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Because Community Matters.

TACOMAWEEKLY NEWS FREE • FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2018

WWW.TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

PORT FINED $159,000 TO ‘DETER FUTURE MALFEASANCE’ OVER WITHHOLDING DOCUMENTS

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By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

ierce County Superior Court Judge Frank Cuthbertson slapped the Port of Tacoma with a $159,000 fine for violating the state’s Public Records Act by withholding documents between port, city, Economic Development Bureau of Tacoma-Pierce County and the

Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber officials regarding the 2016 Save Tacoma Water initiatives that bubbled up in the wake of the planned methanol plant siting on the Tideflats. The natural gas to methanol development later died, but the effort to conserve water remained, prompting a grassroots effort called Save Tacoma Water to gather signatures for initiatives that would have required a vote of the people to allow large water users to draw from

Tacoma wells and rivers. Lawsuits ensued over legal questions about citizen-started initiatives, however. Save Tacoma Water and its supporters claimed that the port, city and the business groups had worked together to kill their efforts before the official campaign started. They sought e-mails between the government agencies and the business groups to prove their case. The port first withheld them under the argument of attorney-client privilege

Central Co-op targets summer opening for new Pearl Street location

u See PORT / page A9

Pierce County Prosecutor considers vacating marijuana misdemeanors By Andrew Fickes

By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

After a long wait, members of Central Co-op living in Tacoma will soon have a store to shop at. Central Co-op, which had to close its Tacoma store on Sixth Avenue in July 2016 because of a lease dispute, has secured a new site in the former Bargain World building at 4502 N. Pearl St. A 10-year lease agreement has been signed, with two five-year options. Opening date is scheduled for mid- to late-summer 2018. The retail area of the new building at 12,000 square feet, according to Central Co-op CEO Garland McQueen, is more than double that of the Sixth Avenue location. u See CO-OP / page A9

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan’s and Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes’ decision to request that Seattle Municipal Court vacate all misdemeanor marijuana convictions prosecuted before pot was legalized in Washington now has Pierce County’s chief prosecutor considering the same course of action. “I share Seattle’s concern about fairness, job opportunities and the disproportional impact that marijuana misdemeanor charges have on people of color,” said Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney Mark Lindquist. “We are looking into this. Our misdemeanor chief is in contact with Seattle to learn from their process and how they’re doing it.” Durkan’s and Holmes’ decision has the potential to vacate more than 500 misdemeanor convictions from court records, representing cases prosecuted by Seattle Municipal Court between 1997 and 2009. Lindquist gave no indication as to how many convictions could be vacated from Pierce County Superior Court records, but the estimate is likely significant. In Washington, according to the Drug Policy

PHOTO BY ANDREW FICKES

Central Co-op’s new Tacoma location is at 4502 N. Pearl St. in the former Bargain World building.

TACOMA PREPS GALLERY

‘THE GLASS MENAGERIE’

ART SHOW AT FULCRUM GALLERY

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GUEST EDITORIAL The massacre at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. is yet another horrific reminder of the United States’ failure to do right by our children. PAGE A5

Pothole of the Week.....A2 Bulletin Board...............A2

Sports..........................A10 Hot Tickets..................A11

Look for daily updates online: tacomaweekly.com

u See MARIJUANA / page A9 CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA! FACEBOOK: fb.com/tacomaweekly TWITTER: twitter.com/tacomaweekly INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/tacomaweekly

City Life....................... B1 Culture Corner............. B3

Calendar..................B6 Word Search............B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

Pothole of the Week

Deputies search for Spanaway suspect who turned shoplift into strong-arm robbery By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

SO. 36TH AND WILKESON ST.

After appearing on the side of area milk cartons for months and months, we’ve come to the realization that our beloved Percival, the Pothole Pig, is not coming home to us. The celebrated swine has either found a new life somewhere else, or perhaps became a delicious and nutritious part of someone’s breakfast at some point. Whatever the case, we will miss him and be forever in his debt as his dedication to the City of Destiny led to so many nasty potholes being filled. This week, Carter the Crater Gator found another impressive road divot to stretch out in. To be honest, we’ve had a difficult time with this critter. He can’t get over the fact that he’ll always be second-fiddle when compared to Percival, and frankly, he’s been getting a little snarky. While we’ve let him know that his replacement could waddle through the front door of the Tacoma Weekly office at any moment, the toothy sourpuss has countered with his own threat of “pulling a Percival” and disappearing. With this in mind, we are still in the process of trying out new pothole seeking varmints. If you’ve got any ideas, please send them to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

CASCADIA TAX PROFESSIONALS

Pierce County Sheriff's deputies are asking for the public’s help to I.D. a strong-arm robbery suspect. Surveillance video from the Walmart DAVID ROSE in Spanaway shows a guy lollygagging through the store last week. The camera followed him as he grabs a sweatshirt off a rack and starts heading toward the doors. “This starts out as a simple shoplift,” said Pierce County Det. Ed Troyer. “It’s a $17 sweatshirt, but once he assaulted the store employee on the way out it turns it into a felony. So, a person that will go do a simple shoplift and actually resort to assault to escape is somebody we want to get identified because he’s probably out doing shoplifts every day and we don’t want anybody else to get hurt.” The suspect appears to be white,

lanky and wearing a black beanie, baggy gray hoodie and baggy dark pants. He also had a blue bandana hanging down from his front, right pants pocket and earbuds or headphones hanging around his neck.

If you know his name, please call Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County at 1 (800) 222-TIPS (8477).​ It is anonymous and there is a cash reward of up to $1,000 for any information that leads to an arrest and charges in the case.

Convicted sex offender sentenced for naked Lakewood burglaries Curtis Leon Sell, 51, was sentenced on Feb. 21 to seven and a half years in prison. Sell pleaded guilty on Oct. 18, 2017 to two counts of residential burglary and one count of residential burglary with sexual motivation. Sell has prior convictions for rape of a child in the second degree and failure to register as a sex offender. “We should all feel safe in our homes. This defendant shook that sense of safety,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. “We have a special assault unit that holds sexual

predators accountable.” The case was handled by Deputy Prosecutor Heather DeMaine. “This defendant behaved as a predator and terrorized three households,” DeMaine said in court during sentencing. On Aug. 2, 2017, police were dispatched to an apartment building in Lakewood. When they arrived, they spoke with N.M., the one who called the police. She told officers she awoke to a man, later identified as Curtis Sell, removing the fan from her bedroom window. She said Sell

was naked. She began to scream and her boyfriend came into the room. She said Sell seemed startled, scooted back out of the window, and ran away. That morning, investigators were also called to two other residences in the same complex and a neighboring complex where two other women had similar stories. The man was wearing only a condom in one instance, only a bra in the other. Sell also pleaded guilty to failure to register as a sex offender on Oct. 18, 2017.

Bulletin Board Serving the South Sound area with 10 years of experience!

MORE FLU EXPECTED IN WASHINGTON Preliminary data released this week estimates that the 2017-18 flu vaccine to be 36 percent overall effective at preventing flu illness. Washington’s health officials want everyone to know it isn’t too late to get a flu shot since flu activity is still expected to be high for several more weeks. This year is a reminder of how unpredictable and serious flu can be. Every flu season is different based on many factors including the circulating viruses and how well the flu shot protects against those viruses. “Washington has seen a lot of the H3N2 strain of flu, which causes more severe illness in young children and those over 65 years old,” said Washington State’s Communicable Disease Epidemiologist Dr. Scott Lindquist. “This year’s vaccine protects against H3N2, but that strain of the virus is known to change frequently throughout the season, making the vaccine less effective against the virus. Protection is higher against other strains included in the vaccine and can help flu illness be milder and shorter for those who still get sick.” The Department of Health urges everyone aged six months and older, including pregnant women, to knock out flu with a flu shot. Visit KnockOutFlu.org for places to get your vaccine, weekly flu activity updates, and frequently asked questions and concerns about the flu vaccine. “There are important steps to take to avoid getting the flu; get a flu shot every year, avoid contact with sick people, wash your hands often and stay home if you’re sick. No vaccine is 100 percent effective, but they still provide some protection against serious flu complications, including death,” Lindquist said. FIELDHOUSE FLEA MARKET CELEBRATES 50 YEARS This year is the 50th anniversary of the giant Parisianstyle flea market at University of Puget Sound’s field house, and the college’s Women’s League is making their Saturday, March 17 event a special one. The Fieldhouse Flea Market, offering everything from 100-year-old antiques to freshly baked bread, regularly attracts some 4,000 visitors. This year there will be 70 local vendors, artists and craftsmasters selling furniture and household décor, books, jewelry, gourmet food, artisan crafts and up-cycled treasures for your home and garden. There also will be advance prizes, a raffle, and – in memory of the original flea market in 1968 – a booth with homemade lemon tarts, baked by two daughters of the tarte au citron’s first Women’s League creator. The Fieldhouse Flea Market will take place Saturday, March 17, in University of Puget Sound’s Memorial Fieldhouse, on North 11th Street, near Union Avenue, in Tacoma. Early entry, from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., is $10. General entry thereafter runs from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is $5. Children aged 2 and under enter free. Parking is free. All of the proceeds from admission fees go toward scholarships to help students attend University of Puget Sound. A Golden Ticket contest on social media gives marketgoers the chance to win free, front-of-the-line entry to the market, as well as raffle tickets and swag bags of goodies. Visitors to the Women’s League Instagram, Facebook, and Facebook event pages can enter the drawings in the weeks leading up to the event. Susan Strobel, who attended the first Women’s League flea market in 1968 while a student at Puget Sound, says

her mother, Elsie Strobel, regularly prepared batches of fresh lemon tarts for the event. “The one thing that really motivated me to come to the flea market, and that I had to have when I was there, was the lemon tarts,” she said. This Valentines Day she and her sister, Carol Colleran, were busy fluting pastry cups and squeezing lemon juice as they made test batches of tarts, aiming to equal their mother’s. Amy VanZandt remembers walking in the rain to attend her first Fieldhouse Flea Market on St. Patrick’s Day. “We had such a good time! I was in grad school and was writing my thesis, so stress was high. I bought a peppermint candle and burned it over the next several weeks of writing. I loved that candle – and aced my thesis.” Susan Resneck Pierce, president emerita of Puget Sound, writes, “I first encountered the Women’s League in 1992 and was blown away by the passion of its members.” She said the generosity of donors, such as Bethel Schneebeck, and the popular appeal of the flea market had greatly impressed her. Proceeds from the Fieldhouse Flea Market go toward need-based scholarships for University of Puget Sound students. Last year Women’s League endowed scholarships provided $65,000 in financial aid to 17 Puget Sound students, while over the years more than 350 students have received scholarships. The market is the largest fundraising event organized each year by volunteers from the University of Puget Sound Women’s League. It has been held since 1968, after a league member traveled to Paris, France, and was inspired by a visit to a flea market there. The league was founded in 1900 and has supported the university and its community since that time—doing everything from making curtains for the dormitories to feeding students during the 1918 flu epidemic. In recent decades the group has focused on raising funds for scholarships. For more information, visit pugetsound.edu/FleaMarket. For updates, facebook.com/PugetSoundWomensLeague. COUNTY COUNCIL OUTLINES 2018 POLICY PRIORITIES Last week, the Pierce County Council reinforced its 2018 priorities to include a continued focus on economic development, behavioral health/homelessness, public safety, and property abatement/public nuisances. “As we discussed our priorities for 2018, it was abundantly clear there is still a great deal to be done in these areas for those we serve,” said County Council Chair Doug Richardson. The Council’s economic development policy emphasizes the need to build the economy by supporting businesses, promoting job growth, encouraging tourism and investing in infrastructure. In 2017, the Council authorized more than $4.6 million in behavioral health program funding and in the new year continues its commitment to strengthening behavioral health in Pierce County. The Council’s 2018 behavioral health policy focuses on early intervention and diverts people with behavioral health issues away from the criminal justice system and into treatment options. Reducing the number of people in Pierce County experiencing homelessness is also a top priority for the Council in 2018. This work will be done through programs that provide housing to those coming out of SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A3


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2 treatment facilities, or by partnering with both public and private developers. With the passage of public nuisance Ordinance 201722s and chronic nuisance Ordinance 2017-29 the Council declared that blighted properties will not be tolerated in Pierce County. As a result, the Council will develop policy in 2018 that promotes safe neighborhoods and protects property values through aggressive institutional and departmental enforcement of public nuisance laws and abatement of blighted properties and drug houses. The 2017 Supplemental and 2018 Budget added an additional seven deputy positions to the Sheriff’s Department. For 2018, the Council is providing targeted resources to public safety and justice departments and agencies to prevent and reduce crime in the community and prosecute criminals. “I look forward to addressing these priorities during my final year in office,” said Dan Roach, County Council vice-chair. “We have problems to solve and I look forward to working with my colleagues on the Council to provide long-lasting solutions.” For more information about Pierce County Council meetings or members please visitwww.piercecountywa.org/council. I-940 CARRYING A 47-POINT LEAD De-Escalate Washington, the political committee supporting Initiative 940, has announced results of a recent poll showing 68 percent of Washington voters support the measure and 21 percent oppose. The poll, conducted Feb. 8-15 by EMC Research, surveyed likely November 2018 voters and carries a statewide margin of error of +/- 3.6 percent. Voters were read the ballot title that will appear on their November ballot without supporting or opposing arguments. In Eastern Washington, 62 percent of voters support the proposal while 26 percent oppose. In Seattle and the greater Puget Sound region, 73 percent of voters support and 18 percent oppose. The regional breakouts carry a margin of error of +/- 5.3 percent. I-940 would require law enforcement to receive violence de-escalation and mental-health training and would amend legal standards for use of deadly force, adding an objective “good faith” standard and requiring independent investigation. According to data compiled by The Washington Post, Washington ranked fifth of the 50 states in number of people fatally shot by police in 2017 and 12th in per capita rate. Nationwide, mental illness played a role in a quarter of the incidents. The secretary of state certified I-940 to the legislature on Jan. 23. The Senate Law & Justice Committee and House Public Safety Committee will conduct a joint hearing on the measure in Olympia Tuesday at 7 p.m. The legislature can pass I-940 into law, pass an alternative measure, or take no action. If it takes no action, I-940 will go onto the November 2018 general election ballot. If it passes an alternative, both I-940 and the alternative will go onto the ballot. More information is available at www.deescalatewa.org. CENTER AT NORPOINT HOSTS FREE WELLNESS EVENT If you’re looking for new fitness options or seek a healthier lifestyle, check out at the Center at Norpoint’s Fitness and Wellness Conference on Saturday, March 10. The free, family-oriented event runs from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. and features a series of concurrent, half-hour fitness demonstrations, healthy-living seminars and cooking classes for all ages. It’s a great way to try something new.

Choose from among about 25 different fitness classes, six wellness seminars and five healthy cooking classes. The fitness demonstrations include multiple types of yoga, TRX training, Zumba, martial arts and rock-wall climbing. Some demonstrations are specifically for youngsters, others are aimed at the 50 and better crowd. The program kicks off with a presentation from Jim Kurtz, Seahawks chiropractor and clinical director of NW Sports Rehab. He’ll talk about how to avoid injury while working out. Proper form is crucial, he says, particularly when engaged in weight training. If you plan to attend, please register in advance. The first 100 people to register will receive a free gift. The Fitness and Wellness Conference is sponsored by Bloodworks Northwest, which will hold a blood drive in conjunction with the event. A Bloodworks bloodmobile parked outside the Center will accept donations from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Conference organizer Zoe Pinkerton said the event purposely features a broad menu of healthy activities to sample. “We’re introducing several new fitness activities. We’re very eager to get feedback, so we’re asking everyone for input on virtually everything,” she said. Among the new offerings: Strong by Zumba, Afro Zumba and TRX Circuits. In addition to the rotating medley of classes and seminars, two Norpoint personal trainers will conduct free individualized training assessments, evaluate posture and measure body mass. If requested, they’ll also show people how to use exercise machines and offer advice on beginning an exercise regimen. A number of vendors also plan exhibits in the Center’s lobby to promote their enterprises. Many will give away free samples or offer specials. More information, the event schedule and registration are available online at metroparkstacoma.org. BRIDAL SHOWCASE OFFERS ONE-STOP SHOPPING FOR WEDDING PLANNING Brides-to-be can reduce the overwhelming task of wedding planning at the fifth annual Bridal Showcase on Sunday, March 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Environmental Services Building, located at 9850 64th St. W. in University Place. The Bridal Showcase will connect prospective brides with up to 20 different event vendors. Experience Chambers Creek Regional Park and get inspired by the majestic views of Puget Sound. A sampling of confirmed participants includes live entertainment by Music De-Lite DJ/MC Service, photographers Lauren Bentley and Mike Tabolsky, who will be showcasing their work. Also, preferred caterers X-Group Catering, Jonz Catering and Snuffin’s will have tasty samples, along with Celebrity Cake Studio. Discover the latest trends from local salon and spa Brassfield’s and their cutting-edge stylists, personalize your dream honeymoon with experienced travel planners, and so much more. Other highlights include complimentary mimosas for guests 21+ from our beverage partner and showcase vendor KemperSports and a chance to win prizes. This free event is open to the public. Bring your bridal party, family, and all your ideas and questions to the showcase. This is the place to get your entire wedding planned in one weekend! For a full list of activities and exhibitors visit www. piercecountywa.org/esbbridal. To learn more about the Environmental Services Building call (253) 798-4141 or e-mail pceventrental@co.pierce.wa.us.

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 HEART’S ANN WILSON BEGUILES EQC AUDIENCE  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BOOM CONTINUES FOR TACOMA IN 2018  YEAR OF THE DOG  TMP BRINGS SINATRA TRIBUTE TO THE STAGE  TWO FOR TACOMA  TACOMA URBAN LEAGUE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF SERVICE TO THE COMMUNITY

Changes Coming to Paid Sick Leave cityoftacoma.org/employmentstandards

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN BEING A PART OF A FOSTER CARE COMMUNITY! We are now recruiting homes to be a part of a Mockingbird Family Model Constellation offering Therapeutic Foster Care!

Family Behavioral Health

Stop by our Foster Parent Informational Open House every Wednesday from 4:30-6:30!

We are located at 5219 N. Shirley St. Suite 3 in Ruston.

Join Family Behavioral Health as we build an intentional community of support around foster families. Interested in learning more?

Reach out to us at 253.348.0684 or email amyso@ccsww.org

UNSOLVED HOMICIDES Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect(s) responsible for the murders of Terry Northcutt and Voravangso “Two” Phanmama. At approximately 1:00 a.m. on Friday, October 14th, 2016, witnesses reported hearing gunshots outside Voravangso Phanmama’s house, located in the 3600 block of Portland Ave. E. in the City of Tacoma. Responding officers discovered the bodies of victim Terry Northcutt and Voravangso Phanmama in the yard of the residence; both victims were deceased from gunshot wounds. Detectives are looking for information on any suspicious persons or vehicles seen near Voravangso Phanmama’s house on the night of Fridays at 10:30pm on

TERRY NORTHCUTT

VORAVANGSO “TWO” PHANMAMA

Thursday, October 13th, 2016, or the early morning of Friday, October 14th, 2016. Detectives are also looking for information on any possible motives for the homicides.

10,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case. Additional sources contributed $9,000 to the reward.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

6824 19th Street W #139 • University Place WA 98466


Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HIGHLANDS GOLF COURSE

The ownership group of the nine-hole Highlands Golf Course are seeking new owners as neighbors fear the course could become housing development.

Future of Highlands course uncertain with call for buyers By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The owners of the Highlands Golf Course are seeking buyers who are interested in operating the nieghborhood course in Tacoma’s West End. There is no timeline or even a pricetag at this point. But the 18 owners of the course are looking for options. “We haven’t listed it with anybody or anything like that,” ownership member Wayne Thornson said. “We are getting older and it needs some new blood. Our hope is that it stays as a golf course, but we’ll have to see what happens.” Highlands is a nine-hole, par 27, links-style course located in a quiet planned development in the shadow of State Route 16 that dates back to 1968. The course is public, although surrounded by private homes. The current owner group has operated the course for the last 37 years. Only one year in the last 10 broke even. That was in 2015 when the U.S. Open played at nearby Chambers Bay. The owners have been approached by residential developers, but zoning rules and agreements with the city that date back to the course’s foundation have not been

reviewed regarding restrictions, so those contacts are just inquiries at this point. “We are hoping to find these answers pretty soon,” Thornson said, noting that the owners don’t even know what the course is worth. News of the possible sale first came in the form of a posting that appeared on the course’s club house bulletin board earlier this year. It announced an intent to sell, with hopes that the new owners would continue to operate the course at a time when most small courses around the nation struggle as interest in golf shifts to other sports. “It’s not cheap to run a golf course,” Thornson said. “Luckily, our group didn’t have to make a living from it.” Understandably, news of the possible sale got residents anxious about visions of apartments, houses or duplexes filling in the green course and trees they see from their windows. The course’s financial picture, and the hot housing market, don’t help calm their concerns. “Right now, they don’t make any money,” said Highlands neighbor and Help Save the Highlands Golf Course organizer Zach Zimmerman. “I see the reason why they are doing it (seeking buyers). I don’t blame them.”

His Facebook group gained more than 400 followers since it formed earlier this year, par with the number of followers the course itself has. Zimmerman noted that people interested in his effort to save the Highlands should also follow the course’s page and maybe shoot a quick round to help the club’s bottom line. The course is supported by $10 to $12 rounds of golf, rental of meeting spaces for 50 guests, and sales at a pro shop managed by Don Mojean that includes an Antique and Collectible Corner for people in search of older golf clubs. It’s slogan is: “Twice the fun in half the time.” “It is a great place to play around with your family in 90 minutes,” Zimmerman said, while admitting that he isn’t much of a golfer. The owner of a house in the neighborhood for the last seven years, however, fears that any new ownership group would look at the course’s greens and only see the green of cash by developing the 22-acre course into residential units. “I don’t see how you can sell a golf course that isn’t making any money,” he said. “We just need to show support for them too.”

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Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Tacoma Weekly News® LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Dave Davison / dave@tacomaweekly.com Andrew Fickes / andrew@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chance Pittenger, Josiah Rutledge, Barb Rock COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer EDITORIAL CARTOON BY MILT PRIGGEE • WWW.MILTPRIGGEE.COM

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

WEB DEVELOPERS Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.

Guest Editorials

Military leaders can transform education

By Don C. Brunell Do good military commanders make good education leaders? That is a question which Montana’s Higher Education Commission will answer in the coming years. However, if the new University of Montana president follows the pattern set by former Seattle Public School Superintendent John Stanford and Clark College President Bob Knight, the answer will be a resounding yes. Seth Bodnar, 38, is the youngest UM president since World War II. He started in January. He doesn’t have the coveted title “Ph.D.” His key academic credentials include Rhodes and Truman scholar and his practical experience comes from his distinguished service in the U.S. Army and at General Electric. Bodnar led platoons in Iraq when General David Patraeus commanded the 101st Airborne Division, qualified for the elite Special Forces (Green Beret), learned Mandarin Chinese and trained Philippine troops to fight insurgents. He left the military, joined GE’s slumping locomotive manufacturing division, and led the transformation to install on-board sophisticated computer systems which collectively saved 900,000 gallons of diesel per week. Sales ticked up. At Montana, Bodnar deals with a 25 percent enrollment decline since 2010. The university is still healing from a rash of sexual assault allegations detailed in Jon Krakauer’s 2015 book “Missoula.”

So why would a 20-member faculty committee search for nine months and break tradition settling on an outsider? The same question was asked of the Seattle Public School Board members when they recruited John Sanford, a retired army major general, in 1995; and when Clark College trustees hired Bob Knight, a retired army officer and West Point grad, as president in 2007. They were looking for transformative leaders who have a record of bringing people together to resolve complex and thorny problems. The trio are goal-oriented, tireless workers and inspirational. They project warmth, nimbleness and humility. Stanford engaged students, teachers and the community to deal with Seattle’s high dropout rate and declining SAT test scores. He raised $2 million in private donations to support the 10 initiatives that he and the board adopted. Stanford successfully engaged disgruntled educators and parents. Unfortunately, Stanford died of leukemia in 1998. Over the last decade, Knight reinvigorated Clark College, renewed partnerships with major four-year universities and partnered with employers to train students for future jobs. He re-engaged the community and built support among students, faculty and staff. His vision for the college is solid and progressing well. In 2016, Knight was awarded Vancouver’s coveted “First Citizen Award.” Bodnar has many of Stanford and Knight’s attributes. They are engrained in military leaders and hardened

through their training and experience. America’s armed forces, like our public schools, have people from all walks of life – income levels and political, ethnic and spiritual backgrounds. Leaders must mold individuals into cohesive units where each member depends on the other. Effective leaders must clearly communicate face-toface with people and groups. They must cautiously text and tweet to avoid misunderstandings and misinterpretations. Bodnar, Stanford and Knight are visionaries who engage people. They don’t wait for people to come to them. They go out and tackle difficult problems by listening especially to those with differing opinions. They are good at sizing up situations, take calculated risks and work to find plausible solutions. All three are charismatic and make people feel part of a solution. They are positive and effectively handle criticism and have the ability to put themselves in other people’s shoes. Through it all, they carefully measure what they say, check their pride, and build bridges rather than blowing them up. Hopefully, Bodnar will succeed, Knight will continue on course and Stanford’s legacy will live on. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

Parkland massacre shows link between domestic violence and mass shootings – again

By Laura Finley

I never thought this would be my life’s work. But writing and speaking about the connections between domestic and dating violence and mass shootings has become an absurd and sickeningly frequent part of my life. Here we go, again. The massacre at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., just 20 minutes from where I live, is yet another horrific reminder of the United States’ failure to do right by our children. We legally compel them to go to school but can’t seem to keep them safe when they are there. Although addressing guns, mental health, and school security is vital, one thing I haven’t seen being promoted is the importance of teaching young people about dating violence and healthy relationships. Yet, as is so often the case, this school shooter had been abusive to his former girlfriend and to his mother, a huge red flag that more violence is to come. Nikolas Cruz reportedly abused his girlfriend, and when she broke up with him and began dating someone else he physically attacked her new boyfriend and threatened on Instagram to kill him. Cruz sent a photo of his gun collections and wrote, “You f***ing c**t stole my ex you c**t. “I am going to f***ing kill you… I am going to watch you bleed [sic].” Police reports also show that Cruz abused his late mother, hitting her with part of a vacuum cleaner and calling her a “useless bitch.” Although he was never arrested or charged with any offense, police responded to 36 calls to his family’s home between 2010 and 2016, with child/elderly abuse and domestic disturbance among the most frequently occurring. His mother told police that he was often violent, that he threatened her, called her names, hit her, punched a hole in the wall, and routinely threw things around the room.

Cruz is far from the only mass shooter with abuse in his past. The link is clear. Before he killed 49 people at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Omar Mateen beat two of his wives. Devin Patrick Kelley, who killed 26 people in a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, had been kicked out of the Air Force due to domestic violence, having served a year in a military prison for beating and choking his girlfriend, threatening her with a gun and fracturing her child’s skull. Stephen Paddock, who killed 58 people in Las Vegas, was known to verbally abuse his girlfriend in public. The man who killed seven people near the campus of UC-Santa Barbara in 2014 targeted a sorority and claimed he was waging a war on women. These are just a few examples. School shootings often follow a breakup or rejection by a desired dating partner. At least 12 school shootings involved male perpetrators who specifically targeted girls who had broken up with them or rejected them. These include infamous shooters from the 1990s: Luke Woodham, Michael Carneal, Evan Ramsey, Mitchell Johnson and Andrew Golden, Andrew Wurst, Kip Kinkel, Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris, and TJ Solomon, among others. In each case the boys had previously threatened or acted aggressively toward the girls, yet school officials either did not recognize the red flags or chose to ignore it. Approximately one-quarter of all women in the U.S. have experienced physical violence by a partner, and 21 percent of high school girls report suffering physical or sexual violence from someone they were dating. Some 1.5 million high school students experience physical abuse by a dating partner, and 35 percent of 10th grade students report physical or verbal abuse. The CDC has found that this is the most frequently occurring type of violence experienced by youth in the U.S.

Despite these examples and statistics, research has shown that most high school principals are not very well informed about dating violence. A study inquiring about the 2016-16 year found that 57 percent of the responding principals had assisted a dating violence victim in the previous two years but 68 percent said they lacked formal training about how to do so. Less than a third said information about dating violence was easily available or accessible to students, and 62 percent said that teachers and staff had not been trained about it. Only 35 percent said that their school’s violence prevention policies specifically addressed dating violence. In 2010, Florida enacted Florida Statute 1006.148, which requires that district school boards adopt and implement a dating violence and abuse policy and provide training to teachers, faculty, staff, and administrators as well as include the topic in comprehensive health education curricula for students in grades 7 through 12. I do not know whether it was offered at MSD, but I know many schools in Florida are not doing so. I have spoken to many high school groups and “no” is the resounding response when I ask about whether they have received such education. Perhaps because the law includes dating violence education as part of health education, which is not a required course but rather an elective. Or maybe, as they previously mentioned study found, principals rated dating violence as a minor issue. While we discuss what to do so that no more kids are mowed down at their schools, please let us consider actually teaching youth about dating violence, healthy relationships, and how to handle rejection and breakups. Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicated by PeaceVoice.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

MARY ROBNETT ENTERS RACE AGAINST LINDQUIST “Mary is ethical, tough and fair – exactly what the Prosecuting Attorney’s office needs after Lindquist.”

– Former Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney Gerald Horne

By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Eighteen-year veteran of the Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office Mary Robnett has announced a bid to unseat her former boss Mark Lindquist. A notable endorsement for Robnett against Lindquist’s well-funded campaign to stay in office comes from former Pierce County Prosecuting Attorney Gerald Horne. Horne had tapped Lindquist as his heir apparent but has since been critical of Lindquist’s management of the county’s top legal team. “Mary is ethical, tough and fair – exactly what the Prosecuting Attorney’s office needs after Lindquist,” Horne said in the campaign announcement. “She’ll lift the cloud over the prosecutor’s office and remove the taint of politics that has pervaded there.” A good portion of Lindquist’s time in office has been spent dealing with lawsuits, scandals and workplace complaints. Most notable among those is Lindquist’s withholding of work-related text messages that were sought as part of a case against him – that he eventually lost – that has cost county taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars in outside attorney fees and staff time. Damages and penalties will likely drive that taxpayer bill even higher. “I’m going to put the people, the taxpayers, of Pierce County first – above my own interests,” Robnett said. “Mark Lindquist uses his position to promote himself.” Robnett has spent the last six years in the state Attorney General’s office after being hired by Republican Rob McKenna and promoted by Democrat Bob Ferguson to work as an assistant attorney general in the

MARY ROBNETT

Sexually Violent Predators unit. Before that however, she spent almost two decades as a prosecutor in Pierce

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Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

City raises community awareness of Crisis Text Line partnership

“We’re looking forward to offering our residents an avenue of communication when they don’t feel they can talk to anyone.” – Vicky McLaurin, program manager for the City of Tacoma’s Neighborhood and Community Services Dpartment

By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY ANDREW FICKES

City of Tacoma recently erected this sign on the 34th Street Bridge with the aim to promote its text-based crisis intervention service to residents. Approximately 30-40 more signs will be placed in the city over the course of 2018.

“There is hope,” a sign emphatically states, located on the light post on the 34th Street Bridge in East Tacoma. This sign, and a second identical sign on the opposite side of the bridge, were recently placed by the City of Tacoma to spread word about its partnership with Crisis Text Line, a national notfor-profit offering free 24/7 crisis intervention via SMS text message. The signs on the 34th Street bridge invite those in crisis to text HEAL to 741741. Individuals in crisis are guaranteed to receive a text response from a live counselor within five minutes. Counselors are trained to deescalate an individual in crisis from a hot moment down to a cool calm by paying close attention to key words in the text. “They will stay with that person for as long as it takes,” said Vicky McLaurin, program manager for the City of Tacoma’s Neighborhood and Community Services Department. “When there are key words that are identified as triggers, live counselors will contact local authorities in order to send a first responder to the person in need.” McLaurin said Crisis Text Line does not charge the city for the service, nor does the City charge residents. The only fees an individual may incur are mobile phone usage rates imposed by their cellular carrier. When the City of Tacoma launched the service in May (mental health awareness month) of last year, it became the first city in Washington to enter into a partnership with Crisis Text Line and the first city to use a specific word: HEAL. “The intent was for us to increase our ability to serve our residents (with mental health challenges) and to provide additional services that they may not have,” McLaurin said. The City collects one-tenth of 1 percent of local sales tax to support mental

health and substance abuse disorder services to residents. McLaurin said the City is utilizing the funding exclusively for advertising the program. Over the next year, the City plans to use the money set aside to erect 30-40 signs throughout the city that promote and advertise the program. “To put up signs at minimal cost and within a quick amount of time is an excellent example of collaboration among city departments,” McLaurin said. “This is a collaboration between Public Works and Community and Neighborhood Services. This is something that is ongoing. The community won’t see signs overnight, but over time.” Starting this May, marking the one-year anniversary of the program, the Washington State Healthcare Authority and City of Seattle is expected to launch a sister program. City of Seattle and WSHA plan to collaborate with the City of Tacoma by using the same text word: HEAL. “Once 200 people have used the service with the word HEAL we will have access to the data and we will be able to make funding decisions,” McLaurin said. “We will be able to identify the zip codes of areas that may need additional funding and use the data to identify the type of crisis individuals may be experiencing, which will help us to identify funding when applying for grants.” Since May 2017 the text line has helped 99 residents of Tacoma and has helped identify three residents who required the help of a first responder. “As we continue with the process, we will get more marketing out, and we’re confident we will get to that 200,” McLaurin said. “We’re looking forward to offering our residents an avenue of communication when they don’t feel they can talk to anyone.”

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

We’re

‘Drive the Blues Away’

America’s Automotive Trust ushers in spring with fourth annual concert at America’s Car Museum

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Tacoma event will feature live music as well as tastings from distilleries, wineries and breweries on Feb. 24.

America’s Automotive Trust (AAT), a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring a vibrant future for the collector car pastime, will kick off its 2018 Signature Event season with a bash at America’s Car Museum (ACM) on Feb. 24. “Drive the Blues Away,” which has been held at ACM for the past three years, has become a staple event in Tacoma that brings together car and music enthusiasts to celebrate the end of winter with live music, and tastings from local distilleries, wineries and breweries. This year’s event is expected to attract more than 500 guests. The 21-and-over event will feature music from Hit Explosion, Incendio and Junkyard Jane. Refreshments will be provided by Balvenie, Elysian Brewing, Hedges, Heritage Distilling, Sidetrack Distillery and Suntory Whisky, among others. “‘Drive the Blues Away’ is a great chance for locals and visitors to come out for a night that celebrates our country’s great motoring pastime and enjoy music from greater Seattle-area bands,” said AAT CEO Adam Langsbard. “Car enthusiasts look forward to being able to take their cars out on the road as the weather warms

up, and we certainly want to kick-start this year’s driving season.” Visitors to “Drive the Blues Away” will also get access to ACM’s vast car collection, which features displays like “Route 66: Low & Slow” – a collection of lowriders from the Lows Traviesos Lowriders Club of Washington – and an exhibit of exotics, supercars and hypercars in the “Exotics@ACM” display space. “Drive the Blues Away” will also include a raffle as part of the event with prizes including a Carrera Calibre 16 by TAG Heuer and a pair of tickets to Shania Twain at the Tacoma Dome on May 3. Tickets will be available at the event for $20 each or six for $100. General admission tickets are available for $40 and include admission and six tasting tokens; VIP tickets are $65 and include 10 tasting tokens, early admission to the event and complimentary parking. To purchase general admission tickets, go to https://tinyurl.com/y9nypduz. To purchase VIP tickets, go to https://tinyurl.com/yb9xlg3r. More information on “Drive the Blues Away” can be found at www.americascarmuseum.org/event/driveblues-away.

Landmarks design review switching to online permits system

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In an effort to streamline the Landmarks Preservation Commission’s design review, the City of Tacoma’s Historic Preservation Office is moving this process to the online Tacoma Permits system. This web-based permitting platform utilizes Accela software and offers a number of efficiencies including online permit application, online payment processing, and will efficiently track the permitting process in historic districts. The change to the new system will begin on Thursday, March 1. On this date, City staff will begin working with residents to use the system and expects to have the full permit process transitioned to the Tacoma Permits system by Tuesday, May 1. “Our goal in making these changes is to bring the historic design review process in line with the other permitting services and technical assistance offered by the City,” said Historic Preservation Officer Reuben

McKnight. “This should result in simpler processing, and give customers more of a one-stop shopping experience.” For more information on landmarks design review, visit www. cityoftacoma.org/LPCDesignRe-

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view or e-mail LHoogkamer@ cityoftacoma.org or call (253) 5915254. For information on how to use or pre-register for a Tacoma Permits account, visit tacomapermits.org, e-mail TacomaPermits@cityoftacoma.org or call (253) 591-5030.


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRADLEY THOMPSON

t Port

From page A1

and then cited clerical error. Cuthbertson didn’t buy either argument. “In this case, a number of documents were withheld, and later released, actually related to a ‘communications plan,’ not litigation, while others were shared with individuals who were not clients (voiding the attorney-client privilege argument,)” the judge wrote in his decision last week. “The port was grossly negligent in withholding documents that were clearly responsive, notwithstanding any misunderstanding about the (public records) request. The port’s intransigence warrants a penalty that will deter future malfeasance.” The documents were made public 410 days after public records champion and governmental gadfly Arthur West first requested them. They should have been released after 15 days. “In this case, the search led to the discovery of responsive documents,” the judge wrote in his decision. “However, the failure to produce, or even identify, 39 pages of documents until over a year after the initial request denied (West’s) right to inspect or copy the documents. This was unreasonable and a violation of the PRA. … The Public Records Act does not allow silent withholding of entire documents or records, any more than it allows silent editing of documents or records. Failure to reveal

t Co-op From page A1

“We are really happy with this location, because it will allow us to serve people from all walks of life in the neighborhood, and it is in a spot that many people drive by on their way to the park or the ferry,” McQueen said. “The site was originally a grocery store, but has been a clothing store since the 1980s. We have many neighbors who remember those days and are excited to have a grocery store on that corner again.” McQueen said plans for the

that some documents have been withheld in their entirety gives the requesters the misleading impression that all documents relevant to the request have been disclosed. In this case, the port acted in bad faith by silently withholding documents that were responsive. … The people of this state do not yield their sovereignty to the agencies that serve them, the people, in delegating authority, do not give their public servants the right to decide what is good for the people to know and what is not good for them to know. The people insist on remaining informed so that they may maintain control over the instruments that they have created.” Three pages of documents, which were only disclosed late last year, prompted the highest fine under state law – $100 a day – while fines for withholding other documents were lower because the port has since changed its process of handling document requests. “We are disappointed in the ruling, especially since we rectified the response as soon as we realized we had overlooked a few records,” the port’s Communications Director Tara Mattina wrote in a response for comment. “We also believe the ruling is inconsistent with similar case law.” West believes the port will appeal for two reasons, in hopes of lowering the fine amount and to deter future requests for information that the agency doesn’t want publicly known. “It wasn’t an honest mistake. It was deliberate policy,” he said. “The Port of Tacoma is not known for pinching pennies when it comes to defending itself against public

site include a produce department; an expanded bulk-food section; a fresh meat and seafood department; a wellness center; packaged grocery; and a deli featuring fresh food made in-house. “We will also have some inside and outside seating, and a community room that we will use for workshops and other events,” McQueen said. Central Co-op expects to hire 40-45 employees to run the Pearl Street store. This year Central Co-op celebrates 40 years of service to the greater Seattle and Tacoma communities. It opened its first grocery store on Capitol Hill in Seattle on Oct. 16, 1978. In Decem-

ber 2015, the owners and boards of Tacoma Food Co-op and Central Co-op decided to merge and became known as Central Co-op. The customer- and worker-owned co-op has 14,400 active members. An update to members at the end of January stated that interior demolition had been performed and improvements to the parking lot were made. A store design has been finalized. A construction crew on site is expected by late March. An open-house event at the store is scheduled from 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, March 24, to show members and the general public the layout of the store and the progress made at that point.

VILLAGE CONCEPTS OF MILTON

MILL RIDGE VILLAGE

records request cases. They have a blank check,” funded by taxpayers. “They don’t see the benefit of complying. That isn’t the mentality of these types of agencies.” Outside of an appeal of the $159,000 fine, the issue is far from over. The state Attorney General’s Office is appealing a lower court’s dismissal of a case against the port and business groups that alleges they failed to disclose their expenses to kill the water-right initiatives as campaign costs. The lower court ordered the AG to pay attorney fees of $121,000. Save Tacoma Water was awarded $15,000 from the City of Tacoma in December for withholding public records about a related issue – the billing invoices for all the taxpayer money spent to keep the water protection petitions off the ballot at a time the city was technically a defendant when the port sued Tacoma for allowing the petitions to gather signatures. The Port of Tacoma, Economic Development Board and the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber would later win an injunction against the initiatives. The city was listed as a defendant in that action because the city clerk allowed the signature gathering to start, but the city then filed a cross claim siding with the port’s legal arguments against the legality of the initiatives themselves. E-mails later showed the legal strategy was tossed around city hall and port offices before the lawsuit was filed. “That’s what proved all of our allegations from the get go,” Save Tacoma Water organizer Sherry Bockwinkel said. “This goes all the way back to the very beginning. It’s a pretty big win.”

t Marijuana From page A1

Alliance, marijuana misdemeanor convictions have been particularly discriminatory on people of color. In the first decade of the 21st century in our state, African Americans were arrested at 2.9 times the rate of whites; Latinos and Native Americans were arrested at 1.6 times the rate of whites. Lindquist said his office has been following closely the evolution of how to correctly pursue marijuana

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prosecutions ever since pot became legalized in the state in 2012. “As soon as the initiative passed, we dismissed all of our pending cases,” Lindquist said. “There have been some large-scale marijuana prosecutions in Pierce County (involving firearm-related charges) but no longer any personalpossession charges (which are classified as a misdemeanor).”


Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

ONE DOWN, ONE KICKING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2018

SECTION A, PAGE 10

WISL STARS EDGED FOR TITLE, MASL STARS STILL ALIVE

PHOTOS BY QUINN WIDTH / GOALWA.NET

(Top-left) Danny Minniti (11) congratulates Mark Lee following his goal. The first quarter blast marked the fifth goal for Lee in the previous four quarters of play. (Top-right) The future is looking bright for the Stars with newer players like Adrian Correa. The speedster can be a thorn in the side of opponents and change the face of a contest entirely. (Mid-left) Tacoma veteran Nate Ford flips the ball in reverse on a set piece that nearly scored. (Mid-right) Goalkeeper Aaron Anderson was outstanding in his final appearance with Tacoma. (Bottom) For a brief moment, it looked as though Eddie Na's (13) hat trick goal just might be enough for the trophy. By Justin Gimse

I

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

t felt as though you could power the entire town from the electricity in the air at the Bellingham Sportsplex on Saturday, Feb. 17. The two-time defending champion Hammers from Bellingham United would be hosting the Western Indoor Soccer League’s original champions from Tacoma, and it was the sort of championship match that no one in attendance will likely ever forget. With more than 800 fans packed tightly around the playing field, the resulting 60 minutes of play felt akin to a fight scene from the movie “Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome.” While the Tacoma Stars Reserves and the Bellingham United have not always been the friendliest bunch to each other over the years, this match was incredibly physical, yet fairly clean. A couple of calls were costly for Tacoma in the waning minutes that turned the tide for Bellingham, giving the home side their third straight WISL championship by a score of 6-5. Throughout the 60 minutes of play, neither team led the other by more than a single goal. Bellingham’s Sawyer Preston would break the scoreless deadlock in the first quarter, slipping a shot past Tacoma's legendary goalkeeper Aaron Anderson. Tacoma would answer in short order when Mark Lee would gather in a long pass at the top of the circle, spin to his left and cracked a blast into the upper left corner of the goal to even the score at 1-1. Former Pacific Lutheran University standout Eddie Na would then give Tacoma the lead. The twotime NWC Offensive Player of the Year fought for control of the ball in the corner, came away with it, and quickly sent a low dribbler that Bellingham goalkeeper Riley Liddle was unable to get a bead on. Tacoma took a 2-1 lead into the first quarter break.

Tacoma would suffer an unfortunate bounce to give Bellingham the equalizer in the second quarter. Anderson would make an exceptional kick save on a shot that was heading toward the inside of the left post. The ball ricocheted out to Bellingham’s Kurtis Pederson, who wasted no time, catching the ball in the air with a swinging right footer that found the back of the net. The score was tied at 2-2. The ever-dangerous Nate Ford had gathered defenders around him near the wing in front of the Bellingham goal. The veteran saw Na heading toward the top of the box and sent a toe-pass that Na delivered into the upper right side of the goal for a 3-2 Tacoma lead. Tacoma’s momentum was building, but was again tempered by some nifty work by Bellingham. With only one defender in front of him, veteran Nic Cashmere made a rush down the left side of the field with the ball. Cashmere hesitated and went to his right, just as another Stars' defender entered the fray. Cashmere snapped a rightfooted blast that split the defenders and found the far side of the net. The teams would enter halftime tied at 3-3. It felt as though there was a 12-round heavyweight championship fight going down. Another unfortunate bounce would hit Tacoma again in the third quarter. Cashmere was rushing down the right side of the field with the ball, and somehow pushed the ball through the defense of a flashing Danny Minniti. As Cashmere approached the box, Anderson came off his line and got his foot on the ball. The ball knocked around quickly like a pinball, and then went off the back of Anderson’s heel deeper into the corner. Cashmere quickly put a toe on the ball and Bellingham had regained the lead at 4-3. As he has often done over the years, Ford was in the right place at the right time to even up the score. Lee sent in a smoking shot toward the left

post that looked to be a touch wide. Before Liddle was able to recover to that side of the goal, Ford slid in for a right footed touch into the back of the net and the score was tied at 4-4. The fourth quarter began with its fair share of controversy. Na drew a penalty on what was ruled a breakaway. It would setup a shootout attempt by Na against Liddle with just 30 seconds expired in the final stanza. Na would move the ball to his right as Liddle charged out from his line. As Na sent one in, Liddle had crept just outside of the goalbox and got a hand on the ball. The ricochet found Ford out on the wing, and he blasted the ball into the back of the net. The whistle blew and the goal was disallowed. There would be a blue card assessed to Liddle for a hand ball, and it would be up to Na to take a penalty shot and regain the goal that was just wiped off the scoreboard. After a short hesitation approaching the ball, Na sent a blast into the back of the net, while Liddle was cheating the opposite direction. It would be a hat trick for Na, and the large gathering of Tacoma fans who made the trip north were in major celebration mode as Tacoma would take a 5-4 lead. Bellingham would answer off the left foot of Eleazar Galvan. An outdoor star, Galvan showed his skills off with a juke to the right that put his Tacoma defender out of position. He would follow it with a cannon shot from his left that snuck inside the upper-left corner of the goal. The score was now 5-5 and the level of play was speeding up and getting even more physical. A questionable foul was called on Tacoma just outside and to the left of the goalkeeper’s circle. With less than four minutes remaining, Bellingham’s Richard Henderson approached the free kick and found a path straight through the Tacoma defensive wall. As the ball hit the back-right of the net, Anderson was u See STARS / page A13

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Top) Lincoln senior Willie Thomas III was named the 3A Pierce County League's Defensive Player of the Year. Once the Abes hit the Tacoma Dome, they're going to need everything Thomas can throw at the other big men. (Middle) Lincoln senior guard Nashontae Frazier rises for a jumper. (Bottom) Bellarmine junior Reyelle Frazier gets up into the timber.

Tacoma area sends 16 teams to hoop regionals By Justin Gimse

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

As usual, the prep postseason will see several Tacoma-area schools battling for state basketball hardware this season. Exciting match-ups are on-tap for the regional rounds, with the various Hardwood Classic fields stocked with the best of the best. Let's get caught up with the comings and goings of the area’s best teams. It would be a third match-up of the season for the Lincoln Lady Abes and the Bethel Braves for the 3A WCD championship. Bethel would keep themselves within striking distance for much of the game, but they were never able to put together a run that could put them over the hump. Instead, the Lady Abes would cut down the championship nets for the second year in a row by a score of 51-43. The Lady Abes (23-1) earned the top ranking in the 3A RPI standings and have secured a trip to the Tacoma Dome. Despite beating Gig Harbor in the semifinals, and having quite a better record, Bethel (21-3) would only secure the eighth RPI spot, while the Tides (18-6) garnered second. With that outcome, Lincoln and Bethel will meet for a fourth time this season in a regional game at Puyallup High School on Saturday, Feb. 24, at 4 p.m. The winner will secure the top seed into state and recieve a bye in the first round. On the same court earlier, the Lincoln Abes boys’ team entered the 3A WCD title game with an undefeated 23-0 record against a hot-shooting Kelso squad that had already knocked off Wilson in the quarterfinals. The game would prove to be the lowest-scoring affair of the season for the Abes, u See BASKETBALL / page A13


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

Sportswatch

TACOMA AREA PREP SCORES BOYS BASKETBALL 4A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16 ENUMCLAW - 60, CURTIS - 54 SKYVIEW - 57, OLYMPIA - 27 KENTWOOD - 59, BELLARMINE - 48 FEDERAL WAY - 82, UNION - 62 FRIDAY, FEB. 16 BELLARMINE - 56, OLYMPIA - 48 (7th/OUT) SKYVIEW - 74, KENTWOOD - 69 (5th/6th) SATURDAY, FEB. 17 UNION - 65, CURTIS - 61 (3rd/4th) ENUMCLAW - 53, FED. WAY - 44 (1st/2nd) 3A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT THURSDAY, FEB. 15 LINCOLN - 76, TIMBERLINE - 54 KELSO - 67, NO. THURSTON - 58 WILSON - 77, SPANAWAY LAKE - 52 (OUT) PRAIRIE - 64, CAPITAL - 40 (OUT) SATURDAY, FEB. 17 PRAIRIE - 49, WILSON - 40 (5th/6th) TIMBERLINE - 67, NO. THURS. - 55 (3rd/4th) KELSO - 62, LINCOLN - 49 (1st/2nd) 2A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14 CLOVER PARK - 51, STEILACOOM - 33 (OUT) PT. ANGELES - 67, LINDBERGH - 59 (OUT) OLYMPIC - 55, SEQUIM - 49 OT (OUT) FR. PIERCE - 70, HIGHLINE - 68 (OUT) THURSDAY, FEB. 15 NO. KITSAP - 73, RENTON - 66 FIFE - 62, HENRY FOSS - 58 FRIDAY, FEB. 16 CLOVER PARK - 49, PT. ANGELES - 46 (OUT) OLYMPIC - 53, FR. PIERCE - 49 (OUT) SATURDAY, FEB. 17 CLOVER PARK - 63, OLYMPIC - 47 (5th/OUT) HENRY FOSS - 82, RENTON - 61 (3rd/4th) NO. KITSAP - 50, FIFE - 37 (1st/2nd) 1A WCD TOURNAMENT THURSDAY, FEB. 15 CASCADE CHRIS. - 52, BELL. CHRIS. - 49 (1st) VASHON - 53, PT. TOWNSEND - 41 (OUT) SATURDAY, FEB. 17 BELLEVUE CHRIS. - 57, VASHON - 47 (2nd/OUT)

2B SW DISTRICT TOURNAMENT THURSDAY, FEB. 15 LIFE CHRISTIAN - 56, NAPAVINE - 53 MORTON-WP - 49, TOLEDO - 37

2A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14 PT. ANGELES - 37, NO. KITSAP - 36 WHITE RIVER - 66, FIFE - 47

SATURDAY, FEB. 17 TOLEDO - 66, NAPAVINE - 43 (5th/OUT) MORTON - 51, LIFE CHRISTIAN - 44 (3rd/4th) ADNA - 66, TOUTLE LAKE - 55 (1st/2nd)

THURSDAY, FEB. 15 KINGSTON - 50, EATONVILLE - 31 (OUT) RENTON - 34, FOSTER - 23 (OUT)

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - BASKETBALL 3A Girls Regionals Prairie vs. Gig Harbor Mt. Tahoma HS - 6 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 17 RENTON - 33, KINGSTON - 28 (5th/OUT) NORTH KITSAP - 49, FIFE - 41 (3rd/4th) WH. RIVER - 56, PT. ANGELES - 47 (1st/2nd)

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - BASKETBALL 2A Boys Regionals Burlington-Edison vs. Fife Puyallup HS - 6 p.m.

1A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14 PT. TOWNSEND - 58, CASC. CHRIS. - 54 SEA. CHRIS. - 58, BELL. CHRIS. - 46

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - BASKETBALL 2A Boys Regionals Clover Park vs. Renton Auburn Mountainview HS - 8 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 17 BELL. CHRIS. - 48, CASC. CHRIS - 33 (3rd/OUT) SEA. CHRIS. - 77, PT. TOWNS. - 40 (1st/2nd)

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - BASKETBALL 3A Girls Regionals Mt. Spokane vs. Peninsula Mt. Tahoma HS - 8 p.m.

1B TRI-DISTRICT TOURNAMENT THURSDAY, FEB. 15 POPE JOHN PAUL - 47, LUMMI - 45 (OUT) MT. RAINIER LUTH. - 69, NEAH BAY - 52 (OUT) MUCKLESHOOT - 88, TULALIP - 51 TAC. BAPTIST - 68, CP CHRISTIAN - 48 FRIDAY, FEB. 16 CP CHRISTIAN - 76, POPE JOHN PAUL - 38 TULALIP - 52, MT. RAINIER LUTHERAN - 47 SATURDAY, FEB. 17 POPE JOHN PAUL - 43, MR LUTH. - 36 (5th/6th) CP CHRISTIAN - 68, TULALIP - 50 (3rd/4th) MUCKLESHOOT - 61, TAC. BAPTIST - 51 (1st/2nd) GIRLS BASKETBALL 4A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT THURSDAY, FEB. 15 BELLARMINE - 60, KENTLAKE - 47 KENTRIDGE - 65, CAMAS - 50 ROGERS - 58, OLYMPIA - 34 TODD BEAMER - 69, UNION - 45 SATURDAY, FEB. 17 UNION - 44, OLYMPIA - 35 (7th/OUT) BEAMER - 66, ROGERS - 57 (5th/6th) CAMAS - 40, KENTLAKE - 39 (3rd/4th) KENTRIDGE - 55, BELLARMINE - 41 (1st/2nd) 3A WCD DISTRICT TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14 LINCOLN - 44, PRAIRIE - 42 BETHEL - 55, GIG HARBOR - 47 KELSO - 60, YELM - 42 (OUT) PENINSULA - 54, TIMBERLINE - 47 (OUT) FRIDAY, FEB. 16 PENINSULA - 58, KELSO - 47 (5th/6th) PRAIRIE - 42, GIG HARBOR - 35 (3rd/4th) SATURDAY, FEB. 17 LINCOLN - 61, BETHEL - 43 (1st/2nd)

2B SW DISTRICT TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14 NAPAVINE - 55, LIFE CHRISTIAN - 38 ILWACO - 45, WAHKIAKUM - 44 MOSSYROCK - 60, OCOSTA - 43 (OUT) ADNA - 48, TOLEDO - 44 (OUT) FRIDAY, FEB. 16 LIFE CHRISTIAN - 57, MOSSYROCK - 52 WAHKIAKUM - 68, ADNA - 38 SATURDAY, FEB. 17 MOSSYROCK - 49, ADNA - 42 (5th/OUT) WAHKIAKUM - 54, LIFE CHRIS. - 37 (3rd/4th) ILWACO - 49, NAPAVINE - 48 (1st/2nd) 1B TRI-DISTRICT TOURNAMENT THURSDAY, FEB. 15 MT. RAINIER LUTH. - 48, CLALLAM BAY - 29 NEAH BAY - 63, MV CHRISTIAN - 46 RAINIER CHRIS. - 38, TULALIP - 22 (OUT) NW YESHIVA - 48, LUMMI - 32 (OUT) FRIDAY, FEB. 16 MV CHRISTIAN - 48, RAINIER CHRIS. - 13 CLALLAM BAY - 67, NW YESHIVA - 46 SATURDAY, FEB. 17 NW YESHIVA - 38, RAIN. CHRIS. - 37 (5th/6th) MV CHRIS. - 54, CLALLAM BAY - 46 (3rd/4th) NEAH BAY - 62, MR LUTHERAN - 44 (1st/2nd)

STATE BASKETBALL REGIONALS (SEEDS 1-8 ON TO STATE) (SEEDS 9-16 LOSER OUT) (LOWER SEED HOSTS NEARBY) BOYS BASKETBALL 4A BOYS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 SUNNYSIDE (8) VS. GONZAGA PREP (1) DAVIS (5) VS. RICHLAND (4) BELLARMINE (16) VS. LEWIS & CLARK (9) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 ENUMCLAW (7) VS. SKYVIEW (2) FEDERAL WAY (6) VS. UNION (3) SKYLINE (15) VS. GLACIER PEAK (10) KAMIAK (14) VS. KENTWOOD (11) CURTIS (13) VS. BOTHELL (12) 3A BOYS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 RAINIER BEACH (7) VS. O’DEA (2) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 WILSON (8) VS. GARFIELD (1) EASTSIDE CATH. (6) VS. LINCOLN (3) TIMBERLINE (5) VS. KELSO (4) ARLINGTON (16) VS. PRAIRIE (9) MT. SPOKANE (15) VS. MARYSVILLE-P (6) KAMIAKIN (14) VS. STANWOOD (11) SEATTLE PREP (13) VS. NO. THURSTON (12) 2A BOYS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 BURLINGTON-EDISON (15) VS. FIFE (10) CLOVER PARK (14) VS. RENTON (11) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 WF WEST (8) VS. LYNDEN (1) COLUMBIA RIVER (7) VS. SELAH (2) PULLMAN (6) VS. FOSS (3) ML TERRACE (5) VS. MARK MORRIS (4) CHENEY (16) VS. NORTH KITSAP (9) LIBERTY (13) VS. WEST VALLEY (12) 1A BOYS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 CASCADE CHRISTIAN (7) VS. FREEMAN (2) KINGS (16) VS. LAKESIDE (9) MONTESANO (14) VS. LA CENTER (11) NACHES VALLEY (13) VS. MT. BAKER (12) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 NEWPORT (8) VS. LYNDEN CHRIS. (1) NORTHWEST (6) VS. ZILLAH (3)

BELLEVUE CHRISTIAN (5) VS. ROYAL (4) KING’S WAY (15) VS. WAHLUKE (10) 2B BOYS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 BREWSTER (8) VS. KITTITAS (1) MORTON WP (5) VS. ADNA (4) FRIDAY HARBOR (13) VS. OROVILLE (12) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 TOUTLE LAKE (7) VS. ST. GEORGE’S (2) LIBERTY (6) VS. TOLEDO (3) ORCAS ISLAND (16) VS. LIFE CHRISTIAN (9) WHITE SWAN (15) VS. TRI-CITIES (10) CROSSPOINT (14) VS. COLFAX (11) 1B BOYS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 AC-HARTLINE (8) VS. SUNNYSIDE CH. (1) POMEROY (5) VS. YAKAMA TRIBAL (4) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 TACOMA BAPTIST (7) VS. MUCKLESHOOT (2) ODESSA (6) VS. CEDAR PK. CHRISTIAN (3) RIVERSIDE CH. (16) VS. TAHOLAH (9) PATEROS (15) VS. NASELLE (10) POPE JOHN PAUL II (14) VS. TULALIP (11) MR LUTHERAN (13) VS. GARFIELD-PALOUSE (12) GIRLS BASKETBALL 4A GIRLS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 WOODINVILLE (5) VS. MOSES LAKE (4) UNION (16) VS. TODD BEAMER (9) ROGERS (15) VS. KENTLAKE (10) GLACIER PK. (13) VS. LEWIS & CLARK (12) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 CAMAS (8) VS. CENTRAL VALLEY (1) LAKE STEVENS (7) VS. EASTLAKE (2) BELLARMINE (6) VS. KENTRIDGE (3) UNIVERSITY (14) VS. SUNNYSIDE (11) 3A GIRLS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 PRAIRIE (7) VS. GIG HARBOR (2) SEATTLE PREP (5) VS. KAMIAKIN (4) KELSO (16) VS. BELLEVUE (9) MT. SPOKANE (14) VS. PENINSULA (11) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 BETHEL (8) VS. LINCOLN (1) WEST SEATTLE (6) VS. GARFIELD (3) LYNNWOOD (15) VS. STANWOOD (10)

SHORECREST (13) VS. CLEVELAND (12) 2A GIRLS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 LYNDEN (7) VS. WF WEST (2) LIBERTY (16) VS. BLACK HILLS (9) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 WHITE RIVER (8) VS. EAST VALLEY (1) WAPATO (6) VS. BURLINGTON-ED. (3) ARCH. MURPHY (5) VS. PT. ANGELES (4) FIFE (15) VS. WASHOUGAL (10) RENTON (14) VS. NO. KITSAP (11) EAST VALLEY (13) VS. PROSSER (12)

FEBRUARY 23 – MARCH 3

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - MASL SOCCER Ontario Fury vs. Tacoma Stars Accesso ShoWare Center - 7:35 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 1B Boys Regionals Tacoma Baptist vs. Muckleshoot Auburn Mountainview HS - 10 a.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 4A Girls Regionals Bellarmine vs. Kentridge Auburn Mountainview HS - 12 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 2A Boys Regionals Pullman vs. Foss Mt. Tahoma HS - 2 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 3A Girls Regionals Bethel vs. Lincoln Puyallup HS - 4 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys Regionals Eastside Catholic vs. Lincoln Puyallup HS - 6 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 2B Girls Regionals Orcas Island vs. Life Christian Mt. Tahoma HS - 6 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 24 - BASKETBALL 2B Boys Regionals Orcas Island vs. Life Christian Mt. Tahoma HS - 8 p.m. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. THURSDAY, MAR. 1 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m.

1A GIRLS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 PT. TOWNSEND (16) VS. NOOKSACK (9)

FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys/4A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 3:45 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 24 MERIDIAN (8) VS. LYNDEN CHRISTIAN (1) LAKESIDE (7) VS. CASHMERE (2) LA CENTER (6) VS. LA SALLE (3) MEDICAL LAKE (5) VS. ZILLAH (4) SEA. ACADEMY (15) VS. SEA. CHRIS. (10) FREEMAN (14) VS. MONTESANO (11) BELLEVUE CHRIS. (13) VS. CLE ELUM (12)

FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys/4A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 5:30 p.m.

2B GIRLS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 ST. GEORGE’S (7) VS. DAVENPORT (2) WHITE SWAN (6) VS. WAHKIAKUM (3) COLFAX (5) VS. NAPAVINE (4) LAKE ROOSEVELT (15) VS. MABTON (10) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 LA CONNER (8) VS. ILWACO (1) ORCAS ISLAND (16) VS. LIFE CHRISTIAN (9) FRIDAY HARBOR (14) VS. TRI-CITIES (11) MOSSYROCK (12) VS. BREWSTER (12) 1B GIRLS FRIDAY, FEB. 23 MV CHRISTIAN (5) VS. SUNNYSIDE CH. (4) RIVERSIDE CHRISTIAN (16) VS. ENTIAT (9) SATURDAY, FEB. 24 MT. RAINIER LUTH. (8) VS. COLTON (1) AC-HARTLINE (7) VS. POMEROY (2) SELKIRK (6) VS. NEAH BAY (3) NW YESHIVA (15) VS. TAHOLAH (10) YAKAMA TRIBAL (14) VS. RAINIER CHR. (11) COLUMBIA ADV. (13) VS. CLALLAM BAY (12)

FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys/3A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - INDOOR SOCCER Kansas City Comets vs. Tacoma Stars Accesso ShoWare Center - 7:35 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys/3A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 9 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 4A Girls State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A Girls State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 9 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

TACOMA TEAMS PRIMED FOR STATE

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Upper-left) Bellarmine Prep senior Shalyse Smith has been a force in the paint and a proven leader for the Lady Lions. A twisted ankle early in the 4A West Central District championship game cost Bellarmine a shot at the district crown, and may also play a part in Bellarmine's fate at state. (Upper-middle) Bellarmine junior Reyelle Frazier may have to step up even bigger for the Lady Lions. (Upperright) Lincoln junior SaNaya McAffe takes it into the paint. (Lowerleft) Lincoln senior Azallee Johnson fights for position. (Mid-bottom) Lincoln senior Le'Zjon Bonds takes it to the rack. (Lower-right) Lincoln freshman Julian Simon has shown to be the real deal.

TACOMA GRAPPLERS DO THE MAT CLASSIC

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

The 30th edition of the Mat Classic was a huge success at the Tacoma Dome on Friday, Feb. 16 and Saturday, Feb. 17. Tacoma area medalists in the girls division included Bellarmine senior Alina Collins (105 champion), Lincoln senior Jamayia Blackston (115 third), Wilson senior Kathleen Flanagan (155 champion), Jennifer King (155 fifth) and Fife senior Veronique Abaglo (235 fourth). 4A boys medalists included Curtis sophomore Aizayah Yacapin (113 champion), Curtis junior Devin Neal (145 third), Bellarmine senior Daniel Ladenburg (170 seventh), Curtis senior Ketner Fields (182 third) and Curtis junior Luke Purcell (220 second). 3A boys medalists included Lincoln juniors Boira Mokmouen (113 third) and Jeremiah Duncombe (126 sixth), Lakes senior Zander Coakley (132 sixth), Lincoln senior JJ Dixon (195 champion), Lincoln junior Janoah Thomas (220 fourth) and Wilson senior Josiah Vaiolo (285 second). 2A medalists included Washington junior Josh Camacho (138 sixth), Franklin Pierce senior Jacob Westfall (182 fourth), Foss senior Aundre Seabrook (195 fourth) and Fife junior Lupeti Sarte (285 eighth).


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Stars

From page A10

visibly upset as to how out-of-position his men were in front of him, but there would be no time for that, as Tacoma would now need a goal to tie the match before time expired. Tacoma had several good looks in the final minutes, but it all went out the door when the team was called for a substitution penalty. With around 1:30 left in the match, it was the sort of call that you don’t like seeing for any team in a championship match, and as would be expected, the Tacoma bench and crowd went unhinged. It will probably be talked about for a long time. Now, down a man to close-out the game, Tacoma was playing desperate to even get control of the ball. Playing up a man, Bellingham were mostly able to play keepaway

t Basketball From page A10

as they fell from the ranks of the unbeaten by a score of 62-49. The shots weren’t falling for the Abes and their normal fourth quarter rush would never find a jumpstart without the buckets falling. Despite the loss, the Abes earned the third spot in the RPI standings and have punched a ticket to the Tacoma Dome. The Abes (23-1) will face a dangerous Eastside Catholic (21-5) squad in a 6 p.m. regional game on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Puyallup High School. The winner will earn a first-round bye at the 3A Hardwood Classic. The Wilson Rams darkhorse hopes of winning a state championship took a savage blow over the course of their final two district games. Emmitt Matthews Jr. injured his non-shooting wrist in a 77-52 victory over Spanaway Lake on Thursday, Feb. 15. Two nights later, he played in Wilson’s 49-40 loss to Prairie. Later, it would come out that Matthews had actually broken his wrist, and will be unavailable to play for the Rams in their regional game against Garfield, nor in their trip to the Tacoma Dome. Wilson head coach Dave Alwert will have to work up some lineup and matchup magic to make up for Matthews’ absence. The Rams will travel north to face Garfield at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Bellevue College. The Bellarmine Lady Lions would face the defending 4A state champions from Kentridge for the 4A WCD championship to cap-off the district championships at Puyallup High School on Saturday, Feb.

from Tacoma for the remaining moments, and again, the WISL championship trophy would remain with the Hammers. The Tacoma Stars of the professional Major Arena Soccer League found themselves on their heels as they took on the Ontario Fury in California on Thursday, Feb. 15. Tacoma was unable to match the home team’s intensity in the first half, but were somehow able to keep the game close at 4-3 off of two goals from Taylor Walter Bond and a solo shot from Philip Lund. The second half would see the Fury run-off five unanswered goals. A late blast by Evan McNeley made the match a more-respectable 9-4 at the final buzzer, but it certainly wasn't the sort of outing Tacoma was looking for while in the middle of a late-season playoff hunt. Ontario would now hold a 10-10 record on the season, while Tacoma’s playoff hopes took a solid jab to the nose as the Stars’ record fell to 8-11. However,

there would be no time for the Stars to wonder what went wrong, as they would need to head north to pay a visit to the Turlock Express. While the Express have been dwelling at the bottom of the MASL Pacific Division standings, they have always tended to put together surprising outings on their tiny playing field at Turlock Indoor Soccer. A loss would be devastating to the Stars, while it could offer a feel-good result for the 2-17 Express. As expected, Turlock put up a strong fight and goals by Tacoma’s Troy Peterson, Derek Johnson and Nick Perera gave the Stars a slim 3-1 advantage going into halftime. Turlock would get closer midway through the third quarter to make it 3-2, but Tacoma would answer with a goal by Trevor Jensen late in the third and solo blast by Jamael Cox early in the fourth quarter to make it 5-2 Tacoma. Turlock would get their final goal with nine minutes remaining in the match, but

Tacoma’s defense would shut them out the rest of the way. Now the stakes are even higher for the 9-11 Stars as they host Ontario on Friday, Feb. 23, at the Accesso ShoWare Center at 7:35 p.m. With two games left in the regular season, this match is a do-or-die for Tacoma. Should the Stars earn a victory, both teams would sit at 10-11, with Tacoma owning a 3-1 tiebreaker in headto-head contests. Ontario will then close out their season with a home match against a San Diego Sockers club that has already wrapped up the Pacific Division title on Thursday, March 1. Tacoma will host the Kansas City Comets the following night. Ontario could still regain the second seed to the playoffs with a win over the Sockers and a Tacoma loss to the Comets. Of course, this is all hypothetical. It all begins on Friday, Feb. 23, when Tacoma hosts Ontario. Nothing else matters to either team right now.

17. A first quarter ankle injury by all-state sensation Shalyse Smith put the Lady Lions on their heels for nearly the entire game, and Bellarmine would fall 55-41 without their leader. Since Bellarmine finished sixth in the RPI standings, the Lady Lions have already secured a ticket to the Tacoma Dome. However, Bellarmine will have to face Kentridge, yet again, in the regional round with the third seed on the line on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Auburn Mountainview High School at 12 p.m. Keeping up with tradition, the Curtis Vikings boys’ team will be making a return trip to the regional round. The Vikings had already secured a berth to regionals before falling to eventual 4A WCD champion Enumclaw 60-54 in the semifinals on Wednesday, Feb. 14. Two nights later, the Vikings would put in a strong showing, but fell to Union 65-61. Curtis (17-7) finished ranked 13th in the RPI and will travel to North Creek High School on Saturday, Feb. 24, to face Bothell (20-2) at 6 p.m. in a loser-out game. The Bellarmine Lions boys’ team took the longest route possible to earn a ticket to the regionals. Bellarmine would drop their district opener to Auburn 49-45, sending the Lions into the consolation bracket. Bellarmine would then stop Mt. Rainier (60-54) and Kennedy (53-48) in loser-out contests. The Lions would then fall to the 4A defending champions from Kentwood 59-48 on Wednesday, Feb. 14. With seven seeds on the line this season, Bellarmine would find themselves in one more loserout game. Despite falling to Olympia twice in the regular season, the Lions turned it on when it counted and dropped the Bears 56-48 on Friday, Feb. 16, at Mt. Tahoma

High School to nab the seventh, and final, seed. Bellarmine (15-10) will travel to West Valley High School in Spokane to face Lewis & Clark (16-8) on Friday, Feb. 23, at 6 p.m. in a loser-out game. In the 2A WCD boys’ tournament, the Foss Falcons did something that was brand new to the team since moving to the 2A classification last year. Since beginning play in 2016, the Falcons had not lost to a single 2A foe. That impressive run came to an end with a surprising 62-58 loss to Fife (20-5) in the district semifinals. The Falcons bounced back in the third-place game and put an 82-61 hurting on Renton. Foss earned the third spot in the 2A RPI standings and has punched a ticket to the SunDome in Yakima. The Falcons (19-4) will first play host to Pullman (19-2) in a 2 p.m. regional matchup on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Mt. Tahoma High School. Out of the boys’ 2A district, Fife and Clover Park will be playing in loser-out regional match-ups. The Trojans will host Burlington Edison (13-12) at 6 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 23, at Puyallup High School. Clover Park (178) will travel for an 8 p.m. showdown with Renton (19-5) the same night. On the girls’ 2A side, the Fife Trojans (15-9) are 15th in the RPI standings and will travel to Battle Ground High School on Saturday, Feb. 24, for a 4 p.m. showdown with Washougal (19-5). The winner goes to Yakima, while the loser’s season ends. The Cascade Christian (14-8) boys have earned a ticket to Yakima for the 1A tournament. The Cougars finished seventh in the RPI standings and will face unbeaten Freeman (21-0) at University High School in Spokane on Friday, Feb. 23, at 8 p.m. The Life Christian boys’ and girls’

teams will be fighting for a trip to the 2B tournament at Spokane Veteran’s Arena. Both teams went through grueling district tournaments that saw a total of just three 2B Pacific League teams advance to the regional round with the Central B League gathering up the other seven available berths. With both teams earning ninth in the final RPI standings, the squads will each host Orcas Island on Saturday, Feb. 24. The Life Christian girls (16-5) tip-off at 6 p.m., followed by the boys (21-4) at 8 p.m. The winners will head to Spokane, while the losers’ seasons will be over. Eagles’ head coach Mark Lovelady garnered his 400th career win in district play and looks to add a few more, along with some state hardware, before the dust settles on the postseason. Tacoma Baptist will be returning to Spokane, but this time it will be the boys’squad making the trip. The Crusaders (22-4) earned the seventh spot in the 1B RPI and will play second-seed Muckleshoot Tribal (24-2) in a 10 a.m. regional game on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Auburn Mountainview High School. It will mark the fourth meeting of the season for the two teams, with Muckleshoot taking the previous three games. However, the Crusaders have closed the gap between the two schools and should be considered a darkhorse pick to make some noise in Spokane. Mt. Rainier Lutheran’s girls (21-3) earned the eighth RPI position in 1B and have booked their trip to Spokane. As the 13th seed, the boys (18-10) will have to travel on Saturday, Feb. 24, to Pullman to face Garfield-Palouse (18-6) in a regional loser-out game, followed by a seeding game for the girls against top-ranked Colton (21-1).

WELCOME

TACOMA C H E N E Y S TA D I U M 2 0 1 8 WILL YOU BE THERE? SEASON TICKETS AND SCHEDULE AT


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Tree Hugger’s Corner A guide for those who want to get out there and take action on behalf of the environment and social justice Friday, Feb. 23, noon FRIDAY FORUM: STORMWATER POLLUTION AND TRANSPORTATION Urban Grace, 902 Market St., Tacoma

The number one source of petroleum and other toxic chemicals that end up in the Puget Sound is non-industrial pollutants; that’s cars, parking lots, and other household chemicals. How can we keep water clean by using alternative transportation options? Tanisha Jumper will moderate a discussion with Jessica Knickerbocker, City of Tacoma

government; Melissa Malott, Citizens for a Healthy Bay and students from Annie Wright Schools. Info: www.facebook.com/events/144180792940287/ Tuesday, Feb. 27, 6:30-7:30 p.m. HOW TO HELP FERAL CATS IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD Tacoma Public Library, Olympic Room, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S., Tacoma Come hear a talk by the founder of FCAT (Feral Cat Assistance & Trapping), a network of local volunteers that go out to houses and neighborhoods where feral and/or stray cats are gathering, humanely trap feral cats, evaluate what medical care is necessary, and gets them spayed or neutered. After their surgeries and recovery, they are returned to their original location. When possible, tame cats and kittens are put into foster care with local rescues/shelters to find them forever homes. Learn about the connection between tame cats and feral cats; why there’s a narrow window of opportunity to rescue kittens born in the wild before they’re too old to tame; the resources available for

low/no-cost spay/neuter for your pets; who to call if you see stray/feral cats, or are feeding them already and want to ensure their health and safety; how to set and monitor a humane trap to assist in the TNR process; what exactly is TNR (trap/neuter/return) and why you should care. Info: www.facebook.com/events/188336101758936/ Thursday, March 1, 6 p.m. LNG TRIVIA NIGHT The Forum, 815 Pacific Ave, Tacoma Come on down to The Forum for a funfilled evening of LNGrelated trivia. Learn the facts about PSE’s liquefied natural gas facility at the Port of Tacoma and what that means for our community. There will be free food, quizzes, prizes and lots of fun. The evening is hosted by the State Chapter of the Sierra Club and Pierce County’s Tatoosh Group. Info: www.facebook.com/events/338013033369542/


City Life

YOUR TICKET to TACOMA

‘The Glass Menagerie’ at Lakewood Playhouse

B4

TA C O M A W E E K LY. C O M

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2018

SECTION B, PAGE 1

‘First on the Waterway’

FOSS WATERWAY SEAPORT EXHIBIT TELLS STORY OF PUYALLUP TRIBE’S CONNECTION TO LOCAL WATERS

PHOTOS BY BILL BUNGARD

(Above) “First on the Waterway,” an exhibit that tells the story of the Puyallup Tribe’s relationship with the local waters, opened Feb. 15 at the Foss Waterway Seaport. (Right) The Puyallup Tribe’s Canoe Family, a drumming and singing group — who were accompanied by dancers (lower picture) — were on hand at the exhibit’s opening night.

F

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

eb. 15 witnessed the unveiling of “First on the Waterway,” a brand-new exhibit at the Foss Waterway Seaport. The exhibit tells the story of Tacoma’s waterways from the point of view of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians and other Salish-speaking groups: the first inhabitants of this region. Thousands of generations of regional rootedness gave the area’s Native population a deep familiarity with Commencement Bay, the Puyallup River, the Tacoma Narrows and the complex network of passages, islands and inlets of the South Sound, also known as the Salish Sea. Nourished by the plants, animals, fish and marine life of the local land and water, the first inhabitants and their generations of descendants are the offspring of this specific area, made of its substance, generated by the materials resident to this part of the world. Ironically, the story of Tacoma often begins with European explorers and overlooks or glosses over the story of the people who have lived in the region for millennia. At the Feb. 15 opening of the exhibit, Seaport Executive Director Wesley A. Wenhardt noted that telling the story of the first people of the area is very much part of the Foss Waterway Seaport’s mission, which is to preserve Puget Sound’s maritime heritage, educate the public about it and serve as an events center to celebrate that heritage. The exhibit, centrally located in the newly heated building, consists of a cluster of well-illustrated informational panels, models and artifacts. The information on the panels is liberally sprinkled with examples of the native Lushootseed language. A helpful pronunciation guide put out by the Language Department of the Puyallup Tribe is available for anyone who wants to learn some Lushootseed words. The panels tell the story of the Puyallup people’s connection to the local waters in the past, present and future. The individual parts of the exhibit are divided into categories like “Traditions of Fishing and Gathering,” “Gifts from the Water” and “Tides and Currents.” There are chapters on more recent history of the Tribe, such as the “Fishing Wars” of the late 1960s/early 1970s in which the Tribe fought to assert fishing rights accorded by treaty. There is also a chapter on the “Canoe Journey,” an annual event in which members of numerous regional tribes paddle their canoes on a grand circuit through the Salish Sea

ONE TACOMA CALLIGRAPHY GUILD

Monday, Feb. 26, 5:30 p.m. Tacoma Calligraphy Guild, 6501 N. 23rd St. (The Truman Center for Professional Development) Bldg. B, Rm. 4, Tacoma. Join Tacoma Calligraphy Guild at its February meeting. A fun program has been planned by Jan Cooper: Contemporary Versal Letterforms, which are fun, energetic, dancing letters for journals, gift cards, place cards and quote enhancement. Learn to draw shapes that make up the letters of this alphabet using speedy, continuous, spontaneous gestures, going for fluidity. Bring pencil, micron pigma or fine line sharpie, paper, i.e. Pro Layout Pad, ruler. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/tacomacg.

TWO CLAW PRESENTS ARTIST’S BEST

each summer. There is a large, light-up map that shows the locations of the numerous Native settlements of the region. Models and artifacts exhibit the sophistication of some of the building, maritime technology and navigational skills of the Native inhabitants. Their plank-built houses were marvels of engineering, and their canoes are both seaworthy vessels and beautiful, spiritual things, often carved with an animal head in the bow. At the unveiling of the exhibit, a number of Puyallup Tribal leaders were on hand. Puyallup Tribal Council Chairman Bill Sterud called the opening of the exhibit a “momentous moment,” in which the Puyallup Tribe can tell its story in its own way. Sterud emphasized that the Tribe is an important part of the fabric of the region’s community and its history needs to be known and appreciated by the community as a whole. “We’re all in this together,” he said, “We’re moving in a good direction for fish, air, water and people. We’ve got to keep our water clean, our fish vital and our air breathable. This is a good year to share the story. Welcome to the Puyallup Nation!” Puyallup Tribal Culture Director Connie McCloud noted that the Seaport building is not far from some of the old villages of bygone years and she told of how the Tacoma area was traditionally a land of abundance, where people could fish and hunt literally from their front porches. Puyallup Tribal Councilman Jim Rideout noted the importance of “First on the Waterway” as a means for newcomers to the region to hear the story and to know the history of the people who have been here all along. “People who come from elsewhere can come here and learn about the waterway,” he said. The Puyallup Tribe is generationally bound to this place more deeply than any other group. So much a part of this place are they, that they have perhaps the greatest stake in ensuring that the waters, and air and land that sustained their ancestors continues to be a source of vitality for all of us and for those that come after us. Their role as the protectors of this place is legitimized by generations of ancestors that are part of the very ground on which we walk. In addition to the speeches of dignitaries, there was a powerful performance by the Puyallup Canoe Family singing and drumming group. Their voices and their drumming soared to the high rafters of the building as dancers recreated the motions of canoe paddlers on a

BUSINESS PRACTICES Wednesday, Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma Join the Cartoonists’ League of Absurd Washingtonians (CLAW) and panel host Jennevieve Schlemmer for an informative and fun panel about what it takes to be a working artist. We will cover best practices for creating a schedule, finding consistency, pricing your work, balancing your books, motivating yourself, and creating your own creative community. Panel includes amazing local artists Mindy Barker, Michaela Eaves, Steve Garvin, and Mark Monlux. For information, visit www.cartoonistsleague.org.

THREE WARREN MILLER TRIBUTE PARTY Thursday March 1, 5 p.m. Harmon Brewery & Restaurant, 1938 Pacific Ave., Tacoma

journey. Also on hand were some Native carvers, working on traditional canoe paddles. “First on the Waterway” provides a glimpse into the ancient past of this place, in which the people here lived in a close relationship with the local plants, animals and marine life. Their buildings were strong and beautiful and their canoes transformed Puget Sound and the inland rivers into a transportation and communication network that allowed much interaction among the many communities of the maritime Pacific Northwest. “First on the Waterway” was curated by Chris Fiala Erlich, who worked in close proximity with the Puyallup Tribe’s Historic Preservation Office. The exhibit was made possible by contributions from the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, City of Tacoma, Tote Maritime Keltech and Port of Tacoma. Wenhardt noted that it is a hopeful sign that these organizations, which are not always in agreement, could come together to make this exhibit possible. The Seaport plans to host monthly events, like canoe paddling, carving, weaving and dance, that coincide with the exhibit. It is also hoped that the Seaport can play a part in this summer’s “Paddle to Puyallup” Canoe Journey, when a flotilla of more than 100 canoes from numerous tribes will come into Puyallup Tribal territorial waters. Organizers of the exhibit would like schools and educational programs to take advantage of the exhibit and bring their students to view it. A hard and fast date for the end of the exhibit has not yet been determined, but it will certainly be on view through July. The Foss Waterway Seaport is located at 705 Dock St. If you have not been there lately or have never been, a visit is highly recommended. “First on the Waterway” is just one of the many exhibits that the maritime-themed museum has to show. There are many beautiful old boats, canoes, vintage boat motors, model ships, paintings, a whale skeleton and much to see and do. The building itself is a survivor of a mile-long row of wheat warehouses that once lined the Thea Foss Waterway. It is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. For more on the “First on the Waterway” exhibit and the Foss Waterway Seaport, visit fosswaterwsyseaport.org or call (253) 272-2750.

We felt it important that we gather – skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers alike – to celebrate the man who always brought us together each fall to get pumped about the upcoming season. Come enjoy some winter drink and beer specials (we have a secret stash of the Steep and Deep Winter Ale), vintage Warren Miller videos, yummy Harmon grub and of course – swag. For information, visit www. facebook.com/events/628851944123978.

FOUR FLY FISHING FILM TOUR Thursday, March 1, 7 p.m. Blue Mouse Theatre, 2611 N. Proctor St., Tacoma The Gig Harbor Fly Shop is proud to bring you the 2018 premier of the FlyFishing Film Tour. The event will benefit the Coastal Cutthroat Coalition. Doors open at 6 p.m.,

pre-party starts at 6:30 p.m. with a silent auction and live music. Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets will be $15 locally in advance at Gig Harbor Fly Shop and $18 online and at the door. For more information, contact the Gig Harbor Fly Shop at sales@gigharborflyshop.com or (253) 851-3474 or visit gigharborflyshop.com.

FIVE NATALIE HOLT STANDUP COMEDY Friday, March 2, 8 p.m. Odd Otter Brewing Company, 716 Pacific Ave., Tacoma Catch Natalie Holt’s standup comedy at the Odd Otter. Holt’s comedy career started in Seattle, but her absurd spirit is the result of her weird and wonderful upbringing in Florida. She keeps busy as a producer at Seattle’s “The Comedy Nest” and co-writer of the live inter-dimensional talk show “Alyssa Explains It All.” She’s also performed at Bumbershoot and co-hosts the Sexual Awake’n’Baking podcast. For information, visit www.facebook. com/events/132777137534942.


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

ART NEWS ROUNDUP

VIEW CUTTING EDGE FASHION AND ART AT 1120 CREATIVE HOUSE

The Black Sushi Illegal Art and Fashion Show, a mod mashup of a runway fashion display and fine art by local artists, takes place Saturday, March 3 at 7 p.m. at 1120 Creative House (1120 Pacific Ave., Tacoma). The show is sponsored by Mary Mart Tacoma, a recreational marijuana dispensary, and will feature a collection of 10 emerging clothing designers, six unique visual artists and a live performance from James Harman, a.k.a. “The Urban Musician.”

Artists include PotCasso, Shawn Foote, James Allan, Adika Bell and Lourdes Jackson. Runway fashion collections by FlyFit Brand, By Clemm, Pimp My Pal, Fast Lane Life Style, Street Vitals, AUZÓN and others will be presented. In addition to the music by the Urban Musician, there will be a live performance by Caleb Jermaine Barsh. RSVP at www.facebook.com/ events/147208935939887.

Author, historian Michael Hemp to talk at Foss Waterway Seaport Foss Waterway Seaport presents historian Michael Kenneth Hemp, revealing exciting new horizons for Pacific Northwest history, our cultural and literary connections, marine science and maritime interests, and a new travel and hospitality industry potential throughout Puget Sound and the Pacific Northwest. His presentation is titled “Conjunction” and will take place Saturday, March 3 at 1 p.m. In 1983, Hemp established the non-profit Cannery Row Foundation and has served since as its principal researcher and celebrant. His acclaimed “Cannery Row, The History of John Steinbeck’s Old Ocean View Avenue” (1986) is now in its third edition, fourth printing. Hemp is now president emeritus of the Foundation and principal of The History Company, engaged in historical research, heritage marketing consulting, publishing, lecturing and heritage special events (see www.thehistorycompany.com). California old Cannery Row historian and historical authority on John Steinbeck’s world-famous Cannery Row and its pioneering marine biologist Edward F. “Doc” Ricketts has relocated to Gig Harbor in order to further research, record, establish and celebrate our shared legacies. Foss Waterway Seaport is proud to have been chosen for the premier presentation of “Conjunction: The Emerging Con-

GODDESS ART AT MANIC MERMAID

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

Detail of one of Elora Blessing’s pour paintings. A display of her work opens at the Lincoln District’s Manic Mermaid gallery Feb. 24.

The Manic Mermaid, an art gallery in Tacoma’s Lincoln District located at 769 S. 38th St., will be showing the multi-media artwork of Elora Blessing. Blessing is a graphic designer working in Seattle who calls Tacoma her home. Originally from the Southwest, she really enjoys the climate and culture of the Pacific Northwest. She has won awards for her art from the University of Texas at El Paso, where she earned her bachelors of fine art. When not painting or designing, she enjoys cooking, practicing yoga and spending time with her family. Most of Blessing’s pieces start with scrap wood, painted with spray paint as a base coat. Multiple layers are created with acrylic by being thinned out with pouring medium and consolidated into one cup. To create cells, some colors include oil. Most paintings are finished with a layer or two of epoxy resin, and nection of Cannery Row, the Historic Pacific Northwest, John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts, the Sea of Cortez, and the Saga of the Western Flyer.” Admission to this event is free with paid admission to the museum. A “meet the author” and book signing will follow the talk. Foss Waterway Seaport is located at 705 Dock St. in Tacoma. For information, visit www.fosswaterwayseaport. org.

the dried excess is sanded off. “Used as a way to escape hectic life, these paintings act as a source of calm when creating and in viewing,” says Blessing. “The process of pouring fluid acrylic is a meditative one, and though they are abstract, they are methodical. Allowing there to be a shared control by the artist, the paint, and gravity allows for unique pieces every time. The sometimes accidental, sometimes intentional shapes mimic nature and biology. Each piece represents something strong, powerful and beautiful – and therefore each take the name of a goddess. The artist welcomes viewers to take from each piece what they wish to see.” A reception for Blessing’s show will happen Saturday, Feb. 24 at 6 p.m. Come and meet the artist. For information, visit www.facebook.com/ manicmermaids.

‘HAMILTON:’ THE SHOW HEARD AROUND THE WORLD

KING’S BOOKS TO HOST WRITING WORKSHOP

On Saturday, Feb. 24, 1 p.m., King’s Books (218 St. Helens, Tacoma) will host a workshop called “Putting Pen to Page: Writing No Matter What.” The workshop is run by Jennifer Wilhoit, PhD, author of “Writing on the Landscape: Essays and Practices to Write, Roam, Renew” and Brenda FantroyJohnson, author of “Imagine Me.” The workshop is for anybody who wants or needs to write but never seems to get anything on the page. Come learn some writing tips, simple practices, suggestions, brainstorming for your unique project, as well as hands-on experience seeing how to get words to accumulate on the page. Students will leave the workshop with practical tools for navigating the writing project and the writing process. The workshop runs 1-2:45 p.m. and costs $30. Advance registration required. To register, e-mail Wilhoit at tealarborstories@gmail.com. After the workshop, from 3-4 p.m.,

there will be a free book reading and discussion by the facilitators Wilhoit and Fantroy-Johnson. “Writing on the Landscape: Essays and Practices to Write, Roam, Renew” offers a way through some of the challenges we face when we write, including difficulties in daily life that impede our progress. Filled with writing and naturebased practices, this book uses rich language to inspire anyone compelled to write or live more fully in connection with self and nature. “Writing on the Landscape” is a practical, lyrical book aimed at helping blocked writers to become unstuck. Wilhoit is a spiritual ecologist and the founder of TEALarbor stories. This is her third published book. “Imagine Me” is a riveting story of a young black girl’s journey growing up in the early ‘60s. The setting is Detroit, where dreams are formed from life experiences within a city ghetto. A coming-of- age story set during the height of the civil rights movement, this was a time of music, baseball, and fishing on the Detroit River, a time of developing and discovering identity. Fantroy-Johnson is a computer security manager, and is busy at work on her second book, a novel. For information, visit www.kingsbookstore.com/event/wilhoitfantroy.

PHOTO COURTESY OF HAMILTON NATIONAL TOURING CO.

The Broadway hit “Hamilton” has come to our region with showings at Seattle’s Paramont Theater. The hip hop excursion into the American Revolution runs through March 18.

By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The touring production of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s super successful “Hamilton” is hitting Seattle’s Paramount Theatre, with the debut of Joseph Morales and Nik Walker in the key roles of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr. They decidedly bring the thunder in their roles as do the other principal actors: Ta’Rea Campbell as Angelica Schuyler, Marcus Choi as George Washington, Elijah Malcomb as John Laurens/ Phillip Schuyler, Shoba Narayan as Eliza Hamilton, Fergie L. Philippe as Hercules Mulligan/James Madison, Kyle Scatliffe as Marquis de Lafayette/Thomas Jefferson, Danielle Sostre as Peggy Schuyler/ Maria Reynolds and Jon Patrick Walker as King George. But you could expect nothing less from such an anticipated production of a Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical that has won rave reviews since it first took to the Great White Way in 2015 and has since revolutionized musical theater with its mashing of history, diversification of cast lists, stinging lyrics and tick-tock timed hip hop beats. The show brings a bit of everything for everyone. History. Iconic characters. Quick lyrics.

Brassy women. Political intrigue. Snappy music of every genre imaginable. Precision choreography. Modern themes. Various skin tones. Mesmerizing costumes. Dramatic lighting. The visual aspects of the show are so powerful, outside the stage design – which is minimal, so focus is on the action – that it wouldn’t be a bad idea to listen to the soundtrack a few times just to get the rhythm and gist of the show beforehand, so you can bathe in everything the show has to offer. For those folks who have been living under a cultural rock for the last three years, “Hamilton” tells the political backstory of the American Revolution and the founding of the nation through the biography of Hamilton, an immigrant orphan from the West Indies who finds himself serving as the righthand man of Washington during and after the war for independence from England. He goes on to craft the state-versus-federalgovernment relationship while serving as the secretary of the treasury, all the while being “frenemies” with Burr, his political mentor turned rival and future assassin. Hamilton runs at the Paramount Theatre through March 18. And while tickets for the run of the show are largely sold out, the $10 lottery continues as planned.


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

LONG-TIME SALMON BEACH RESIDENT EXHIBITS WORK AT FULCRUM GALLERY

Culture Corner

A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Upcoming Theatrical Events: You On The Moors Now

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma artist R. A. Turner has been a denizen of Salmon Beach since the days that the little-known, secret community tucked away beneath Point Defiance was in transition from a bunch of shacks occupied by gristly old fishermen to beach cabins occupied by hippies and decorated with glass ornaments and dream catchers. “I have had one shack or another at Salmon Beach for 56 years and the everchanging land, sea and sky compositions are part of me,” he said. “This motif can be seen in both the realistic work and the White Series. It’s all about light – some inner, some outer.” Turner is referring to a new series of paintings, now on display at the Fulcrum Gallery, in which the Salmon Beach experience of living down on the water informs the content of the work. The show consists of two parts. The main gallery space is devoted to “The White Series.” Here, big surfaces are done in textured effects, made with cardboard and other material. A final layer of tissue paper, treated with a varnish or resin, covers everything and binds it all together. Washes of white paint of various values are accented here and there with blues and grays. The works are very subtle, textural, meditative and quieting. This muted stillness is the effect that Turner is after. “For some time,” he states, “I have been acutely aware of urban noise. I even went to the Arizona desert searching for quiet. Much of the White Series is my attempt at quiet.” These semi-abstract paintings are inspired by the natural environment experienced while living at water level along the Tacoma Narrows. The water, the islands, land masses, the clouds and the sky blend together via the medium of misty, atmospheric moisture so common to our

Feb. 23-24, March 1-2, 7:30 p.m., March 3, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. University of Puget Sound, Norton Clapp Theatre, CMB 1084 The University of Puget Sound

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

Detail from one of R. A. Turner’s drawings of a scene from Salmon Beach, of the type used for his rowboat race posters.

region. These are subtle impressions or meditations in the mist. They communicate quiet fog. They speak softly of being socked-in on Salmon Beach and feeling far removed from the busy urban world buzzing about on the land mass above. Some of the paintings are hung side by side, while others hang in clusters, forming interesting configurations. Only with work so subtle could such a feat be carried off. With more outspoken works, such an arrangement would result in a jarring visual cacophony. Second part of the show, hung on one wall in Fulcrum’s middle space, is a display of Turner’s more literalistic, representational paintings. These are more traditional landscape paintings of some of the beach houses of the artist’s unique community. “The Salmon Beach paintings are a result of working up images for our annual rowboat race posters,” Turner says. The rowboat races that he refers to is an annual Fourth of July event held among the members of the Salmon Beach community. In his book, “Tacoma’s Salmon Beach,” author Roger Cushman Edwards credits Turner with being the originator of the annual rowboat race: “Richard Turner started another community tradition in

1970 with an annual rowboat race, on the Fourth of July, the full length of the beach. Commodore Richard, the artist, produced original posters that are now collectibles, and handed out ersatz trophies at the end of the race.” Some of the art and the posters are exhibited in the Fulcrum show. On Feb. 15, the exhibit’s opening night, the Fulcrum Gallery was the place to be as Third Thursday Art Walk wound down. In the back of the gallery, a disk jockey was spinning vinyl and folks were dancing. A silver-haired gentleman in a tuxedo poured glasses of chilled white wine and there were three types of tea, courtesy of the Mad Hat Tea Company. Turner had a good turnout for the opening of his show, supported by a combination of the Tacoma arts community and the Salmon Beach community. Turner’s “White Series and Salmon Beach Retrospective” will be at the Fulcrum Gallery through March 15. Fulcrum Gallery is located on Tacoma’s Hilltop, at 1308 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Way. The gallery has dodgy hours, so to view the show, contact owner Oliver Doriss at fulcrum@oliverdoriss.com or call (253) 250-0520 to arrange a time. For information, visit www.fulcrumtacoma.com.

Department of Theatre Arts presents its faculty-directed performance of “You On The Moors Now” by Jaclyn Backhaus, directed by Professor Jess K. Smith. This playful, smart, feminist play goes back more than a century to give some of our favorite literary characters a 21st century makeover. It’s 2018 and Jo March, Elizabeth Bennet, Jane Eyre, and Cathy Earnshaw Linton have moved far beyond their original forms. They are fed up with men who conflate feelings of love with expectations of ownership and are ready to call it out in no uncertain language; begging the question of whether female friendships can be enough. Written with fast, witty and often crude turns of phrase, this play is both a send up and love letter to the heightened emotions, epic landscapes, and tortured journeys so intrinsic to the books from which these characters originate. Tickets: $11 general; $7 Puget Sound students/faculty/staff, sr. citizens, students, military Info: www.facebook.com/events/1088005664674996

Java Tacoma: Covfefe is for Closers

GANWICH PHOTOGRAPHY

March 2-18, Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m., Sundays 2 p.m. The Dukesbay Theater (above The Grand Cinema), 508 Sixth Ave. #10, Tacoma The Tacoma sit-com for the stage returns once more. About once a year, something unique happens in Tacoma theatre: A situation-comedy for the stage about three life-long friends who meet every day at a Tacoma coffee house, will tickle our collective funny bone for a seventh time. Jeri, Kate and Linda join forces once again to commit comic mayhem over at Tacoma’s Perky’s Coffee House. This time, the ladies find themselves dealing with an unscrupulous real estate investor over the ownership of the historic building that houses Perky’s. Watch as the BFFs sing love songs to this business mogul in hopes that one of the ladies can buy the building from him. But can they fight The Man without fighting each other? Loosely inspired by William Shakespeare’s “King Lear,” Java Tacoma is a celebration of friendship, middle-aged womanhood and all things Tacoma. All tickets are $10, which includes coffee, tea and an assortment of baked goods. Purchase your tickets online and pay no service fee. Info: dukesbay.org

You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown

March 2 and 3, 7:30 p.m., March 4, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma Tacoma Musical Playhouse is proud to present a program designed specifically for the senior community. The Young at Heart Players provides an exciting theatrical opportunity for mature adults, ages 50 and older, through a performance-based workshop that culminates in a fully-staged musical production for everyone to enjoy. This year YAHP presents, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” The musical explores the life of Charlie Brown and his friends in the Peanuts gang, as adults. Info: tmp.org

High School Musical

Friday, March 2, 7 p.m., and Saturday, March 3, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Wilson High School, 1202 N. Orchard St., Tacoma Disney Channel’s smash hit movie musical “High School Musical” comes to life on the Wilson High School stage. Troy, Gabriella and the students of East High must deal with issues of first love, friends and family while balancing their classes and extracurricular activities. It’s the first day after winter break at East High. The Jocks, Brainiacs, Thespians and Skater Dudes find their cliques, recount their vacations and look forward to the new year. Basketball team captain and resident jock, Troy, discovers that the brainy Gabriella, a girl he met singing karaoke on his ski trip, has just enrolled at East High. They cause an upheaval when they decide to audition for the high school musical that is being led by Ms. Darbus. Although many students resent the threat posed to the “status quo,” Troy and Gabriella’s alliance might just open the door for others to shine as well. The show is directed by Chris Serface, musically directed by Zachary Kellogg, and choreographed by Jill Heinecke. This production features 30 of Wilson High School’s most talented actors, singers, dancers and technicians. Tickets are $10 for students and youth and $15 for all others. Tickets may be purchased in person at the auditorium or at the Wilson High School office. Info: (253) 571-6000 or cserfac@tacoma.k12.wa.us.


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

TACOMA’S RICH HISTORY SPARKS CREATIVITY IN INAUGURAL YOUTH WRITING COMPETITION By Andrew Fickes

Andrew@tacomaweekly.com

On July 12, 1935, at the intersection of 11th and A Street in Tacoma, the timber workers strike boiled over into a violent confrontation between timber workers and the Washington National Guard. History was written. In anticipation of Historical Preservation Month in May, the City of Tacoma’s Historic Preservation Office, in partnership with local literary nonprofits Write253 and Creative Colloquy, and also Tacoma Public Library, is accepting submissions of creative historical fiction from youth 18 and under through March 30 as part of the inaugural youth historical fiction competition that aims to bring to life some of Tacoma’s lesser-known historical milestones and landmarks like the timber workers strike at 11th and A Street. “I think we really want to introduce students to episodes in Tacoma’s history through a creative way,” said Michael Haeflinger, executive director of Write253. “We find that young writers are often really excited by universe building and fan fiction, and by casting some key moments in the city’s history – especially those that arose out of injustices and reactions to those injustices – we hope to offer an opportunity for young people to bring that history to life in the minds of their readers.” Anneka Olson, an intern for the Historic Preservation Office, said the idea for the competition was rooted in the Office’s desire to reach new audiences – especially youth – and connect with Tacoma’s history, and more specifically, the history of the city’s built and natural environment. “One thing that is exciting about historic preservation is that it allows you to pinpoint a particular street or place or building and tie them to larger themes in history, and people don’t always understand the site-specific piece,” said Olson, who also is a graduate student in UW-Tacoma’s urban studies program. “Our interest was to connect with specific writings and pinpointing them to a specific place or building, and now youth can do the writing and pinpoint the writing to a specific place.” In her role at the Preservation Office, Olson had the fun task of performing historical research and pulling together the primary and secondary sources to include in the resource guide designed specifically for teachers who are encouraged to guide their students through writing historical fiction set in Tacoma. The Preservation Office performed targeted outreach to history, social studies, and English teachers in the Tacoma School District, as well other education organizations, including the Washington State Historical Society. “We figured that this is the most likely way we will have students participate in this competition,” Olson said. “We would be thrilled if teachers used it as a classroom

PHOTO COURTESY OF TACOMA PUBLIC LIBRARY, RICHARDS STUDIO

In 1935, the “Battle in Tacoma,” part of labor strikes along the West Coast among timber workers seeking higher wages and better working conditions, centered on the 11th and A Street intersection and the 11th Street Bridge, now called the Murrray Morgan Bridge.

assignment and encourage any student to take the assignment and run with it.” The resource guide, made available at cityoftacoma. org/youthfictioncompetition or at write253.com/historicalfictioncontest, includes four historical prompts, a discussion guide, and additional resources. To get students’ creative juices flowing, Write253 is hosting Saturday drop-in writing sessions from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Feb. 24, March 10 and March 24. Competition guidelines are also available at the aforementioned web links. The story must be 2,000 words or less and include a short informal bibliography listing primary and secondary sources. The competition is open to any student of high school age in Pierce County or those students completing their GED.

Judging the entries will be Michael Sullivan, local historian and storyteller; Daniel Person, a writer and journalist; Jennifer Mortensen, member of the Tacoma Landmarks Commission and staff person at the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation; Renee Simms, writer and professor of African-American studies at University of Puget Sound; and Tamiko Nimura, staff person at the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian-American Experience and also independent writer and historian. Winners will be announced May 1. First, second and third-place winners will be awarded cash prizes and publication on the Creative Colloquy website. Winners will have the opportunity to read their work at Creative Colloquy’s May reading series at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 21 at Black Kettle Bites and Brew (744 Market St.).

LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE CAPTURES MULTIFACETED RICHNESSS OF ‘THE GLASS MENAGERIE’ By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Lakewood Playhouse continues its stellar 79th season with a well-crafted production of Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie.” Written in 1944, the largely autobiographical play was Williams’ first big hit as a playwright. The “memory play” is a psychological drama that examines the dynamics of an economically and emotionally hard-pressed family struggling to find meaning and make ends meet in depression-era St. Louis. Directed by Micheal O’Hara, the play is Lakewood Playhouse’s first production of the classic. The story, presented as a series of memories of Tom Wingfield (Niclas Olson), takes place in the Wingfield’s claustrophobic apartment. Amanda (Dayna Childs), the single mother of two grown children – Tom and Laura (Jess Weaver) – is a verbal font of maternal badgering who is constantly trying to steer Tom into being more serious about his dreary, dead-end job and in finding a husband for Laura, who is handicapped socially as well as physically. Tom seeks escape through a combination of poetry, booze and movies, while Laura is lost in the tranquil beauty of her own inner world. Amanda, however, gets Tom to invite a work friend, Jim O’Connor (Nick Fitzgerald), to dinner. Jim does not know that he is there to meet Laura as a potential mate. Amanda seems to be using her children as pawns in a game to recapture the dignity and reputation that she lost when her husband abandoned the family when the children were young. The four seasoned actors in the play make each of the characters fascinating to watch. Childs turns in a tour de force performance as Amanda, the one-time southern belle, who has since faded like a bouquet of jonquils. Her relationship with reality is somewhat shaky. Steeped in the past and unwilling to acknowledge hard truths – like the fact that her daughter is “crippled” – Amanda is the source of much of the spiritual illness that infects the family.

She is a keeper of her own “glass menagerie” of memories of old boyfriends – endlessly recounting all the details of their lives (and deaths). She is bubbling over with things to say, but little of it is informed by present reality. Olson is splendid as Tom, the snide, knowing, cynical young man (who is also a self-portrait of Williams himself). He is suave as the narrator and spirited during outbursts when he is cornered by his mother and is forced to blurt out hard truths (at which she takes much offense). Tom is always jotting things down (poetry presumably) in his pocket notebook and there is charm in the way he lovingly lingers near the typewriter, as if feeling its potential as a machine or even a ship that can take him on his own adventures. Tom is the most self-aware character in the story, yet he frequently indulges in escapism via frequent trips to the movie theater. He is aware that, out in the world, there is danger and turmoil – there is civil war in Spain and war is brewing in Asia and Europe. Tom, however is stuck in an apartment living on an economic razor’s edge – expected to support his helpless sister and constantly badgering mother. Weaver, as Laura, turns in a moving performance as the shy, magical creature who seems content to have confined herself to the apartment where she can enjoy her collection of glass animals and an old record player. It is a world of pure sensation. Around other people, however, Laura can become upset to the point of sickness. Her mother’s insistence on forcing Laura into courtship causes extreme anxiety. Amanda, however, remains unwilling to see that her daughter is never going to be the graceful “belle of the ball” that she herself imagines herself to have been once upon a time. Fitzgerald’s portrayal of Jim, the “gentleman caller,” is as fascinating as the others. Jim was the high school hero who has been brought down to earth by the reality of the Great Depression. When sent to console Laura, he ultimately becomes the proverbial bull in the china shop, upsetting

PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSTON

(L to R) Niclas Olson (Tom), Jessica Weaver (Laura) and Dayna Childs (Amanda) from the Lakewood Playhouse production of Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie.”

a delicate edifice. His armchair psychology applied to Laura is naive and insulting. “You have an inferiority complex,” “don’t be self-conscious” and “be more confident” are all part of his advice to Laura. Jim regards himself as the type of popular guy that nevertheless has time to pay notice to those not up to his level. He is the one that is nice to the “crippled” girl, gives her a nickname and gives himself a pat on the shoulder for being a good person. In granting the favor of his kiss, Jim delivers a fatal blow. In addition to the great acting, Aaron Mohs-Hale’s lighting design is especially effective in creating the spell that this play casts upon the audience. Themes of light and shadow are hugely symbolic in the play itself. (i.e. Tom leaves family in the dark by using money for the power bill to pay merchant marine dues. Laura gives a speech on beauty of her glass animals and how they take up the light and how the light shines through them. Knowledge is illumination and ignorance is darkness). In addition, there are various types and degrees of lighting

used for the stage. At times, things are brilliantly lit. At other times, the characters move through the dim of memories that, perhaps, wish they could be forgotten. Tom acts as a kind of Prospero figure, standing on high and using hand motions to summon illumination upon scenes conjured for the audience to witness. It is easy to see why “The Glass Menagerie” is an American classic. You get bang for the buck on multiple levels. The many facets of this play will have you pondering it over and over, like Laura holding her glass creatures up to the light and turning them this way and that. With the play, Williams has transformed his own family life into a glass menagerie that the audience can take home and mull over whenever compelled to do so. The overarching theme of the play is that divorce from truth has its consequences. Trying to force people into lives too much at odds with their own nature distorts them. Something has to give. Either they break (if they are as brittle as glass) or they flee. “The Glass Menagerie” is not a Disney story with an ending where everybody wins. Neverthe-

less, it does its job. Amanda will no doubt be as much stuck in your head as she is in the heads of the characters in the play. The play serves as warning beacon. It gives its audience a means to step back and examine their own network of relationships. What sort of distortions have crept in? How much are your relationships and social ties based in reality? How many are healthy relationships? How many are propelled by habit, dependency and are gummed up with unrealistic expectations, illusions and unequal power dynamics? I always approach the works of the American masters like Williams, Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller with a little apprehension, expecting them to come across as musty old relics. I am generally wrong in this manner of approach. Plays by the above-mentioned playwrights are enduring classics for a reason. They maintain a timeless relevancy; they continue to work their magic. Lakewood Playhouse has done another good one here. “The Glass Menagerie” runs through March 11. For scheduling information and ticket prices visit lakewoodplayhouse.com or call (253) 588-0042.


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

TCC ORCHESTRA TO FEATURE WORKS BY AFRICAN AMERICAN COMPOSERS

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: TW

PICK

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”Got Opera?!—The Venture Beyond,” an installment of University of Puget Sound’s Jacobsen series of musical shows, will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 23, in Schneebeck Concert Hall. Four gifted vocalists will share a selection of wellbeloved songs from the worlds of both opera and musical theater. “Got Opera?!” will include arias from Mozart, Verdi, Donizetti, and Rossini, plus song favorites by Andrew Lloyd Webber, Leonard Bernstein, and Frank Wildhorn and Nan Knighton, among other works. The show features mezzosoprano Dawn Padula; soprano Christina Kowalski; baritone Ryan Bede; tenor Jesse Nordstrom and pianist Jinshil Yi. Tickets are $15 for general public. UPS students are free. For information, visit www.pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/events-calendar/ details/jacobsen-series-got-operathe-venture-beyond/2018-02-23.

Friday, Feb. 23 REAL ART TACOMA: Among Authors, Dirty Dirty, J. Martin, Dweller on the Hill (Indie, alt rock) 7 p.m., $7-$10 PHOTO COURTESY OF NSE EKPO

Dr. Nse Ekpo will be a guest conductor of Scott Joplin’s classical ragtime compositions when the TCC Orchestra performs works by a trio of African American composers on March 2.

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

The Tacoma Community College Orchestra, conducted by Dr. John Falskow and Dr. Nse Ekpo, is slated to perform a concert March 2 at 7:30 p.m. The program, featuring music by African-American composers, is called “American Expressions.” On the schedule for the evening are three of Scott Joplin’s ragtime compositions, from “The Red Back Book;” George Walker’s “Lyric for Strings” and Florence Price’s “Symphony No. 1.” Price is especially interesting. She was an African American composer who was based in Chicago. Born in Little Rock, Ark. in 1887, she died in 1953 and her music was largely neglected during her lifetime, though she did receive some national attention and some of her works were performed by the Chicago Symphony. In recent decades,

however, interest in Price’s compositions has gained recognition. Much of her work is being rediscovered – literally rediscovered. In 2009, a trove of her music was found in a derelict cottage that had been Price’s vacation home. During her lifetime, Price composed four full symphonies in addition to concertos and chamber music compositions. “Symphony No. 1,” which the TCC Orchestra will perform, has been described as possessing a “hypnotic stillness.” Price is said to have written “luminous” passages for wind instruments and to have had a special feel for the bassoon. (So to all my fellow bassoon aficionados, take note!) Joplin (1868-1917), the “King of Ragtime,” wrote 44 ragtime pieces, one ragtime ballet and two operas over the span of his career. Joplin refined the ragtime music of honky-tonk piano players and combined AfroAmerican music’s synco-

pation with 19th-century European romanticism to elevate the form. The real title of the Red Back Book is “Standard HighClass Rags,” published by the Stark Music Company of St. Louis around 1912. Among musicians, however, the popular name came from the red color of the front and back page. The book contains 15 “classical” rags in the collection. Walker, who is still with us, is the first African American composer to win the Pulitzer Prize for Music, which was awarded for “Lilacs” in 1996. “Lyric for Strings,” the piece to be played by the TCC Orchestra, was written in 1946 after the death of Walker’s grandmother. It was composed while Walker was a graduate student at the Curtis Institute of Music. After a brief introduction, the principal theme is stated by the first violins with imitations appearing in the other instruments. The linear nature of the material alternates with static moments of harmony. After the second of two climaxes, the work concludes with reposeful cadences that were presented earlier. “American Expressions” takes place Friday, March 2 at 7:30 p.m. at TCC Building 2 (close to South 12th and Mildred). Admission is free, but donations are accepted. For information call (253) 460-4374 or e-mail jfalskow@tacomacc.ed. TCC Music’s facebook page is www.facebook.com/tccmusic.

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS IS SEEKING AN

EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING

ALEGRE BAKERY AND GELATO: Erina McGann (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m. AIRPORT TAVERN: Island Vibes, Peacemaker Nation, Rhythm n Brown (island soul) 9 p.m., $7 DAWSONS: Mark Hurwitz and Gin Creek (rock) 9 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Groove City (dance tunes), 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: Noi!se, The Drowns, Cody Foster Army, Old Foals (rock) 9 p.m., $8-$12 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC PACIFIC BREWING: The Kareem Kandi Band (jazz) 7 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Showcase Concert (classical) 8 p.m. PANTAGES THEATER: Michael Feinstein (crooner tunes) 7:30 p.m. THE SWISS: The Hipsters (rock) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Luenell (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. TACOMA MUSICAL PLAYHOUSE: My Way (Sinatra tribute) 7:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: 0 Dark 30 (rock) 8 p.m. UNIVERSITY PLACE LIBRARY: Robyn Carmichael (classical piano) 7 p.m., $15 UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK HALL: Dawn Paula, Christina Kowalski, Ryan Bede, Jesse Nordstrom, Jinshil Yi (opera) 7:30 p.m., $10-$15 THE VALLEY: The Purrs, Sandy Grasdalen, Oldface (prog rock, psychedelic) 8 p.m.

Saturday, Feb. 24

THE SWISS: Open Mic Night (open mic) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bartlett on bass (jam) 7 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb. 27 PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Camas Wind Quintet (classical) 8 p.m., $10

DAWSON’S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH: Tacoma TotemAires Barbershop Chorus (barber shop) 7 p.m. METRONOME: Open Mic (open mic) 7 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: Counter/Balance, Sorrytown, Lakota Dorris, Something United (folk, indie) 7 p.m., $8-$10 ROCK THE DOCK: Bingo (it’s a game) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Blues Jam with Roger Williamson (blues) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz (trivia) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m., 18+, NC UNCLE SAM’S: SOB Band (jam) 7 p.m., NC WESTGATE TAVERN: Hole Dug Deep, Wayside, thoZZ guyZZ (rock) 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 28

AIRPORT TAVERN: Etchings, Wells, Silver Dollars (indie) 9 p.m., $5 EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Groove City (dance tunes), 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: Red Elvises, The Fun Police (rock) 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LEMAY CAR MUSEUM: HitExplosion, Junkyard Jane (rock) 8 p.m. NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE: The T-Town Aces (blues) 8 p.m., $7 PANTAGES THEATER: Duane Hulbert, Tacoma Concert Band (classical and popular) 7:30 p.m. PYTHIAN TEMPLE: Luminosity Orchestra (classical) 7 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: Marrowstone, Lo’ There, Newbrighton, Nacion De Humo, Save Bandit, Wanting (noise, punk, hardcore) 7 p.m., $7-$10 ROCK THE DOCK: Birthday Bash (rock) 8 p.m. THE SPAR: Tupelo (rock) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: 80s Invasion (80s music) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Luenell (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. TACOMA MUSICAL PLAYHOUSE: My Way (Sinatra tribute) 3 p.m., 7:30 p.m. TIPSY TOMATO: Cloneapalooza (rock) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Taken Chances (rock) 8 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 25 BETHANY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: Robyn Carmichael Piano Concert (classical) 2 p.m.

Tacoma Weekly News is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC will be a highly motivated self-starter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the abilJOHNNY’S DOCK: Maia Santell and the House Blend (rock, ity to develop new business and possess excellent time blues, R&B) 5 p.m. management skills. Additionally, they should be able to Friday 2/23 - Sun 2/25 manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold NEW FRONTIER: Electric Bluegrass, 4 p.m., NC calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, www.destinycityfilmfestival. RIALTO THEATER: Symphony Tacoma (classical) 7:30 p.m. presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaincom ing a high level of customer service to existing customers.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Monday, Feb. 26

DUNAGAN BREWING: McKasson and McDonald (Celtic) 8 p.m.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales Sun experience, 2/23 - Wedpref2/28 erably newspaper, online and special section experiCOCO ence. Must be self motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the publicatand adverNightly 7:00 pm tisers in a positive way. Attendance of community events, organizational skills, and attention to detail, RockyStarting Horrorsalary Picture Show negotiation and problem solving. depends on qualifications. Saturday @ 11:30 pm

THE SPAR: Billy Barner and King Kom Beaux (blues) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Country Music Jam (jam) 8:00 p.m. THE SWISS: Kareem Kandi World Orchestra (jazz) 5 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Tacoma’s Best Comics (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Final Notice with Bob Evans (country, rock, bluegrass) 7 p.m.

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Regency Jazz Ensemble (jazz) 8 p.m., $10 DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JOESEPPIS ITALIAN RISTORANTE: Robin Miller-Richardson (piano and vocals) 5:30 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Karaoke (hit & miss musicianship) 9 p.m. STONEGATE: The Blu Tonez (blues) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Open Mic (comedy) 8 p.m., NC UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (jam) 7 p.m., NC

Thursday, March 1 UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK CONCERT HALL: Heartland Marimba Quartet (marimba) 7:30 p.m., NC

THE AGAVES GRILL: Ed Taylor Band (jazz), 6 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC LA FONDITA MEXICAN RESTAURANT: Jim Meck (piano wizardry) 5 p.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Choral Invitational (jazz) 8 a.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Heather Lanners (classical piano) 8 p.m., $10 ROCK THE DOCK: Open Mic with Dustin (rock) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Power Rock Jam (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Rodney Sherwood (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m. THE VALLEY: Psycho 78, Some Kind of Nightmare, Acid Teeth, The Know Nothingz (punk) 8:30 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

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2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

Coming Events TOP PICK: WORDS IN ACTION Tues., Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m. Rialto Theater, 310 S. 9th St., Tacoma Interested in hearing from renowned voices on social justice? Join Ijeoma Oluo (“So You Want to Talk About Race”), Sonya Renee Taylor (“The Body is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love”), Jaclyn Friedman (“Unscrewed: Women, Sex, Power, and How to Stop Letting the System Screw Us All”) and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarsinha (“Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home”) for a conversation around race, sex, accessibility, gender identity and what it means to take action to create an equitable world. Accessibility: The theater is wheelchair accessible, with gender neutral restrooms and ASL and Spanish interpretation available. We ask that attendees avoid using artificial fragrances for the evening; scent-free seats available. Info: (253) 591-5894 or e-mail tickets@ broadwaycenter.org to request ASL interpretation seats and/or scent-free seats. ‘THE GLASS MENAGERIE’ Fri., Feb. 23, 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 24, 8 p.m. Sun., Feb. 25, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood Amanda Wingfield strives to give meaning and direction to her life and the lives of her children, though her methods are ineffective and irritating. Tom seeks escape in alcohol and the world of the movies and Laura, handicapped, has receded more and more into herself. The plot thickens when Tom invites a young friend to dinner with the family. A drama of great tenderness, charm and beauty, and one of the most famous plays of the modern theatre. A Lakewood Playhouse premier directed by South Sound theater veteran Michael O’Hara. Plays through March 11. Special showing 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 1 (pay what you can actors benefit). Ages: Suitable for all ages, but parental guidance is suggested. Price: $26 general; $23 military and seniors; $20 students/educators Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org; (253) 588-004 ‘MY WAY: A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA’ Fri., Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 24, 7:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 25, 2 p.m. CLOSING PERFORMANCE Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma The Voice. The Sultan of Swoon. The Chairman of the Board. Ol’ Blue Eyes. The Greatest Singer of the Popular Song. These are all nicknames for one of the greatest entertainers of the 20th century, a man whose career successes spanned more than 50 years, enjoying popularity with each successive generation. This is a musical tribute to the crooner, Grammy- and Academy-Award Winner, the one-and-only Frank Sinatra! “My Way,” “Fly Me to the Moon,” “I’ve Got the World on a String” and “New York, New York” are some of his greatest hits that will have you singing along! Legendary singer, actor, and producer Frank Sinatra was one of the best-selling musical artists of all time. Songs like “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Fly Me to the Moon” and “Strangers in the Night” still resonate with a crowd today. “My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra” is a tribute to the musical legend containing 56 songs, both iconic and lesser-known, that are sung by a spectacular cast of four men and four women in a jazz club setting.

Get ready to end the night singing, dancing and feeling grand after seeing “My Way!” Ages: This event is 21+. I.D.s will be checked at the door. Price: $25 per person (price includes TMP logo wine glass). Info: 253565-6867; www.tmp.org MICHAEL FEINSTEIN Fri., Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway Few artists capture the essence of pop music like Grammy-nominated vocalist, pianist and songwriter Michael Feinstein. Price: $39-$95. Ticket Info: (253) 591-5894; tickets.broadwaycenter.org OH MY GOSH – NOW WHAT? PART 4 Fri., Feb. 23, 12-1 p.m. Pierce County Annex, 2401 S. 35th St. Get the basics about Alzheimer’s (and other dementias), disease progression, providing care, legal issues, community resources and more. Ages: All. Price: Free; no RSVP required. Info: (253) 7984600; www.PierceADRC.org TOYTOPIA Fri., Feb. 23, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. What was your favorite childhood toy? A jump rope, a board game, or Space Invaders? Or was it an Easy Bake Oven or a Slinky? You’re sure to find your favorite toys in Toytopia. Ages: All ages welcome. Price: $14 adults; $11 seniors, military (with ID), youth/students; ages 0-5 free. Admission for Historical Society members is always free. Info: (253) 272-3500; washingtonhistory.org/visit/ wshm/exhibits/toytopia WHERE LEADERS ARE MADE Fri., Feb. 23, 12-1 p.m. The BeGe’s Toastmasters of Tacoma, 1101 Fawcett Ave. Whatever you feed will grow, come grow with us. Benefits of toastmasters: Gain confidence, communicate effectively, leadership skills, time management skills, become a great listener, speaking to inspire and giving positive and helpful feedback. We are a fun group, a safe place to learn and grow. Price: Free. Info: beges.toastmastersclubs.org DRIVE THE BLUES AWAY Sat., Feb. 24, 8-11 p.m. LeMay – America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Join us at America’s Car Museum for a night of live music, gourmet light bites and tastings from local craft distilleries, breweries and wineries, in addition to full

Museum access. Ages: 21+ Price: $35 - $65. Info: (253) 779-8490; americascarmuseum.org/event/drive-bluesaway/ EDIBLE GARDENS: CONTAINER GARDENING Sat., Feb. 24, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Metro Parks Tacoma, 4702 S. 19th St. Explore the basics of successful vegetable gardening in the Pacific Northwest from seed to table. These free monthly workshops are held at locations around Pierce County. Ages: All ages. May not be suitable for very young children. Price: Free, registration required. Info: (253) 798-4133; piercecountywa. org/ediblegardens THE GREATEST SHOWCASE AERIAL ARTS CIRCUS Sat., Feb. 24, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Athena Vertical Dance, 15 Commerce St. The show will start with a group act and performance by Mylo Precious and the Athena Vertical Dancers. We will follow that by showcasing silks, pole, lollipop and even some singing by the fabulous VonDeadly. Price: $10 (online), $15 (door). Info: (360) 621-5177; athenavert i c a ld a n c e . c o m / s t u d e n t showcase THE KAREEM KANDI BAND Sat., Feb. 24, 7-9 p.m. The Blue Octopus, 5111 Grand Loop Ste. 1A The band will consist of Kareem Kandi on saxophone and Michael Glynn on bass. Ages: 21+ Price: No cover. Info: (253) 226-0166; kareemkandi.com

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TACOMA’S BEST COMICS Sun., Feb. 25, 8-9:45 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. Every successful comedian started somewhere, just like Tacoma. We have so many funny comics right here in Tacoma and they perform nightly at bars, clubs, and theaters across the Pacific Northwest. Ages: 18+ Price: $5; $12 premium. Info: (253) 282-7203; tacomacomedyclub-com.seatengine. com//shows/73032

munity. Price: Free, must register. Info: (253) 798-6500; withinreachwa.org/events/ basic-food-education-forumsouth-sound/ THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW Mon., Feb. 26, 1-2 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Bible discussion – the Gospel according to Matthew led by Pastor Martin Yabroff. No background required. Open discussion and practical applications. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; saintandrewstacoma.org

‘42 GRAMS’ Sun., Feb. 25, 4:30-6 p.m. Blue Mouse Theatre, 2611 N Proctor St. “42 Grams” is an intimate portrait of how chef Jake Bickelhaupt evolved from running an illegal restaurant out of his home to being a culinary celebrity in less than a year and the toll it takes on his personal life. Price: Students $6 ($7.20 w/service fee); senior/military $7 ($8.24 w/service fee); general admission $9 ($10.31 w/service fee). Info: (253) 752-9500; facebook.com/ events/410176742737851

DROP-IN HELP WITH WORKSOURCE Mon., Feb. 26, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.; 2-4 p.m. Parkland/Spanaway Library, 13718 Pacific Ave. S. WorkSource employment experts help you with your specific questions about all things employment-related–resumes, unemployment claims, job coaching and interview prep. Ages: Adults. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5483304; piercecountylibrary. org/calendar TANTALIZING THAILAND WITH SARAH Mon., Feb. 26, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S. Architect turned professional tour guide Sarah Murdoch will give a talk on her newest area of expertise, that of the fascinating land of Thailand. Ages: All ages. Price: $15. Info: (253) 241-4166; plu. edu/liferoadscholar

BASIC FOOD EDUCATION FORUM Mon., Feb. 26, 9-11 a.m. County Health Department, 3629 S. D St. The Basic Food Education Forum (BFEF) is a platform for agencies assisting clients with the basic food (food stamps) program to meet and network about common issues and strategies to promote basic foods and learn about other food security efforts in the com-

A V F O S S W A T E R W A Y S W N K J R

R R E F M M K V L S A V M H G A O P S A

W R O V I A X F A S K S D C J R U G Q H

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We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

HISTORIC OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH Sun., Feb. 25, 10-11 a.m.; 5-5:45 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s oldest church and building – historic “Old St. Peter’s Church” (1873) – warmly invites you to traditional Anglican/Episcopal worship. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 2724406; oldstpeters.org CREATING THE HABIT OF INNER PEACE Sun., Feb. 25, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Meditate in Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave. S., Ste. #301 In this course, we will see for ourselves that by relying upon the tranquility of our mind we can experience boundless inner peace. Ages: All ages. Price: Class fee is $20, reduced pricing for members, seniors, unemployed and students. Everyone is welcome. Info: (360) 754-7787; meditateinolympia.org/peacemind-tacoma

GLASS MENAGERIE How many words can you make out of this phrase?

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.


Friday, February 23, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7

Classifieds

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PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record for achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

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Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

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REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be a self-motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Be willing to attend community events, have organizational skills and attention to detail with negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 23, 2018

Notices Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 02272018 Auction 01302018 Date 01/30/2018 02/27/2018 Sign in & View @ 1NOON pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

Notices

Volunteers WANTED: PIANO PLAYER

NO. PUY-CS-CS-2017-0044 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON Shelia Pelt

Petitioner,

v. Galen Yallup Jr.

Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 3/1/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

TO: Leanne Krewson Case Style: Re: K.,M Case Number: PUY-PC-CV-2017-0108 Nature of Case: Per Capita YOU ARE HEREBY summoned to appear and respond to the Civil Complaint/Petition filed by the above named Petitioner in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, located at 1451 E 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for April 4, 2018 at 9:45 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated January 24, 2018 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585 IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, DAVID, Petitioner, vs. WILLIAMS JR, DAVID, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0141 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: DAVID WILLIAMS JR. (Respondent)

TO: Leanne Krewson

YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2018 at 2:30 p.m.., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED February 1, 2018

Case Style: Re: K.,A

Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

A(n) Initial Hearing is scheduled at the above-named Court on April 10th, 2018, at 10:00 AM You must respond in writing to the civil complaint/ petition within twenty (20) days after the date of the first publication of this summons. You must serve a copy of your written answer on the Petitioner and file with this Court an affidavit of service. Failure to file a written response may result in a default judgment entered against you. The parties have the right to legal representation at their own expense and effort. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. Copies of the Civil Complaint/Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

Case Number: PUY-PC-CV-2017-0109 Nature of Case: Per Capita YOU ARE HEREBY summoned to appear and respond to the Civil Complaint/Petition filed by the above named Petitioner in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, located at 1451 E 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404. A(n) Initial Hearing is scheduled at the abovenamed Court on April 10th, 2018, at 10:00 AM You must respond in writing to the civil complaint/petition within twenty (20) days after the date of the first publication of this summons. You must serve a copy of your written answer on the Petitioner and file with this Court an affidavit of service. Failure to file a written response may result in a default judgment entered against you. The parties have the right to legal representation at their own expense and effort. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. Copies of the Civil Complaint/Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585. TO: Leanne Krewson Case Style: Re: M-K.,A Case Number: PUY-PC-CV-2017-0110 Nature of Case: Per Capita YOU ARE HEREBY summoned to appear and respond to the Civil Complaint/Petition filed by the above named Petitioner in the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians on the Puyallup Indian Reservation, located at 1451 E 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404.

IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, RITA, Petitioner, vs. YOUNG, DONALD, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0142 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: DONALD A. YOUNG. (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2018 at 1:30 p.m.., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED January 9, 2018 Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

Tacoma Banjo club is looking for a piano player to play 20’s 30’s & 40’s Music. This is a very rewarding and fun activity for a person. The group performs at retirement centers, puyallup fair, private events, senior care centers. This is a volunteer position. We have about 20 Banjo players and two piano players that share performances. If you are interested to be apart of this great and fun group please contact Gary Hauenstein at 253 686 2413.

THE FIFE MILTON FOOD BANK WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE COMMUNITY FOR ITS SUPPORT IN 2017. LOCAL BUSINESSES, SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, AND INDIVIDUALS CONTRIBUTED A LARGE AMOUNT OF FOOD PLUS OVER $24,000 WHICH ALLOWED US TO PROVIDE FOOD TO MORE THAN 1,900 FAMILIES (7,300 CLIENTS) WITH OVER 129,000 POUNDS OF FOOD. WE HAVE 54 VOLUNTEERS WHO LOGGED MORE THAN 4,000 HOURS THIS YEAR. THE FOOD BANK IS SPONSORED BY ST. MARTIN OF TOURS CHURCH AND IS LOCATED BEHIND THE CHURCH (2303 54TH AVE. E., FIFE). Volunteer to help an Isolated Elder Make a difference in someone’s life! Senior Companions and Senior Friends are volunteers whose friendship helps seniors maintain their independence through regular visits and assistance with errands. Senior Companion volunteers must be 55+, low-income and serve 15 hrs/week to receive a tax free stipend. Senior Friend volunteers must be 18+ and serve 2 hrs/ month – no stipend. Eligible volunteers will pass a background check and attend training before being matched with an elder needing your help. Call Sarah (253-722-5686) or Linda (253-722-5691) at Lutheran Community Services for more information & an application VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 798-3789 or Email Kgavron@co.pierce. wa.us. Or visit www. co.pierce.wa.us/index. aspx?NID=1302 Wanted: Volunteers for groceries.

The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come vol-

unteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740. City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife. org/getinvolved. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto w w w. c h i f r a n c i s c a n . org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253538-4649 #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks

Volunteers for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/ Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

Help hard-working families

by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org.

Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver

Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433 Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253-212-2778. Help furnish hope to those in need!

NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.” Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

South Sound Outreach

is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach.org.

Make a difference in the life of a child!

The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma. org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks. com or 253.305.1025.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute

meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253536-4494

Be a Big Brother!

Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT “MEMORY COMMUNITY”

What It Is: We are Memory Community (a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: • helps our senior citizens tell their stories • connects the young and the old • increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are • honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories • All seniors are welcome to volunteer for filming their story! • At most two days of work during daytime – Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day 2: filming, ideally wrapped within half a day What we’d like you to talk about in the film: Use 10 minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ memorycommunity.org Or call Deyung at 360-850-9850 for scheduling a meeting. The filming is free, but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.

Knitters and Crocheters

Loving Hearts is a charitable knitting and crocheting group comprised of community volunteers. We make hats for chemo patients and the backpack program for children, baby items, blankets, wheelchair/walker bags and fingerless gloves for Veterans. We meet in Gig Harbor on the second Tuesday of each month from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. and again on third Wednesday from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Located at the WayPoint Church, 12719 134th Ave KPN, Gig Harbor, WA 98329. We also have a Fife meeting on the third Thursday of the month from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Ardena Gale Mobile Park, 4821 70th Ave East, Fife. For more information please email Cynthia at lovingheartsonkp@aol. com or call Virginia at 253884-9619.

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to: Tacoma Weekly

304 Puyallup Ave.,#1 Tacoma WA 98421

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A(n) Initial Hearing is scheduled at the abovenamed Court on April 10th, 2018, at 10:00 AM You must respond in writing to the civil complaint/petition within twenty (20) days after the date of the first publication of this summons. You must serve a copy of your written answer on the Petitioner and file with this Court an affidavit of service. Failure to file a written response may result in a default judgment entered against you. The parties have the right to legal representation at their own expense and effort. This Court has a list of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to practice in this Court. Copies of the Civil Complaint/Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

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Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Mail or bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

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