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GOOD TIMES AT LINCOLN HIGH – FOR STUDENTS, STAFF AND PRINCIPAL PAT ERWIN

PHOTO BY LARRY LARUE

By Larry LaRue larry@tacomaweekly.com

really hope to inspire and enlighten these children to become global citizens far beyond their school years,” says Healey. “Drawing on our similarities is key to facilitating this; without it, even our cafeteria chef may seem like a world class French-chef to these children.” True enough. Without

There was a book on Lincoln High School students, and a response every Lincoln teacher or administrator had heard when Patrick Erwin became the principal 13 years ago. The book was, don’t invest in Lincoln students – they were not worth the time. And the response? “It was the ‘O’ response,” Erwin said. “Someone would ask one of our teachers where they worked, and they’d said Lincoln and the response was always ‘Ohhhhhhhh…’” Erwin, 52, can laugh now. Lincoln High School is not what it was 13 years ago, for which the Tacoma School District is profoundly grateful. “At Lincoln, we push against the book every day. We have the state Teacher of the Year, Nate Bowling. We have sports programs with integrity. We established a band program, an ROTC program,” Erwin said. “When I first came to Lincoln, the first thing I noticed was the kids were everywhere except their classrooms. There was no accountability. “I took their freedom away. They needed to be in class. This needed to be a school again,” Erwin said. It has become one, and Erwin is at the center of it. Walking the halls of a high school built in 1913, he knows nearly every student, and they know him. Anyone who wants to talk to him can – students, teachers, secretaries. “Everyone needed a tribe, and we tried to provide options for each student with school programs,” Erwin said. “More important, I tried to bring in the best instructors, and made sure those teachers wanted to be at Lincoln. “The idea here was to help transform a community.” In a way, Erwin was part of the community before he became Lincoln’s principal. He was born and raised in Tacoma, and his family had deep roots. Mother Marlene went to Lincoln, graduated in the Class of 1960. As times changed, so did the Lincoln neighborhood, which is one of the poorest in Tacoma. That meant kids enrolling at school were not always can’t-miss students. “Historically, Lincoln has had the worst-prepared students in the district coming in,” Erwin said. “I’ve told our staff, ‘When we come to work every day, we make a difference. We better lives.’” Erwin changed the culture at Lincoln, got kids back in the classroom – and hired teachers who wanted to be in those classrooms with them. “I love it when I'm the dumbest guy in the room, because that means I've brought in a lot of smart people,” Erwin said. “There's a spirit of collaboration here. We all have the same goals.” Lincoln’s athletic programs became competitive, and did it without coaches heavily recruiting kids from throughout the city. Far more importantly, Lincoln’s graduation rate climbed. “When I got here, the graduation rate was about 60 per cent,” Erwin said. “Today, we’re at 82 per cent. Last year we had 193 seniors sign up for college on signing day, the highest total in school history.” Getting his students a high school diploma – and the chance to go beyond high school – is a key toward helping the community, Erwin said. “If kids don't graduate, they don't get jobs. If they don't get jobs, they don't pay taxes and that impacts what happens in the community,” Erwin said. “Every

u See MASON / page A8

u See ERWIN / page A8

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

FENCE. A fence and police patrols have slowed the number of homeless people living in the former Puget Sound Hospital site. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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emolition is set to start to remove a longtime eyesore from Tacoma’s Eastside, the Puget Sound Hospital, so that the site can become the hub for South Sound 911 emergency response communication

operations. Dickson Company crews installed construction fencing in February to start staging demolition equipment at the site that is also being patrolled around the clock by off-duty police officers to keep transients from returning to the property and taking over the former patient rooms. Before the security patrols, police responded to 35 calls for service to the site last year, and were set to shatter that tally this year with about two dozen police calls so

far this year, according to police records. The number of incidents has slowed since the fence and patrols started, however. Most notable about the incidents this year was an unsolved fire at the hospital’s south building. “Now there is a daily presence there,” said Pierce County project manager. The county will continue to have off-duty police on the site through March 27, when Dickson will formally take over the site and have its own security plan to protect the site and the company’s construction equipment. Work to remove asbestos materials and demolition the former hospital will take about six months at a cost of about $2 million. Outlines about the deconstruction process timeline will be the focus of a community meeting at 6 p.m., on March 21, hosted by Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier and Councilmember Rick Talbert at u See HUB / page A8

MASON MIDDLE SCHOOL SHARES SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH SISTER CITY By Duncan Rolfson duncan@tacomaweekly.com

This year, Mason Middle School and Tacoma’s Sister Cities Committee have progressed toward a much more connected relationship with our sister city located in lovely Biot-Sophia Antipolis, France by offering another installment of the teacher-exchange program for one lucky French class. Since 2013, Mason Middle School has participated in pen pal letter exchanges with a middle school from our French sister city, Biot. “Some of what the students share is identical. Two pen pals randomly matched were both huge Harry Potter fans, so there is lots to discover about the other students’ life and culture that we did not expect, and may find interesting,” says French exchange teacher Antona Healey. In 2016,Tacoma-based French teacher Molly Gibson packed her bags, and her lesson plans, for a long-overdue trip across the pond to a middle school located in BiotSophia Antipolis, called College de l’Eganaude. “Traveling to this school was simply amazing, and an enriching opportunity for all of those involved,” says Gibson. Since 2012, Biot has served as our sister city in France, respectively, and draws many

PHOTO BY DUNCAN ROLFSON

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER. Teacher Antona Healey gives a student answers regarding lesson plans about Biot, France.

similarities to our own. Biot, much like Tacoma, has quite an affinity for glass art installations and crafting, “lining most shops and adorning local architecture throughout town,” mentions Antona Healey, Gibson’s French counterpart who had the opportunity to spend a week teaching alongside Gibson in her Mason Middle School French class. “We

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Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK We appreciate that so many people are concerned about Percival our beloved Pothole Pig being gone for so long. We know he does as well. But time moves on. There are still potholes in the city that need attention, and finding an advocate for getting them fixed is crucial. We posted an advertisement on Craigslist and received six resumes from interested candidates. Who do you think would be the best replacement for our beloved pig (least until/if he returns)? • Blighty the Blight-Seeking Beaver just moved to the area and last worked at a sandwich shop in Chicago. • Carter the Crater Gator hails from Kent and wrote a blog about transportation issues. • Charles the Chuckhole Chicken was most recently a coffee-stand operator. • Rosco the Rut-Running Rooster ran a marijuana shop in Lacey, and is writing a mystery novel in his spare time. • Peter the Pit Python works in the fulfillment department at Amazon. • Lastly, there’s Marilyn Strickland, a two-term mayor of Tacoma and staunch civic activist who can’t seek reelection in November and will be in need of a job. The top vote getters so far are: Charles the Chuckhole Chicken, Blighty the Blight-Seeking Beaver and Carter the Crater Gator. Several people want Percival’s replacement, even if temporary, to remain in the pig family, maybe a cousin or sibling. Peyton lives in Portland and Perry lives in Parkland, so we will see if they are interested. Send your thoughts to stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com.

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Bulletin Board COUNTY ROADSIDE HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS START MARCH 28 Pierce County roadsides will get an annual makeover this spring and summer. An initial application of herbicides to combat weeds along road shoulders will start March 28, and continue through June. Targeted noxious weeds and brush control applications will occur through the end of November as needed. Only federal and state-approved herbicides are used. Workers will also mow, cut brush and trim trees along roads during the spring and summer. The work, which will be carried out weather permitting, is part of Pierce County’s integrated roadside vegetation management program. “Properly maintained roadsides are important for the safety of motorists and pedestrians,� said Bruce Wagner, Pierce County Public Works road operations manager. Annual maintenance reduces fire danger, optimizes storm water drainage, helps control noxious weeds and non-native plants, and promotes native plant growth. Property owners who do not want roadsides adjacent to their properties sprayed can sign an “Owner Will Maintain� agreement with Pierce County. Under this agreement, the property owner agrees to maintain the vegetation. If the property owner fails to perform as required, the maintenance of the right-of-way reverts to the county. The agreement must be renewed each March. The owner must display a sign indicating their participation in the program prior to the application of herbicides. Agreement applications and signs are available at the Central Maintenance Facility, 4812 196th St. E. in Spanaway, and by appointment at the West County Maintenance Facility, 13209 Goodnough Drive in Gig Harbor. Please call (253) 798-6000 for an appointment. More information can be found at www.piercecountywa.org/ownermaintain or by calling (253) 798-6000. RFI DEADLINE EXTENDED FOR BUSINESSES The City of Tacoma has extended its request for interest (RFI) proposal deadline to March 31 for businesses interested in making a difference while turning a profit in an approximately 1,500 square foot commercial space at 5401 S. Tacoma Way. “We’re really looking for the ideal business, one that is committed to improving people’s lives as a part of a social enterprise partnership,� said Assistant to the City Manager Nadia Chandler Hardy, who also oversees the Neighborhood and Community Services Department. “This business would get the motivated staff they need to grow and thrive, while youth, ages 16 to 24, who have struggled with experiencing homeless and not having access to the most basic of needs, would get the chance to receive professional training and experience.� A portion of the property at 5401 S. Tacoma Way has been converted into a Youth and Young Adult Drop-in Center and Emergency Young Adult Overnight Shelter, projected to open in early 2018. The available commercial space – ideally configured for a bakery, restaurant or retail business – would face the street. The detailed RFI is available on the City’s website at http://cms.cityoftacoma. org/Purchasing/FormalBids/ED17-0036F-331.pdf. Proposals can be submitted through 5 p.m. on March 31,to the Community and Economic Development Department in the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market St., Room 900. Questions relating to this RFI can be directed to India Adams in Community and Economic Development at iadams@cityoftacoma.org or by calling (253) 591-5142 BARBARA RACINE HONORED WITH ASPEN AWARD Barbara Racine, director of University of Puget Sound Bookstore, has been presented with the Aspen Award in recognition of her lifelong contributions to the industry by the National Association of College Stores (NACS). Racine described receiving the award as “a total surprise and a huge honor.� The award was made during a ceremony at CAMEX 2017 in Salt Lake City. CAMEX is the campus store industry’s largest education and tradeshow event and attracts representatives from many of the nearly 4,000 North American campuses and 1,000 bookstore suppliers represented by NACS. The Aspen lifetime achievement award was created in 2005 and recognizes a professional in the campus store industry who has made continuous, notable contributions to education and professional development. The award was named for the Aspen tree, which is one of the most resilient trees on earth. It is invigorated by disruption and provides shade to allow plants beneath it to thrive. A devoted industry volunteer, Racine has served on the boards of both NACS and its subsidiary NACSCORP, now a part of indiCo. Over the years she has contributed to numerous NACS education programs and served on content review and research committees. She was a member of the CAMEX program committee and of the NACS Education Committee for five years—including one year as committee chair. Also an active member of the Northwest College Bookstore Association, she has served as meeting chair four times. “Barbara Racine exemplifies strength of community, working together, sharing knowledge, building unity,� said Loreen J. Maxfield, 2017–18 NACS board presi-

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dent and director of retail operations for UIC Bookstore, University of Illinois at Chicago. We are all better for knowing, and volunteering and working with Barbara, and NACS is a better organization because of her generous commitment and leadership.� The National Association of College Stores: Headquartered in Oberlin, Ohio, NACS is the professional trade association of the $10 billion campus store industry. NACS provides education and other resources that help its member stores support student success, the campus experience, and the academic missions of higher education institutions. The association represents all campus stores, which include nearly 4,000 campuses in the U.S. and Canada, and approximately 1,000 industry-related companies that supply course materials and other merchandise and services to campus stores

FREE WORKSHOPS DESIGNED TO HELP SUBCONTRACTORS As part of its efforts to help local subcontractors get the business management and administrative skills they need to be successful, the City of Tacoma’s Office of Small Business Enterprise (SBE) has partnered with its Minority Business Development Agency Business Center to host a series of practical, hands-on workshops on March 14, March 28 and April 4, from 5-8 p.m. at the Tacoma Housing Authority (Bay Terrace, Chambers Bay Room, 2550 S. G St.) “These workshops will help subcontractors better understand various aspects of the contracts process, including risk assessment, bonding, certifications, financials and more,â€? said SBE Program Manager Amy Thomas. “There’s just a wealth of information available, and we have some great speakers lined up, so I highly encourage anyone who is interested to attend all three sessions.â€? Workshop details, and online registration, are available here. Questions or requests for additional information can be directed to Amy Thomas at athomas2@ cityoftacoma.org or (253) 591-5224 SPRING INTO FAMILY BINGO NIGHT Spring is in the air which means sounds of family fun will be heard from miles around Chambers Creek Regional Park in University Place at the Annual Family Bingo Night on Friday, April 7 from 6:30-9 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Event admission is $5 per person; children 3-years-old and younger are free. Cost includes a packet of six bingo sheets. Pre-register at (253) 798-4141 by April 5. Participants are encouraged to bring highlighters or bingo daubers. Extra game cards and daubers will be available for purchase and concessions will be on-site. Prizes include items donated by: • Daffodil Bowl: Free games of bowling • Sonic Drive-In: Two $50 gift cards • Emerald Downs: A day at the races for four • Oregon Zoo: Admission tickets • Sprinker Recreation Center: Ice skating tickets • OneMain Financial Services: BBQ set, cooler, and camping chair • Wild Waves: Two admission tickets • Old Town Markee: Date Night for two • And more Visit Pierce County’s Parks and Recreation website at www.co.pierce.wa.us/index.aspx?nid=3469 for more information. Chambers Creek Regional Park is located at 9850 64th St. W. in University Place

PROCTOR ARTS FEST SEEKS POSTER ART SUBMISSIONS Proctor Arts Fest Committee invites all artists to submit an original artwork to the 2017 Proctor Arts Fest Poster contest. All media are accepted, except computer-generated art. Entry will be via online submission only. Theme of the artwork should reflect the spirit of a summer art festival. The winning entry will be reproduced on posters, T-shirts, billboards and possible other marketing pieces to promote the Proctor Arts Fest, held on Aug. 5. Do not include lettering on your art unless it is integral to your design. Printed information concerning the art fest will be added to the poster by our graphic designer. Do not feature any particular Proctor business. The winning artist will receive a $500 purchase award. Acceptance of this award will grant the Arts Fest committee the right to reproduce the art solely for the purpose and promoting and financing the Art Fest. The original art will remain the property of the artist. The winning artist must also agree to display his or her design during the week prior to and including the day of the Arts Fest. The work will be displayed prominently in a Proctor business. The artist may offer his or her work for sale while on display. Previous Proctor Arts Fest poster contest winners may not apply. Only one entry per artist please. To enter, visit the Proctor Arts Fest website at www.proctorartsfest.com and select “Events� then select “Poster Contest� (acceptable file formats: .jpg or .pdf). If accepted, art must be provided in a high resolution format for reproduction purposes. If you cannot provide this yourself, special arrangements can be made for artwork to be photographed. Judging will be by a committee of artists and Proctor business people. Entries must be postmarked by April 15. For questions, contact Bonnie Cargol at bonniecargol@ gmail.com. SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

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Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

TACOMA POLICE SEARCHING FOR ACCUSED I.D. THIEF

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By David Rose Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Mail theft is a widespread problem for many communities in Western Washington. "It's unfortunate that you can't leave things in your mailbox, but we do DAVID ROSE have a lot of thefts just from unsecured mailboxes," said Officer Loretta Cool with Tacoma Police. Detectives have identified one suspect accused of forging a check that was stolen out of a mailbox and then trying to cash it. Kelsea Bernhardt has a warrant for her arrest after being charged with identity theft in the second degree, forgery and theft in the third degree. Tacoma Police say the victim put two checks in his outgoing mail to pay his bills last December. The next day, Columbia Bank notified him that someone had cashed one of the checks for $750.

Detectives say bank surveillance video shows Antonio Overby and Bernhardt enter the Spanaway branch. Each went to a different teller with the forged checks. Detectives say Overby successfully cashed a stolen check. Police say Bernhardt tried to cash one that had been altered to read $1,000. "The teller actually called the owner of the check and determined the check had been stolen. Before Kelsea could obtain any money, she realized that the teller was checking on her so she fled the bank leaving the check behind," said Cool. Overby was arrested on Jan. 17 and remains in the Pierce County jail charged with numerous I.D. theft and forgery cases. Bernhardt has not been caught and police are asking for the public's help to find her. She has an extensive history of forgery, theft, fraud and identity theft. Police encourage everyone to sign up to pay bills online whenever possible to avoid having checks stolen.

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"We advise people not to put written checks out in their mail, especially if their mailbox isn't locked. When you clip your mail to your mailbox and the mailbox is open and people walking by or driving by can see you have five or six letters clipped to the mailbox, they know people are paying their bills and then you’re increasing your opportunity of becoming a victim," said Cool. Bernhardt is 5-feet, 5-inches tall and weighs 200 pounds. She has brown hair and blue eyes. Her hair is short but she sometimes wears a wig. If you can tell officers where to find her, Crime Stoppers of Tacoma\Pierce County will pay you a cash reward of up to $1,000. Just call the hot line anonymously at 1 (800) 222-TIPS. This is one of the cases being featured this weekend on “Washington’s Most Wanted” airing Friday night at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX and Saturday night at 9:30 p.m. on JOEtv and 10:30 p.m. on Q13 FOX.

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ATTENTION RENTERS: Stop Wasting Thousands of Dollars on Rent When You Can Own Your Own Tacoma Area Home By Adam Peters Tacoma - If you’re like most renters, you feel trapped within the walls of a house or apartment that doesn’t feel like yours. How could it when you’re not even permitted to bang in a nail or two without a hassle. You feel like you’re stuck in the renter’s rut with no way of rising up out of it and owning your own home. Well don’t feel trapped any more! A new FREE Special Report entitled “How to Stop Paying Rent and Own Your Own Home” has already helped dozens of local renters get out from under their landlord’s finger, and move into a wonderful home they can truly call their own. You can make this move too by discovering the important steps detailed in this FREE Special Report. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been renting, or how insurmountable your financial situation may seem. With the help of this report, it will become suddenly clear to you how you really can save for the down payment and stop wasting thousands of dollars on rent. To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-800-5301015 and enter 9001. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report and stop wasting thousands of dollars on rent NOW.

MAN SENTENCED IN UNDERCOVER SEX STING Anthony Ray Blankenship, 33, was sentenced on March 14 to 24 months in prison and 36 months of community custody. He pleaded guilty on Feb. 8 to three counts of communication with a minor for immoral purposes. “We are committed to protecting children and other vulnerable members of our community,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. In mid-December of 2015, the Washington State Patrol arrested Blankenship as part of a sting operation where undercover officers posed as a 13-year-old girl online. Blanken-

ship responded to an online posting by the officers and exchanged sexually explicit emails with them. He eventually agreed to meet the “13-year-old” at a gas station in Tacoma. When Blankenship arrived, he was arrested by law enforcement officers. The defendant was carrying a condom when he was arrested. He admitted that he had been asked by the online persona to bring one. Blankenship told detectives that he worked for the City of Tacoma, had a masters in social work, and just wanted to help the underage girl.

He could not explain comments he made to the online undercover officer expressing concern about cops being involved. Local law enforcement agencies engaged in two sting operations in late 2015, posing online as underage girls or parents selling their children for sex. Those operations resulted in 10 defendants being arrested. Of those 10, nine have now been convicted by a jury or plead guilty. Deputy Prosecutor John Neeb is the lead prosecutor on these undercover cases. The 10th is currently set for trial on March 28.

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BANK ROBBERY Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for a bank robbery. This suspect may also be responsible for two similar robberies in Tacoma and University Place in February of 2017. At 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 7th, 2017, the pictured suspect robbed a Wells Fargo Bank located in the 2600 block of Bridgeport Way W. in the City of University Place. The suspect entered the bank and gave the tellers a note demanding cash. The suspect said to give him “all of it”,

suspect was seen wearing blue jeans, a black leather coat over a dark hoodie, sunglasses, latex gloves, and was holding a white piece of fabric over his face.

then took the money and walked out of the bank. The suspect is described as a male, approximately 6’ tall with a medium to heavy build. The

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; then Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

PUYALLUP TRIBE SUPPORTS AREA NON-PROFITS Spirit of 12 Partners, Toy Rescue Mission, Emergency Food Network, Northwest Harvest, Toys for Tots and Tahoma Indian Center all gifted with major donations During the 2015 fiscal year, the Puyallup Tribe contributed more than $2.5 million from its charity and general funds into the local community with donations to various key charities and organizations. These generous donations will go a long way in helping these organizations to continue their vital efforts in the communities they serve. “It is truly humbling to know that there are so many people in need,” said Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud. “I feel immense joy in us having the ability to take care of those who need it most. We, as tribal members, know what it is like to grow up with nothing. It gives us all great joy to make someone’s Christmas happier than it would have been otherwise.” “The donations we made ensure the vitality of the people in our community,” said Puyallup Vice Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove. “It is critical to ensure families and community members, suffering from long or short-term setbacks, that they have resources available to get them moving forward in life. The Puyallup Tribe of Indians is not unfamiliar with difficult times. We relied on the support of our community organizations not long ago and it is of great honor that we, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, are able to pay it forward.” SPIRIT OF 12 – PARTNERSHIP WITH SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Founded in 2004, the Spirit of 12 Partners program embodies the Seattle Seahawks’ commitment to the Pacific Northwest community and its fans. The Puyallup Tribe gifted the Spirit of 12 Partners with $550,000 to help it continue its mission. This gift to the Spirit of 12 Partners is the largest since its inception in 2004. At every home game, Pacific Northwest youth service organizations partner with the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and Seahawks fans to raise funds for kids’ programs. These non-profit partners include YMCA of Greater Seattle, Treehouse (for foster children), Rainier Scholars, Boys & Girls Club of Washington State Association and Camp Fire Snohomish County. As Spirit of 12 Partners, members of community-based nonprofits distribute the Seahawks Gameday Magazine, keeping 100 percent of the proceeds that are then matched by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. In 2014, more than $527,000 was raised in the Spirit of 12 Partners program and more than $3 million in total funds since 2004. Grant programs advance the areas of arts and culture, poverty alleviation, economic relief, education and scientific research. “In the old days, in our aboriginal language, we were known as the S’Puyalupubsh, meaning ‘generous and welcoming behavior to all people (friends and strangers) who enter our lands,’ said Vice Chairwoman Hargrove. “It is with great pride, and boundless excitement, that the Puyallup Tribe of Indians will be supporting the Seattle Seahawks Spirit of 12 program. We hope that our donation of $550,000 is able to advance community programming and create innovative opportunities for children and families throughout our state. The Spirit of 12 program not only generates diverse outlets for personal success, but continues to advance the human spirit. The Puyallup Tribe of Indians humbly thanks the Seattle Seahawks for their steadfast efforts, friendship, and dedication to our community. GO HAWKS!!” TOY RESCUE MISSION Tacoma’s Toy Rescue Mission received $100,000 for its work

to refurbish and recycle gently used toys for disadvantaged children and seniors in care facilities while providing meaningful volunteer opportunities for the young at heart. Not only does the Mission make birthdays, Easter and Christmas bright for children and seniors, its way of recycling toys is environmentally friendly too. At Christmas time, the mission typically serves more than 125 families a day starting around Dec. 2. In total last year, the mission served 11,152 children and seniors, 7,000 of those in December alone. The mission provides for children’s birthdays throughout the year and is at its busiest at Christmas, Easter and back-to-school time. Serving the South Sound for more than 20 years, the Toy Rescue Mission is nearly 100 percent volunteer run and receives no state or federal funding, nor is it affiliated with DSHS or any other state agency. Toy Rescue Mission Director and Board President Martha Davis said the Tribe’s donation is the largest one the Mission has ever received, and she was floored to receive it. “I was in a state of shock to be honored in such a way that I can continue serving the children of Tacoma,” she said. That the donation came at Christmastime, the Mission’s busiest time of year, is the icing on the cake. “We have already served nearly 900 families in eight days and I still have until Dec. 23. I wonder each day how many families will be coming in and if I have enough stuff, and now I don’t have to say no.” NORTHWEST HARVEST A longtime supporter of Northwest Harvest, the Tribe gave $50,000 to this organization, in keeping with generous donations of years past. Northwest Harvest is Washington’s own statewide hunger relief agency. Its mission is to provide nutritious food to hungry people statewide in a manner that respects their dignity, while fighting to eliminate hunger. Northwest Harvest’s vision is that ample nutritious food is available to everyone in Washington State. “We are so grateful for our ongoing partnership with the Puyallup Tribe in feeding hungry people statewide,” said Northwest Harvest CEO Shelley Rotondo. “Their most recent gift of $50,000 at Home Team Harvest puts the Tribe’s total contributions to Northwest Harvest at more than $1 million, which is over four million meals since 2005. With their ongoing commitment to strengthening the community, the Tribe’s most recent generous grant shows respect and concern for all of our neighbors in need. This is especially helpful since the demand for nutritious food continues to grow at a time when donations are down, yet one in five children in Washington are at risk of going hungry. The Tribe’s gift truly makes it possible for us to work toward our goal of ending hunger.” TAHOMA INDIAN CENTER Tahoma Indian Center received $100,000 to enhance its services to assist Native individuals to overcome their barriers to permanent housing, employment and self-sufficiency in a loving, protective environment. A program of Catholic Community Services, the Center serves 1,100 Native people a year free of charge, including serving 50-55 midday meals five days a week. It provides individualized and tailored case management to assist in accessing

support resources, offers free laundry facilities and acts as a mailing address for more than 250 people. Native cultural and spiritual ceremonies and social activities are held there as well. Through the Bridges Village housing program, 10 permanent and supportive housing units are available for Native families who have experienced homelessness. Among the many ways in which the donation will be used, the Center will expand its housing search and rent assistance programs, increase staff hours to provide more direct assistance, build a wheelchair ramp and reinforce stair railings (individuals in wheelchairs are currently carried up the stairs). “It’s an awesome, humbling gift. It will really make a huge impact. This donation will allow us to save Native lives,” said Program Manager Steve Gallion. “That’s the most important thing we can do.” EMERGENCY FOOD NETWORK Emergency Food Network (EFN) received $100,000 to assist in its efforts to provide Pierce County with a consistent, diverse and nutritious food supply so that no person goes hungry. EFN partners with 73 food banks, hot meal sites and shelters, providing them with food at no cost to them or their clients, which are the homeless, unemployed, working poor, elderly, children and military. EFN maintains an eight-acre farm in the Orting Valley and has just started farming it year round. In 2014, EFN distributed 15.3 million pounds of food and accommodated 1,421,417 client visits, with 6,626 of these visits made by Native Americans. EFN was able to distribute 17 percent more food in 2014 than in 2011, keeping pace with the 11-percent increase in need in the community during that same time period. “It was like Chanukkah and Christmas all rolled into one,” said EFN Executive Director Helen McGovern-Pilant, noting that this donation is the highest EFN has ever received since it began in 1982. “It was totally unexpected, an amazing, generous gift and another way the Tribe reaches out to take care of their neighbors in need.” TOYS FOR TOTS Again this year, the Puyallup Tribe helped Toys for Tots with its blessed mission to deliver, through a new toy at Christmas, a message of hope to about 50,000 less fortunate youngsters that will assist them in becoming responsible, productive, patriotic citizens. At Christmastime 2015, the Tribe gifted $50,000 to the Tacoma/Pierce County Toys for Tots effort so that area children would not be disappointed during this most joyful season of the year. Toys for Tots also includes older teenagers who desire more grown-up type gifts but are overlooked by donors focused on young children. “Without the generous donation from the Puyallup Tribe, many kids in specific age groups would not have received gifts this year Christmas morning,” said Pierce County Sheriff’s Detective Ed Troyer, the local Toys for Tots coordinator. With the Tribe’s donation added to the support Toys for Tots receives from across Pierce County, the local Toys for Tots mission will continue to collect new, unwrapped toys during October, November and December each year, and distribute those toys as Christmas gifts to needy children in the community.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

MUSLIM COMMUNITY APPRECIATION DAY Special day reveals true love for this oft-marginalized segment of society By Duncan Rolfson duncan@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY DUNCAN ROLFSON

UNITY. Imam Ahmad Saleh speaks about unity, and drawing on kind hearts for support. dearly.” Dabashi held this event to show the mosque’s appreciation for a community of supporters. “For several months, we have seen a lot of support – calls, letters, notes on our door. All this is in response to perceived actions taken against our religion and certain countries in the East, and we needed to show our love, we had to.” “To one another, we are critical,” says Saleh, of the necessary contrasting aspects of life that we encounter. “But do not trust liars, and cheaters, of course!” The crowd responded with boisterous laughter and applause. “Finding the necessity in each other’s differences and flaws is not innately human, but we must, because that is the way god has created things. A good for a bad, a light for a dark.” Sister Allaa Alshaibani, currently a psychology student at PLU, said it best: “Hate breeds hate. If you cannot stand up and fight hate, act in a manner to oppose it.” Strong words from a woman who’s been affected so emotionally by bans on not just traveling to our great country, but for the persecution faced by those simply born in a perceived “dangerous country,” calling on the politicians in attendance, and guest speakers, to not rest. “The support is a blessing,” says Alshaibani, “but we should not get comfortable yet. There are still many more hurdles to clear ahead.” This day was one meant to shine a light on a gracious community, but also one to illuminate a religion, and region, being skirted to the side by our current administration that feels that these condi-

tions dictate judgement. Alshaibani pleads, “The time to band together united is not over.” University Place School District Superintendent Jeff Chamberlin offered words of encouragement in response to calls for unity and respect, stating that, “It starts with our children; 4th-graders in our district study all aspects of Islamic Empires during a three-week immersion, every year.” Chamberlin was one of many high-profile community heads that spoke that night, along with Representative Derek Kilmer, Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, and Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney Mark Lindquist. “In my community, every single person matters equally, hands down,” Lindquist said. “Listen, everyone matters, it’s simple as that.” Saleh invites everyone in Tacoma to come down to the Islamic Center of Tacoma, located on 2010 Bridgeport Way W., “for education, questions, religious services and anything involved with our mosque,” Dabashi states. “We are open, and want to show our dedication to this community by extending our hand to them.” U.P. Chief of Police Mike Blair stated honestly, “I had my world changed tonight.” To corroborate everyone's enjoyment of the evening, he offered this sentiment: “The prayers and activities that I witnessed here tonight were beautiful. I will be back for the loud prayer,” referring to a special prayer not observed during the event’s length. “If it was anything like the ones we got to witness, it should be extremely powerful.”

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On Saturday, March 11, community members of many religions, races and beliefs congregated at the Islamic Center of Tacoma for a day consisting of appreciation and education. The gathering at the University Place mosque was equipped with a plethora of familiar, state fair-esque activities aimed at engaging the youth in attendance, whilst encouraging an open dialogue among community members with friendly faces and inclusive prayer ceremonies for anyone to participate in. “This is a grand opportunity for us to truly show our appreciation of the support from everyone locally, and give back a bit,” said Aziz Junejo, volunteer at Saturday’s event. Henna tattoos for those interested in styling things up a bit and an artist drafting classic Arabic calligraphy for the evening’s visitors could be found under the activities tent. Not too far away from the activities tent was the pièce de résistance of sorts – a buffet with chicken, vegetables sauteed to perfection and ready for all, even desserts! Engage the youth, feed the adults attending, and fill us with love – good one, guys. Honesty and understanding led to a palatable show of appreciation from the mosque, and local political representatives, amid our current turbulent atmosphere of tightening regulatory interference and travel bans. The Islamic Center of Tacoma has been in the community since 1981 and has recently has seen an outpouring of support, unrivaled by anything in recent memory. Showing up to the mosque to find inspirational and supportive messages posted about the grounds has been commonplace for several months now, including many “we love you” messages and “we support our Muslim community.” So, this day was, “For you, our loving community. Today, and from here on, you are all honorary members of this mosque!” exclaimed Junejo. “Do you agree, Imam Ahmed Saleh?” The Imam, in Islamic mosques, is the highest respected position, and when asked, Imam Saleh replied emphatically, “Yes! Our doors are, and will always be, open for one and all to come and participate or communicate with us anytime.” That was the consistent observation through the night. Upon entering the mosque, for example, the majority of those in attendance gladly shed their footwear to abide by the observed customs of the Islamic tradition. Happily making their way through the sizeable crowd (sans Nikes) the smiles between visitors and Muslim attendees alike was noticeable. Questions like, “Why do you wear the headdress?” were met with honest answers. Clarity really was an ever-present tone, as to make guests feel most comfortable. Speakers from the Muslim community ensured that the attending community members felt cluedin, and aware of every custom observed, even having people present for their traditional prayers, and a translation of most every verse and word from their holy book, the Quran. Much more pressing issues are still present, however, says President Nasir Dabashi. “We need continued community support moving forward. We are a country founded by immigrants, so by neglecting this right to anyone is affecting our community, and our principles,

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Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

Our View

NO GOOD DEED GOES UNPUNISHED WHEN IT COMES TO POWER RATES Tacoma City Council rightfully has a few raised eyebrows about the proposed power rate hikes, but they might go into effect anyway for the same reason that so many bad decisions get made. Decisions are made at deadline with few alternatives to consider. Remember the whole light rail expansion routing decision (cough cough)‌? This time, Tacoma Public Utilities had been forecasting rate changes last fall when the board of commissioners approved the utility’s budget. That budget was later approved by the City Council. With the budget passed and approved, the actual rates get their turn, just a few weeks before they go into effect. The TPU board approved the rates in late February and the City Council is set to do a second reading on them March 21, just 10 days before the April 1 rate changes are set to hit power bills. The proposed changes call for a 5.9 percent hike this year and another hike this time next year on the portion of the power bill customers pay just to have power to their homes and apartments. That flat-rate change adds $5.75 to power bills in 2017 and again in 2018, doubling the connection charge customers pay just to be connected to the power grid that is currently $10.50 a month. The actual rate for the power a customer uses isn’t set to change. The reasoning behind the change to the connection charge, rather than the per kilowatt hour of electricity a customer actually uses, is to recover the costs of maintaining the system, provide for more accurate revenue forecasting and avoid higher power usage increases for customers living in inefficient houses that largely don’t have proper insulation. The cost-per-customer for maintaining the system is about $25 a month, while customers will only pay $22 a month after both increases. But some council members worry that an increase in the base rate and not the power rate itself will hurt efforts to get costumers to conserve energy, and actually hurt low income people who live in smaller apartments and already conserve power. Residents in less efficient homes, however, would avoid much higher power bills since the increases would be on the base rate rather than on their actual power usage. Arguments could be made both ways, but what is clear, is that the talks about rate increases – in whatever form – should have happened sooner rather than later. Maybe, oh just a shot in the dark here, but maybe when the overall budgets were approved, not months later and just a week and a half before they are set to go into effect.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, (Re: TW staff editorial “Pierce County READS does more than promote reading,� March 10 edition.) I am just catching up on my news from last week and was so excited to see the awesome editorial about Pierce County READS. I just wanted to say thank you for the shout out, and also for so nicely recognizing that while the book and reading are important, the true purpose and value of the program is to bring people together and build community. Thank you. Georgia Lomax, Executive Director Pierce County Library System

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 304 Puyallup., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305

PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com Duncan Rolfson / duncan@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Josh Reisberg, Randy Rutledge, Erica Cooley CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, David Turnipseed ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com Andrea Jay / andrea@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. For questions or concerns about delivery, please call Josh at (253) 228-1709.

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Guest Editorial

POG IS WORTH ANOTHER LOOK By Don C. Brunell

In 2003, Gov. Gary Locke (D) faced a 10 percent revenue hole in the state’s budget. He also stared at a sluggish economy still reeling from the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. People were reluctant to fly and airlines stopped buying Boeing jets. Locke faced either recommending substantial tax increases or finding a new way to allocate state tax revenues. He turned to Minnesota’s former commissioner of finance, Peter Hutchinson, who helped his governor balance the budget by cutting waste, tightening efficiencies and prioritizing spending. The process became known as POG – priorities and price of government. As Gov. Jay Inslee (D) and lawmakers now slug it out in Olympia over the 2017-19 budget, revisiting the POG would be productive. Just as Locke believed tax increases to fill a $2.3 billion revenue shortfall would stymie a slowly recovering economy and dampen job growth, Inslee’s plan to add $8 billion in new taxes will similarly hurt. Additionally, to help stimulate economic growth, Locke assembled a blue-ribbon group of business leaders to make recommendations on ways to improve our state’s business climate, attract new investments and grow employment. Among his competitiveness council leaders was thenBoeing Commercial Airplane Co. President Alan Mulally, who went on to turn around Ford Motor Co. At the time, Mulally was fighting to have Chicago-based Boeing build its revolutionary 787 Dreamliner in Everett. Locke also learned from 1993 backlash when Democrats controlled state government and raised the B&O taxes of services, increased workers compensation and unemployment insurance costs, and enacted a state-wide health care law requiring every employer to offer health insurance with a state-mandated set of benefits. In 2003 under POG, Locke and Senate Republicans started at ground zero and shook state government to the core. They looked at all spending and prioritized it – a laborious and time-consuming task. One of the key Republican

senators driving the POG was Issaquah’s Dino Rossi, who returned to the Senate late last year. At the end of the 2003 session, Washington’s budget was balanced without raising taxes and much needed unemployment insurance reforms were enacted. This year, Senator Republicans plan to restructure public K-12 education. In effect, they are taking a new approach. They hope to improve student learning without adding new carbon and capital gains taxes, eliminating tax incentives and raising the B&O (gross receipts) tax on services to 1993 levels. (Inslee’s B&O rate would go from 1.5 percent to 2.5.) It is never easy balancing a budget whether it is a family, business or state or local government. There is never enough money and never will be, but the POG process offers a different, more disciplined approach. Under POG, elected officials determine what they will fund starting with the most important. They resisted attempts to spread money around like a thin coat of peanut butter or simply ordering across the board spending cuts. In 2003, Locke and lawmakers fully funded about a dozen of the state’s top priorities and then had to cut others. It was not easy. Unfortunately, POG only lasted two years. Some elected officials feared the second round would be too drastic. So as the state’s economy improved, elected officials drifted away from POG. A nearly forgotten POG benefit is it offers elected leaders the ability to more quickly respond to rapidly changing technology and global competitive pressures. Hutchinson’s premise is the pace of change is accelerating, government continues to lags behind, and it needs to catch and keep up. Washington’s economy is still recovering and sizeable tax increases will hit business hardest because of our tax structure. The un-intended consequence will impact employment. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

AN OPEN LETTER TO CITIZENS:

WHEN TO CALL 911

Editor’s note: The following letter originally appeared in the Milton-Edgewood Signal newspaper, but its message is one that Tacoma Weekly readers are also invited to take to heart. Like many of you, I am a father, husband and grandfather. I take pride in my community and I am proud to be a member of the Edgewood Police Department. I have been a Patrol Officer for the better part of 21 years, and I have spent a great deal of that time in the City of Edgewood. Often we are notified of suspicious activity by wellintended citizens long after the incident is over and long after any suspect or vehicle has left the area. The primary reason citizens give for not calling 911 when something suspicious is happening is that they don’t believe it’s a � 911 worthy emergency.� Let me assure you, you will not overwhelm our dispatch system if you call to report suspicious activity in your neighborhood. In fact, you may actually reduce the number of calls to South Sound 911 by calling. For example, if you call to report a suspicious van in your neighborhood when it is still there, we have the opportunity to locate that van and identify any individuals associated with it. If this person or people had intended to commit a crime, or series of crimes in the area, they most certainly will leave once they are aware that we are watching them. On the other hand, if you don’t report the suspicious activity, the suspect may very likely commit a rash of vehicle prowls, theft from yards, burglary to sheds or worse, residential burglary or a home invasion robbery. To me, this falls under the old adage, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.� Your one phone call can very easily prevent several of your neighbors from becoming victims and calling us in the morning. The second most common reason I have heard from

citizens for not calling 911 it that you think we have more important things to do. As much as I appreciate your concern with our workload, let me assure you that our dispatchers are very good at prioritizing our calls for service for us, and in the rare instance that I actually do have something more important to do, I will gladly get to you as soon as I finish with the other incident at hand. I truly appreciate the support we enjoy from the citizens here in Edgewood and I hope you can all understand that, when the 911 system was first created in 1968, it was truly for reporting only “life and death� emergencies. All other calls were directed to the non-emergency number. (Let me be honest, in most cases through the early 1980’s, the call would be answered by the same person no matter which line you called!) And so, from what many would describe as the “ancient� and “archaic� past, the system has evolved into a totality new and improved creature. Today, through the miracles of modern technology, the 911 system has morphed into a tremendous crime tracking tool that helps us in determining where assets should be allocated and in what areas we should be more visible. It helps us track calls for service as well as response time, time on scene and the various dispositions of our calls. Please, call and report suspicious people or vehicles in your neighborhood when you first become aware of it! Imagine how powerful it will be if we can see the city through the eyes of 9,000 citizens! If the citizens are all willing to call when there is “something out of place� or “just not right,� it will be like each officer is everywhere at the same time! Sincerely, Deputy Jay Jensen Edgewood Police Department

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@ tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.


Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

UNION TEAMS WITH COMMUNITY GROUP TO BENEFIT EDGEWOOD FAMILIES

PHOTO COURTESY OF MACHINISTS UNION DISTRICT LODGE 751

GENEROUS. Puget Sound Machinists Union members are teaming with the group Many Communities to collect diapers and baby wipes for low-income families and families living in domestic violence shelters. Over the past two years, the union has collected some 25,000 diapers and 9,000 wipes.

EDGEWOOD — Volunteers with Machinists Union District Lodge 751 are once again teaming with community activists to bring help to low-income families and families in crisis in Edgewood and around Puget Sound. District 751’s Machinists Volunteer Program is partnering with the group Many Communities for the third annual March of Diapers drive. The drive is an effort to collect disposable diapers and wipes to donate to families living in women’s shelters as well as organizations that support low-income families in King, Pierce and Snohomish counties. “Please help us as we make a difference, one little tushy at a time,” said

IAM 751 MVP Committee Chairwoman Princie Stewart. Donations of diapers – from premies to size 6 – will be taken at all IAM 751 union halls – including the Auburn hall, at 201 A St. SW – through March 31. In addition, diapers, pull-ups and wipes can be brought to Many Communities partner sites including 2nd peek Boutique at 727 E. Meridian Ave. in Edgewood, and Sozo Realty at 816 Cherry Ave. in Sumner. All diapers, pull-ups and wipes collected will go to social service agencies, including the Edgewood Community Fish Food Bank. Over the past two years, members of District 751 and Machinists Union District Lodge 160 have combined to collect

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nearly 25,000 diapers and pull-ups, and 9,000 baby wipes. Diapers can be a critical need for women living trying to escape from domestic violence or families that are living in poverty. Even though they are a basic need, diapers are not covered by social safety net programs because they are considered “hygiene items,” said

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

t Mason From page A1

being able to show just how normal each others culture is, most kids wouldn’t be interested. Some of the cultural myths to be debunked were classics like every French person eats snails or drinks an abundance of wine. “It’s not something that I enjoy to eat,” says Healey, of dining on escargot. “Wine is also not something that is abundantly being enjoyed, much to the dismay of some who were wondering.” An average day in Biot consists of the same routine we enjoy here, starting with breakfast or a baked good, and then off to school for lessons in subjects like history, physical education, and even learning to speak Italian. One noticeable difference is that in France, and most European countries, several hours per week are dedicated to English class. Not solely English history either, but English language learning. Arriving on March 4 for a one-week residency, coteaching Gibson’s French class is something Healey hoped for long in advance, but hadn’t expected to do herself, until the winds of change blew her direction. “The original correspondent from Biot, Sara-Jane Higgins, was unable to participate, so I happily stepped in for her. My hope is that I make her proud,” gleams Healey, only pausing to continue the day’s lesson with the students. Since 2013, Sara-Jane Higgins has been spearheading the international communications between students of her Biot middle school, and local middle school Mason Middle School with the intention of one day being able to have an open, and consistent, program like we are witnessing. Higgins launched the pen-pal letter exchange that is the highlight of the day when the students arrive. Often, students of Gibson spend entire classes reading and sharing the hidden facts that their own pen pal has enclosed within. Gibson is simply overjoyed with this opportunity, due in part to her being a long-term student of French programs since her youth. “As a kid, it was programs and lessons like these that piqued my interest and drove me to pursue a degree in French and teach French language and history to the next generation of global citizens,” she said. Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland has supported the efforts, and been a huge proponent of this program and its effect on our young people and community at large. “I’m simply overjoyed by the student experiences I have seen and heard about this year,” she said. “The handwritten letters, amongst anything else, may hold a special place for me as it’s such a valuable and personal aspect of this contact.”

t Hub From page A1

the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department auditorium. People will also be able to ask questions, which will most likely center on noise, work hours and safety about the asbestos abatement process. “It is a very regulated and controlled process,” Wakefield said. While crimes might be down, construction complaints are likely on the way, “People should be grateful that the wheels are turning,” said community activist Lynnette Scheidt,

To

PHOTO BY DUNCAN ROLFSON

LEADERSHIP. Molly Gibson, Mayor Strickland and Antona Healey on the roof top of city hall. All three women are key players in Tacoma's partnership with Biot.

Not every student going to primary and middle school will have opportunities like this, however, “and that is precisely why we as a community need to stand behind the staff and members of our nation pushing these programs forward.” states Strickland. “Finding similarities in day to day occurrences can be fun for all, and even shocking to some. But for select families, sharing daily routines wouldn’t behold much pride.” This is why proliferating and spreading this program through all levels of society is essential, because no child should miss out on an interesting global program like this because their family, or schools, cannot afford to send them. To this, we introduce the Tacoma Sister Cities Committee Member Cathy Sarnat and her wonderful accommodations she provides traveling participants via her Vaeth Mansion access, and international assistance all around. “This committee based program is something we fund via public, and private, donations, and have for some time,” says Sarnat of the backing for her Biot exchange program. “Fostering this carefully crafted relationship, and cultural importance, is something that we uphold

who also noted that the transients who had been living in the hospital site have seemingly moved to other areas of the neighborhood. “I have never in my life seen so many encampments.” The former Puget Sound Hospital along the Pacific Avenue hillside dates back 110 years, when it started as Northern Pacific Hospital for railroad workers. It then served as a medical center under various names, most recently as a county-owned mental health facility that finally closed in 2010 after operating at the location for a decade. Once finally demolished, the eight-acre site will be the new

home for South Sound 911, the combined emergency dispatch and records agency for 41 police, fire and medical agencies in the county. Construction of the communication complex is set to start this fall and be completed in the summer of 2019 at a cost of $62 million. South Sound 911's public safety communications center will include two buildings. The main building will be a 55,000-squarefoot center for dispatch operations, as well as a municipal emergency operations center. A second building, about half its size will house administrative offices and a public counter.

Love Someone...

is to learn their song and sing it to them when they have forgotten.

with every move. Understanding that these kids may not have similar opportunities to create life long friendships and worldwide understanding is highly immeasurable, and the reason we continue to fund and spread this program throughout the Tacoma School District.” Mason Middle School, Jennie Reed Elementary and hopefully soon Giaudrone Middle School will all have participated and sparked the interest for dozens, if not hundreds of up and coming globally-focused youth. “We have a cultural and personal connection now, with this and other sister cities all over the world that we need to grow, and foster, moving forward.” says Gibson. Recently, our own Mayor Strickland has stated that “I have reached out to the international delegation of our sister cities, 14 of them currently, and invited them to come to Tacoma during our Festival of Sails so that we may talk about broadening and expanding the program itself to include more student and teacher exchanges. I feel that growing this program is more beneficial than we understand for so many local families, and our sister cities as well.”

t Erwin From page A1

student here is on extra hours – from 7:35 a.m. to 3:05 p.m. every day.” Next year will be Erwin’s 25th in education. He began as a teacher at Mount Tahoma High, became an assistant principal at Hunt Middle School and a principal at what became First Creek Middle School before being assigned to Lincoln. Erwin said he has no desire to move into an admin-

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istrative job with the district; he enjoys the work of a principal. His wife, Tacoma mayor Marilyn Strickland, isn’t certain what his future will be. ”Being a principal is a young man's game” Strickland said, laughing. “You’ve got to be motivated, inspired, very competitive. Pat's recruited staff with the willingness to face challenges and they’ve responded. “The biggest change since he’s been there is Lincoln's reputation. Today, that school is full of pride, with a lot of accomplishments. It's not about trophies and championships – they’re not running a marketing campaign. They're doing right by their students,” she said. Much as Erwin has enjoyed the successes at Lincoln, he is as fond of the oneon-one experiences he and the rest of the school staff have with students. They’ve built relationships that go beyond high school days. “I had a student come back the year after graduating, on his college break, and invite me to take part in a sweat lodge ceremony,” Erwin said. “I went, and I talked another teacher into going with me. “I grew up Catholic, and we don't express our emotions well. With my kids at Lincoln, I can say, 'I love you' and mean it.”

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Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

IT’S NEVER TOO LATE TO LEARN MONEY MANAGEMENT “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” – Benjamin Franklin By William Manzanares

H

william@tacomaweekly.com

ave you ever thought to yourself about why you weren’t taught about money management in school? Not only do they not teach you this in school, money isn’t talked about much there either. Well, the time for blaming what we didn’t learn in school is over because author Cary Siegel has written the book “Why Didn’t They Teach Me This In School? – 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By.” The lessons in the book are practical and can be applied by anyone at any age – from youth who want to learn how to manage money to parents who want to teach their children about money management, and heck even to those of us who still don’t know how to manage money. I highly recommend this book for anyone who simply wants to learn how to save a little money. The really great part about it is that Siegel originally wrote the book to pass on to his children. He never sought to become an author, just share his knowledge to his children. I am glad he wrote the book and now he shares his lessons from his years of experience from dealing with the mega rich to teaching the homeless about money management. The book is packed full of tips and suggestions that if followed will lead to financial freedom.

DEADLINE NEARS TO What is your dream job? ENTER VIBE’S FIRST EVER BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION By William Manzanares william@tacomaweekly.com

Things are moving along nicely for the Veterans Incubator for Better Entrepreneurship’s (VIBE) first ever business plan competition. Open to all colleges and universities in the South Sound and members of the broader community as well, the competition is generally patterned after the popular television show “Shark Tank,” which features average people with entrepreneurial dreams competing for a chance to make their dream a reality. Based at the University of Washington-Tacoma, VIBE provides an applied training environment that supports military veterans’ entrepreneurial aspirations and promotes their understanding of the modern startup life cycle. With the deadline being March 31 for contest entrants to submit executive summaries, VIBE Director Thomas Kuljam said there will be one more pitch round/open mic session on Saturday, March 18, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at RP/6 USO in Lakewood. “This allows servicemembers from JBLM and South Sound colleges and universities to attend and go over the rules and protocols, and give them the opportunity to pitch their ideas,” he said. Every team in the competition must be comprised of a student and a veteran (and one person can fill both these roles) so the day will also allow students and vets to connect with each other. Following March 31, there will be several more stops along the way to choosing a winner, including an investment round at a tradeshow style event

from which finalists will be chosen, a coaching round for finalists to practice pitching, and finals in early May. VIBE is quickly becoming a worldclass training environment that is veteran friendly, embraces and encourages aspiring entrepreneurs from the UWT’s ecosystem to collaborate and help develop the local and world economy. This competition is part of Kuljam’s mission to create an epicenter of entrepreneurial culture in the South Sound and thereby keep talent in this area rather than watching it all drive away to Seattle each working day. “I want people to realize, especially veterans, that they have talent and can create something bigger for themselves,” Kuljam said. “Just because you went to trade school doesn’t mean you have to work in that trade – you can still get more education and learn to understand the language of business to create and retain jobs in the Tacoma/Pierce County/ South Sound areas.” Through the VIBE business plan competition, Kuljam is doing his part to bring better opportunities to Tacoma and the South Sound both for entrepreneurs and the folks that entrepreneurs need to run their businesses. “This is not a UWT thing – it’s a community/South Sound thing,” he said. “We want to inspire future and current entrepreneurs to develop an ecosystem. We have a lot of support – we just need to have proof of the concept that there are people out there thinking the same way.” For more information, visit www. tacoma.uw.edu/VIBE/BPC.

“All our dreams can come true, if we have the courage to pursue them.” – Walt Disney By William Manzanares william@tacomaweekly.com

What is your dream job? Have you ever asked yourself this question? I ask this question in all of the interviews for employment that I conduct. I do this because I truly want to know what the applicants at my companies want out of life. I do everything possible to make it a happy work environment and working toward career goals – the goal of finding your dream job. There is a difference in employees who work for a paycheck and employees who work for his or her dreams.

I truly believe all dreams can come true if you work toward setting future career goals and if you’re willing to take the time to learn the necessary steps for achieving your goals. I do want to add that pursing your dream job doesn’t mean just quitting your current job because you didn’t get the schedule you wanted, or someone upsets you at your job. Pursing your dream truly means to have the courage to put up with the highs and lows and not giving up. Trust me when I say this: Work everyday toward your dream job and one day will wake up from your dream and find it is reality!


SI DE TH E

Sports

LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 2017

TACOMA WEEKLY 2017 ALL-CITY BASKETBALL TEAMS A STATE TITLE AND SIX MVPS IN THIS WRECKING CREW

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy!

SECTION A, PAGE 10

THE

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

THROWDOWN! Anderson will

be joined on the Team 253 roster by Foss' Roberto Gittens, Life Christian's Lovelady, Wilson's Matthews, Federal Way's Malcolm Cola, Kentwood's Darius Lubom and other local stars on April 8 at Highline College in Des Moines.

See more photos on page A13.

MUST-SEE ALL-STAR GAMES ON TAP By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

DESTINY'S BEST. (top-left) Lincoln junior Trevante Anderson has been getting it done for the Abes since offering up

big performances his freshman year. (top-right) We are going to miss seeing the smooth skills of Lincoln's Morticia Mc'Call. No lady hoopster in the 253 pulled down one-handed rebounds like Mc'Call. (bottom-left) He knew he shouldn't have done it, and he was right. Wilson's Londrell Hamilton still had a smile on his face after getting posterized by Life Christian's Luke Lovelady. (bottom-right) Wilson's Emmitt Matthews Jr. flushes it in front of a packed UPS Fieldhouse endzone. One of our favorite photos of the year. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

I

f you were following high school basketball in the city of Tacoma this season, there's a decent chance that you are still shaking your head in amazement at how incredible the teams from the City of Destiny were this year. Not only was there a grip of teams with legitimate shots at a state championship, they were filled with players who played above the rim, and buried shots from the cheap seats. However, if you're going to lead off the season recap for the 2017 Tacoma Weekly All-City Teams, you've got to start at the top, and this year there is very little argument who that might be, even though several teams finished in the upper-echelon of the state. When the season began, this humble writer from Grit City predicted that the Falcons from Henry Foss High School would take to their new 2A surroundings like a party crasher and capture the state championship in Yakima. Admittedly, Foss was the hot pick by several scribes around the state, so it wasn't exactly a prognostication on the level of Nostradamus. The Falcons (25-5) would go on to rattle off 15 straight wins to close the season, and the big, golden ball trophy made the return trip to Tacoma. The Foss fourth quarter became almost a force of nature in its own right. Several outstanding teams would hang in there with the Falcons for three quarters, only to be left with gravel in their face and the smell of burnt rubber on their uniforms by game's end. It was so fun to watch the steals, layins, three pointers and dunks just explode in succession for Foss when

they decided it was time to kick their engine into overdrive. Senior guard Roberto Gittens was named the 2A State Tournament's Most Valuable Player, as well as taking home the 2A South Puget Sound League's MVP honors. He is joined on the AllCity team by senior forward Donald Scott, and junior guard Demetrius Crosby II, both of which earned All-Tourney and All-League honors. Going into the Friday state semifinals, there were five schools from Tacoma still vying for a shot at their respective state championships. The Bellarmine Prep Lady Lions put together their finest season in the history of the girls' program. Capturing the 4A SPSL title, as well as the district championship, the Lady Lions were primed to make a serious go at the state championship. After an opening round win over Woodinville, Bellarmine would face the tall task of facing defending state champion Central Valley and their 53-game winning streak. In front of a raucous crowd at the Tacoma Dome, the Lady Lions nipped 56-55 in a heart-stopper. It would be hard to capture that sort of energy the following night against eventual champion Kentridge in the semifinals, and the Lady Lions would have to settle for a shot at the third-place trophy on Saturday. Showing that they still had quite a bit left in the tank, Bellarmine (26-3) would push Moses Lake to overtime and hold on late for a 51-47 victory and the third-place finish. Junior forward Shalyse Smith was named to the All-Tournament Team, to go along with her 4A SPSL MVP honor. She is joined on the All-City team by juniors Madeline Garcia and Jenny Hagel, and sophomore Reyelle Foster. This team will graduate just one player this year and should already be

2017 BOYS' ALL-CITY TEAM G - Roberto Gittens, Henry Foss, Sr. G - Trevante Anderson, Lincoln, Jr. G - Luke Lovelady, Life Christian, Sr. G - Joey Bodoia, Bellarmine Prep, Sr. F - Donald Scott, Henry Foss, Sr. F - Willie Thomas, Lincoln, Jr. F - Emmitt Matthews Jr., Wilson, Jr. F - Blake Wilcox, Stadium, Sr. F - C.J. Kovacs, Life Christian, Sr. G - Emmitt Linton III, Lincoln, Jr. G - Demetrius Crosby II, Foss, Jr. F - Christian Moore, Bellarmine, Sr. G - Londrell Hamilton, Wilson, Sr. G - P.J. Talen, Tacoma Baptist, Jr.

2017 GIRLS' ALL-CITY TEAM G - Josie Matz, Wilson, Sr. F - Shalyse Smith, Bellarmine Prep, Jr. F - Morticia Mc'Call, Lincoln, Sr. G - Kondalia Montgomery, Lincoln, Jr. G - Madeline Garcia, Bellarmine, Jr. G - Brooklyn Pascua, Tacoma Baptist, Jr. F - Vanessa Higgins, Stadium, Sr. G - Faith Brantley, Lincoln, So. G - Reyelle Frazier, Bellarmine, So. G - Kiara McMillan, Wilson, Sr. G - Alea Yun, Life Christian, So. F - Nini Figuracion, Mt. Tahoma, So. G - Jenny Hagel, Bellarmine, Jr.

considered a strong favorite for the title next season. The Lincoln Abe boys found themselves facing the most difficult task for any team in America when they squared off against Nathan Hale on Friday night in the 3A semifinals. The top-ranked team in the nation doesn't normally show up at the Tacoma Dome to battle for a Washington state title, but this was

u See BASKETBALL / page A12

While it’s totally acceptable to begin mourning the end of basketball season around these parts, there are still a few tasty hoop events on the calendar that are sure to pique the common fan’s interest. You may have to put a few miles on the old automobile, but if the recent tipoff of basketball all-star games is an example of what is on tap in the next few weeks, than it’s time to block a couple of dates off on the calendar. With the state tournaments now a memory, the opportunity to assemble the best players in the area or the state, and pit them against each other on the court has become a reality. The short and sweet all-star basketball season began on Friday, March 10 at Auburn High School. Sterling Athletics rolled out the ASG South Sound All-Star Games and if you weren’t in the building to see some dunks and three pointers, than you’d be better off at the library. The first game pitted the 2A South Puget Sound League Mountain Division against their counterparts from the Sound Division. What ensued was a clinic on why fans come from all over the place when Foss senior Roberto Gittens is scheduled to play. When the smoke had cleared and the final buzzer sounded, Gittens had racked up a game-high 32 points to lead the Mountain Division to a 131-112 victory. Did we mention that Gittens racked up an incredible 13 dunks? Up next, we had the premier game of the evening for fans following Tacoma area ballers. The 3A Pierce County League AllStars squared off against the 3A South Sound Conference All-Stars and the action went right down to the wire. With time running out and down by one point, the SSC squad needed to rack up about five fouls in the final 20 seconds to put the PCL squad into a oneand-one situation. While they failed to hit the magic mark of seven team fouls, they lulled the PCL into a lazy inbound pass. It was the fourth inbound situation in a matter of about 15 seconds and the next thing you know, North Thurston’s Clay Christian was laying in the game winner for a 113-112 final. Lincoln junior Willie Thomas led all scorers with 22 points for the PCL, while Life Christian senior Luke Lovelady added 21 points while throwing down a game-high six dunks. There would be two 4A boys’ all-star games before the night was through, and the following evening would offer up a North versus South and an East versus West pair of girls’ all-star games. The talent from Tacoma was well-represented throughout the weekend and will be on hand for the next two rounds of all-star contests. On Saturday, March 18, the Washington Interscholastic Basketball Coaches Association will hold their All-State Senior All-Star Games at Mountlake Terrace High School. Local players such as Bellarmine’s Joey Bodoia and John Moore and Sindou Diallo of Curtis will represent the 4A team. Foss’ Gittens and teammate Donald Scott will represent the 2A squad. Life Christian’s Lovelady and C.J. Kovacs will be joined by Chief Leschi’s Yahola Gower on the 2B team. The 2B vs. 1B game will tipoff at 2 p.m., with the 1A versus 2A game following at 4 p.m. The 3A versus 4A game will start at 6 p.m. Not to be outdone, the Puget Sound Throwdown is set for Saturday, April 8 at Highline Community College. The boys and girls games will pit the best of the Greater Tacoma area versus the best of the Greater Seattle are in a “253 vs. 206” showdown. Already on board for the boys’ Team 253 are Gittens, Lovelady, Emmitt Matthews Jr. of Wilson, Trevante Anderson from Lincoln, Malcom Cola from Federal Way and Darius Lubom from Kentwood. The girls’ game will start at 2 p.m. and the boys game starts at 4 p.m. Puget Sound bragging rights will be on the line with this one. For more information you can follow @DownPuget on Twitter.


Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

Sportswatch 4A SPSL BOYS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL MVP - John Moore, Sr. Curtis. Def. MVP - Sindou Diallo, Sr. Curtis. Coach - Tim Kelly, Curtis. 1st Team All-League - Joey Bodoia, Sr. Bellarmine Prep; Sindou Diallo, Sr. Curtis; Jason Cassens, Sr. Emerald Ridge; Landen Neff, Jr. Puyallup; Daniel Gregory, Sr. Emerald Ridge. 2nd Team All-League - Christian Moore, Sr. Bellarmine Prep; Hunter Sipe, Sr. Olympia; Casson Rouse, Jr. Olympia; James Buckley, Sr. South Kitsap; Seth Carnahan, Sr. Sumner. Honorable Mention - Nathan Ward, Sr. Curtis; Brennan Winter, Sr. Puyallup; Chase McGuire, Sr. Emerald Ridge; Charles Elzie, So. Bellarmine Prep; James Baker, Jr. Rogers. 4A SPSL GIRLS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL MVP - Shalyse Smith, Jr. Bellarmine Prep. Def. MVP - Madeline Garcia, Jr. Bellarmine Prep. Coach - Kevin Meines, Bellarmine Prep. 1st Team All-League - Jessi Westering, Sr. Rogers; Raigan Barrett, Fr. Rogers; Amelia Ack, Sr. Olympia; Reyelle Frazier, So. Bellarmine Prep; Kaelin WilliamsKennedy, Sr. Curtis. 2nd Team All-League - Jalaiya Frederick, Jr. Curtis; Jill Harris, So. Emerald Ridge; Tristen Coltom, Sr. Rogers; Sophie Dewitt, Sr. Puyallup; Savannah Fickle, Fr. Emerald Ridge; Jenny Hagel, Jr. Bellarmine Prep. Honorable Mention - Joy Mahnken, Sr. Sumner; Mikayla Schwing, Sr. Emerald Ridge; Sophie Wicker, Jr. Rogers; Ellie Hamel, Jr. Rogers; Hailey Marsh, Sr. Curtis; Mary Joyce, Sr. Bellarmine Prep; Jiselle Woodson, So. South Kitsap; Averie Stock, Jr. Olympia; Madeline Garcia, Jr. Bellarmine Prep; Kayrena Taylor, Fr. Curtis; Kennedy Cutter, Jr. Sumner; Miranda Neal, Jr. Olympia; Ciara Gatpatan, So. Bellarmine Prep: Madison Salisbury, Sr. Puyallup. 3A PCL BOYS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL MVP - Trevante Anderson, Jr. Lincoln. Def. MVP - Willie Thomas, Jr. Lincoln. Coach - Aubrey Shelton, Lincoln. 1st Team All-League - Emmitt Matthews Jr., Jr. Wilson; Divante Moffitt, Jr. Spanaway Lake; Willie Thomas, Jr. Lincoln; Blake Wilcox, Sr. Stadium; Jordan Garner, Jr. Spanaway Lake. 2nd Team All-League - Londrell Hamilton, Sr. Wilson; Emmett Linton III, Jr. Lincoln; Isaiah Turner, Jr. Spanaway Lake; Zane Foster, So. Bonney Lake; Marcel Ferguson, Sr. Stadium. Honorable Mention - Jalil Massey, Sr. Mt. Tahoma; Daeshawn Wayne, So. Lakes; Anthony Stokes, Sr. Wilson; David Harris, Sr. Lincoln; Zack Nykowski, Sr. Lakes; Le’Zjon Bonds, Jr. Lincoln; Davion Gaines, So. Stadium; Tyler Williford, So. Mt. Tahoma; Joehnis Joyce, Sr. Bethel. 3A PCL GIRLS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL MVP - Josie Matz, Sr. Wilson. Def. MVP - Kondalia Montgomery, Jr. Lincoln. Co-Coaches - Michelle Birge, Wilson; Jamila Jones, Lincoln; Cal-Jean Lloyd, Stadium. 1st Team All-League - Tianna Brown, Jr. Bethel; Vanessa Higgins, Sr. Stadium; Morticia McCall, Sr. Lincoln; Faith Brantley, So. Lincoln; Kondalia Montgomery, Jr. Lincoln. 2nd Team All-League - Kiara McMillan, Sr. Wilson; Mallory LaPoole, Sr. Lakes; Tiarra Brown, Fr. Bethel; Nini Figuracion, So. Mt. Tahoma; Payton Mitchell, Sr. Bonney Lake. Honorable Mention - Tonisha Flowers, Jr. Lakes; Tatiana Sparks, Jr. Lakes; Ghionna Porreca, Sr. Bethel; Nanalia Wagoner, Jr. Bethel; Desiree Ayler, Sr. Wilson; Khaliyah Harris, Sr. Wilson; Brooklyn Grant, So. Wilson; Zyonna Fellows, Jr. Mt. Tahoma.

Sr. Steilacoom; Genaro Castenada, Sr. Highline; Austin Wiebe, Sr. Tyee; Brooks Moeller, Sr. Eatonville. 2nd Team All-League - Kelle Sanders, Sr. River Ridge; Alex Coleman, Sr. River Ridge; Jack Burcham, Jr. Highline; Darzell Walker, Sr. Highline; Deondre Russ, Jr. Renton. Honorable Mention - Ray Springer, Sr. Eatonville; Jalen Thomas, Sr. Steilacoom; Josh Kennedy, Sr. River Ridge; Sejdulah Kaharevic, Jr. Tyee; Isaiah Hampton, Sr. Steilacoom; DJ Kerson, Sr. Clover Park; Carson Hutchings, Sr. Eatonville; Travis Miller, Sr. Orting; DeNero Washington, Sr. River Ridge; Jordan Locke, Jr. Renton; Taheem Jones, Jr. Renton. 2A SPSL GIRLS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL Mountain Division MVP - Kendall Bird, Sr. White River. Coach - Chris Gibson, White River 1st Team All-League - Alexius Foster, Sr. Franklin Pierce; Christina Willis, Jr. Fife; Elle Watts, Jr. Lindbergh; Georgia Lavinder, Jr. White River; Ghane Buze, Sr. Franklin Pierce. 2nd Team All-League - Alani Sinclair, Jr. Lindbergh; Courtney Morton, Sr. Fife; Jane Allyn Norris, Sr. White River; Sofia Lavinder, Jr. White River; Jill Jin, Sr. Lindbergh. Honorable Mention - Unique Taylor, Sr. Lindbergh; Teyha Spates, Fr. Lindbergh; Angela Arzaga, Sr.Lindbergh; Kayle Meach, Sr. Franklin Pierce; Makanna Montoya, So. Foster; Precious Serafica, So. Foster; Lee Audrey Norris, So. White River; Breanna Hernandez, So. Fife; Elizabeth Lindo, Sr. Evergreen; Sabrina Pietron, Jr. Evergreen; Lexi White, So. Evergreen; Sierra Hartfield, Jr. Washington; Winter Bray, So. Washington; My’Dream Carson,So. Foss; Tasia Johnson, Sr. Foss; Jasmine Phillips, So. Foss; Lucy Rasmussen, Sr. White River; Chloe Narolski, So. White River. 2A SPSL GIRLS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL Sound Division MVP - Caitlin Yenne, River Ridge, jr. Coach - Jess VanderWeerdt, Eatonville 1st Team All-League - Sammie Swartout, So. Eatonville; Leah Clardy, Jr. Steilacoom; Lillian Evans, Sr. Renton; Tiajane Tate, Sr. Renton; Mia Flores, Fr. River Ridge. 2nd Team All-League - Madison Jumper, Jr. Eatonville; Natasha Henley, Sr. Eatonville; Tori Allen, Jr. Renton; Maddie Retzlaff, Jr. River Ridge; Stella Fosberg, So. Highline. Honorable Mention - Sarah Fohn, Jr. Orting; Hila’atu Veikoso, So. Tyee; Sydney Banyai, Sr. Orting; Tiarra Tuapua, Sr. Highline; Sierra Brooks, Jr. Tyee; Maria Wilson, Jr. Clover Park; Meilani Wilson, Jr. River Ridge; Jaelin Hotz, So. Eatonville; Emerald Terrones, So. Tyee; Taryn Lucas, So. River Ridge; Samantha Box, So. Highline; Xavia Hall, Jr. Clover Park; Margaret Zilla, So. River Ridge; Tatum Tripp, Sr. Orting; McKenzie Jumper, So. Eatonville; Raylyn Apolonio, Sr. Renton; Britney Kinney, So. Highline. 2B PACIFIC BOYS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL MVP - Luke Lovelady, Sr. Life Christian. Coach - Mark Lovelady, Life Christian. 1st Team All-League - C.J. Kovacs, Sr. Life Christian; Yahola Gower, Sr. Chief Leschi; Kason Koski, Sr. Raymond; Zac Tapio, Sr. Ilwaco; Zach Allton, Jr. Ocosta. 2nd Team All-League - Ethan Bannister, Sr. Ilwaco; Tim Johnson, Sr. North Beach; Chris Whitford, So. Chief Leschi; Tony Dominguez, So. NW Christian; Ryon Ashley, Jr. Valley. Honorable Mention - Anthony Kunitsa, Sr. Life Christian; Donnelle Irvin, Fr. Chief Leschi; Noah Robinson, So, Life Christian; Ecko Auhgkopinee, Jr. Chief Leschi; Payton Shamp, Sr. Life Christian; Kahea Baker, So. Chief Leschi; Eric Overgaard, Jr. Life Christian. 2B PACIFIC GIRLS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL MVP - Makenzie Kaech, Jr. Ilwaco. Coach - Jason Koski, Raymond

2A SPSL BOYS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL Mountain Division MVP - Roberto Gittens, Sr. Foss. Co-coaches - Mark Schelbert, Fife; Rick Tripp, White River. 1st Team All-League - Jalen Green, Jr. Lindbergh; Demetrius Crosby, Jr. Foss; Alex Wallen, Sr. White River; Kelton Williams, Sr. Lindbergh; Donald Scott, Sr. Foss. 2nd Team All-League - Tavis Johnson, Jr. Fife; Cameron Cawley, Sr. White River; Cooper Schelbert, Jr. Fife. Justin Ellerbee, Sr. Lindbergh; Isley Stoneham, Sr. Washington. Honorable Mention - Ryan Larsen, Sr. White River; Joe Flanigan, So. White River; Micah Pollard, So. Foss; Alijah Maddox, Jr. Washington; Dekari Boyd, Jr. Franklin Pierce; Richard Nguyen, Sr. Evergreen; Ishmael Muhammad, Sr. Evergreen; Jamari Severson, Fr. Foster; Xavier Dumas, Jr. Lindbergh; Eli Graham, Jr. Fife. 2A SPSL BOYS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL

1st Team All-League - Madeline Jacobson, Jr. Ilwaco; Cydney Flemetis, Sr. Raymond; Reilly Moore, Sr. North Beach; Aubree Gardner, Sr. Raymond; Alea Yun, So. Life Christian. 2nd Team All-League - Heidi Sowers, Sr. NW Christian; Eliza Bannister, Jr. Ilwaco; Karley Reidinger, So. South Bend; Kristi Raffelson, So. Ocosta; Mikayla Collins, Sr. Raymond.

MVP - Brooklyn Pascua Jr. Tacoma Baptist. Coach - Beth Wing, Tacoma Baptist. 1st Team All-League - Katelyn Schwartz, Sr. Evergreen Lutheran; Tamar Jacobson, Jr. Northwest Yeshiva; Jesse Holder, Sr. Evergreen Lutheran; Kaayla Butler, So. Auburn Adventist Academy; Mercy Nelson, Jr. Rainier Christian. 2nd Team All-League - Abby Leaman, Sr. Tacoma Baptist; Emi Bezman, So. Puget Sound Adventist; Katia Cureton, Jr. Mt. Rainier Lutheran; Izzy Jones, Jr. Seattle Lutheran; Allison Jones Sr. Quilcene.

Coach - Rick Comer, Renton. 1st Team All-League - Davien Harris-Williams, Jr. Clover Park; Malik Coats, Jr. Renton; La’Jon Enis-Carter,

Honorable Mention - Liza Koch, Sr. Auburn Adventist Academy; Emily Crone, Sr. Tacoma Baptist.

MVP - Jordan Skipper-Brown, Sr. River Ridge.

MAR. 16 – 31 THURSDAY, MARCH 16 – SOCCER Bonney Lake vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 16 – SOCCER Stadium vs. Lakes Harry Lang Stadium – 7 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 16 – SOCCER Spanaway vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 17 – SOCCER Graham Kapowsin vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium – 5:30 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 18 – BASEBALL Ingraham vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 12 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 18 – BOXING Battle at the Boat 110 Emerald Queen Casino – 7 p.m. MONDAY, MARCH 20 – BASEBALL Bonney Lake vs. Lincoln Heidelberg Field – 4 p.m. MONDAY, MARCH 20 – SOCCER Central Kitsap vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. TUESDAY, MARCH 21 – SOCCER Mt. Tahoma vs. Lakes Harry Lang Stadium – 7 p.m. TUESDAY, MARCH 21 – SOCCER Lincoln vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 – BASEBALL Lakes vs. Wilson Wilson HS – 4 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 – BASEBALL Spanaway Lake vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 4 p.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 – BASEBALL Bethel vs. Stadium Heidelberg Field – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 23 – BASEBALL Sequim vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 4 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 23 – SOCCER Wilson vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 23 – SOCCER Lakes vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 24 – SOCCER Spanaway Lake vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 24 – SOCCER Olympia vs. Curtis Curtis Viking Stadium – 7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, MARCH 28 – SOCCER Curtis vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS – 4 p.m.

1B SEA-TAC GIRLS ALL-LEAGUE BASKETBALL

3rd Team All-League - Molly Zepeda, Fr. Pope John Paul II; Alyssa Bergemann, Sr. Evergreen Lutheran; Maddie Kitselmann, Sr. Tacoma Baptist; Joelle Zoolkoski, So. Crosspoint; Raamiah Nelson, So. Rainier Christian.

Sound Division

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS

TUESDAY, MARCH 28 – SOCCER Bethel vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 6:30 p.m. TUESDAY, MARCH 28 – SOCCER Lakes vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m. THURSDAY, MARCH 30 – SOCCER Bonney Lake vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m. FRIDAY, MARCH 31 – SOCCER Mt. Tahoma vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl – 7:15 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

t Basketball From page A10

one of those once in a lifetime or two sort of years. Lincoln would bring one of their best teams in school history to face a Hale team that could have arguably ran with the University of Washington this season. While that may sound like quite a stretch, if you saw Nathan Hale in person, you'd likely agree. It was 26-0 Lincoln against 27-0 Nathan Hale and the setting, under an iconic Tacoma roof, in front of a huge crowd, will be burnt into many memories around here for quite some time. Unlike many top-quality teams to face Hale this season, the Abes actually made the eventual state champions work for the victory, and their fans were proud to see them hang with what many consider to be the best high school basketball team in state history. The following day, Lincoln was giving West Seattle the business in the thirdplace game, before they hit a fourth quarter unlike any they had seen all season. Whether it was inside, outside or anywhere on the court, there seemed to be a cover on the Abes' basket, and West Seattle hit a hot streak. Lincoln would finish the season 26-2 and considering the 3A field, the fifth-place trophy was a fantastic accomplishment. Still, it would have been fun to see what Lincoln would have done in a tournament that didn't have what amounted to an all-star team. Junior guard Trevante Anderson was named to the All-Tourney team, to go along with his 3A PCL League MVP award. Joining him on the All-City team is junior Willie Thomas, the PCL Defensive MVP, as well as junior Emmitt Linton III, who proved to be quite the game changer for the Abes when they needed a shot in the arm this season. Not to be outdone by their counterparts, the Lincoln Lady Abes also advanced to the 3A state semifinals. The league champions opened state tournament play with impressive wins over West Seattle, followed by Stanwood, to reach the semis against perenniel powerhouse Bishop Blanchet. It looked good early for the Lady Abes, but Blanchet's inside game took over in the second half and Lincoln would have to settle for a rematch with Snohomish the following day, ultimately taking home the fifthplace trophy to go along with their outstanding 21-8 record. Senior forward Morticia Mc'Call was named to the All-Tourney team. When Mc'Call was clicking, there wasn't a better basketball player in Tacoma this season. She is joined by junior Kondalia Mont-

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

FLOOR GENERAL. Three years ago, a young freshman point guard named Josie Matz made a splash at the 3A state tournament, helping a veteran Wilson Lady Ram team advance to the semifinals. Matz would be named to the All-Tourney team, and made her first of four appearances on our All-City rosters. Matz will now take her skills to the University of Portland.

gomery, the PCL's Defensive MVP, as well as sophomore guard Faith Brantley. Expect the Lady Abes to make some more noise at the Dome next season. Heading into state tournament week, it felt like it all was lining up for the Life Christian Eagles. After destroying the 2B Pacific League for the third straight year, the Eagles would blast through stiffer competition to capture the SW District title. After slapping Toledo around by nearly 30 in the quarterfinals, Life Christian was on the doorstep of their first state title appearance. All they had to do was get past Liberty (Spangle) in the semifinals; a team that also looked scorching hot com-

ing into the game. As advertised, the teams went at it like a heavyweight boxing match and the game was tight throughout. It wasn't until some unfortunate calls went the other way for the Eagles late and Liberty closed the deal. Showing some serious resilience, Life Christian (27-2) would rebound the following day and topped St. George's 64-51 for the third-place trophy. It's going to be quite some time before a small-school talent like senior guard Luke Lovelady represents Tacoma again. The 6-8 league MVP did it all for the Eagles, as well as making his teammates better. Joining him on the All-City team

is 6-5 senior forward C.J. Kovacs. When they had it going on, there probably wasn't a better high-low offensive punch in town, and they proved it against bigger schools in non-league contests. Speaking of the small schools, Tacoma Baptist fielded a girls team that was absolute dynamite. The Lady Crusaders captured the 1B Sea-Tac League title, as well as the top seed from districts on their way to a perfect 24-0 record entering tournament play in Spokane. As any fan will tell you, the Spokane tournament is where perfect records usually end for teams from the west side of the state. Tacoma Baptist opened the tournament against Almira-Coulee-Hartline (a rematch of the 1991 boys state championship) and the eventual runners-up held off the Lady Crusaders 46-34, ending the undefeated run. Tacoma Baptist would rebound the following day for a 60-57 win over Neah Bay, before falling to Oaksdale on Saturday for the fifth-place trophy. Junior guard Brooklyn Pascua makes a return appearance on the All-City team. The league MVP is easily one of the most talented guards in Tacoma. Expect Pascua to take over more of the scoring next season and make a run at some all-state accolades. It wouldn't be an All-City team without PCL MVP Josie Matz. The senior guard is making her fourth appearance on our team, and there's no player more deserving of the spot. After suffering a season-ending knee injury late in her junior year, the general of the Wilson Lady Rams returned with a vengeance this season. On paper, this didn't look like the sort of team that would advance deep enough into the playoffs to literally be just one more bucket away from a ticket to the Tacoma Dome. Sometimes a program has to reload or retool. In this case, they just needed their four-year starter to lift up the rest of the players and the Lady Rams (16-10) responded loud and clear. Matz is joined on the All-City team by longtime backcourt mate Kiara McMillan. The duo leave a legacy of winning at Wilson that will serve as a goal and example for players in the years to come. We'd also like to congratulate Stadium senior Vanessa Higgins. While the Tigers haven't been world beaters during her career at Stadium, the opposition knew they were going to have their hands full with the talented wing/forward. A perennial all-league selection, Higgins makes her fourth appearance as a member of the All-City team. Making their second All-City team appearance are seniors Joey Bodoia and Christian Moore from Bellarmine Prep, along with junior Emmitt Matthews Jr. and senior Londrell Hamilton from Wilson.

COLLEGE TOURS FOR FAMILIES Congratulations! You have a student who is digging into algebra, reading great works of literature and drawing closer to graduation. But do you know what’s ahead for your student? For many students, attending a two- or four-year college, university, or vocational school is a crucial next step on their path to fulfilling their career and life dreams. If you want to help your child meet their higher education goals, join us on our 3rd annual family tours. From March 28th – May 16th, Tacoma Public Schools is sponsoring tours of eight outstanding local colleges. We will provide transportation to and from each institution. Each visit includes a customized tour and presentation from college staff on the admissions process, financial aid and scholarships and college life unique to each school. Buses leave from the Central Administrative Building at 601 S. 8th Street, Tacoma WA, 98401 at the times listed below. Roundtrip visits will last 2-3 hours, depending on location.

SCHEDULED VISITS · Tue., March 28: Pacific Lutheran University (4:45 pm) · Tue., April 11: Pierce College Fort Steilacoom (5:30) · Thurs., April 13: Evergreen State College (5:40) · Mon., April 17: University of Washington - Tacoma (5:30 pm) · Wed., April 19: University of Puget Sound (5:30 pm) · Mon., April 24: Clover Park Technical College (5:40 pm) · Wed., May 3: Tacoma Community College (5:30 pm) · Tues., May 16: Bates Technical College (5:40 pm)

To register, please visit: www.tacomaschools.org/collegetours or call the TPS Community Partnership Office at 571-7980


Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

ALL-STAR PHOTO GALLERY

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1 PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ALL-STAR JAMS. (1) Lincoln junior Willie Thomas rises for his second dunk at the South Sound All-Star Game. (2) Stadium senior Marcel Ferguson finishes with the two-hand stuff. (3) Bellarmine senior Joey Bodoia spent all year above the rim. (4) Curtis senior Sindou Diallo was a 4A SPSL first-teamer. (5) Curtis senior Nate Ward rolls to the hoop. (6) Lincoln junior Kondalia Montgomery isn't just a defensive stopper. (7) Lincoln sophomore Faith Brantley has a bright future ahead with the Lady Abes. (8) Bellarmine junior Madeline Garcia was named Defensive MVP of the 4A SPSL. (9) Four-time All-City selection Vanessa Higgins looks for an opening.

8

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! Wh a t a Feelin ''!

Pre-Season PARTY S at u r d ay, M a r c h 2 5 1 - 4 PM

) Pick up your season tickets ) I v a r ’s f r e e s a m p l e s i n c l u d i n g Sriracha specialties and a preview of Baconfest weekend

) ) ) )

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Concessions and drink specials Family Fun Zone and photo booth Ballpark tours Mariners vs. Rangers on the video board

PROFESSIONAL INDOOR SOCCER For tickets call 1-844-STARS-TIME or visit TACOMASTARS.COM For more information call 253-752-7707 or visit tacomarainiers.com TW What a Feelin 021417.indd 1

2/14/17 2:24 PM

TW PSP 030217.indd 1

3/3/17 1:08 PM


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Stop LNG Now!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the west coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!” The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER Pristine waterways next to an industrial complex such as LNG could cause an environmental disaster in the Puget Sound from which we may never recover.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleaner-burning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our roadways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need. Thousands of oil train cars enter and leave the Port of Tacoma daily. A train derailment in the river would be catastrophic.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned.

The I-5 corridor is well known for traffic congestion, which greatly increases the risk of toxic accidents on the highway.

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.

r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another. r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.


‘Godspell’ at PLU

City Life

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTO BY CHRIS COYLE

BIG BUSINESS. The rock duo - comprised of Jared Warren and Coady Willis - will headline an all-ages show at Real Art Tacoma on Saturday, March 18.

BIG BUSINESS PLAYS AT REAL ART TACOMA MARCH 18 By Ernest A. Jasmin

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ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

inger-bassist Jared Warren and drummer Coady Willis - aka Big Business, aka twothirds of the Melvins’ rhythm section - will bring their thunderous sound to local all-ages hot spot Real Art Tacoma on Saturday. In anticipation, Tacoma Weekly caught up with singer-bassist Jared Warren to get the skinny on “lumber hauling rock,” finding time to record between Melvins tours and raising a newborn, and how not to get invited back to open for Beck. Here is part of that conversation. Tacoma Weekly: Last time I saw you, you were in Melvins mode at Bumbershoot where you guys sounded amazing. Is that the first time you played the big stage there? Warren: Yeah, I think it was. TW: Buzz (Melvins front man Osbourne) was wearing his trademark wizard frock, and I think you were rockin’ a fancy turban that day. Is there a story behind those outfits? Warren: Well, Buzz has been wearing outfits for some time. I think he originally starting wearing moo moos that his wife made for him. Originally, he wanted me to wear one, and I did wear a super frumpy moo moo his wife made the first couple tours. After that, I took initiative to make my own outfit, just for fun, and also I didn’t find the moo moo as forgiving in performance as he does. I prefer pants. There’s not much of a crazy story or anything. It’s just a matter of being goofy. TW: It definitely adds a layer to the aesthetic. And before we start talking about Big Business I’m gonna float a theory: Part of the reason Buzz wanted you in the band is because you have similar hair. Warren: Sometimes I do. I haven’t had long hair in a while; but yeah, the very first tour I did with ‘em, my hair was long. We played every podunk town you can think of (including) lots of places that had never seen the Melvins. So I was often mistaken for Buzz, despite the fact I’m 10 years his junior, and much more handsome. (He laughs.) TW: You’re kind of like time machine Buzz. Warren: Yeah, exactly. TW: So how do you know it’s time to go into Big Business mode? Warren: Well, when we’re not doing Melvins stuff. (He chuckles.) It depends. Over the years, we’ve kind of fit it in where we could, which was difficult to do when

we started playing with those guys. It would take up so much of our time initially because we had to learn a whole catalog of songs. Big Business was also writing a record at the same time, so it was pretty chaotic. We just kind of fit it in when we could, and these days we’re just kind of going for it. TW: I’ve noticed from reading interviews that one of your big pet peeves is being called “sludge.” If you were to make up a slick, cynical marketing term for what you do what would it be? Warren: Huh, that’s something I should have. (Pause.) I’ve had this conversation with music writers and band people, it does seem like that’s just kind of this throwaway term that doesn’t mean anything. When I hear the word sludge … I think of the mediocre grunge bands that never went anywhere because they were terrible. It implies a slow tempo, too, which doesn’t really apply to us necessarily. We have some slower songs, but by and large our tempos are pretty peppy. I don’t know. If I sat down, and it was my job to think of adjectives to describe our music, I think I could come up with something better than sludge. “Slime” and “hammer music.” Those are two just off the top of my head. “Lumber hauling rock.” TW: Maybe I’ll steal one of those for this story. Warren: “Arson metal.” TW: That actually has a ring to it - or maybe “torch metal.” With “Command Your Weather” (find it at bigbusiness.bandcamp.com) you went a ways to further dispel the “sludge” label with probably your most eclectic album to date. What can you point to that maybe set the tone for what you ultimately came up with? Warren: After having played with some guitarists for several years, we no longer had a guitarist and were back to being a two-piece. So we kind of had to figure that out in short order. We were supposed to tour with Mastodon in Europe, and our guitar player couldn’t come. TW: What happened that he couldn’t come? Warren: He had a back injury that was pretty major and he just couldn’t physically do it. We had already bought plane tickets and all that, so it wasn’t something we could really back out of. So we went and did it as a two-piece, and that worked really well. So going into our last record, we were kind of starting from scratch in a way, but also (we were) excited and encouraged by our own abilities. It was refreshing to be a two-piece again. I just kind of had to start relying on pedals a little bit more to fill in some of those gaps, and also be more creative with our writing. When you have a

ONE

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BLUES FAVORITE Legendary New York blues singer Bill Sims Jr. is the special guest at this weekend’s Blues Vespers show which will kick off at 5 p.m. on Sunday, March 19, at Immanuel Presbyterian Church, 901 N. I St. Sims was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2015 for his work with the Heritage Blues Orchestra. He wrote the music for the acclaimed Broadway production of August Wilson’s “Jitney” and just released a new CD of songs by Bob Dylan, called “Bill does Bob.” This installment of IPC’s Vespers series is also a fund raiser for a 2018 Habitat for Humanity build in Guatemala. For further details, call (253) 627-8371 or visit: www.ipctacoma.org.

THE FAIR + FUNK Legendary R&B, soul and funk band Earth, Wind & Fire is the latest act to be announced for this year’s Washington State Fair. The band – known for “September,” “Reasons” and other classics – will headline the Fair’s 11,000-seat grandstand at 7:30 p.m. on Sept. 22. Tickets will go on sale to the general public at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 18, with prices ranging from $45 to $80; www. thefair.com/concerts for further details.

THREE PDZA GOES GREEN With a tip o’ the cap to the Emerald Isle, Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium is celebrating the color green during its “Going Green”

guitar player, you can add a lot of flourishes and melodies and things that just aren’t there when you’re a two-piece. Coady (drummer Willis) got some new percussion we’ve been using a lot, like the bells that come up a few times on the record. All those things kind of set the tone, particularly the bells that are really distinct sounding. I guess we were working with what we had; working with less and trying to come up with more. TW: Have you started working on the follow-up? Warren: We are just starting to. We recorded a couple of Suicide covers just to keep ourselves busy and to put up on Bandcamp. TW: Which songs? Warren: “Sheree” and “Ghost Rider.” So we’re just finishing those up. We’ve been trying to take advantage of recording stuff in our practice space, and just trying to trim the fat wherever we can. Paying people to record you is expensive, and getting stuff mastered is expensive. But yeah, we have a couple of new songs we’re kicking around for the new record. But I’ve been busy. My wife and I just had our second child in December, so I’ve been neck-deep in diapers and whatnot for the last couple months. TW: And not so much sleep. Warren: Not so much sleep, not so much creative time. (He chuckles.) TW: As I was doing research for the interview, I was watching clips from the KARP documentary (“Kill All Redneck P-----: KARP Lives 1990-1998,” directed by William Badgley) where we learn your very first tour was with Beck. That seems like it would set a high bar as far as tour experiences go. Warren: Ehhhh, I don’t know. (He laughs.) TW: Or maybe low bar. What do you remember? Warren: It was during the “Loser” tour, so it was right when Beck was getting big. ... We were really young; we were 18, 19 years old and just had no idea how to act. We were super unprofessional, and we just didn’t know how it worked. Like we didn’t understand that our dressing room was for us, and Beck’s dressing room was for them, and we weren’t supposed to be eating their food; not major stuff, but we were definitely the oddballs on the tour. It would be like taking your nephew on tour or something, or a bunch of 13-year-olds. We were idiots, we were total idiots. Beck’s crew, there were a few of them that were not into us at all. The sound person, she was really not into us. The tour manager was really not into us.

event on Saturday, March 18, during which Polar bears, gibbons, Asian elephants and more will enjoy green treats and enrichments – ranging from refreshing green ice to smashing and devouring watermelons – starting at 11:30 a.m. Over at Kids’ Zone, the zoo will also celebrate the first birthday of goats, Dublin and Clover, by presenting them with Timothy hay “cupcakes” at 1:30 p.m. All activities are free with zoo admission, which is $9.95 to $17.95, or free for children ages 2 and under; www.pdza.org.

FOUR DISCO DOES NOT SUCK Fans of the ‘70s will get another chance to show off their retro dudes following “Soul Revue: The ‘70s Edition,” which took over Broadway Center’s Pantages Theater on Thursday night. Discolux will bring more of a late ‘70s, Studio 54 vibe to the Mix, 635 St. Helens Ave., from 7 p.m. till close on

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Saturday, March 18. DJ Broam will set the mood with a play list that’s sure to include musical goodies that span from Labelle to Donna Summer, and the fierce drag kings and queens of AB Pure Entertainment will strut their stuff from 8 to 10 p.m., during this special edition of their monthly drag show, “Queens of the Night.” Cover charge will be $3 to $5; www.themixtacoma.com.

FIVE PEGG-FEST Enjoy the finale of what has become known as the Cornetto Trilogy – a series of British horror and scifi comedies starring Simon Pegg – when the Grand Cinema screens 2013s “The World’s End” at 10 p.m. Saturday, March 18. “The World’s End” stars Pegg as a deluded, again hipster who discovers something is amiss – like “Stepford Wives” meets “Invasion of the Bodysnatchers” amiss - during a pub crawl through his normally quiet, English hometown. The film is preceded in the trilogy by “Shaun of the Dead” and “Hot Fuzz.” Tickets are $5.50 to $10; www.grandcinema.com.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

WEEKLY REWIND Classic rockers Blue Oyster Cult rocked the Emerald Queen Casino’s I-5 Showroom on March 11. Find more of staff photographer Bill Bungard’s images from that show - as well as appearances by Geoff Tate, John 5 and more – online at www. tacomaweekly.com.

Photo by Bill Bungard

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Fitness gadgets abound these days: mileage trackers, smart watches, wireless headphones. There’s no end to the wave of hi-tech tools flooding today’s fitness market. But what if you’re an avowed luddite? Or broke? Or both? What if you’ve already filled your basement with treadmills, stationary bikes and other workout machines that do nothing but collect dust? There are plenty of ways to get a good workout without investing in the latest shiny offering. What follows are two strategies for staying fit that don’t depend on technology of any kind. The first we’ll call the naturally fit approach, which focuses not on adding a fitness regimen to your life but merely making the best of daily opportunities to stay active. If you work or live in a multistory building, take the stairs. Going down works different muscles than going up, by the way. If you own a home with an outdoor space, you’re in luck: spring’s just around the corner. Get out there and cut the grass with a manual, humanpowered mower. Kneel down and get your hands dirty; you’ll stretch your lower back while you’re at it. Shovel some compost. Rake a few leaves. Fill two buckets with weeds, and lug one in each hand to the yard waste bin. Maybe your kitchen is overdue for a remodel. Tiling, painting, plumbing—most remodelingrelated activities engage your core,

muscle, but you hate gyms, don’t want to clutter your house with fitness contraptions or are working with a tight space or budget. Well, you might be surprised to learn that everyone has access to a yoga instructor these days. For free. Downward facing dog, reverse warrior, open triangle—every yoga pose imaginable has been demonstrated on YouTube. The same goes for Pilates, aerobics routines and Kegel exercises. If you don’t like your instructor, that’s okay. Twenty more are waiting to teach you. Just scroll down. Old standbys like the common pushup belong to nearly every workout routine, even for bodybuilders with access to state-ofthe-art weight rooms. In fact, those gurus on YouTube will show you a dozen different ways to safely do a pushup, including one or two that match your fitness level. They’ll show you how to tone your abs or your arms using only a chair. They’ll teach you how to strengthen your glutes courtesy of the nearest wall. Think of it this way: if technology was necessary for fitness, we’d be the fittest society in history. But the opposite is true. We’d be wise to take a few cues from the earliest humans, who could run long distances and endure remarkable hardships without the aid of modern gadgets.

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Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

PLU PUTS ON ROUSING RENDITION OF ‘GODSPELL’

Culture Corner

A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Goings on this Week in Tacoma: Creative Colloquy Three Year Anniversary Celebration March 20, 7 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Opera Alley, Tacoma, WA 98402 Join Creative Colloquy in celebrating its three-year anniversary and the return of Spring at a special monthly reading and open mic event on 20 March. Festivities will include five featured readers followed by an open mic opportunity, raffle, cake and more. Washington State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall will make a guest appearance to commemorate the spring-themed evening. Info: www.creativecolloquy.com

Goings on this Week at Tacoma Art Museum: PHOTO COURTESY OF PLU SCHOOL OF ARTS AND COMMUNICATION

TEACHER. Blayne Fujita takes center stage in his role as Jesus in PLU’s staging of “Godspell.”

Last weekend, Pacific Lutheran University’s School of Arts and Communication opened a production of “Godspell,” a combination of music, dance and performance art based on the Gospel according to St. Matthew. The show has been a staple of musical theater since its 1971 Off-Broadway beginnings. It has experienced a number or revivals both on and off Broadway. “Day by Day,” one of the songs in the show, was even a mainstream radio hit back in 1972. The PLU production, co-directed by Jacob Viramontes and Jeff Clapp, is held in the intimate space of the university’s Studio Theater. All of the action – energetic dancing, configurations of bodies and performance of vignettes – takes place on and around a ramped dais that is set right in the midst of the audience. Although the performance begins with the Baptism and ends with the Crucifixion (with a prologue and a finale), the show is not really a narrative of the Jesus story. A large portion of the show is derived from the parables and the teachings of Jesus. Other stories from the ministerial career of Jesus are illustrated, but not necessarily in chronological order. Only three biblical characters are named: Jesus, John the Baptist and Judas. The rest of the cast takes on a multitude of shifting roles as they are featured in individual songs and act out the characters in the parables and the scenes from the gospel story. The brilliance of the cast, the skill of the musicians, and the staging, choreography, costuming and lighting all come together to make this a rock sold show. In the starring role of Jesus, Blayne Fujita exhibits skilled acting and a vocal range that goes from quiet, silvery melodies, to jaunty vaudevillian jocularity to a spirited, angry spitting-out of lyrics (as when Jesus confronts his accusers). Nick Hager’s portrayal of the ever-complex Judas is a delight to behold. His vocal skill is first encountered when he and Fujita perform “All for the Best,” but his acting comes forward with moving pathos during the course of the betrayal and crucifixion of Jesus. The show is propelled along at a lively pace by the steady stream of delightful vocal performances by the members of the

cast. Madisen Willis’s “Day by Day” is as cozy as a field of buttercups on a sunny day. Arika Matoba’s silky voice – with a brassy edge – is so good that one wishes her songs could last twice as long as they do. After Lydia Bill, clad in a feather boa, rose to the pinnacle of the stage and belted out a sultry and sassy rendition of “Turn Back, O Man,” the audience responded with enthusiastic applause at what was one of the high points (literally and figuratively) of the whole show. Contrasting such bold, brash moments are those like Emma Deloye’s performance of “By My Side,” in which the woman accused of adultery sings of her renewed life with a voice as sweet as honeyed cream. Space limits preclude in-depth discussion of the entire cast, but all are great in this dynamic production: Ally Atwood, James Clifford, Gabby Dolan, Lexi Jason, Logan Kropp, Matthew Kusche, Ben Martin, Kathryn Wee and Luke Hartley. The characters in the show start off in plain clothes (lots of denim), but soon dawn a colorful, rag-tag, motley set of fantastical outfits to mark the transformation that takes place once they begin their friendship with Jesus. In the playbill, the directors assert that this is a show about a group of individuals that come together to form a community around a common spirituality. By presenting the gospel message in a non-churchy way (although “Godspell” had an influence in many churches), one is able to experience the Jesus story from a different angle. There are any number of striking moments that percolate up from the swirl of song, dance and pantomime. The lesson that the selfexalting will be humbled and the humble will be exalted, for example, seemed especially effective in speaking to this time in our political landscape. “Godspell” is one of touchstones in our cultural landscape that is good to revisit from time to time. It is adaptable enough that it still able to deliver a punch and work as a vehicle for spiritual wisdom that has served as a guide to civilization for centuries. The PLU production of “Godspell” delivers the goods with pizzazz. Remaining performances of the show take place March 17 and 18 at 7:30 p.m. and March 19 at 2 p.m. For further information visit www.plu.edu/soac or call (253) 535-7150.

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Teen Night: The Outwin 2016 (TAM’s show of contemporary portraiture) March 25, 7-10 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 TAM’s Teen Art Council brings The Outwin 2016: American Portraiture Today to life at Teen Night, planned by teens for teens. Show off your dance moves, collaborate with friends to make larger-than-life art, snap your best selfie, and more! All area high school students are invited to attend. Activities: live music, open mic, photo booth, DIY button making, poster screenprinting, collaborative mural painting, Tacoma Talks Art chats, food. Cost: Free with high school ID; parking is free in the TAM lot. Info: www. tacomaartmuseum.org/event/teen-night-outwin-2016 Teen Art Council creates a space for young people to share their voices, opinions and suggestions with TAM. Eleven dedicated students from high schools across the Tacoma metro area meet twice a month to immerse themselves in exhibitions, plan programs for teens, cultivate Tacoma’s creative community, and exercise TAM’s mission of connecting people through art. And they do all of this in between school, studying for the SAT, and practicing the tuba! Building on successful youth programs such as Art After School and Youth Connect, the Teen Art Council was developed in response to demonstrated community needs. Partnering with Graduate Tacoma, TAM is dedicated to increasing Tacoma’s high school and college graduation rates. Teen Art Council provides high school students with mentorship and leadership opportunities, and exposes youth to careers in the arts. Programs like Teen Art Council help to build a pipeline for young people from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds to enter the museum field. Artist Talk: Veryl Goodnight March 26, 2-3 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 Inducted into the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame on Oct. 27, 2016, Veryl Goodnight is a largely self-taught sculptor who lives on a range overlooking Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado. The rugged terrain provides her with many of her subjects. She has always believed in working from live models, aiming to capture each animal’s individuality in her sculptures. Goodnight’s majestic Spirit of Autumn is on view in the Haub Family Galleries. Hear about her inspiration and work. Tickets: $10 ($5 members/students with ID.) Info: www.tacomaartmuseum.org/event/artist-talk-veryl-goodnight


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE SET TO t Big CELEBRATE ST PATRICKS DAY E v e r y o n e ’s Ethan Tucker wearing green, and Stephanie Guinness and Anne Johnson, Jameson is flying both alumni of off the shelves, NBC-TV’s “The and the muzak at Voice,� will peryour neighborhood form at 7 and 10 grocery store is set p.m., respectiveto “Pogues.� Say, ly. The Pierce it must be St. PatCounty Firerick’s Day. fighters Pipes Expect Doyle’s and Drums will Public House to turn up the volagain be one of ume at 9 p.m., the hottest spots and Gritty City in town this weekSirens will spice end since organizthings up with ers have erected a two sets of sul4,000-square-foot try burlesque, at party tend in the in 9:30 and 11 p.m. parking lot between Tickets are the bar - located $10, and they at 208 St. Helens are good for Ave. - and King’s entry on both Books next door Friday and Satfor two epic nights urday. They of partying, on Friare available in day and Saturday, advance at the March 17 and 18. bar or online The main event at doyles317. will start at 5:30 brownpapertickPHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER. p.m. on Friday BOMBSHELLS. Heather Tolbert - aka Heather Hostility of Gritty ets.com. Locals with a lineup that City Sirens - will likely shed layers of green this weekend at Doyle’s can also pick includes regional Public House. up a commemoCeltic-rock favorrative t-shirt at ite, Ockham’s Razor, and the foot-stompin’ bluegrass (or Doyle’s that allows them to skip the line – and there will “drunkgrass,� as they call it) of Tacoma’s Rusty Cleavers. be a line. Entertaining in the tent on Saturday will start at 6 p.m. with local indie-pop band, Jordani. Singer-songwriters Ernest A. Jasmin, Tacoma Weekly

From page B1

TW: Like who are these guys? Warren: I mean, don’t blame ‘em. We were total pains in the ass. We were always loud, always drunk and high and smoking, eating people’s food. You know those cigarettes loads? They were little things you’d buy in the back of a comic book back in the day, little explosive things you put in a cigarette and – bang! - it pops. We would do that to people on the tour. We were those f---in’ d------ds. But the best part of that tour was the other band was this band, Truman’s Water, from Portland by way of San Diego. They were like older brothers, I guess, that put us under their wing. They were super nice, and I’m friends with all those guys still. TW: You’re sharing your bill in Tacoma with Helm’s Alee. How did you meet those guys, and what stands out when think of their style? Warren: I’ve known Ben (singer-guitarist Verellen) since he was just a youngun’. I just met him through the scene, I guess and just stayed friends with him over the years. When they started Helms Alee, I thought they were great. We played a bunch of shows with them over the years, and then did a tour with them and Red Fang a few years ago. That was a lot of fun. They’re the sweetest people in the world. It makes you want to hang out with them and play with them and want to support them as a band. They’re a unique force, for sure; and I can’t think of another band that I’ve watched from their very beginnings transform into such an amazing band over a short period of time. They’ve always been a great band, but they seem to have really found themselves in a way that most bands never figure out. They’re a force, for sure. BIG BUSINESS WITH HELMS ALEE AND POST/BOREDOM 8 P.M. SATURDAY, MARCH 18 REAL ART TACOMA, 5412 SOUTH TACOMA WAY TICKETS ARE $12; WWW.REALARTTACOMA.COM

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: ED SHEERAN English singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran recently announced dates for his U.S. Tour which includes a July 29 stop at the Tacoma Dome. The flame-haired singer – known for “Thinking Out Loud,â€? “Shape of Youâ€? and other hits – is touring in support of his newest disc, “%.â€? The show will start at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are on sale now with prices ranging from $36.50 to $86.50. For further details on that and these other upcoming shows, visit www.ticketmaster.com except for where otherwise indicated. • Earthquake: 7:30 p.m. April 6 to 8, 10:30 p.m. April 7 and 8, Tacoma Comedy Club, $20 to $27; www. tacomacomedyclub.com. • Garrison Keillor “Just Passing Throughâ€?: 7:30 p.m. April 13, Pantages Theater, $39 to $99; www. broadwaycenter.org.

• U2 “Joshua Tree Tour 2017â€?: 6:30 p.m. May 14, Century Link Field, Seattle, $35 to $280. • Tim Meadows: 7:30 p.m. May 25 to 27, 10:30 p.m. May 26 and 27, Tacoma Comedy Club, $20 to $27; www.tacomacomedyclub. com. • “Sasquatch Music Festivalâ€? featuring Frank Ocean, The Shins and more: May 26 to 28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George, $275 to $295 festival pass. • Soul 2 Soul Tour with Tim McGraw and Faith Hill: 7:30 p.m. May 27, Tacoma Dome, $66.50 to $116.50. • Def Leppard: 7 p.m. June 9, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $59.50 to $139.50.

• Kyle Kinane: 7:30 p.m. April 20 to 22, 10:30 p.m. April 21 and 22, Tacoma Comedy Club; www. tacomacomedyclub.com.

• King Crimson: 7:30 p.m. June 13, Moore Theatre, Seattle, $37 to $147.

• Jake “The Snakeâ€? Roberts with Susan Jones: 8 p.m. April 26, Jazzbones, $15 to $20; www. jazzbones.com.

• “United We Rock Tourâ€? featuring Styx, REO Speedwagon and Don Felder: 7 p.m. June 21, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn, $27.50 to $99.50.

• Gabriel Iglesias: 8:30 p.m. April 29, Emerald Queen Casino, $45 to $110.

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• Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals: 7:30 p.m. July 21, Pantages Theater, $55 to $129; www. broadwaycenter.org.

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Friday, March 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

‘GYPSY’ COMES TO TACOMA STAGE

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: ENGLISH COMEDY LEGEND JOHN CLEESE

– KNOWN FOR THE ICONIC “MONTY PYTHON’S FLYING CIRCUS� AND DIRECTING THE CLASSIC “A FISH CALLED WANDA� – WILL HEADLINE TWO SETS AT BROADWAY CENTER’S PANTAGES THEATER, AT 7:30 AND 9:30 P.M. ON FRIDAY, MARCH 17. TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW WITH PRICES RANGING FROM $39 TO $110; WWW.BROADWAYCENTER.ORG.

PHOTO BY DENNIS K PHOTOGRAPHY

GYPSY. Uncle Jocko (Alex Koerger), Momma Rose (Stephanie Leeper),

Young Louise (Summer Mays) and Baby June (Alexandria Bray) pull together to tell the quintessential “theater mom� story of Momma Rose through the lens of the early life of the girl who would later become the famed burlesque dancer, Gypsy Rose Lee.

Louise (Cassie Jo Fastabend). June escapes with a secret marriage and Louise moves on to reinvent herself and become the most famous burlesque star in history. Leeper offered just the right balance of bat-crap crazy with a dash of actual caring and the pipes to carry the vocals for Stephen Sondheim’s lyrics. Leeper’s range created a character who is tragically flawed and most certainly mentally unstable but also ultimately pitied unlike the one-dimensional villainous stage mom Joan “Mommie Dearest� Crawford. But one role can’t carry a show. Lucky for Leeper that the balance of the cast held their own, particularly Fastabend in the title role and Jed Slaughter as Momma Rose’s conflictavoiding love interest Herbie. One standout in the roster of actors in supporting roles was Emilie Rommel-Shimkus, who easily challenged Leeper in the thunder-throat department and brought it all to her limited role as Miss Mazeppa during “You Gotta Have a Gimmick.� Faith Dane, who played the role on Broadway as well as in the 1962 movie version that followed, would be proud.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweeklyl.com

Tacoma Little Theatre’s production of one of America’s musical greats has all the glamour of a hoodie and loafers, or maybe a straightjacket and slippers. But that’s the point. “Gypsy,� directed by Chris Serface with choreography by Lexi Barnett and musical direction by Debra Leach, isn’t as much a play about the title character – famed burlesque icon Gypsy Rose Lee (played by Cassie Jo Fastabend) – as it is about her over-bearing-to-thepoint-of-psychosis theater mom, Momma Rose (Stephanie Leeper). This show is the prequel of the legend that only forms right as the curtain closes. So don’t worry about a community theater getting too much into the old bump and grind; this production shows less skin than a Taliban-approved beach walk. Momma Rose channels all of her dreams of stardom into her children as they perform around the nation as a traveling show in the waning days of vaudeville only to alienate everyone along the way, including her daughters June (Julia Wyman) and

Standout moments in staging include the midsong use of strobe lights to show the passage of time with swapping out of Baby June (Alexandria Bray) for older June (Wyman) and the opencurtain use of the theater’s revolving stage to change scenes without breaking the show’s momentum. The show, which includes the popular hits “Let Me Entertain You,� “Some People� and “Everything’s Coming Up Roses,� clocks in at about three hours with an intermission and well worth the time. “Gypsy� runs Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through April 2. Friday and Saturday showings are at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. There will be a “pay what you can� performance at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 23 as well. This show is recommended for ages 12 and up. Tickets are $26, or $24 for seniors, students and military, and $22 for children 12 and under). Tickets may be purchased at tacomalittletheatre. com, or by calling the Box Office at (253) 272-2281. The theater is located at 210 N. I St.

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FRIDAY, MARCH 17

SUNDAY, MARCH 19

TACOMA DOME: Chris Botti with Symphony Tacoma (jazz) 8 p.m., $26-$87, AA B SHARP COFFEE: “Something to Tell� (storytelling open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE’S: Ockham’s Razor, The Rusty Cleavers (Celtic rock, bluegrass) 6 p.m., $10 G. DONNALSON’S: Maggie Laird (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Afrodisiacs (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Kry (rock covers) 8 p.m., $7-$8 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Ducttape Booking’s Luck of the Damned St. Patty’s Day Show with Pure Earth, Noctium, Vesuvian and Chamber (rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): Two Macs (jazz, pop, folk) PANTAGES: John Cleese (comedy) 7:30, 9:30 p.m., $39-$110, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Archspire, Arkaik, The Devils of Loudon, Massacre at the Opera, Aethereus (metal) 7:30 p.m., $12, AA STONEGATE: “Get Shamrocked Party� (rock) 6 p.m., NC THE SWISS: “‘80s Costume Ball� with Hairstorm (‘80s rock covers) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA COMEDY: Pablo Francisco (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $20-$27, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: LoLo and Friends (R&B, soul, blues jazz) 8 p.m.

SATURDAY, MARCH 18

THE SWISS: Puget Sound Firefighters Pipes and Drums, 6:15 p.m., NC; Dance Factory (dance) 9 p.m. B SHARP COFFEE: T-town Blues Revue with Perry Sanders (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA DOYLE’S: Ethan Tucker Band, Stephanie Anne Johnson, Gritty City Sirens, Jordani (rock, pop, burlesque, singer-songwriter) 6 p.m., $10 G. DONNALSON’S: Maggie Laird (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vietnamese night, 9 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Washed in Black, Stargazer, Plush (Pearl Jam, Mother Love Bone, Stone Temple Pilots tribute) 9 p.m., $12-$15 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: DedElectric, Wyatt Olney and the Wreckage, Dire Fire (rock, alternative) 8 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): Kim Archer (rock, soul, blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA METRONOME: Sam Bogle, Jordyn Cooper (singer-songwriter, acoustic) 7 p.m., NC, AA THE MIX: AB Pure Entertainment presents “Discolux� (drag, burlesque) 8 p.m., $3 PANTAGES: Lewis Black (comedy) 8 p.m., $59.50-$75 REAL ART TACOMA: Big Business, Helms Alee, Post/Boredom (alternative, hard rock) 8 p.m., $12, AA THE SPAR: Blumeadows (singer-songwriter, blues) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rat King, Red Roulette & Werthless (rock) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Pablo Francisco (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $20-$27, 18+ early show TACOMA DOME: Eric Church (country) 8 p.m., $25-$89, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Harrison Street Band (blues, rock) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Lesli Sanders CD release with Fair Lady and the Wild Lips (rock) 8 p.m.

B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Belly Dance Revue, 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Bill Sims (blues) 5 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Hollow Earth, Heiress, Wake of Humanity, Greg Bennick (alternative, doom metal) 7 p.m., $7, AA THE SPAR: Morton, Japp Funk Shop (blues) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Puget Sound Music for Youth (all-ages jam) 8:30 p.m., $6, AA TACOMA COMEDY: “The Dope Show� (comedy) 8 p.m., $14.20-$24.20, 18+ UPS – SCHNEEBECK HALL: Symphony Tacoma presents “Mini Maestros: Jungle Jams – Brass� (classical, chamber music) 2:30 p.m., $7-$10, AA

MONDAY, MARCH 20

B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (literary open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jazz and blues open mic, 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, MARCH 21

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Stoops and Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA METRONOME: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: “New Talent Tuesday� (comedy) 8 p.m., NC, 18+

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22

THE SWISS: Rascal Martinez (singer-songwriter) 8 p.m. B SHARP COFFEE: Puget Sound Revels (pub songs, chanteys) 7 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ REAL ART TACOMA: Deathbed Confessions, Mercy Brown, Redeem the Exile, Ergo I Exist (metal, rock) 7:30 p.m., $7, AA DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Motamouth Jones, Serious Mak, NYQE Unorthodox, Scott Elkins (hip-hop) 8 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

THURSDAY, MARCH 23

B SHARP COFFEE: Elliott Turner’s Ground Up Triio (jazz jam) 8 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Rod Cook (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: “Ladies Night� with DJ Pheloneous (DJ) 10 p.m., $5 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Jonathan Kite (comedy) 7:30 p.m., $12$18, 18+ TACOMA ELKS: Randy Litch (one-man band, eclectic) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

PIERCE COUNTY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER GROUP SEEKING A

SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking a Sports Photographer with a great eye for capturing live game action at games, practices and events in Pierce County. Experienced photographers preferred. REQUIREMENTS: 1-2 years experience taking sports photos. Must have professional equipment, reliable transportation and ability to travel to sports event locations. The ideal candidate is a self motivated, outgoing individual with a positive attitude. They should be able to work evenings and weekends, be willing to work outdoors in various weather conditions, and be able to stand, bend, kneel for prolonged periods of time. Please send your resume and photography examples to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com.

MILTON • EDGEWOOD


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, March 17, 2017

Coming Events TW PICK: CD RELEASE PARTY: ‘MY EYES ARE GREENER ON THE OTHER SIDE’ Sat., March 18, 9 p.m. The Valley, 1206 Puyallup Ave. Gifted musician and songwriter Lesli Sanders hosts a release party for his newest solo acoustic CD, “My Eyes are Greener on the Other Side.” Receiving five-star reviews in just its first few months, Sanders’ CD reveals his gifted way with words and music, as he wrote all songs and played all instruments on this one-of-a-kind recording. While most know him as the glam punk founder and frontman of international touring act The Prophets of Addiction, “Greener” and his first solo acoustic CD “The Haunting Truth of My SelfPortrait” feature Sanders in a softer, gentler light with melodies and lyrics that speak to the deepest parts of listeners’ souls. Be sure and visit www. TacomaWeekly.com for a full review of “My Eyes are Greener on the Other Side.” Ages: 21+ Price: Free. Info: www.ProphetsOfAddiction.com/www. CDBaby/com. ‘SPAMALOT’ Fri., March 17, 7:30 p.m. – OPENING NIGHT Sat., March 18, 7:30 p.m. Sun., March 19, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave. March often marks the turning from winter to spring, and with the warm sunshine of spring comes all sorts of delightful things: flowers, birds, bees, rabbits, you get the idea. And what better place to celebrate spring than on a quest for the Holy Grail? Join King Arthur and his knights of the roundest table as they adventure across Britain in search of the most revered of all legendary treasures. “Spamalot” was originally adapted based on the 1975 hit comedy film “Monty Python and the Holy Grail.” After a successful Broadway run in 2005, the production won three Tony Awards, and an additional 14 Tony Award nominations. Featuring a whimsical cast of Medievalaged knights, “Spamalot” details the epic journey of a band of heroic adventurers across Britain in search of the Holy Grail. With jokes suitable for all ages, “Spamalot” is sure to excite and charm any audience. Price: Adults $31; senior, military, students $29; children (12 & under) $22; groups of 10 or more $27. All seating is reserved. Info: (253) 5656867; www.tmp.org. ‘GYPSY’ Fri., March 17, 8 p.m. Sat., March 18, 8 p.m. Sun., March 19, 2 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. A crowning achievement in American musical theatre, Gypsy tells the story of Mama Rose, the ultimate stage mother, and her hopes and dreams for her daughters, June and Louise. Ages: All ages. Price: $24; $22 students, seniors & military; $20 12 and under. Info: (253) 272-2281; www.tacomalittletheatre.com ‘MY HUSBAND LIKED BEVERLY BETTER’ Fri., March 17, 7:30 p.m. Sat., March 18, 7:30 p.m. Sun., March 19, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. SW, Lakewood (inside Lakewood Towne Center) Enjoy an evening or an afternoon special one-woman show and special fundraiser for Lakewood Playhouse’s education program. “My Husband Liked Beverly Better” features stories and insights from Syra Beth Puett about her life both inside, and outside, of the theatre. Although the show chronicles her experiences in community theater, it also reveals reasons she became involved in theater. She will introduce people and situations that informed the pe former that she became. Through these insights, you may just discover that she is

not the actor, or person, that you thought she was. Ages: All ages. Price: Tickets $10. Info: (253) 588-0042; www. lakewoodplayhouse.org ‘GALLERY – MIGRATION’ BY MATTHEW OLDS Fri., March 17, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S. Exhibit looks into the relationship of people moving through places from the Tacoma area, to current desperate global migrations, and ultimately the journey from life to death. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5357150; www.plu.edu 80’S COSTUME BALL W/ HAIRSTORM Fri., March 17, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Party hard on St. Patrick’s Day with Hairstorm at The Swiss in Tacoma. Rock out in your best 80’s attire and The Swiss will give away gift cards and cool Jameson swag. Ages: 21+ Price: $8. Info: (253) 572-2821; www. theswisspub.com ‘GODSPELL’ Fri., March 17, 7:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University: Studio Theatre, 12180 Park Ave. S. A small group of people helps Jesus Christ tell different parables by using a variety of games, storytelling techniques and comic timing. Price: General admission $8; 55+, military, & alumni $5; PLU & 18 and younger $3 Info: (253) 535-7325; www. plu.edu/soac/events JOHN CLEESE Fri., March 17, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway John Cleese made his mark as a founding member of the legendary Monty Python troupe in the 1960’s. He has gone on to write, produce, direct, and star in an abundance of comedic hits. Price: $39$110. Info: (253) 591-5894; www.broadwaycenter.org CRAFT SATURDAY: RING IN SPRING Sat., March 18, 1-4 p.m. Job Carr Cabin Museum, 2350 N. 30th St. Drop by Job Carr Cabin Museum for our monthly Craft Saturday event. Activities are designed for children ages 3-9 and their families. On 3/18, we’ll be making a spring bell craft. Price: Pay As You Can. Info: (253) 627-5405; www. jobcarrmuseum.org DANCE FACTORY Sat., March 18, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Come on out and witness Dance Factory’s EPIC encore return to the Swiss in Tacoma. Please Share, invite and make plans with everyone you know to party the night away with us at The

Swiss. Ages: 21+ Price: $10. Info: (253) 572-2821; www. theswisspub.com FAMILY STEAM DAY – ROBOTIC VEHICLES Sat., March 18, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Design, build, tinker and learn together as you explore the world of automobiles and its relation to science, technology, engineering, art and math. Ages: All ages. Price: $10-$18. Info: (253) 7798490; www.americascarmuseum.org FLEA MARKET & FIELDHOUSE FULL OF AWESOME STUFF Sat., March 18, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Memorial Fieldhouse, 1500 N. Warner St. 49th annual fundraiser for UPS student scholarships filling the Fieldhouse with local makers, creatives, antique and vintage vendors. Ages: All ages. Price: 8-9:30 a.m. $10; 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. $5. Info: (253) 759-0725; www. pugetsound.edu ARGENTINE TANGO BEGINNERS CLASS Sun., March 19, 12-1 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an Absolute Beginner Level Class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine Tango. You will learn the basic elements for this wonderful dance by a certified professional instructors. Ages: 16 with guardian and up. Price: $10 per class, 8 classes for $40, 10 classes for $70. Info: (253) 3048296; backstreettango.com CHARLIE SHELDON AUTHOR EVENT Sun., March 19, 2 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. One stormy May night, just as Tom Olsen is about to leave with his Native American friends to visit his grandfather’s grave deep in the Olympic Peninsula wilderness, he answers a knock at his door to find an abandoned 13-yearold girl who claims to be his granddaughter. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www. kingsbookstore.com HISTORIC “OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH” WORSHIP Sun., March 19, 10-11 a.m.; 5-540 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s first and oldest church St. Peter’s (est. 1873) invites you to experience Holy Communion every Sunday at 10 a.m. (Sunday School). At 5 p.m., we offer Compline Services the 1st and 3rd Sundays and Evening Prayer all others. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-4406; www.oldstpeters.org

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

BIBLE DISCUSSION THE GOSPEL OF JOHN Mon., March 20, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. All are welcome for a discussion of the Gospel of John, led by Pastor Martin Yabroff of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. No background required. Open discussion and practical applications. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www.saintandrewstacoma. org

BANNED BOOK CLUB Tues., March 21, 7 p.m. Doyle’s Public House, 208 St. Helens Ave. Join this twisted book club reading books that have been banned or challenged. March’s selection is The Giver by Lois Lowry, books available for purchase at King’s Books. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-7468; kingsbookstore.com/event/banneddec ‘THE WALTZ OF THE TOREADORS’ Fri., March 24, 8 p.m. Sat., March 25, 8 p.m. Sun., March 26, 2 p.m. Dukesbay Theater, 508 6th Ave. S. (above the Grand Cinema) French farce comes to Tacoma! This bitter farce is set in 1910 France where we meet self-absorbed and blustery General Léon Saint-Pé and his infatuation with Ghislaine, a woman with whom he danced at a garrison ball some 17 years earlier. A married man trapped in a loveless marriage to his hypochondriac wife, the General pines for true love, his lost youth, and the courage to move forward. Quite unexpectedly, Ghislaine appears at his door, demanding to finally start her life with him. But what will stand in his way of their happiness, other than his pompous self? Is the old waltzer now tripping over his own feet? The Waltz of the Toreadors is a comic and tragic (is that possible?) story that weaves both humor and sadness as the aging general, who still fancies himself to be a toreador with the ladies, must deal with the hollowness of his life. A special wine and cheese reception will be held on Opening Night, Friday, March 24. Ages: Rated PG for occasional sexual innuendo. Price: $10-$15, which includes coffee and an assortment of baked goods. Info: dukesbaywaltz.brownpapertickets.com

RAINIER LEAGUE OF ARTS, MARCH INTO ART Mon., March 20, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Catholic Community Services, 1323 S Yakima Ave This is a mixed art show of photography, watercolor, oil, blown glass and even a Native American hand painted drum. Show is free and open to the public. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 502-2617; www.rainierleagueofarts.com SUDSPOP WITH OUTLAW FORT GEORGE BREWERY Mon., March 20, 6-9 p.m. Peaks and Pints, 3816 N. 26th St. Every month Peaks and Pints invites a craft brewery to create a three-hour soundtrack off our Jukebox, pour its craft beer and award prizes during zany games. Ages: 21 and older. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 328-5621; peaksandpints.com KITTREDGE GALLERY EXHIBIT Mon., March 20, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Kittredge Gallery, 1500 N. Warner St. Exhibit includes Isabella Gresser, visual artist and student-curated works from the Abby Williams Hill Collection. Price: Free. Info: (253) 879-3348; www.pugetsound. edu

T H Z Z D C K O C U A Y Y E B T B E Q R

U D V X M D H G Q E A L M C Z K R E U F

G B A S E B A L L R I H P A M I K P P B

H K L B G Y C D K F T U M K U O S L L S I X M C H E R P R H Z P A W W Y C S L D

J Y H L O N G J U M P U R O L T Q H V C

T U Y O C C W N G E WO H G W V K X Z D T Z M R G E A B D P C K Z X V W H G I H

Y L O O H C S E L D D I M N O S A M Z W

E B Z I C X P N R D R G H H P E F S D Y

P N O O L T E P V W A V UM L N T I W F G Q N A I L G Z MH O A P Y G E K O P V

S J M T Q C C Y O S N Y K B O P D Q M A

E I P U G E T S O U N D H O S P I T A L

Z J N J R L U Q U X W L S Y G Z L Y B P

Y R I N L P S O F X G R X K S I T J T Q

D I A P E R S C Q N A B F G A S G E I E

V Q S N K T G S H P M E G O D S P E L L

Z E N V Q I L U A Y U D F D G X L K F S

F N O T N I M D A B X K S H S N Q H Z V

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

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EMPLOYMENT Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing. com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

AAA Cleaning Service LLC offers you the โ€œWhite Glove Touchโ€ s(IGH%ND(OMES s2EAL%STATE3HOW 2EADY Cleanings โ€“ โ€œSparkleโ€ s2E CURRENT-OVE )NS-OVE Outs s/FlCE#LEANING s0OST #ONSTRUCTION#LEAN OUTS s(OME!DVISORCOM#ERTIlED

All work 100% Guaranteed Discounts Available Call Today 253-507-8731 For Quote

www.AAACleaningLLC.com

WANTED

MAG WHEELS (FIT 6 HOLE), LIGHT BAR, ROLL TOP DESK, FIRE SUITE, TABLE SAW & MORE! LEAVE A MESSAGE (253) 212-2365

OFFICE

253-671-9951

CLEANING

PAINTING

FOR SALE

CELL

253-222-9181

EMPLOYMENT

THE NORTHWESTโ€™S PREMIER EXTERIOR CLEANING COMPANY

s ROOF CLEANING s'544%2#,%!.).' s02%3352%7!3().' s7).$/7#,%!.).' 360-440-6301

HAULING

FREE Hauling for Metal

Licensed & Insured

ALEXโ€™S WINTER MAINTENANCE SERVICES

HAULING

Garage Clean Out Yard Clean Up

LAWN CARE

Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621

HAULING

HAULING

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

WEST COAST LASER DESIGN 253-985-5824 WWW.WESTCOASTLASERDESIGN.COM

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you.

HAULING

HAULING

SERVICES

Father AND AND Son Hauling

Your Local Roof Experts โ€œRepairs or Replacementโ€ 1901 Center TriState St., Tacoma, WA 98409 Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

DESIGN

SERVICES

HELP NEEDED LANDSCAPE LABOR

to install sprinklers and lawns, prune plants and install bark. Transportation and experience helpful. Call Andy 253-442-7547 CLASSY CUTS HIRING HAIR STYLIST. FULL AND PART TIME. AT TWO LOCATIONS. 810 E. 72ND STREET, TACOMA: 253-476-0598 AND 20817 E. STATE ROUTE 410, BONNEY LAKE: 253-447-7700

Experienced Tree Climber

Full Time/ Year Round $160-$250/ day $1,000 Incentive & Medical can be earned after 60 days Safety is the most Important thing to us! Please email work experience to:

Recruiting@treeservicesnw.com 1-800-684-8733 ext. 3434

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179.

Never a fee for my services.

WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

  

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: โ€ข Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com โ€ข Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com โ€ข Andrea Jay, andrea@tacomaweekly.com


Page 8 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY -ARCH17 

NOTICES

NOTICES

NOTICES

VOLUNTEERS

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PIERCE ./    35--/.3"905",5#!4)/.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 3/21/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 3/20/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 2:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 1:00-2:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

4/!LVIN!TALIG

4/#HRISTINA"URWELL #ASE.AME"*

#ASE.AME3! 3 (

#ASE.UMBER059 ' *6  

#ASE.UMBER059 #7 402  

.ATUREOF#ASE'UARDIANSHIPOFA-INOR#HILD

.ATURE OF #ASE 4ERMINATION OF 0ARENTAL 2IGHTS

35--/.3!.$./4)#%/&(%!2).' 0,%!3%4!+%./4)#%THATAPETITIONHASBEEN lLED ASKING THE #OURT TO APPOINTED THE ABOVE NAMED0ETITIONERS TOBETHEGUARDIANS FOR"* AMINORCHILDUNDER04#'UARDIANSHIPOF -INORS#ODE  9/5 !2% 35--/.%$ TO APPEAR AT A GUARDIANSHIPHEARINGINTHIS#OURTONTHE 0UYALLUP)NDIAN2ESERVATIONAT $!9 -ONDAY $!4% -ARCH TH  4)-%  0- ,/#!4)/.  %!34  ST 34 4!#/-! 7! 4HE GUARDIANSHIP HEARING IS PRIVATE AND CLOSED /NLY THOSE PERSONS THE #OURT lNDS TO HAVE A LEGITIMATE INTEREST IN THE PROCEEDINGS MAY ATTEND 4HE #OURT WILL HEAR TESTIMONY TO DETERMINE WHETHER GUARDIANSHIP IS IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE CHILD AND THE 4RIBAL COMMUNITY 4HE#OURTWILLCONSIDERALLGUARDIANSHIPREPORTS SUBMITTED FOR REVIEW !LL PARTIES SHALL BE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO CONTEST THE FACTUAL CONTENTS ANDCONCLUSIONSOFTHEGUARDIANSHIPREPORTS !NYPARTYMAYlLERECOMMENDATIONSREGARDING THE GUARDIANSHIP WITH THE #OURT AT LEAST  CALENDARDAYSBEFORETHEHEARING 9OU ALSO HAVE THE FOLLOWING RIGHTS BEFORE THE #OURT 4HERIGHTTOBEPRESENTBEFORETHE#OURT  4HE RIGHT TO PRESENT WRITTEN AND ORAL TESTIMONY 4HERIGHTTOSUBPOENAWITNESSES 4HERIGHTTOSUBMITRELEVANTEVIDENCETOTHE #OURTFORCONSIDERATION  4HE RIGHT TO COUNSEL AT YOUR OWN EXPENSE ANDEFFORTTHE#OURTHASALISTOFATTORNEYSWHO ARE ADMITTED TO PRACTICE BEFORE THE 0UYALLUP 4RIBEAND  4HE RIGHT TO APPEAL A lNAL DECISION IN THIS MATTER )F YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING OR lLE A WRITTENRESPONSETOTHEPETITIONWITHINDAYS FROMTHEDATEOFTHISNOTICE THE#OURTMAYENTER ANORDERINYOURABSENCE ./4)#% 05235!.4 4/ 04#  $%&!5,4*5$'-%.4 7(%. ! 0!249 !'!).34 7(/- ! *5$'-%.4 )3 3/5'(4 &!),3 4/ !00%!2 0,%!$ /2/4(%27)3%$%&%.$7)4(). 4(%4)-%!,,/7%$ !.$4(!4)3 3(/7. 4/ 4(% #/524 "9 ! -/4)/. !.$ !&&)$!6)4 /2 4%34)-/.9 4(% #/524-!9%.4%2!./2$%2/&$%&!5,4 !.$ 7)4(/54 &524(%2 ./4)#% 4/ 4(% 0!249 ). $%&!5,4 %.4%2 ! *5$'-%.4 '2!.4).' 4(% 2%,)%& 3/5'(4 ). 4(% #/-0,!).4

35--/.3!.$./4)#%/&(%!2).' ! PETITION FOR TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS HAS BEEN lLED AGAINST YOU 9OU HAVE IMPORTANT LEGAL RIGHTS AND YOU MUST TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS 4()3 0%4)4)/.#/5,$2%35,4).0%2-!.%.4 ,/33/&9/520!2%.4!,2)'(43 !LLPARTIESHAVEARIGHTTOBEREPRESENTED BY AN ADVOCATE OR ATTORNEY AT THEIR OWN EXPENSE TO EXAMINE WITNESS AND TO BE INFORMED OF POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES IF THE ALLEGATIONS OF THE PETITION ARE FOUND TO BE TRUE!LLPARTIESSHALLBEENTITLEDTOADVANCE COPIES OF #OURT DOCUMENTS INCLUDING PETITIONS AND REPORTS UNLESS DEEMED INAPPROPRIATEBYTHE#OURT 9OU HAVE THE RIGHT TO HAVE A LAWYER REPRESENT YOU AT THE HEARING AT YOUR OWN EXPENSE AD EFFORT ! LIST OF ATTORNEYS ADMITTEDTOPRACTICELAWBEFORETHE0UYALLUP 4RIBAL #OURT IS AVAILABLE FROM THE #OURT #LERK!LAWYERCANLOOKATTHElLESINYOUR CASE TALK TO THE SUPERVISING AGENCY AND OTHERAGENCIES TELLYOUABOUTTHELAW HELP YOU UNDERSTAND YOUR RIGHTS AND HELP YOU AT HEARINGS )F YOU CANNOT AFFORD A LAWYER THECOURTMAYAPPOINTONETOREPRESENTYOU AFTERASEPARATEINTAKEPROCESS4OAPPLYFOR ACOURT APPOINTEDLAWYERYOUMUSTCONTACT THE0UYALLUP4RIBAL#OURTAT   9/5!2%35--/.%$4/!00%!2FORA 0RE4RIAL(EARINGATTHE0UYALLUP4RIBAL#OURT LOCATED AT  % ST 3TREET 4ACOMA 7ASHINGTON  ON -ONDAY !PRIL TH AT0- 9OU MUST BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING OR THECOURTMAYlNDYOUDEFAULTFORFAILINGTO APPEAR 7(%. ! 0!249 !'!).34 7(/- ! *5$'%-%.4 )3 3/5'(4 &!),3 4/ !00%!2 0,%!/2/4(%27)3%$%&%.$ 7)4().4(%4)-%!,,/7%$ !.$4(!4)3 3(/7.4/4(%#/524"9!-/4)/.!.$ !&&)$!6)4 /2 4%34)-/.9 4(% #/524 -!9 %.4%2 !. /2$%2 /& $%&!5,4 !.$ 7)4(/54&524(%2./4)#%4/4(% 0!249).$%&!5,4 %.4%2!*5$'-%.4 '2!.4).' 4(% 2%,)%& 3/5'(4 ). 4(% #/-0,!).404#

#OPIES OF THE 0ETITION AND THIS 3UMMONS ARE AVAILABLEATTHE#OURT#LERK@S/FlCELOCATEDAT  %ST3T 4ACOMA 7!

9OU MAY CALL 0UYALLUP 4RIBAL #HILDRENS 3ERVICES FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CHILD 4HE AGENCYS NAME AND TELEPHONE NUMBER ARE 0UYALLUP 4RIBAL #HILDRENS 3ERVICESAT  

)F YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE #OURT#LERK@S/FlCEAT  

! COPY OF THE PETITION IS AVAILABLE AT THE 0UYALLUP4RIBAL#OURT

2ONALD,-OOREAND#LAUDIA*-OORE (USBANDANDWIFE

0LAINTIFFS 6S .%47/2+).'&5.$).' #/20/2!4)/. A#ALIFORNIA #ORPORATIONANDANYPERSONORENTITY CLAIMINGBY THROUGHORUNDERTHEM IN ANYCAPACITY REGARDINGTHEPROPERTY WHICHISTHESUBJECTOFTHISSUIT $EFENDANTS

Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan. org and click “hospice and palliative care� in the “our services� tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA

4(%34!4%/&7!3().'4/.4/.%47/2+ &5.$).' #/20/2!4)/. A #ALIFORNIA #ORPORATION AND ANY PERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING BY THROUGH OR UNDER THEM IN ANY CAPACITY REGARDING THE PROPERTY WHICH IS THE SUBJECT OF THISSUIT 9OUAREHERBYSUMMONEDTOAPPEARWITHIN SIXTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHElRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISSUMMONS TOWITWITHINSIXTYDAYSAFTER THE TH DAY OF &EBRUARY  AND DEFEND THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED COURT ANDANSWERTHECOMPLAINTOFTHEPLAINTIFFS 2ONALD AND #LAUDIA -OORE AND SERVE A COPY OF YOUR ANSWER UPON THE UNDERSIGNED ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF $ONALD . 0OWELL

AT HIS OFlCE BELOW STATED AND IN CASE OF YOUR FAILURE TO DO

JUDGMENTWILLRENDEREDAGAINSTYOURACCORDING TOTHEDEMANDOFTHECOMPLAINT WHICHHASBEEN lLEDWITHTHECLERKOFSAIDCOURT4HEOBJECTOFTHE LAWSUITISTOQUIETTITLETOTHEPROPERTYINANDWITH 0LAINTIFFSANDTODECLARETHELIENCREATEDBYTHE DEED OF TRUST IN FAVOR OF THE NAMED DEFENDANT .%47/2+ &5.$).' #/20/2!4)/. A #ALIFORNIA#ORPORATION ISVOIDANDOFNOEFFECT HAVING FULLY PAID AND SATISlED MORE THAN TEN YEARSAGO )FYOUWISHTOSEEKTHEADVICEOFANATTORNEYIN THISMATTER YOUSHOULDDOSOPROMPTLYSOTHAT YOUWRITTENRESPONSE IFANY MAYBESERVEDON TIME 4HIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO 2EVISE #ODE OF 7ASHINGTON #HAPTERS  AND  AND PURSUANT TO A #OURT ORDER AUTHORIZING SERVICEBYPUBLICATION $ATEDTHISTHDAYOF&EBRUARY  $/.!,$.0/7%,,73"! !TTORNEYFOR0LAINTIFFS2ONALDAND#LAUDIA-OORE

There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

City of Fife Needs You!

Read Across America Day Communities in Schools of Tacoma is working with both Graduate Tacoma and the Rotary Club’s to organize and recruit volunteer guest readers for Read Across America Day, to encourage students to pick up a book and read. And this year marks the eighteenth annual celebration of reading and Dr. Seuss’s birthday! As we gear up for Read Across America Day, we would like to ask fellow community members to put aside the many hats they wear for work and read to children on March 2, 2017. If you are interest-

Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253272-8433 Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686.

Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout

PETS

VOLUNTEERS We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife.org/ getinvolved

Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.

Pet of the Week

ed in reading to children on March 2nd, please contact Valerie Sweisthal, Communities In Schools of Tacoma-Early Childhood Outreach Coordinator for more information 253571-4989 or vsweist@ tacoma.k12.wa.us or visit http://tacoma.ciswa.org/ news/join-communities-inschools-of-tacoma-andgraduate-tacoma-for-readacross-america-day/ to find out what schools are participating. I look forward to working with you to motivate our children to read on March 2 and every day. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you.

BAILY Spending nights alone binge watching et i ? ooking for the perfect snuggle bunny? Then eatured et Baily is the bunny for you. The 5-year-old Casanova loves to be pet, and would be quite content hanging out on the couch. Just bring the popcorn for you and some greens for our laid back gent, and enjoy a good romantic comedy or two. #A515019

www.thehumanesociety.org

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

Name: _______________________________ Address: _____________________________

Tacoma Weekly 304 Puyallup Ave., #1 Tacoma WA 98421

Category: Ad Copy Here:

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

______________________________________ Phone:_______________________________

Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

.

30 Words and Under: _____________________ Extra words @ .05: ________________________ Sub Total: _______________________________ x Number of Weeks = _____________________ Total Amount: __________________________

Cash Check Money Order Visa/Mastercard

Exp.

Card #

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave. Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

3 0 4 P u y a l l u p Av e . , Ta c o m a • 2 5 3 - 9 2 2 - 5 3 1 7 TA C O M A W E E K LY

FIFE FREE PRESS

M I LTO N - E D G E W O O D S I G N A L

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

UNIVERSITY PLACE PRESS


Friday, March 17, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs0AGE

CALL 253.922.5317

Classifieds REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES

Serving the Community Since 1991

WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs

Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNT‰ BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF t (FUUJOHRVBMJmFEBOEBQQSPWFEGPSBMPBO t $IPPTJOHUIFSJHIUMPBOUZQFGPSZPV t 6OEFSTUBOEJOHDSFEJUTDPSFTBOEIPXUPVTF DSFEJUJOXBZTUPJNQSPWFZPVSTDPSF t -FBSOUIF)PXBOE8IZPGXPSLJOHXJUIB SFBMUPS UIFIPNFQVSDIBTJOHQSPDFTTBOE IPXUPNBLFBOPGGFS

LEARN ABOUT THE...

CLASSES ARE FREE!

Home Advantage Loan

CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4 (Loan Specific Criteria applies)

CLASSES HELD REGULARLY

Down Payment Assistance

Call Amy for information:

0% INTEREST/%.035("(& NO MONTHLY PAYMENT!

206-715-1847

(Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

61500'5)&45.035("(&".06/5 64&'03%08/1":.&/503$-04*/($0454

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

Top Producing Broker 2008-2015 Voted “Five Star Professional� by Clients

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

WANTED

$625 $975

UNIV. PLACE DUPONT HOME

2208 GRANDVIEW W 2367 MCDONALDDR. AVE

$1450 $1395

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1BED 1 BATH 450 SF. 3 CLEAN, BED 1 BATH 1000SF. CUTE 3 BD 1 BA1040SF. LG KITCHEN APPL COME TO THIS 3 BED 2W/ALL BATH COZY APARTAND COZY BEDROOM WITH 1 BATH INCLUDING WASHER/DRYER, OAK CABIU.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD MENT IN3TACOMA, DUPLEX 36TH AVE E. NETS, NEW CARPET, OPEN FLOOR PLAN. FLOORS ON THE MAIN LEVEL. EASYLOCATED ACCESSON TO WA-16.

TACOMA APT. DUPONT

GIGPUYALLUP HARBOR DUPL

$550 $1850

$1395 $1150

900744TH 115TH 5240 PUGET HOLLOW SOUND AVELN #14 14311 AVE.ST. CT.ENW 2205SBOBS 2 BED 2.5 BATH 11571,238 SF. REMOD2 BED, 1.5 BA, SF. 2274 SF. 2 STORY W/ 03 BED BED2.51 BATH BATH 400SF. STUDIO ELED TOWNHOUSE 2 BEDS QUIET, RELAXED W/ COUNTRY 3 SPACIOUS BEDROOMS, UPSTAIRS APARTMENT IN AN CHARMING & 1.5 BATH. NEWER OPENCOMPLEX. LOFT, AND LANDING AREA SETTING FOR THIS FLOORING, UPGRADED OLDER ALL UTILITIES APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. PERFECT FOR TOWNHOUSE. INCLUDED FORAAWORK $60 STATION. FLAT FEE. REMODELED

TACOMA TACOMA HOME

14406 AVE 9024 PACIFIC E WALLER RDS

$695 $950

N.SPANAWAY TACOMA HOME

5121 ST. CT. 4621203RD N MULLEN STE

$1425 $2100

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 1 BED, 1 BATH 575 SF. GREAT 2 BED, 1 BATH 730SF. HOME HAS 3 BED 2 BATH 1773ST. MUST VIEW MUST SEE!! FANTASTIC 2 VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDA HUGE ROOM AND FAMILY PROPERTY. AND INTRIGUSTORY IMMACULATE HOME, 3 BEDROOM ROOMLIVING UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE ROOM HARD WOOD FLOORS. 2.5 INGBATH REMODELED 2 STORY HOME. ON A CORNER LOT. IN WITH THE PACIFIC OAKS APTS.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

WANTED

Advertise Your Real Estate Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA TACOMA DUPLEX 3228 S UNION AVE. 17121 36TH AVE E

www.stephanielynch.com

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

• Tree Removal • Pruning • View Trimming • Emergency Service & Storm Cleanup • Tree Health Assessment

FREE ESTIMATES!

Licensed • Insured • Bonded

253-234-GROW

$

(4769)

www.familytree253.com Jay Brock

Any Tree Service

Johnny Marth

Not valid with other offers or specials. Expires 4-21-17.

$500 job minimum

Certified Arborist PN-7500A

LIC. FAMILTRC874M6

100 off

Certified Arborist PN-7495A

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

304 Puyallup Ave.,#1 Tacoma WA 98421

Ad Copy Here:

Name: Address: Phone: Cash

$15.00 30 Words and Under: ______________ Extra words @ .05: _________________ Check

Visa/Mastercard Card #

Money Order Exp.

Sub Total: ________________________ x Number of Weeks = ______________

Total Amount: _______________

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

LAND FOR SALE 5th Avenue Court NE, Milton

LAND FOR SALE 13117 E. 94th Ave., Puyallup

$330,000

2.2 acres undeveloped raw land situated in an industrial area of Tacoma annex by the City of Milton. Close to tide flats off Pacific highway. Some value in the timber can be logged, graded and paved for storage and commercial parking. 2 parcel each is 1.10 acres. slopping lot. There is a non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress. Property has been Incorporated into Milton. All building and land use fall under the Milton Municipal Code Chapter 17.14 Table of Use.

COMMERCIAL

$880,000 Level 3.93 acres, zoned “Urban Center,� Senior and Nursing housing, Daycare centers, Educational services. High traffic count. Some easement restrictions from Bonneville Trans lines. Property abuts to Future site of Puyallup Retirement Residence. 2 parcels totaling just under 4 acres of development land. There is a 2300 sf residence on one parcel.

COMMERCIAL

FOR SALE!! 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

$595,000

Good Investment Property, FULLY LEASED , completely remodeled commercial office building, 3350 sq ft, .25 acre commercial lot, owner occupied, 10 offices, 3 bathrooms, Spacious conference room, 2 full Kitchen reception area, 2 parking lots front and rear. Centrally located to all services. 7.5 Cap Rate.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

UNIVERSITY PLACE-COMMERCIAL temporary offFormer the CPA market ZONED, 27th & Bridgeport Way, Office Real Estate Included, $225,000, Now Vacant. EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail.

g n i

OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease. price reduction

d n e

P

LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided. SUCCESSFUL, LONGTIME ESTABLISHMENT. Manufacturer of Award Ribbons and Rosettes with large wholesale customer base. (Local and out of state business) Business is for sale. $60,000 Plus investor.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY -ARCH 

Battle at the Boat 110

Kenny “Babyface� Edmonds

Brian McKnight

March 18, 7pm

March 24, 8:30pm

April 14, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

I-5 Showroom $40, $65, $100, $105

I-5 Showroom $40, $60, $90, $95

CageSport MMA

Keith Sweat

ASIA FEST:

Nguyen Hong Nhung

April 22, 7pm

May 6, 8:30pm

May 27, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $65, $70

I-5 Showroom /P$IBSHF

MORE Winners, MORE Often! twww.emeraldqueen.com &2$* *&YJU &UI4U 5BDPNB 8"t&2$)PUFM$BTJOP *&YJU 1BD)XZ& 'JGF 8" :PVNVTUCFUPFOUFSUIFDBTJOP.BOBHFNFOUSFTFSWFTUIFSJHIUUPDIBOHFBOZFWFOUPSQSPNPUJPO5JDLFUTBWBJMBCMFBUUIF&2$#PY0GGJDFT&2$JTOPUSFTQPOTJCMFGPSBOZUIJSEQBSUZUJDLFUTBMFT

Twa 03 17 17 p01  
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