOR SOUNDERS FC 2

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

APRIL 19, 2018 TEMPLE THEATER, TACOMA WA

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While it's still very early in the Sounders FC 2 season, the boys were in need of a little home cooking to return to their winning ways. After dropping four consecutive matches, Sounders FC 2 pulled off a dramatic 3-2 victory over Rio Grande Valley FC on Saturday, April 14. The Tacoma rains fell throughout the game at Cheney Stadium. Felix Chenkam deposited two goals into the back of the net, while 16-year old Azriel Gonzalez netted the game winner with nine minutes left in regulation. The next match at Cheney is set for Sunday, May 6, at 1:30 p.m. against Sacramento Republic FC.


Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 15

t Rainiers From page A12

first Tacoma out as the second batter of the inning with a strikeout. After the torrent of Tacoma runs had ended, Motter came to the plate again, only to end the inning with his second strikeout in the bottom of the eighth. The Tacoma road trip saw some big scores from both the Rainiers, as well as their opponents. Tacoma kickedoff the fireworks in Fresno by destroying the first-place Fresno Grizzlies by a score of 13-0 on Tuesday, April 10. It was an 11-run ninth inning that spelled doom for the Grizzlies. Tacoma’s Christian Bergmann was dominant from the mound, striking out eight Grizzlies, while giving up just four hits and walking none over seven innings of work. Pitchers Shawn Armstrong and David McKay blanked Fresno over the final two innings to secure the rout. Fresno was able to exact a little revenge the following night, erasing a 9-3 deficit to take a 13-9 victory over the Rainiers. The Grizzlies were able to push across five runs in the sixth inning, as well as another five in the seventh inning to seal the comeback victory. It was

a tough loss for Tacoma, considering the fact that they knocked around Fresno pitchers for 13 hits. Three errors also didn’t help the Rainiers’ chances for a victory. Fresno held off a late Tacoma rally in the following game to win the series with a 5-3 victory. The Rainiers put across three runs in the ninth inning, but that was going to be it for Tacoma, as the Fresno pitching closed the door on their comeback. After a short trip to Sacramento, Tacoma got back in the win column with a tight 3-2 victory over the River Cats on Friday, April 13. The two teams were able to muster just 11 hits combined, with Rob Whalen putting in six strong innings on the hill, giving up just six hits and no earned runs. Sacramento’s bats caught fire the next night, as the River Cats slapped around 13 hits on their way to a 12-7 victory. The Rainiers put four runs on the board in the eighth inning to put themselves within striking distance of Sacramento, but that was as far as they were going to get. Tacoma rebounded in a big way on Sunday, April 15, as the Rainiers dropped a 15-5 win on the River Cats. A five-run third inning, as well as a seven-run fourth inning were too much for Sacramento to overcome, despite knocking around 12 hits of their own. Three River Cats errors also didn’t help their cause. Bergman got his sec-

ond win of the season pitching five strong innings, while giving up just one earned run. Bergman did get a little wild, issuing four walks. The fourth game of the Sacramento series was rained out and the Rainiers headed back to the friendly confines of Cheney Stadium Tacoma will wrap up its series with Albuquerque on Friday, April 20. The game will be capped by a fireworks show for the fans. The following day, Tacoma will welcome Sacramento back to Cheney Stadium for a quick three-game series. Saturday, April 21 is also day one of “Throwback Weekend” for Tacoma fans. The first 1,000 fans through the gates will receive a free Tacoma Giants snapback ball cap. The following day, the first 1,000 fans will receive a free Tacoma Twins snapback ball cap. After getting a look at both throwback ball cap designs, fans are going to want to get to the ball park nice and early to get a crack at these beauties. Tacoma will hit the road on Wednesday, April 25, to begin a five-game series with Fresno. With the Grizzlies leading Tacoma by 3.5 games in the standings, the Rainiers have a chance to not only close that gap, but take over the lead in the Pacific Coast League’s Northern Pacific Division by the time they return home for a series-opener with Albuquerque on Monday, April 30.

t Freeriding From page A12

just returned from 2018 North American Junior Freeride Championships at Snowbird Mountain Resort in Utah. Blazing his way down the mountainside from 11,068 feet, Bryan represented the International Freeskiers and Snowboarders Association’s (IFSA) Pacific Northwest Region with reckless abandon. A sixth-grader at Meeker Middle School, Bryan would go on to capture second place in the 12 to 14 age bracket of the Junior Nationals. When the final numbers were tallied, Bryan would also go on to finish third in the overall standings, which include 15 to 18-year olds. Bryan is currently the top-ranked freeride snowboarder in the Pacific Northwest region with a whopping 3,466 IFSA points through five sanctioned competitions this year. It must be quite the mental load on a youngster, trying to maintain their grades, while travelling all over the world chasing mountainside powder. “He’s gets a little stressed out sometimes,” said Haack. “But, usually he’s just stoked to be up on the mountain. It’s where his heart is and it’s what he wants to do for the rest of his life. That’s where he wants to be. Way up there as high as he can get.” So far, Bryan has been able to maintain his grades while spending a considerable amount of time on the road. He’s kept his focus with the support of his snowboarding coach Nater Youngchild, as well as the watchful eye of his family. The folks at Meeker Middle School have also gotten behind their snowboard prodigy by working out homework assignments to keep him on track. However, the classroom may soon be in the rear view mirror for Bryan, as he has been hoping to switch to home schooling to go along with a snowboarding schedule that will be taking him to the mountains of Argentina and New Zealand before the year is through. While nothing

PHOTO COURTESY OF NANCY HAACK

The sport can be a big test of endurance to get up to a prime starting point. Things get a little more wild on the way back down.

has been decided upon, Bryan’s third-place finish at the Junior Nationals fulfilled a home school goal. He was told that if he got a top-three finish, home school was going to be on the table. Bryan is a member of the Puyallup Tribe and is proud to carry his heritage with him wherever he may roam.

WELCOME

AT

“He wants to get a Volkswagen van and travel to all the mountains he can,” said Nancy Haack. “I told him, you’re still only 12 years old honey.” At the moment, Bryan may need a ride to get to all of those mountains, but once he gets there you can leave the riding to the kid. Just give a wave when he’s flying by.

C H E N E Y

S TA D I U M

SNAPBACK HATS TO FIRST 1,000 FANS EACH GAME SATURDAY, APRIL 21

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

TACOMA C H E N E Y S TA D I U M 2 0 1 8 WILL YOU BE THERE? SEASON TICKETS AND SCHEDULE AT FOR TICKETS CALL 1-800-745-3000 OR VISIT TACOMARAINIERS.COM


Section A • Page 16 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018


City Life

YOUR TICKET to TACOMA

Screaming Butterflies present ‘Richard II’

B4

TA C O M A W E E K LY. C O M

Make way for FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 2018

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Wayzgoose 14th annual letterpress and print festival takes place at the end of April By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Artists and small presses:

acoma’s annual Wayzgoose festival is coming right up, slated for the weekend of April 28 and 29. All would be well advised to make their way to the Wayzgoose and have a goosey gander at all the goings on. The Wayzgoose festival, held at King’s Books (218 St. Helens Ave.), is Tacoma’s yearly celebration of all things to do with paper and printmaking. The origin of the term Wayzgoose is lost in obscurity, but it is the name of traditional celebrations for printers and papermakers in old Europe, dating back to the first use of the printing press and to a time when most people had windows made of waxed paper. More recently, the term has been revived to denote festivals that feature hands-on craftsmanship in printing, celebrating shops that still use hand-set printing of the written word and makers of cards, broadsides, and artistic, limited edition books. With widespread and easy use of digital means of promulgating the written word, handmade, crafty print products have found an economic econiche as prized products made with care and devotion. Hence the revival of the Wayzgoose festival, variations of which have been cropping up all over the United States and Canada. This year will mark the 14th annual Wayzgoose festival in Tacoma. It started and continues to run as a collaboration between King’s Books, which is under the able helmsmanship of sweet pea Flaherty, and Springtide Press, which is run by printer extraordinaire Jessica Spring helped by her partner in crime, Chandler O’Leary of the Anagram Press. (The duo are the force behind Tacoma’s famous “Dead Feminist Broadsides.”) From the beginning, Wayzgoose has had support from the Tacoma Arts Commission, which provides funding for things like the linoleum blocks for the steam roller prints as well as the use of a steam roller itself. Support from the arts commission also brings money for materials that festival visitors can use to make free souvenirs. Wayzgoose started in Tacoma in 2004 and has steadily grown in popularity. In 2015 the event became a two-day affair, drawing increasing numbers of fans and participating printmakers and vendors. In 2009, the Wayzgoose featured the first steam roller prints, in which large squares

• Anique Zimmer of CLAW Creative Guild (Sun. only)

T

• Carl Montford (with Laura Bentley) of Montford Press (Sat. only) • Carol Clifford of Orange House Press • Carrie Foster of Shroom Brothers (Sat. only) • Cat Snapp Cat Snapp Studio • Cathy Moeller of Printwood Blocks • Chandler O’Leary of Anagram Press • Doris Arndt (Sun. only) • Emily Riley of Rx Letterpress • Griffith Williams of East Point West Press • J Hukee of Pope Press (Sat. only) • Jenny Craig of Notta Pixie Press • Jessica Spring of Springtide Press • Juniper White of dwell press (Sun. only) • Karen Perrine of Karen Perrine Art • Katie Dean • keegan wenkman of keegan onefoot (Sat. only) • Laura Bentley (with Carl Montford) of Pinwheel Press (Sat. only) • Lisa Hasegawa of ilfant press (Sun. only) • Liz Brindley of Prints & Plants, LLC (Sat. only) • Mare Blocker of Presstidigitation

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WAYZGOOSE

Steam roller prints are one the annual highlights of Tacoma’s Wayzgoose festival. 3 x 3 foot squares of linoleum are carved with a design, inked and then pressed with a steam roller to produce a large print on paper. This year’s Wayzgoose takes place at King’s Books April 28 and 29.

of linoleum are carved with a design, inked up, covered with paper and run over with a steam roller to press the ink to the paper. From the start, the steam roller prints have been one of the main attractions of the Wayzgoose. Select artists and teams of designers create the blocks used for these large works of art. This is a popular project for the art departments of some of the local schools. In the past, teams from Pacific Lutheran University, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Community College, Charles Wright Academy and Stadium High School have carved linoleum blocks to be set before the mighty press of the steam roller. This year, a team from Lincoln High School will join the fray. This year’s theme is “All Around T-Town,” so the prints will all have something to do with Tacoma’s neighborhoods. Inside and outside King’s Books, there will be tables and booths at which vendors, printers and designers will

ONE TACOMA TAROT BABES Saturday, April 22, 1-4 p.m. Red Elm Café (in the Community Room), 1114 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tacoma Come to the second Tarot Babes meet up at the Red Elm Café. Stop by, stay a while, and connect with people who love, use, or are interested in tarot and oracle cards. Tarot Babes meet-ups are very casual, inclusive events where the focus is on meeting others in the area who share affection for tarot and oracle reading. No matter your experience level or the method(s) you employ to read cards, you are welcome at this event. This event will be inclusive of all religious preferences, racial, cultural identities, sexuality and gender identities. You don’t have to bring anything, but you can bring a deck, your favorite tarot resource book, or anything else that you may want to use to break the ice and help others get to know you. This is a free event, meant for networking and community building; this is not an event where tarot readings are guaranteed to be performed. This event is hosted by Genaviv Rose, of Moondust Darling. For more infor-

show their wares and offer festivalgoers a chance for hands-on activities like paper making or printing a memento. Bring a blank T-shirt and you will have a chance to silk screen a design on it. The Wayzgoose is one arts festival that seems to have captured the fancy of many in Tacoma. It is fun for all ages. The lumbering presence of the steam roller and the workmanlike nature of the craft no doubt have an appeal to the citizens of our City of Destiny, where hands-on workmanship has always been prized. This is a working town, after all. Perhaps the prospect of getting one’s hands down into the pulp from which paper is made hearkens back to the days when the pulp mills on the flats sent clouds of uniquely scented steam into the very air from which we draw our breath. Wayzgoose takes place April 28 and 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Admission is free. For additional information, visit tacomawayzgoose.com.

mation, visit www.moondustdarling.com.

TWO YEAR OF THE DOG FOUND OBJECT SCULPTURE Wednesday, April 25, 7:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma Join your friendly neighborhood artist/illustrators and come build small, up-cycled earth dog themed sculptures from wire and other bits from Tinkertopia. Some supplies and pliers will be available for use, but bring any wire, bits and pieces (buttons, beads, nuts and bolts, etc.) and tools that you may have. For more information, visit: www.facebook. com/events/181210302523747.

THREE UP FOR ARTS CONCERT Friday, April 27, 7 p.m. Pierce County Library, 3609 Market Place W., Suite 100, University Place Jennifer Thomas will be the featured artist for the April edition of the UP for Arts Spring concert series. Thomas will perform her own original songs (plus new music from upcoming new albums), as well as covers, on a beautiful Ritmuller piano accompanied

• Mare Blocker of Pacific Lutheran Printmaking and Elliott Press Students (Sat. only) • Marilyn Stablein of Book Arts Editions (Sun. only) • Sherry Buckner of Red Twig Studio • Tom Llewellyn and Lance Kagey of Beautiful Angle • Yoshiko Yamamoto of The Arts and Crafts Press

Steam Roller Print Artists and Teams: SATURDAY, APRIL 28 • 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Brian Hutcheson, Stadium High School • 12:30-2:30 p.m., Chris Sharp, Saiyare Refaei (new this year) • 2:30-4 p.m., Katie Dean, Tom Llewellyn and Lance Kagey of Beautiful Angle SUNDAY, APRIL 29 • 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Carrie Foster of Shroom Brothers, Charles Wright Academy • 12:30-2:30 p.m., Audra Laymon, Lincoln High School • 2:30-4 p.m., Cecelia Schilling of SeaGreen Studios, Tom Llewellyn and Lance Kagey of Beautiful Angle • Yoshiko Yamamoto of The Arts and Crafts Press

by select instrumentalists and backup orchestral tracks. Thomas is an awardwinning American pianist, violinist, composer, performing artist and recording artist. She is equally well known for her classical covers and her original compositions. Visual art by watercolorist Cindy Baij will be on view. Tickets are available at the door: $15 general admission, $5 for students. For information, visit upforarts.org.

FOUR GIRLS ONLY PROM Saturday, April 28, 7 p.m. STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St., Tacoma The Girls Only Prom is a 21 and over dance party that celebrates the collective power of women. Girls Only will bring together ladies of all backgrounds to experience an amazing night out in an all-inclusive environment. Slip on your favorite party clothes and grab your girlfriends to dance the night away. Proceeds from The Girls Only Prom will go to benefit the Sexual Assault Center of Pierce County, where vulnerable women in our community can find refuge, support

and healing. Be a part of The Girls Only Movement. Info: girlsonlyprom.com.

FIVE UKRAINIAN SHADOW THEATRE FIREFLIES Sunday, April 29, 3 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway, Tacoma Broadway Center presents Ukraine’s Shadow Theatre Fireflies for an afternoon of uniquely beautiful visual storytelling at the Pantages Theater comprised of more than 10 creative young artists who meld stage props and acrobatics into a showcase of imaginative storytelling. Join the Fireflies on an exciting journey into the world of shadows, a mysterious space that provides the most amazing adventures. Discover the beauty of storytelling through a fusion of shadow, color, shape and music. The Shadow Theatre Fireflies create machines, animals and trees, as well as human characters, with their bodies in this breathtaking visual experience. Tickets are on sale now, beginning at $19. Call the Broadway Center Box Office at (253) 5915894, toll-free 1 (800) 291-7593, online at BroadwayCenter.org, or in person at 901 Broadway in Tacoma’s Theater District.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

ART NEWS ROUNDUP

LOUDER THAN A BOMB- WELCOME SPRING TACOMA: TEEN POETRY WITH LOCAL BELTANE FESTIVAL RETURNS TO CELEBRATIONS TCC ON APRIL 28

PHOTO COURTESY OF WRITE253

On April 28, Louder Than a BombTacoma: The Tacoma Teen Poetry Festival (LTAB-Tacoma) comes to Tacoma for the third year in a row, showcasing poetry written by teens in the regional area. The single-day event features more than 75 participants between the ages of 13 and 19, all of whom are from Tacoma and surrounding Pierce County cities. LTABTacoma is a friendly poetry slam competition where “the points are not the point; the point is the poetry.” LTABTacoma will take place at Tacoma Community College (6501 S. 19th St., Building 11) and begins at 9 a.m. The original and wildly popular Louder Than a Bomb (LTAB) festival was founded in 2001 in Chicago by Young Chicago Authors, a non-profit organization with strong community ties. Since LTAB was founded 17 years ago, more than 15 cities in the United States and Canada have started their own LTAB competitions. The City of Tacoma hosted the first LTAB held on the West Coast three years

ago. This year’s event will begin with preliminary poetry slam bouts at 9 a.m. and noon, followed by finals at 3:30 p.m. There will also be a poetry yoga workshop and a community-wide open mic during the day. Throughout the event, young poets and their adult mentors will showcase their poetic talents at the finals, which are open to the public. The program will also include special guest poets, educators and DJs to create a fun and supportive environment for poets and audience alike. The event is all ages and free, although donations are appreciated. LTAB-Tacoma is presented by Write253 and Tacoma Community College’s Office of Student Engagement and funded by the Tacoma Arts Commission. For information, contact Michael Haeflinger at michael@write253. com, or visit Write253’s website at www.write253.com for more information.

MOB ROLL 8 COMES TO TACOMA’S 2ND CYCLE APRIL 29

Eight years ago, bicycle builder Thomas Kolb wanted to spend more time with his musician friend. His solution: create a twoweek music and art tour around Puget Sound on bikes. Every spring, Kolb and his crew of bicyclists ride a 400mile circumnavigation of the Sound, stopping every night to showcase their music, art, film and poetry. They call it MOB Roll, and this is the eighth edition of the event. The group of intrepid cyclists traditionally start off in Bellingham and end up, after two weeks of riding and music-making, in Olympia. On April 29, the cyclists will roll through Tacoma and will put on a show at 6:30 p.m. at 2nd Cycle, located at 1205 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tacoma.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MOB ROLL

FILE PHOTO

Lakewood’s Mystic Sanctuary Gift Shop is hosting a Beltane maypole ritual and potluck on Sunday, April 29 from 3-6 p.m. It will be a festive day including a Beltane ritual, maypole, potluck and music. People of all paths, traditions and ages are welcome to attend. The public ritual is open to all. No experience or knowledge of rituals is needed and there will be a free class prior to start time. It is suggested that you bring maypole ribbons, if you wish to join the dance. The fabric ribbon should be at least 18 to 20 feet long and at least one inch wide. Please no plastic or wireedged, as the ribbons shall be ritually burned later. Bring a potluck dish to share with 10-12 people. Please bring your dish ready to serve as this is an outdoor space with no power, kitchen or running water. Please label the ingredients of your potluck dish, as many people have food allergies or intolerances. Bring drums and other musical instruments to participate in the drum and music circle. Feel free to bring flowers for the altar and wear your brightest and most festive clothes, masks and flower crowns. Suggested donation is $5 per person to help with supplies. This is a suggested donation; however, any amount is good, and no one will ever be turned away for not having a donation. Mystic Sanctuary Gift Shop is located at 8415 Steilacoom Blvd. SW., Lakewood. For more on the Mystic Sanctuary celebration of Beltane, visit www.mysticshoppe.com.

UPS THEATRE SENIORS PRODUCE ‘THE TRESTLE AT POPE LICK CREEK’

This event is all ages, with a suggestion donation. The music will start at 6:30 p.m. There will be performances by Dante Manalo, Bird Teeth, The Frizz, Ralph Reign, Maray Fuego and Ain’t Got Time to Bleed. For more information, visit www. facebook.com/2ndCycle. To view a short video clip about MOB Roll, visit vimeo.com/173566427.

PACIFIC LUTHERAN DANCE STUDENTS OFFER SPRING PERFORMANCE

Dance at Pacific Lutheran University provides unique opportunities in performance, choreography, dance history, dance production, dance technique (including modern, jazz, ballet, hip-hop and tap), yoga, social dance forms and healing arts of mind and body. Selected courses are cross-referenced with physical education/movement studies, and two to four classes are offered every semester along with other co-curricular opportunities. Students can receive credit for their participation in these activities. Additionally, student choreography is emphasized in order to help nurture aspiring artists into becoming successful professionals. Along with the student choreography, faculty and guest choreographers regularly create original works and set repertory on the students. On April 20 and 21, at 7:30 p.m., PLU dance students will perform “Dance 2018: Storytelling,” directed

Summer is coming in and winter’s gone away. It is time to celebrate the joys of Beltane, now that the Earth is growing green – warmed by the power of the sun. All around us we can see the Pacific Northwest coming back to life. After the long winter, we are ready for the return of the longer, warmer days. Beltane is the name for the Gaelic May Day festival. Most commonly it is held on May 1, or about halfway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. Historically, it was widely observed throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Beltane is mentioned in some of the earliest Irish literature, and it is associated with important events in Irish mythology. It marked the beginning of summer and was when cattle were driven out to the summer pastures. Rituals were performed to protect the cattle, crops and people and to encourage growth. Special bonfires were kindled, and their flames, smoke and ashes were deemed to have protective powers. The people and their cattle would walk around the bonfire or between two bonfires, and sometimes leap over the flames or embers. All household fires would be doused and then re-lit from the Beltane bonfire. These gatherings would be accompanied by a feast. Doors, windows and the cattle themselves would be decorated with yellow May flowers, perhaps because they evoked fire. In parts of Ireland, people would make a May Bush: a thorn bush decorated with flowers, ribbons and bright shells. Many of these customs were part of May Day or midsummer festivals in other parts of Great Britain and Europe. Beltane celebrations had largely died out by the mid-20th century, although some of its customs continued in some places. It has been revived as a cultural event. Since the late 20th century, Celtic neo-pagans, Wiccans and those who seek spirituality in nature have observed Beltane, or something based on it, as a religious holiday. In Tacoma, Beltane observances come courtesy of Crescent Moon Gifts and the Mystic Sanctuary Gift Shop. At Crescent Moon Gifts, the holiday will be observed on Saturday, April 28 at 6 p.m. The public is welcome to this free ritual. Crescent Moon Gifts is located at 2506 6th Ave. For information visit www.crescentmoongifts.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU

by Rachel Winchester. The performance will take place on the PLU campus at KHP Eastvold Stage. Part of PLU’s arts Spotlight Series, “Dance 2018: Storytelling” is an inspiring collection of faculty, student and guest artist choreography, revealing fresh perspectives and diverse artistry. Spotlight Series: $10 general admission; $5 for 60+, military, alumni and students. Call (253) 535-7411 to purchase with cash/credit/debit. You can purchase your tickets online at www. eventbrite.com/e/dance-2018-storytelling-tickets-37506339471.

FILE PHOTO

University of Puget Sound’s Senior Theatre Festival continues with a production of “The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek” by Naomi Wallace with performances at 7 :30 p.m. on April 20 at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on April 21. The UPS Department of Theatre Arts Spring 2018 Senior Theatre Festival features student-directed plays. “The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek” is directed by Mariah Prinster. The story is about Dalton Chance, who is all of 15 years old and has been imprisoned for murder. He spends his days making shadow puppets on the wall – a trick he learned from his depressed, unemployed father – and ignoring the bitter taunts of his jailer. Just a few months in the past, Dalton freely roamed the bleak rural landscape around his tiny town, in the fascinating wake of Pace Creagan, a tough, charismatic girl several years his senior, who roped Dalton into her greatest obsession: running the trestle that spans the dried-up Pope Lick Creek, playing chicken with the 7:10 train that already claimed the life of a friend. In a town wasted by the economic depression, in which neither Dalton’s nor Pace’s

parents can offer them any hope for the future, there is nothing for them to do but court death in order to feel alive. Pace postures below the trestle, telling tales, both bullying and flirting with a cautious but curious Dalton, who expects a more conventional romantic encounter between them than Pace has planned. Meanwhile, Dalton’s father Dray sits at home, in miserable silence, feeling empty and purposeless after losing his job, and his mother Gin contemplates joining fellow townspeople in a communist action: re-opening an old, disused glass factory, in order to provide jobs for themselves. As “The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek” unrolls its spare, bleak beauty, timelines converge and the living and dead collide in this rough, poetic drama which explores intergenerational devastation, economically hopeless circumstances, emerging sexuality and the wondrous abilities of the human imagination. Tickets: $8 general; $6 Puget Sound students/faculty/staff, sr. citizens, students, military. For more information visit www. pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/artsat-puget-sound/senior-theatre-festival/


Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

HANDFORTH EXHIBITS Culture Corner POSTHUMOUS A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Upcoming events in community theater: RETROSPECTIVE OF TACOMA PHOTOGRAPHER VIRNA HAFFER By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Handforth Gallery, located within the hallowed halls of the main branch of Tacoma Public Library (1102 Tacoma Ave. S.) is hosting a show of photographs by a Tacoma photographer named Virna Haffer (1899-1974). The show is called “18 Chapters in Photography,” after Haffer’s working habit of dividing her photos into 18 different themed categories. These were given titles like “Reflections,” “Abstracts,” “Shadows,” “Doorways” and “Pictorial People.” An example from Chapter 10, “Outof-Place-Things,” is a picture of an old bathtub, half full of rainwater, which is inexplicably placed on a rocky beach. Chapter 14, “Alaska,” has some amazing pictures from the rustic, northernmost state of the union. Some of Haffer’s gauzy nudes date back to the 1930s. The exhibit spans the entirety of Haffer’s long career. Born in Home, Wash., Haffer’s family moved to Tacoma just after the turn of the century. She attended Stadium High School and became an apprentice photographer, setting up her own studio in Auburn in 1919 at age 20. She was influenced by Alfred Stieglitz’s “pictorial school of photography,” in which photographs were given a fuzzy blur that was meant to imbue them with emotional content. This is apparent in some of Haffer’s early nudes. Haffer’s work continued to evolve through the decades of her long career. From 1964 through 1973, Haffer’s pictures were regularly featured in the pages of the Tacoma News Tribune. Haffer’s photos were exhibited all over the country and locally, including exhibits at PLU and UPS. She also had an exhibit at the Handforth Gallery itself in 1970. The retrospective at the Handforth Gallery features 29 photos that have not seen the light of day for more than 40 years. The exhibit includes a ring binder that has copies of Haffer’s type-written essays that accompanied each chapter of her collected works. A visit to the Handforth is often an adventure. The show space is situated between the library’s main desk and the security area and bathrooms. A variety

“The Art of Remembering” and “Mountain Language” PHOTO BY VIRNA HAFFER

This shot of a tower is part of Haffer’s “Abstract” series, Chapter 4 of her “18 Chapters in Photography.”

of personalities pass through the space, often making meditative musing upon the art work a challenge. When I was in the gallery, there was a woman who was angry that her cell phone vanished after she left it unattended at a charging station. The woman proceeded to spew a stream of profane language at the library staff, presumably because they had not prevented the theft of her phone. In a nearby room, meanwhile, a religious gathering of some sort was going on and the voice of a sermonizing preacher was bleeding out into the gallery. Haffer’s pictures capture the human drama even as it unfolds in the little space of the gallery itself. At the Handforth, you can get an art exhibit and a live show: two for the price of one. (Actually, you get it all free of charge.) “18 Chapters in Photography” runs through May 12. For more on the Handforth Gallery visit www.tacomalibrary. org/handforth-gallery. (Unfortunately, this website no longer has an accurate listing of upcoming shows or even much information about current exhibits. Between the retirement of long-time Handforth Gallery Director David Domkoski and the library’s having changed its website, it is difficult to stay apace of this important artistic resource of Tacoma.)

AMERICAN ART CO. HOSTS JURIED PASTEL EXHIBIT

PHOTO COURTESY OF IAPS

Hsiiu Min Hung, of the Pastel Society of Taiwan, won the Founder’s Award for “Lobster,” a photo realist pastel painting.

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

The American Art Co. (1126 S. Broadway) is hosting a voluminous, radiant show of pastel paintings done by pastel artists from all over the world. The show is a juried exhibit of work by members of the International Association of Pastel Societies. Limited only to artists who have excelled in their own regional pastel society, the artists featured in this show represent the crème de la crème of the pastel medium, and there are so many of them: more than 80 paintings by some of the most accomplished practitioners of pastel. Unlike oil or acrylic paint, pastel (the word means “paste”) are sticks of pure pigment bound in a gum or other substance. Pastel sticks (which look similar to crayons) are a means of applying almost pure pigment to the pictorial surface. Thus, pastels have a reputation for remaining true to their original color, whereas other media are prone to darkening or cracking with age.

Microscopically, pastel pigments have a crystal form, which makes them reflectors of light, lending them the luminous quality for which they are known. Works in this show run a gamut of subject matter, most are traditional: landscapes, still lifes, portraits and genre paintings. A wide range of stylistic preferences are also on display. You will encounter everything from photo realism to impressionistic, expressionistic and gestural work. Award winners are accompanied by the ribbons that the show’s juror, Ned Mueller (of the Northwest Pastel Society), assigned to some of the paintings. The ribbons give the show a county fair feel. If you are seeking a pleasant respite, stroll through the American Art Co. and peruse the paintings and the sculptural work (part of the gallery’s permanent display) and spend some time with the artists of the IAPS. The show runs through April 30. For more information, visit www.iapspastel. org. For more on the American Art Co., visit www.americanartco.com.

Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma Thursday, April 26, 7:30 p.m. Info: www.tacomalittletheatre.com Tacoma Little Theatre’s “Off the Shelf” and the Empathos Company are proud to present an evening of two one-act productions: “The Art of Remembering” by Adina L. Ruskin and “Mountain Language” by Harold Pinter. Both are directed by Chevi Chung. Family, immigration, memory and language are shared themes in both plays, which seek to confront the past while also raising awareness of contemporary social and political issues. “The Art of Remembering” is about Rebecca, a grieving woman who returns home to bury her father. The character of Rebecca is portrayed by three actors who travel through time and a myriad of memories in a non-linear fashion. “Mountain Language,” set in an unknown prison, examines human rights and expression of words, and is told in a linear narrative. The evening of staged readings features: Deanna Martinez (Rebecca), Laurice Roberts (Reba), and Deya Ozburn (Becky) in “The Art of Remembering.” Aya Hashiguchi (Elderly Woman), Vaneiya Miller (Young Woman), Brittany D. Henderson (Sergeant), Mariesa Bus (Officer), Emily Cohen (Prisoner), Mark Peterson (Guard), and John Levi III (Hooded Man) in “Mountain Language.” Alana Fineman (stage manager) is on point to read the stage directions for each play. Tickets for the performance $10 for non-TLT members, and free for those who are members. Tickets may be purchased online at www.tacomalittletheatre.com, or by calling our Box Office at (253) 272-2281. About the Empathos Company The mission of the Empathos Company is to cultivate collaborative storytelling and to bring artists and audiences together in unexpected and inspiring ways. For more information contact: Chevi Chung via www.empathos. company, e-mail: info@empathos.company, Instagram: @empathoscompany. TLT’s Off the Shelf Tacoma Little Theatre knows that there is a tremendous amount of wonderful theatre that deserves to be heard but sometimes just doesn’t get an opportunity. With “Off the Shelf,” local directors and actors will be bringing some scripts to life that we hope you will find entertaining, challenging and educational to our stage. We hope that you’ll sit back and enjoy an evening of theatre. You never know, you might see one of these shows on the TLT mainstage in the future.


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

SCREAMING BUTTERFLIES STAGES DYNAMIC PRODUCTION OF SHAKESPEARE’S ‘RICHARD II’

PHOTOS BY KATHRYN PHILBROOK

The Screaming Butterflies production of “Richard II” features gender neutral casting. (left photo) Northumberland (Ben Stahl), The Duke of York (LaNita Walters) and King Richard (Brittany Henderson). (right photo) Northumberland (Ben Stahl), Harry Percy (Jazmine Herrington) and Bolingbroke (Nastassia Reynolds), who becomes King Henry IV.

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

“For heaven’s sake let us sit upon the ground And tell sad stories of the death of kings.” – King Richard, Act 3 Scene 2 Tacoma has a new theatrical company in its midst. Led by Kathryn Philbrook, Screaming Butterflies Productions aims to produce multifaceted theatrical works that reflect the many communities that make up Tacoma. Pieces that use dance and movement, poetry, music and evocative imagery to tell a story are sought after by Screaming Butterflies. Philbrook, who once directed the ancient Greek play “Agamemnon,” says that she “particularly loves to take old stories and bring them into today, either by changing the context, drawing connections to current struggles or questions, and/or using music and visual cues to remind us that an old story carries humor and wisdom that we can still recognize.” “We also,” continues Philbrook, “believe that the people on stage and the designers behind the scenes must reflect the richness of our diverse community, welcoming many genders, cultures, ethnicities, language speakers, and bodies if the art is to be relevant and dynamic.” True to the above mission statements, Screaming Butterflies comes storming out of gate with its first offering: a dynamic, well-crafted production of William Shakespeare’s “Richard II.” One of Shakespeare’s so-called history plays, “Richard II” tells the story of the deposition of one English king and his replacement by another, Bolingbroke. While it is not one of Shakespeare’s best known plays, the poetic and insightful script explores the plight of a ruler who is smug in his assumption of his right to rule. Richard II assumes that his kingship is a God-given right. When he is defeated and imprisoned by his cousin Bolingbroke, however, the fragile King Richard is forced to come face to face with his own humanity; to the fact that he is little different from anyone else made of flesh and blood. “Richard II” is the first of a tetralogy of plays that depict England’s fall into a time of civil strife and fraternal bloodletting, the War of the Roses. With the deposition of King Richard II, the shroud of darkness descends upon England.

BRING IT TO BARB

Answering your questions on mental health, relationships and life issues

By Barb Rock DEAR BARB, I recently went to the doctor and to my surprise I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I have a few extra pounds but never thought this would happen to me. What are the worst foods for diabetes and heart disease? Signed, Concerned and Counteractive DEAR CONCERNED, This can be a scary reality to be told this by your doctor. This may seem harsh, but nobody forces you to eat what you eat every day or buy what you bring home and place into your cabinets and refrigerator, which is the true culprit for creating this condition in your body most likely. In my opinion it boils down to one thing: lack of self-control. Remember the commercial years ago for Lay’s Potato Chips? “Nobody can eat just one!”

The Screaming Butterflies version of the play is inventive on several fronts. The costumes are striking – described as 1920s Art Deco, the king wears a zoot suit and Bolingbroke is clad in sumptuous, bronzy velvet. Pinstriped suits and ties are sported by many of the characters. The minimal stage sets, consisting of flimsy reflective panels suspended from metal poles and a throne made of particle board, are endlessly rearranged to create a variety of settings: everything from a boxing ring to a prison cell. Props are minimal, but I enjoyed the sight of courtiers sipping martinis and characters out on the field of battle continually resorting to their flasks in order to alcoholically lubricate their dark and daring deeds. Mateo Herrera’s original music also helps to set the mood for this descent into political chaos. What is most remarkable about the play, however, is the brilliant acting on the part of the cast. Using gender neutral casting, a number of the male characters are played by female actors. The lead roles of King Richard II and Bolingbroke, for example, are played by Brittany Henderson and Nastassia Reynolds respectively. Henderson captures all aspects of King Richard’s decline with remarkable ease, transforming from the jaded, selfassured monarch (who is surrounded by flatterers) to the brittle prisoner forced to relinquish his crown. Reynolds, meanwhile, plays Bolingbroke as a fiery, aggressive and brash prince who seizes power as due compensation for personal slights committed by the king. Ben Stahl, one of the region’s great Shakespearians, is magnificent as Northumberland. Snyde and cool as a cucumber, he aids Bolingbroke’s popular rebellion and rise to power. Cat Waltzer tugs at the heart strings as the sorrowful Queen Isabella, while Jazmine Herrington is riveting as the flashing-eyed Henry Percy. Jackie VC, in her role as the Duchess of York, performs one of the most powerful scenes, which comes late in the play. She falls to her knees before the newly crowned King Henry IV and refuses to get up until the king promises to spare the life of her rebellious son, Aumerle (ably played by Travis Martinez). AntHicks, a local comedian and performer, provides some comic relief in the play, especially in the role of Green, one of King Richard’s sycophants. AntHicks delivers the Shakespearian language with a southern drawl. LaNita Walters speaks volumes with facial expressions and body language. Ed Medina is there to fill out in variety of auxiliary roles.

Actually, yes you can eat just one, if you tell yourself to only eat one. Sugar, however, has been recently named as a “poison” responsible for America’s obesity and diabetes epidemic. Do you notice that those who struggle with diabetes are also overweight consistently? The link is sugar! Sugar is your dietary enemy number one. It has been described as similar to cocaine, being equally difficult to resist once you have a taste of it. It’s in your bread and your packages of boxed products. It is one of the many foods that turn the body into a breeding ground for diabetes. It also causes inflammation in your body. Now, most American diets consist of foods that have been harming the body for years, but this doesn’t mean that diabetics have to cut out all tasty foods completely. Balance is the key. Let’s be completely honest; one cookie a day is much different than eating five cookies a day! Sugar used to be available in the form of fruit or honey, but today high fructose corn syrup is added to everything from processed food to infant formulas. You would be shocked if you started looking at the sugar content on every label for each product you put in your shopping cart this week. Set a limit of 24 grams of sugar a day and see how fast that number can add up by checking your cereal, yogurt or jam. Saturated fat is your second biggest enemy of the modern diet. Everybody loves a steak or a juicy hamburger

Steve Gallion, as the aged John of Gaunt, delivers one of the more memorable speeches in the play, the ode to England, which he sees to be in jeopardy of slipping away from its privileged place in the world through bad kingship. A deep reverence for the soil of England, as an almost sacred substance, comes forward very strenuously from Shakespeare’s lines. In preparation for viewing this play, I read much of the script while on an airline flight between Dallas and SeaTac. A silent reading did not prepare me for the dynamism with which the actors were able to breathe life and personality into the old language. There is as much said with a sneer, the rolling of eyes and a sigh of impatience as there is with the verbalization itself. It is the actors that make this production such an enjoyable ride. To get the most out of a Shakespearian play, however, I do recommend that audience members arm themselves with a little foreknowledge. Read or listen to a YouTube synopsis of the play if you do not have time to read the script. The more that you know ahead of time, the less you become bogged down in Shakespeare’s sometimes opaque language. A little preparation ahead of time makes for a more satisfying experience and you will begin to see why Shakespeare is such a revered hero of the English language (if you did not already think so to begin with.) Screaming Butterflies’ choice of this play at this moment in our national political lives makes for an interesting choice. The examination of an entitled, unreflective ruler who surrounds himself with flatterers is not so far removed from the present day. Will we, in our time, bear witness to the deposition of such a ruler. Will we see a fragile ego dragged off to jail and suffer a crushing crisis of identity as that falsely inflated ego is forced, at long last, to come face to face with the mirror of reality? And if so, will such an event auger the beginning of a time of civil strife? Shakespeare’s “Richard II” may function as much as a warning of the future as a telling of the past. What becomes of a country, the Bard seems to ask, if the ruler that deposes his predecessor is little better than that which he deposed? “Richard II” runs through April 29 with performances at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays. Performances are held at Dukesbay Theater at 508 S. 6th Ave., in Tacoma. For more on the play and Screaming Butterflies Productions, visit screamingbutterfliestheater.wordpress. com.

from time to time, but too much steak, hamburger, lamb and other red meat has been linked to heart disease and diabetes. Recent research at leading U.S. medical centers suggest that L-carnitine, a component in red meat, leads to clogged coronary arteries. Red meat delivers a heroin-like shot of L-carnitine to the bacteria that live in the human gut. That bacteria turns into trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMA0), which leads to cholesterol-clogged arteries, which in turn can lead to a heart attack. Processed red meats such as bacon, sausage, and salami are the worst. Studies indicate that eating too much meat can increase diabetes by 41 percent.  Be careful of “skim” products that contain powdered milk solids and toxic industrial oils, which cause terrible inflammation in the body, making the body work overtime. Remember, inflammation has been linked to cancer! Finally, diets high in refined grains were two and a half times more likely to cause type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate whole grains or fewer carbohydrates. So, what do you eat? Anything you want in moderation! What a concept. For now, however, to correct your body and control your diabetes, you need to eat as little sugar as possible, as little saturated and processed meats as possible and as few bread products as possible. What’s left? Everything grown in the

ground. Undoing years of incorrect food consumption will not be fixed in a week or could take more than a year. Upbringing and childhood environment is extremely influential and powerful, causing a sense of belligerence when creating new eating habits. We all get grumpy when we’re hungry. But correct food choices when you are hungry will amaze you with the reward of how good you feel and you’ll lose weight without even trying. Choose when you eat your demon foods; you know what they are, but never every day! The best help I can offer is to suggest you keep a diary of the sugar amounts every day for a week as best as you can. It does take telling yourself “no” all the time. As adults, we should be good at saying “no.” We say no to doing high-risk activities. Eating badly is a very high-risk activity for you right now. Invite a friend to team up with you. Our society is conditioned to throw things away when they are broken or old, but it does not apply to our bodies. How bad do you want it? You can do this! You have one body, you own it wrecked or you own it healthy, either way, you own it. Do you have a question? Barb Rock is a mental health counselor answering questions related to mental health, relationships or life issues and the published author of “Run Your Own Race, Happiness after 50.” Send your questions to BarbRockrocks@yahoo.com. If your anonymous question is published, you’ll receive a complimentary copy of her book. 


TACOMA CONCERT BAND BIDS FAREWELL TO FOUNDING CONDUCTOR ROBERT MUSSER IN APRIL 28 CONCERT

Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: SOUNDS OF BRASS THE 11TH ANNUAL “SOUNDS OF BRASS POPS” concert is Sunday, April 29th at 3 p.m., Tacoma Community College, Bldg. #2. The featured ensemble is a 16-member brass with rhythm section under the direction of John Falskow, T.C.C. music chair. Guest soloist is trombonist Gary Schutes. Schutes has performed with Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., Bob Newhart, etc. He has lived and worked in New York City, Los Angeles, and the Puget Sound area. Music selections will include: “Three Dances for On the Town,” “Broadway Medley,” “Blackbird Special” (Dirty Dance Band). Schutes will be featured on “Emily,” “Shadow of Your Smile” and “Summertime.” The concert is free to the public. For more information visit www.brassunlimited.org.

Friday, April 20 ALEGRE BAKERY AND GELATO: Angie Lynn (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA CONCERT BAND

Robert Musser will retire after 38 years as director and conductor of Tacoma Concert Band.

On April 28, the Tacoma Concert Band is honoring the retirement of conductor, music director, and founder Robert Musser with a concert called “Celebration!” For 38 years, Musser and the band entertained Pacific Northwest audiences with great music. Musser is professor emeritus at the University of Puget Sound, where he was director of bands, professor of oboe and saxophone and chairman of winds and percussion for 34 years. He is the founder, music director and conductor of the Tacoma Concert Band, an organization that has gained a national and international reputation for excellence. He is also the former music director and conductor of the Puget Sound Youth Wind Ensemble. For many years, he performed as principal oboe with the Tacoma Symphony and as a woodwind specialist (playing oboe, English horn, flute, clarinet and saxophone) throughout the Puget Sound area. Among his many awards are the National Band Association Citation of Excellence, election into the prestigious American Bandmasters Association (an honorary organization for distinguished band conductors), the Diploma of the Sudler Order of

Merit of the John Philip Sousa Foundation, and election into the Washington Music Educators Association Hall of Fame. He has conducted numerous regional and state festivals and honor bands and appeared as a guest conductor of both bands and orchestras throughout the United States, Canada, China, Russia, and Ukraine. Upon his retirement from the University of Puget Sound, the mayor of Tacoma, on behalf of the City Council, proclaimed April 22, 2005 as Robert Musser Day the City of Tacoma “in celebrating the contributions of this outstanding educator, musician and mentor.” According to John Falskow, director of instrumental music at Tacoma Community College,

“Bob Musser is an icon in local music education and performance. As the music director of Tacoma Concert Band and also the director of bands at UPS, he has had a profound influence on music and music education in our community. The Tacoma Concert Band has provided our community with excellent musicianship and exciting performances for over 35 years! Bob’s leadership has been at the center of the band’s success.” Falskow also noted that, this being Musser’s retirement concert, the band is certain to pull out all the stops and deliver a bang of a performance. For more information, visit www.tacomaconcertband.org or www. facebook.com/OfficialTacomaConcertBand.

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AIRPORT TAVERN: DJ Flave, Double Shot, Grunt (disk jockey) 9 p.m. ALMA MATER: Smokey Brights, Sisters, Deep Sea Diver (progressive pop) 7 p.m. ANNIE WRIGHT SCHOOLS: Lisa Bergman, Cindy Renander, Svend Ronning (classical) 7:30 p.m. BLEU NOTE LOUNGE: Kareem Kandi Trio (jazz) 7 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Nite Crew (dance tunes), 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Randy Oxford Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m. LOUIE G’S: Cashing in Karma, Asterhouse, The Morning After, Sun Mother (rock) 7 p.m., $10, AA PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Brennan Brichoux, Josh Carlisle (voice recital) 8 p.m. PANTAGES: Pink Martini (Latin, jazz, cabaret) 7:30 THE SAFE HOUSE: The Head Choppa, International Punk Kings, Jekyll & Hyde, PMS (punk) 6 p.m., AA THE SWISS: Lo There, Liquidlight, Old Foals (alternative rock) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Sarah Colonna (comedy) 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. TEMPLE THEATRE: Zapp and the Dazz Band (funk) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock) 7 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK HALL: Wind Ensemble/Concert Band (classical) 7:30 p.m. THE VALLEY: Neutralboy, Millhous, Ball Bag, The Nightmares (punk) 9 p.m., $5

Saturday, April 21

AIRPORT TAVERN: The Brothers Reed, Redwood Son (hipster folk) 9 p.m.

DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE: Forest Beutel, Rooster Crow (Americana blues) 9 p.m. DUNAGAN: That Irish Guy (Irish rebel music) 9 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Nite Crew (dance tunes), 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: LeRoy Bell and his only Friends (soul) 8 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: The Adarna, Strangely Alright (rock) 8 p.m., AA NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE: T-Town Aces (rock) 8 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Not My Tempo (rock) 8 p.m. THE SAFE HOUSE: Chili Mutiny, Circle Twerks, The Gerbil Turds (punk) 6 p.m., AA SHAKABRAH JAVA: Cosmo’s Dream (Americana) 8 p.m. THE SPAR: Denny Blaine (rock) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: Nite Wave (80s music) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Sarah Colonna (comedy) 7:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m. TACOMA DOME: Trevor Gordon Hall, David Ellefson, John 5 and the Creatures, Paul Reed Smith, Will McFarlane (Tacoma Guitar Fest) 9:30 a.m. THEATER ON THE SQUARE: Jose’ Antonio Rodriquez (flamenco guitar) 7:30 TIPSY TOMATO BAR AND GRILL: Stop Don’t Stop, Shookup, Zombie Jihad (rock) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Wayward Strangers (rock) 7 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK HALL: Aaron Klein (clarinet recital) 2 p.m.; Melissa young, Sheri Ann Nishiyama (voice recital) 5 p.m.; Wyatt Jackson, Alison Hay (voice recital) 7:30 p.m. THE VALLEY: Granite Waves, The Heyfields, Halcion Halo, Headless Pez, Green Jello (alternative) 8 p.m.

REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be self motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Attendance of community events, organizational skills, and attention to detail, negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Monday, April 23

ODD OTTER: Live Music Monday (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m. THE SWISS: Open Mic Night (open mic) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bartlett on bass (jam) 7 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND: SCHNEEBECK HALL: Alistair MacRae (chamber music) 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday, April 24

DAWSON’S: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH: Tacoma TotemAires Barbershop Chorus (barber shop) 7 p.m. METRONOME: Open Mic (open mic) 7 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: University Singers, Men’s Chorus, Chamber Singers (classical) 8 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Bingo (it’s a game) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Blues Jam with Roger Williamson (blues) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz (trivia) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m., 18+, NC UNCLE SAM’S: SOB Band (jam) 7 p.m., NC UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND: SCHNEEBECK HALL: Chamber Music Concert (chamber music) 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 25

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Brahms and Beyond (classical chamber concert) 6:30 p.m., $10

AIRPORT TAVERN: Gabriel Rutledge, Josh Firestine (comedy) 8 p.m. ANTHEM COFFEE CO., OLD TOWN: Jazz Jam with B Sharp Music Society (jazz) 6:30 p.m. DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JOESEPPIS ITALIAN RISTORANTE: Robin Miller-Richardson (piano and vocals) 5:30 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LEE HANSEN RECITAL HALL: Erika Yeomans (flute recital) 8 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Karaoke (hit & miss musicianship) 9 p.m. STEEL CREEK: Aaron Watson (country) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: The Blu Tonez (blues) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Open Mic (comedy) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (jam) 7 p.m., NC THE VALLEY: Year of the Cobra, Mos Generator, Destroyer of Light, Kyberox (doom and gloom) 8 p.m. VINO AQUINO WINERY: Open Mic Night (open mic) 6 p.m. WHEELOCK STUDENT CENTER, UPS: Noon recital series (classical) 12 p.m.

Thursday, April 26

BLEU NOTE LOUNGE: Lady A, Kim Archer (blues, foul, funk) 6 p.m.

Sunday, April 22

REAL ART TACOMA: Fantastic Fogman, Bunny n’ Bear, The Landmarks, Will Moore, Dream Ring (alternative pop) 7 p.m., $7-$10

SALES REPRESENTATIVE Tacoma Weekly News is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated self-starter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Sarah Colonna (comedy) 8 p.m. TACOMA DOME: Trevor Gordon Hall, Will McFarlane, Carl Tosten (Tacoma Guitar Fest) 10 a.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Final Notice with Bob Evans (country, rock, bluegrass) 7 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND: SCHNEEBECK HALL: Rosie Rogers, Aric MacDavid (bassoon recital) 2 p.m.; Davis Hampton (clarinet recital) 5 p.m.; Emily Laliotis (voice recital) 7:30 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JOHNNY’S DOCK: Felix (R & B, blues) 5 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, EASTVOLD AUDITORIUM: Malick Folk Performers (Caribbean drumming) 3 p.m., NC; Kaitlynn Turner (cello recital) 5 p.m.; Nicholas Stevens (voice recital) 8 p.m. PANTAGES: Earth Songs from the Harp, Symphony Tacoma (classical) 2:30 p.m. THE SPAR: Maia Santell (blues) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Country Music Jam (jam) 5:00 p.m.

THE AGAVES GRILL: Ed Taylor Band (jazz), 6 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Open Mic with Dustin (rock) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Power Rock Jam (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Bob Hill, The Twang Junkies (Swiss 25th anniversary) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Joe List (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

SHERLOCK GNOMES Nightly @ 7:00 pm Sat. & Sun. Matinee at 4:30 p.m. FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS

DOLLS

Friday 4/20 at 10:00 p.m. 2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500

WAYZGOOSE

RICHARD II

TACOMA TAROT BABES

TACOMA CONCERT BAND

SHADOW THEATER

SOUNDS OF BRASS

BELTRANE FESTIVAL

YEAR OF THE DOG

BULL RIDING

UP FOR ARTS

HANDFORTH GALLERY

LOUDER THAN A BOMB


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

Coming Events TOP PICK: TACOMA CITY BALLET’S ‘CINDERELLA’ Sat., April 28, 2 p.m. Sun., April 29, 2 p.m. Sat., May 5, 2 p.m. Sun., May 6, 2 p.m. Federal Way Performing Arts & Event Center, 31510 Pete von Reichbauer Way South, Federal Way, WA 98003 Since the death of her beloved mother and her father’s re-marriage to the evil widow of a wealthy tax collector, poor Cinderella’s life has been miserable…until her Fairy Godmother appears. Under the artistic direction of Erin M. Ceragioli, with the Tacoma City Ballet Orchestra under the direction of Maestro Bernard Kwiram, Tacoma City Ballet presents “Cinderella” in grand classical style. The opulent scenery and costumes of this familiar fairytale ballet are certain to delight. “Cinderella” has it all — comedy, magic, and romance! Don’t miss this magical, magnificent production of one of your favorite fairy tales – “Cinderella.” Tickets: $18, $34, $59, $79, $104. Info: (253) 835-7010; www.BroadwayCenter.org

‘THE PILLOWMAN’ Fri., April 20, 7:30 p.m. OPENING NIGHT Sat., April 21, 7:30 p.m. Sun., April 22, 2 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma Tacoma Little  Theatre presents this dark comedy by Martin McDonagh, the Oscar-winning author/ director of “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri.” McDonagh echoes the works of Stoppard, Kafka and the Brothers Grimm in this New York Drama Critics’ Circle and Olivier Award-winning script. “The Pillowman” is a viciously funny and seriously disturbing tale of Katurian, a fiction writer in an unnamed totalitarian state. Katurian and his brother, Michael, are brought in for questioning by two bulldog detectives, Tupolski and Ariel, when the content of his short stories – which involve disturbingly gruesome tales – begin to resemble real-life murders. “The Pillowman” weaves between reality and storytelling, and the result is an urgent work of theatrical bravura and an unflinching examination of the very nature and purpose of art. Plays through May 6. Ages: 13 and up. Price: Adults $24; seniors 60+/ students/military $22. Info: (253) 272-2281; www. TacomaLittleTheatre.com ‘PETER & THE STARCATCHER’ Fri., April 20, 8 p.m. Sat., April 21, 8 p.m. Sun., April 22, 2 p.m. CLOSING PERFORMANCE Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd S.W., Lakewood A wildly theatrical adaptation of Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson’s best-selling novels, “Peter & The Starcatcher” features marauding pirates and jungle tyrants, unwilling comrades and unlikely heroes, as the stage production playfully explores the depths of greed and despair... and the bonds of friendship, duty and love – a Lakewood Playhouse and South Sound premiere. Prices: $26 general admission, $23 military and seniors, and $20 students/educators. Parental advisory: Features swordplay and “pirate talk” considered appropriate for those who have seen other funny shows with pirates in them. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse. org; (253) 588-0042 ‘CATCH ME IF YOU CAN’ Fri., April 20, 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 21, 7:30 p.m. Sun., April 22, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. Nominated for four Tony

Awards, including Best Musical, this delightfully entertaining show was created by a Tony Award-winning dream team, with a book by Terrence McNally (“The Full Monty,” “Ragtime”). Plays through April 29. Price: Adult: $31/senior (60+), student, military: $29/child (12 and under): $22/groups of 10+: $27. Info: (253) 565-6867; tmp. org

DANCE: STORYTELLING Fri., April 20, 7:30-10 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University – Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, 12180 Park Ave. S. An inspiring collection of faculty, student, and guest artist choreography, revealing fresh perspectives and diverse artistry. Price: $5-$10. Info: (253) 5357411; eventbrite.com/e/ dance-s tor ytelling-tickets-37506340474 TOYTOPIA Fri., April 20, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. What was your favorite childhood toy? A jump rope, a board game, or Space Invaders? Or was it an Easy Bake Oven or a Slinky? You’re sure to find your favorite toys in Toytopia. Ages: All ages. Price: $14 adults; $11 seniors, military (with ID), youth/students; ages 0-5 free. Admission for Historical Society members is always free. Info: (253) 272-3500; washingtonhistory.org/visit/wshm/exhibits/ toytopia ORGAN RECITAL Fri., April 20, 12:10-1 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church Tacoma, 310 N. K St. Six Puget Sound organists, Cheryl Drewes, Martha Freitag, April Kuhr, Satya Jaech, Curt Sather and Shari Shull, play music by J.S. Bach, Heinrich Scheidemann, Georg Böhm, Alfred Hollins, Max Reger, William Mathias and Louis Vierne on the renowned Brombaugh pipe organ.Price: Donation. Info: (253) 383-1569; ccptacoma.org PREPARING FOR PREGNANCY AND PARENTHOOD Sat., April 21, 2:30-4 p.m. Red Elm Cafe, 1114 MLK Jr. Way Walk away from this hour and a half workshop with a heightened connection to self, baby, and partner. When you attend this free workshop you will learn three essential skills for navigating both pregnancy and parenthood. Price: Free. Info: (504) 782-0739

ANNUAL FUCHSIA SALE Sat., April 21, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Disabled American Veterans, 1110 N. Stevens Come early for the best selection. This is an opportunity to find beautiful, unique, hardy perennial fuchsias for your garden. Some trailing fuchsias also available. Ages: All ages. Price: No charge to browse. Info: (253) 7522970; facebook.com/tahomafuchsiasociety LOOSE CANON COMMUNITY SING-ALONG AND PIE SOCIAL Sat., April 21, 6-7:30 p.m. Bethany Presbyterian Church, 4420 N. 41st St. No cost, just fun, song, pie and cobbler afterward. Bring non-perishable/cash donation for FISH food bank. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 752-1123; bethanytacoma.org PLAYDATES: TOYS FROM THE WSHS COLLECTION Sun., April 22, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. “PlayDates” celebrates some of the most popular toys in America through a look into the collections of the Washington State Historical Society. Ages: All ages. Price: $14 adult, $11 seniors/youth/student/military (with ID); children 0-5 free; WSHS members always free. Info: (253) 272-3500; washingtonhistory.org WORSHIP AND COMMUNION Sun., April 22, 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Spiritually uplifting communion services. Traditional, user-friendly Episcopal worship. Focus on daily living and life’s challenges. Nursery and children’s Sunday School at 10 a.m. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; saintandrewstacoma.org KNOWING WHERE TO TURN IN DIFFICULT TIMES Mon., April 23, 7-8:30 Meditate in Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave. S., Ste. #301 By learning to respond to challenges skillfully, with acceptance, compassion, and wisdom, our problems become powerful spiritual fuel. Ages: All ages. Price: Cost $10 per class; $5 for students/seniors; free for members

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

2210-2212 N. 30th St. Learn the art of creating pottery on the potters wheel, hand building techniques and decorative and functional pottery in our clean and spacious studio.Ages: 18+. Price: $220 + cost of basic tool kit. Info: (253) 2547961; throwingmudgallery. com/pottery-classes

presents Dave Slager of U.W. talking about his favorite birds, eBirding, and more. Ages: Adults. Price: $10. Info: (253) 879-3100; abcbirding.com/april-24-2018dave-slager-to-visit-abc

FAMILY STORY TIME Tues., April 24, 10:30 a.m. Summit Library, 5107 112th St. E. Stories, art activities, rhymes, singing and finger plays for children caregivers, and families with young children. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3321; piercecountylibrary.org/calendar

ROOT TO GROW: A SIX-WEEK YOGA SERIES Mon., April 23, 5:306:30 p.m. Tacoma Nature Center, 1919 S. Tyler St. The intention of this series is to cultivate physical and emotional stability. You must first lay an intentional foundation, your roots, to grow into your fullest potential. Price: $60 for series. Info: (206) 458-5593; beyogawild.com

PENINSULA ART LEAGUE MEETING AND FREE DEMO Tues., April 24, 5:30-8 p.m. Gig Harbor United Methodist Church, 7400 Pioneer Way, Gig Harbor This month’s demo: Judy Buskirk demonstrates how music can exhilarate and inform your artmaking. Price: Free. Info: (720) 840-8290; peninsulaartleague.com

VACATIONS OF A DIFFERENT STRIPE Tues., April 24, 12:10 p.m. Pierce County City Building, 930 Tacoma Ave. S. There’s a growing interest in alternative vacations ranging from extended house sitting to “voluntourism” and many other options. Ages: All ages. Price: Free; no RSVP required. Info: (253) 7987384; PierceADRC.org

COPPER CANE WINE DINNER Wed., April 25, 6-9 p.m. Pacific Grill, 1502 Pacific Ave. The evening will feature wines from trendsetting winemaker Joe Wagner, one of the bright young stars in Napa Valley, alongside our deliciously paired fiveCourse menu from Pacific Grill’s talented chefs. Ages: 21+. Price: $99.50 per person (plus tax and service charge). Info: (253) 7221480; pacificgrilltacoma. com/coppercane

BIRDS WITH DAVE SLAGER Tues., April 24, 6:458:30 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Thompson Hall, 1517 N. Union Ave. The ABC Bird Club of Tahoma Audubon along with the Slater Museum at UPS

P F D M U T L Y G L E P T O V A Q M S Y

L Z J B O H A X P H L U I I F D I W D N D P T T Y T B M C S I Q D U F J H A WH

B F O V O E D X D A Q E N O O V P X D A

E L X S H Q R F G B P G N B U M F P O N

L I B E S M A X L T F P V A N Y O L W D

T D U B S B H K R R H C V N D E R U T F

R X L A U G C X D E W E J A S A A O H O

A K L B X C I B H C U N G H O R R G E R

N E V M R I T O WQ B P R H I N B P N O V D WA J V T R F B O F T S NM A T T H

F G D R T Q Q H C C N Y K E R T D W E G

E E I A T E K O A A N Z Y D A H E I R A

S H N T T W A L F M N G A U S E I K O L

T P G A D E F L I O S O V O S D L Q B L

I G U M O U X B U C D O M L C O W I E E

V H Q O T J Y D X A N S G D S G T L M R

A L Q I Z G C A E H S Y F Z Z S GW T E C S E K WN J V W E B G X J A T X Z Y K

X R P T W Z T U K S X I U X Q B E Q C Y

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

HANDFORTH GALLERY How many words can you make out of this phrase?

POTTERY CLASSES AT THROWING MUD GALLERY Mon., April 23, 6-8:30 p.m. Throwing Mud Gallery,

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.


Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7

Classifieds

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Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

Notices

Notices

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 4/26/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 04242018 Auction 01302018 Date 01/30/2018 04/24/2018 Sign in & View @ 11pm pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office TO: Rigoberto Zamora-Case Case Name: C, A Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2017-0017 Nature of Case: Child/Family Protection Petition – ADJUDICATORY HEARING SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING A Child/Family Protection Petition has been filed regarding the above-named child. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to personally appear before the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians for a FORMAL ADJUDICATORY HEARING and date, time and location below: DATE: Friday, May 11th, 2018 TIME: 10:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 At the formal adjudicatory hearing the petitioner must prove that the allegations raised in the child/family protection petition are more likely true than not and that the best interests of the child will be served by continued Court intervention. The Court will either find the allegations of the child/family protection petition to be true or dismiss the child/family protection petition, unless continued to allow the presentation of further evidence. If you do not respond to the petition within 20 days or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find you in default and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps you must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. A copy of the Petition and an Advisement of Rights is available at the Court Clerk’s office. You may call Puyallup Tribe Children’s Services for more information about your child. The caseworker’s name is Khaliah Tsegai and the telephone number is 253680-5532. DATED this 11th day of April 2018 . For more information, please call the Puyallup Tribal Court Clerk at 253-6805585.

TO: Rigoberto Zamora-Case Case Name: Z-C, D Case Number: PUY-CW-CW-2017-0018 Nature of Case: Child/Family Protection Petition – ADJUDICATORY HEARING SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING A Child/Family Protection Petition has been filed regarding the above-named child. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to personally appear before the Children’s Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians for a FORMAL ADJUDICATORY HEARING and date, time and location below: DATE: Friday, May 11th, 2018 TIME: 10:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31ST ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 At the formal adjudicatory hearing the petitioner must prove that the allegations raised in the child/family protection petition are more likely true than not and that the best interests of the child will be served by continued Court intervention. The Court will either find the allegations of the child/family protection petition to be true or dismiss the child/family protection petition, unless continued to allow the presentation of further evidence. If you do not respond to the petition within 20 days or appear for the formal adjudicatory hearing, the Court may find you in default and enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps you must follow to correct the underlying problem(s). NOTICE, PURSUANT TO TRIBAL CODE SECTION 7.04.750, THE COURT MAY FIND THE PARENT, GUARDIAN OR CUSTODIAN IN DEFAULT FOR FAILURE TO RESPOND OR APPEAR AT A COURT HEARING. THIS MAY RESULT IN YOUR CHILD(REN) BEING PLACED IN ANOTHER HOME AND THE PARENT ORDERED TO CORRECT CERTAIN PROBLEMS. A copy of the Petition and an Advisement of Rights is available at the Court Clerk’s office. You may call Puyallup Tribe Children’s Services for more information about your child. The caseworker’s name is Khaliah Tsegai and the telephone number is 253680-5532. DATED this 11th day of April 2018 . For more information, please call the Puyallup Tribal Court Clerk at 253-6805585. NO. PUY-CS-CS-2018-0009 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing

Volunteers

FIFE’S NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATION PROGRAM PUBLIC HEARING TO REVIEW THE 2018-2019 TITLE VI GRANT. MONDAY, MAY 7, 2018 AT 4:30 PM AT THE FIFE HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA. Any questions please contact: Martha Sherman, Native American Education Program Coordinator - 523517-1000 Ex.t 25103. Public Hearing for Native American Education Program 2018-19 Grant Review to be Held April 30th Parents, teachers, administrators, and community members from the following school districts are invited to attend a public hearing on April 30, 2018 at Sumner Middle School. The formula grant for the Native American Program will be reviewed for the current 2017-18 school year, while having the opportunity to provide input regarding 2018-19 Title VI programming. WHO: Parents, school staff, students, and community members from the following school districts: Franklin Pierce, Peninsula, University Place, and Sumner. WHAT: Public Hearing regarding the 2018-19 Native American Education Program WHEN: April 30, 2018 5:00-7:00 pm WHERE: Sumner Middle School 1508 Willow St. Sumner, WA 98390 About the Native American Education Program The Native American Education Program facilitates academic success for Native students and helps all students become more aware of Native American culture, particularly within our region. Coordinated through Puget Sound Educational Service District, the program provides Education Coordinators in four participating school districts: Franklin Pierce, Peninsula, Sumner, and University Place. Superior Court of Washington County of Pierce In re: Marriage | domestic partnership Petitioner EDWARD HINDS NO: 18-3-01349-5 Summons Served by Publication And Respondent YOLANDA RAYNETTE HINDS Summons Served by Publication To Yolanda Raynette Hinds- the other party has asked the Court to End your Marriage or domestic partnership.

Volunteer to help an Isolated Elder

Olivia Elkins Petitioner, v. Rodney Hopper III Respondent, The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for May 23rd, 2018 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court.

You must respond in writing if you want the court to consider your side Deadline! Your Response must be filed and served within 60 days of the date this summons is published. If you do not file and serve your Response or a Notice of Appearance by the Deadline: *No one has to notify you about other hearings in this case, and * The court may approve the request in the Petition without hearing your side (called a default judgment). Follow these steps: Read the Petition and any other documents that were filed at court with this summons. Those documents explain what the other party is asking for. Fill out a Response on this form FL Divorce 211, Response to Petition about a Marriage. Serve (give) a copy of your Response to the person who filed this Summons at the address below, and to any other parties. You use certified mail with return receipt requested. For more information on how to serve, read Superior Court Civil Rule 5. File your original Response with the court clerk at this address: Superior Court Clerk, Pierce County 930 Tacoma Ave S. Tacoma WA 98402 Lawyer not required: It is a good idea to talk to a lawyer, but you may file and serve your Response without one. Person filing this summons or his/her lawyer fills out below EDWARD HINDS April 5, 2018 The following address 34414 28th Place SW Federal Way WA 98023 Superior Court of Washington, County of Pierce

Wanted: Volunteers for groceries.

Make a difference in someone’s life! Senior Companions and Senior Friends are volunteers whose friendship helps seniors maintain their independence through regular visits and assistance with errands. Senior Companion volunteers must be 55+, low-income and serve 15 hrs/week to receive a tax free stipend. Senior Friend volunteers must be 18+ and serve 2 hrs/month – no stipend. Eligible volunteers will pass a background check and attend training before being matched with an elder needing your help. Call Sarah (253-722-5686) or Linda (253-722-5691) at Lutheran Community Services for more information & an application

The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740.

City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife. org/getinvolved.

VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES

The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 7983789 or Email Kgavron@ co.pierce.wa.us. Or visit www.co.pierce.wa.us/index.aspx?NID=1302

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS

CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www. chifranciscan.org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

Pets

Name Change Change the name of the Respondent

IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Dated April 9, 2018 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585

Notices

Pet of the Week

MACCHIATO

Featured Pet Macchiato is a drop dead gorgeous Satin Angora. The rabbit is as sweet as the sugary beverage she’s named for and enjoys attention, which makes it even easier for the grooming she requires several times a week. Macchiato came to the Society severely matted and had to be shaved down. Now that her luscious locks are growing back and with regular grooming, it won’t be long before her soft mane is back in all its glory. Macchiato enjoys the simple things in life: a good long hop time to get the blood flowing, daily salads (hay, not so much), and your utter care and devotion. If you have any questions about the beautiful lass or her care, please contact her former foster family at GSSU1720@aol.com.

www.thehumanesociety.org

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Friday, April 20, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 9

Classifieds

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ Serving the Community Since 1991 Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

FOR SALE 5513 62nd Ave W University Place, WA 98467

$589,950 5Beds 3.50 Baths, 2,898 SqFt Year Built 1999.

Your beautiful new home is here in Chambers Creek Crossing on a quite culde-sac on 62nd Ave W. A newer home that has been completely remodeled... where can you get main and upper master bedrooms, both with a bath off master!? Attention to detail throughout and many extras; detailed ceilings, woodwork, central air and dual heat pumps, large deck and RV/boat parking with off street parking for ten or more cars. Gas fireplace, hardwood floors, tile, granite and stainless appliances. A must see.

Your Go-To North Tacoma Experts and Neighbors

Toner Real Estate Solutions SPECIALIZING IN RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SALES; & PRIVATE LOANS

CALL TODAY 253-441-5000

Joseph Toner Sharon Benson • Sharonbenson.com Managing Broker CRS, GRI, ABR, SRES, CDPE, ONE 2016 Pierce County Realtor of the Year 253.381.7447 sharon@sharonbenson.com

Kelli Jo Hjalseth • Kellijo.net

Managing Broker CRS, IMS, RMS, CSHP 253.208.9066 Kellijo@windermere.com

TACOMA URBAN DIGS

Cell: 253-212-8468 Cell: 253-222-4549

hcrittendon@yahoo.com

www.facebook.com/TacomaUrbanDigs ing

1628 Mildred Street, Suite 202 Tacoma Washington 98465 Joe@JoeToner.com 253.441.5000

REAL ESTATE

Heather Crittendon & Associates

pend

Designated Broker, Principal Toner Real Estate Solutions

218 Broadway #6 Tacoma, WA 98402 $249,995 2 Bed, 1.5 Bath 921 SqFt

1120 Cliff Ave #411 Tacoma, WA 98402 $273,500 1 Bath 608 SqFt

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

TACOMA TACOMA APARTMENT 3228 S UNION 3228 S UNION AVE. AVE

UNIV.APARTMENT PLACE TACOMA 2208 GRANDVIEW DR. W 4010 S THOMPSON AVE #C

1BED 1 BATH 450THE SF. EL 1 BED 1 BATH 450SF. CLEAN, COZY APARTPOPO APARTMENTS OFFER A MENT IN TACOMA, WITH CLEANACCESS & COZY APARTMENT EASY TO WA-16.

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1 BED 1 BATH 550 CHARMING, COME TO THIS 3 SF. BED 2 BATH 1 BD 1. BATH SMALL COMMUNITY U.P HOME, W/HARDWOOD 2ND FLOOR HOME. FLOORS ONAPARTMENT THE MAIN LEVEL.

7518 41ST ST CT W #F2 2205 BOBS HOLLOW LN

9007 115TH ST. E #B 4541 S PUGET SOUND AVE

$625 $675

UNIV. PL. APT. DUPONT

$1095 $1850

sold

TACOMA APARTMENT PUYALLUP

$1150 $1150

2 BED BATH 1050SF. 1157 SF.CENTRALLY REMODBED 1 2.5BATH BATH 2274 STORY W/ 2 3BED 800SF. SF.2AVAILABEL 2+ BED2.5 1 BATH ELED TOWNHOUSE W/ 2 BEDS 3 SPACIOUS BEDROOMS, UPSTAIRS NOW! 1ST FLOOR APARTMENT LOCATED 2+ BDRM TOWN HOME WITH & 1.5 BATH. NEWER FLOORING, OPEN LANDINGSETTING AREA HOME INLOFT, THEAND WOODSY FRESH PAINT AND NEW CARPETS. APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. PERFECT A WORK STATION. OF FIRFOR PARK COMPLEX.

TACOMA PUYALLUP APARTMENT

222 Broadway #A-15 Tacoma, WA 98403 $224,950 2 Bed, 2 Bath 887 SqFt

$1450 $750

14406 PACIFIC AVE S 901 W MAIN AVE #301

$695 $895

1 BED, 1 BATH 575 SF. SF. LARGE GREAT 1 1 BED, 1 BATH 489 VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDBD,3RD FLOOR APARTMENT IN ROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE DOWNTOWN . IN THE PACIFICPUYALLUP OAKS APTS.

SPANAWAY BONNEY LAKE CONDO

5121LOCUST 203RDAVE ST.E CT. 8403 APT E L2

$1425 $1150

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 2 BED 2 BATH 1100SF. WEST LAKE MUST SEE!! FANTASTIC 2 TAPPS CONDOMINIUMSBEAUTIFUL & STORY HOME, 3 BEDROOM SPACIOUS 2BD UNIT W/ W&D 2.5 BATH ONLOWER A CORNER LOT.

Park52.com · Park52.com · 253-473-5200 253-473-5200

www .T acoma U rban D igs . com

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

View pictures, pictures, discounts discounts & & more more properties properties online. View online.

Professional Services ProfessionalManagement Management Services

UNDISCLOSED , WELL-ESTABLISHED LANDSCAPING BUSINESS in Gig Harbor for Sale. $85,000 Cash. Tax return shows substantial increase in sales and net income from previous year. COLLISION CENTER, PORT ORCHARD, SIDNEY AVE. Longtime established, includes Real estate. Price reduced. $900,000. SBA Financing Possible. Price includes business, equipment, several outbuildings. Over 38,000 sq feet of land. Excellent road exposure. Seller Retiring. Call Ed: 253224-7109 BAR & GRILL INCLUDES REAL ESTATE. Same location since 1934. Same Owner last 10 years. Owner Retiring. Annual Gross income $500,000 Approx. Excellent Net. Absentee Run Package Price $495,500. ($145,000 for the Business, $350,000 for the Real Estate). Seller prefers all cash. Currently owned free and clear. SBA financing possible. Excellent Condition Call Ed: 253-224-7109

g n i d pen


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, April 20, 2018

CageSport MMA

Kool & the Gang

Brian McKnight

April 28, 7pm

May 19, 8:30pm

June 2, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $35, $65, $95, $105

I-5 Showroom $35, $40,$65, $60,$95, $90,$105 $95

Battle at the Boat 116

Dane Cook

Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds

June 9, 7pm

June 16, 8:30pm

June 22, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

I-5 Showroom $65, $90, $165, $175

I-5 Showroom $40, $65, $100, $105

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 • EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424 You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.

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