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FREE • Friday, February 17, 2017

QUEENS OF THE COURT

A10

WEEKLY REWIND

B2

TACOMA SYMPHONY

B1

.com TACOMAWEEKLY YO U R CO M M U N I T Y NE W S PA P E R - 29 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E

MAYOR ANNOUNCES CALL FOR BUSINESS, EDUCATOR SUMMIT ON JOB CREATION

STRICKLAND'S STATE OF THE CITY ADDRESS HIGHLIGHTS ACHIEVEMENTS, CALLS FOR PARTNERSHIPS

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

OUTLOOK. (Left) Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland gave her final State of the City address with a call for workplace training initiative. (Middle) Travel Tacoma President Bennish Brown highlights the fact that tourism spending topped $1 billion last year and will continue to grow in 2017. (Right) The Lincoln High School Drumline kicked off the State of the City address. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

T

acoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland gave her final State of the City address to a capacity crowd of about 250 people at the Hotel Murano last week with a message of improvements in the city since she

became mayor in 2010 and a forecast of things to come this year under the theme of “Educate. Connect. Prosper.” The mayor is leaving office at the end of the year with a city much different than the one she started with two terms ago. The unemployment rate was 12 percent, the high school graduation rate was 55 percent and the city's financial picture was described by bond-raters as "stable,”

THE PEOPLE'S GATHERING: A REVOLUTION OF CONSCIOUSNESS

CONFERENCE AT PLU FOCUSES ON HOW TO HAVE PRODUCTIVE CONVERSATIONS ABOUT RACE AND EQUITY

Strickland said of Tacoma when she took office in 2010. In contrast to now, the jobless rate is 6 percent and the graduation rate from public schools is 85 percent, above the state average and continuing to climb. In addition, credit bureaus now give the city's budget a rating of "positive." “We are going in the right direction," she said. "There are opportunities now that were not available just a few years

ago.” The mayor hopes to build on those opportunities during a summit this spring that will include educators, businesses and community partners to develop ways the better match workers with the local workforce as a way to improve wages and slow the leaching of talent to Seattle by boosting the local job market, particularly

u See STATE OF THE CITY / page A9

SHELBIE BOYD CRUISES TACOMA'S EASTSIDE WITH A BADGE AND HEART

BEACH

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

KEEPERS. Volunteers with the

South Sound Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation spent a few hours on Saturday cleaning up trash along the shoreline of Jack Hyde Park. The group found no dead birds that day. PHOTO COURTESY OF SHELBIE BOYD

KEYNOTE. Robin DiAngelo, Ph.D., director of Equity for Sound Generations,

Patrolwoman Shelbie Boyd with a dog rescued from a trash bag as a pup.

Seattle/King County and a consultant and trainer for more than 20 years on issues of racial and social justice, will be one of the guest speakers at The People's Gathering: A Revolution of Consciousness.

larry@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY JOHN FROSCHAUER

By Zach Powers PLU Marketing & Communications

Genesis Housing and Community Development Coalition will host a professional development conference called The People’s Gathering on the campus of Pacific Lutheran University on Friday, February 24. The full-day conference will focus on skills and strategies to facilitate difficult conversations around race in workplace and educational settings. Headlined by four nationally-known speakers (listed with bios below) with expertise in diversity, racial equity and multicultural education, The People’s Gathering will seek to help attendees increase their personal and professional

By Larry LaRue

INVESTIGATION OF GULL DEATHS ON TIDEFLATS CONTINUES By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

cultural competency. “Our goal is to bring company leaders, employees and student leaders together to create a supportive space in which participants can engage in honest and open dialogue about race and racial disparities that are systemically present in work, school and everyday life,” said Genesis Housing and Community Development Coalition President Toney Montgomery. The conference will balance lessons from the featured speakers with breakout sessions in small groups. “We hope to increase cultural understanding and respect in the community through a unique and engaging learning experience that will expand professional

Shelbie Boyd was driving through the eastside of Tacoma recently and saw a young man alone on a park bench. Something about his body language told her he was in trouble. Boyd pulled over, got out of her car and started chatting with him. “We talked for a while and he said he was depressed. He and his girlfriend had broken up,” Boyd said. “We kept talking, and it turned out they'd lost a baby. I couldn't do anything for him but listen, but maybe having a cop listen

Early laboratory results suggest that whatever killed sea gulls along the Tacoma waterfront last month likely isn’t harmful to people, but more tests are underway to determine the source of the die-off of upward of 80 seagulls. “Based on what we know so far, water pollution or contamination is highly unlikely and there is little or no risk to human health,” said Dr. Katie Haman, a veterinarian for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, which is investigating the incident. Haman reported that initial results showed inflammation of the intestine and liver, but bacteria could not be cultured from those lesions, making it difficult to determine the cause. Initial lab work further ruled out avian influenza virus and avian cholera, and standard screening at wildlife rehabilitation centers ruled

u See GATHERING / page A7

u See BOYD / page A9

u See TIDEFLATS / page A9 FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly

TACOMA TEAMS ROLL

A12 IT'S JUST BUSINESS

The Veterans Incubator for Better Entrepreneurship at University of Washington-Tacoma has launched its first ever business plan competition. PAGE A8

URBAN HIKING

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Pothole Pig .................A2 Crime Stoppers...........A3

JUNKYARD JANE ANNIVERSARY

B5

Sports ........................A10 Hot Tickets ................A11

TWITTER: @TacomaWeekly TUMBLR: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com PINTEREST: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly FLICKR: flickr.com/tacomaweekly

A&E ....................... ....B3 Make A Scene ............B5

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Calendar .................B6 Word Search ...........B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 17, 2017

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

Someone knows something. We were hopeful that recent sightings of Percival, our beloved Pothole Pig, meant that he was on his way home to his loving family and friends. But those sightings have stopped and all possible clues have led to dead ends. He has not been seen in three weeks after a flurry of sightings. Keep him in your thoughts.

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Bulletin Board TITLOW PARK SHORELINE RESTORATION JUST ABOUT COMPLETE A $597,000 project to restore the shoreline, improve fish and wildlife habitat and expand the public recreation area at Titlow Park is nearly done and visitors have more room to explore via the adjacent Hidden Beach trail. The nonprofit South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group spearheaded the project, which entailed demolition of a vacant beach house and removal of contaminated soils so the area can be returned to a natural state. What was informally known as Kay’s house was located near the south end of the trail, north of Steamers Seafood Café. The single-story house was once the home of a Titlow Park caretaker and his wife. Late last year, a contractor razed the house, its garage, an attached boathouse, a bulkhead, and took out an underground septic system and storage tanks. Additionally, soil contaminated by airborne pollutants from the former Asarco copper smelter in Ruston was removed from the site. The house also contained harmful asbestos components. The embankment where the house stood has been reshaped to a more natural slope. The plan is to stabilize it with native plants as soon as weather permits, said Mary Anderson, Metro Parks natural resources manager. And while visitors are encouraged to explore the area, they’re also asked to be mindful of the fencing that will be installed to protect the bank as new vegetation takes hold. Eventually, a split-rail fence will replace orange safety barriers. In 1969, Metro Parks Tacoma acquired the house, which has been vacant since 2004. One of the conditions of the acquisition was that its occupants, James and Kay Irwin, be allowed to reside there as long as they lived. The house removal project is part of Metro Parks’ 2010 Titlow Park master plan. Besides demolition, the plan calls for eventual creation of a picnic meadow and viewing deck on the site. This project did not include funds for those future improvements, but additional positive changes regarding Titlow Park will be announced by Metro Parks soon. The South Sound Salmon Enhancement Group received money for the project from the federal Environmental Protection Agency, by way of the Puget Sound Marine and Nearshore Grant Program, administered by the state Recreation and Conservation Office. Metro Parks contributed $75,000 derived from capital improvement bonds approved by voters in 2014. For more information, go to metroparkstacoma.org. CITY PARTNERS WITH URBAN LEAGUE FOR WORKSHOP The City of Tacoma’s Community and Economic Development Department has partnered with Tacoma Urban League to host a free three-hour workshop designed to educate community members on how to build wealth for themselves or their family through real estate. The workshop, “Let’s Build Wealth: A Real Estate Workshop,” is scheduled to take place on March 25 from 9 a.m. to noon at Tacoma Urban League (2550 S. Yakima Ave. in Tacoma). Diverse community members ages 18-35 are encouraged to attend. “Tacoma’s housing market is sizzling right now,” said Community and Economic Development Director Ricard Noguera. “Whether you’re looking into real estate as a profession, or one of many revenue streams, you won’t want to miss this exciting, non-traditional workshop.” Community and Economic Development staff will be present, along with guest presenters from Onpoint Real Estate Services. Community members interested in attending should RSVP to India Adams at iadams@ cityoftacoma.org or (253) 591-5142 to reserve their spots. CITY RECOGNIZED BY GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS The Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting has been awarded to the City of Tacoma by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) of the United States and Canada for its comprehensive annual financial report. “This reflects the City of Tacoma’s continued commitment to sound financial practices and transparency,” said Finance Director Andy Cherullo. The City’s comprehensive annual financial report was judged by an impartial panel to meet the GFOA of the United States’ standards, which include a demonstrated constructive “spirit of full disclosure” clearly communicating the City’s financial story and motivating potential users and user groups to read it. “The City works diligently to implement the best practices provided by the GFOA to ensure that the City continues to meet the standards to achieve this certification,” said Assistant Finance Director and Controller Susan Calderon. The GFOA of the United States is a nonprofit professional association serving approximately 17,500 government finance professionals with offices in Chicago and Washington.

GRAND CINEMA PRESENTS FILM AWARDS PARTY 2016 offered an incredible selection of films and once again, The Grand Cinema proudly invites movie lovers to celebrate the year’s acclaimed films at our annual Film Awards Party Sunday, Feb. 26 at the Theatre on the Square in Tacoma, WA. Doors to the party open at 4:30 p.m. and Oscar coverage begins at 5 p.m. This year The Grand is also inviting the community to join us through Facebook Live as a group of early-rising staff watch and react to the 2017 Live Oscar Nominations as they are announced by The Academy January 24 at 5:30 a.m. We’ll be giving away a pair of party tickets at random to one lucky person for joining us in theater or tuning in and leaving a comment during our Live reaction broadcast. Can’t get up that early? Catch up on our Facebook page whenever you’d like! Each year, The Grand Cinema rolls out the red carpet to create an interactive celebration of the best in film, and this year we continue the tradition with a live broadcast of the 89th annual Academy Awards hosted by Jimmy Kimmel and presented live on screen in Tacoma with local emcees, a costume contest, raffle prizes, silent auction, Oscars predictions contest (the winner will receive a Golden Ticket good for free movie admission for one person for a year), and more. Local restaurants will provide food for purchase, and beer, wine, and a signature cocktail from En Rama will be available at a no-host bar. Guests are also encouraged to dress festively or as their favorite character from one of the 2017 Oscar nominated films for a chance to win a cash prize in the audience choice costume contest. VIP Film Awards Party guests enjoy an exclusive Oscars viewing area in Theatre on the Square’s Studio II with a fully catered dinner from Europa Bistro. VIP guests enjoy full event access and may come and go as they please between the VIP and General Admission areas. General Admission tickets are $25 and include event entry. VIP tickets are now sold out, and there are a limited number of General Admission tickets remaining. Discounts are available for Grand Members. This event has sold out in the past several years, and those who want to attend are encouraged to reserve tickets early. VIP tickets are limited and tend to sell weeks in advance of the general admission section. Although we’ll be watching the Oscars on the big screen, this event is not sponsored by or affiliated with The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Special thanks to our sponsors who helped make this event possible: Tacoma Arts Commission, Stadium Thriftway, and Sudar Appraisals. Theatre on the Square is located at 915 Broadway, Tacoma, WA, 98402. Tickets to The Grand Cinema’s Film Awards Party are on sale now and are available at The Grand’s Box Office (606 S Fawcett Ave, Tacoma 98402), online at www. grandcinema.com, or by calling (253) 593-4474. JUNIOR LEAGUE OF TACOMA TO CELEBRATE WOMEN LEADERS The Junior League of Tacoma will host its 7th Annual Women in Leadership Panel on Tuesday, Feb. 21 from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Court House Square (1102 A St., #438, Tacoma). The event brings together six local women leaders who will share their path to leadership including challenges, sacrifices and successes to inspire all women in the community to follow their dreams. This year’s panelists include:

• Clemencia Castro-Woolery, Attorney, Ledger Square Law, P.S.

• Joanna Monroe, Vice President, Deputy General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer, True Blue

• Carla Santorno, Superintendent, Tacoma Public Schools

• Lynnae Schneller, Franchise Owner, Chick-fil-A at 38th and Steele

• Louise S. Tieman, President & CEO, World Trade Center Tacoma

• Kim Wyman, Secretary of State, State of Washington The Women in Leadership Panel is free and open to all members of the community and is sponsored by Patriot Fire Protection, Aesthetica Clinique, Commencement Bay Guardianship Services and Balsam Law, and Fournier Insurance Solutions. To RSVP or to learn more visit http://bit.ly/2j6TYzW.

LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE HOLDS PREVIEW PARTY The Lakewood Playhouse is having a party to announce and preview the theater’s upcoming 79th season of shows and you are invited. Doors open and silent auction begins at 6 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26. The preview party kicks into high gear at 6 p.m. Come and enjoy a very special night as Lakewood Playhouse announces the six shows and two bonus shows SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A3

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Friday, February 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

DEPUTIES ON THE LOOKOUT FOR SEX OFFENDER By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Pierce County Sheriff's deputies need your help to find sex offender Edward Butler. The 58-year-old has warrants for domestic violence assault in the DAVID ROSE fourth degree and violation of a domestic violence no contact protection order. Butler is also wanted for failure to register as a Level II sex offender. Detectives say he registers as homeless and was last known to be homeless in Ashford, Wash. “One of the problems with people when they don't register, or when they register as transient, is that it’s

hard to tell where they're at to begin with. That's why they're required to come in bi-weekly or once a month to register. Some of the times when they go off the grid, it's because they're somewhere where they know they're not supposed to be and that's why they don't register, and that's why it makes it even more important to get these guys caught,” said Det. Ed Troyer. Butler was convicted in Alaska of two counts of sexual abuse of a minor in the second degree in 2009 and two counts of indecent exposure in the first degree in 2005. He is 5-feet 11-inches tall, 165 pounds with gray hair and hazel eyes. Call Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County at 1 (800) 222-TIPS if you know where deputies can locate him. There is a cash reward of up to

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2 of next season. It’s a huge evening of fun, prizes and two songs from next season’s musicals, performed by returning cast members from this season’s smash hit musical “The Rocky Horror Show.” This celebration will also be the start of a new tradition – an annual fundraiser for the Playhouse. A special gathering with a 50/50 raffle, wine, punch, door prizes, a silent and live auction and much, much more, including light appetizers provided by Carr’s Restaurant and Catering. All proceeds from ticket sales will go to benefit Lakewood Playhouse’s annual “Friends Fund” and help the theater eliminate the remaining balance of its heating and air conditioning system loan, eliminate all debt and lay the groundwork for a future capital campaign to expand the theatre to a include a new lobby with even more restrooms. Ticket prices are $25 and includes appetizers and apple cider, $50 and includes appetizers, apple cider and a glass of wine for adults, $75 and includes appetizers, apple cider and two glasses of wine for adults and a limited number of VIP tables which seat six each and include a souvenir glass, light appetizers and two bottles of wine. There are only five tables left and these are going very quickly. Tickets and VIP tables are available online at www. lakewoodplayhouse.org or can be purchased by calling the box office at (253) 588-0042.

FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW FEATURES BREATHTAKING DISPLAYS Major display gardens spotlight “Taste of Spring” show theme celebrating festive “plant, grow and eat” elements. Father Nature Landscapes, located in Tacoma, will create one of over 20 spectacular display gardens at

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the Northwest Flower & Garden Show Feb. 22-26 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. Father Nature Landscapes joins the line-up of top landscape design professionals creating colorful gardens embracing the show’s 2017 theme, “Taste of Spring.” The idea generating gardens will celebrate culinary trends, urban gardening, home entertainment and sustainability. Each garden requires months of planning, created in the Convention Center over a three-day period using a wide range of blooming flowers and other plants, hardscape materials, custom artwork and more. With its blooming gardens big and small, the nation’s second largest flower and garden event will boast a big line-up of attractions, 110 free seminars, small space gardening displays at “City Living,” shopping for diverse and unusual products in the Marketplace, the new “Tasting Corner” spotlighting artisan food products, and much more. New this year, the show is introducing round-trip shuttle transportation services with convenient pick-up locations in Shoreline, Kirkland, Issaquah and Federal Way to the Washington State Convention Center. Provided by Starline Coaches, round-trip tickets are $22 and can be purchased online through the show’s website at www. gardenshow.com. Northwest Flower & Garden Show dates, hours and sponsors: Dates and hours are Wednesday through Saturday (Feb. 22-25), 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sunday (Feb. 26), 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. “Early Bird” tickets are now available for purchase on the show’s website for $17 (adult), regularly $22 during the week of the show or at the door. Tickets are $5 for youth (ages 13-17), and children 12 and under are admitted free to the show. Discounted tickets are also offered for groups, and multi-day passes are available. Visit www.gardenshow.com for ticket purchases, additional ticket pricing, and more information on the show.

WASTE CONNECTIONS, INC. SPECIAL OLYMPICS WASHINGTON POLAR PLUNGE PRESENTED BY FRED MEYER

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH AT OWEN BEACH Registration opens at 10am Costume Contest/Awards at 11:00am Plunge at Noon, Festival to follow Take a dip in the ice waters across Washington State and be a part of the “coolest” event of the year! Join the fun, help raise funds and win prizes all in support of Special Olympics Washington. Special Olympics Polar Plunge Series is a fundraising effort organized by law enforcement agencies across the state to benefit Special Olympics Washington. This unique opportunity gives individuals, organizations and businesses the chance to support Special Olympics Washington by collecting pledges for the “opportunity” to plunge into frigid water across Washington State.

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 17, 2017

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon. 

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

PARTNERING TO ENHANCE LOCAL TRANSPORTATION Partnering with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation over the past seven years, the Tribe has spent more than $40 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the region’s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting and safety improvements to bridges and reconstruction projects, providing hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like. Examples of the Tribe’s expenditures over the past seven years to completed and ongoing projects include: 30TH STREET SAFETY PROJECT, TACOMA Paving, lighting, ADA access, replacement of sidewalks on both sides of 30th Avenue from Portland Avenue to R Street, and one side of 31st Avenue, including relocation

of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed spring of 2013. 31ST STREET REHABILITATION PROJECT, TACOMA 31st Street was a failed road that has received repavement, curb and stormwater facilities, street trees, and relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed in summer 2015. EAST ROOSEVELT/EAST WRIGHT STREET IMPROVEMENTS & MAINTENANCE WORK The Tribe committed $15,000 to replace a failing section of Roosevelt that was important for access to the Tribal Health Clinic. A new asphalt overlay was applied, alongside curb improvements and alleyway paving. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & COLLABORATION WITH STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS I-5 HOV Project, Tacoma and Fife: Tribal staff has

worked with WSDOT regarding HOV improvements on I-5. East Side Community Projects: Tribal staff is working with the City of Tacoma with respect to long-range transportation planning involving several city streets.  Additional Transportation Planning and Administration: Tribal staff works in collaboration with a number of federal, state and local government agencies to plan and administer transportation projects in the region. Inspection Services: The Puyallup Tribe pays for City of Tacoma inspectors for road project oversight; fees to exceed $100,000. Port of Tacoma Emergency Response ITS Study: The Puyallup Tribe has committed $75,000 to partner with the City of Tacoma, Port of Tacoma, and local port businesses to study emergency vehicle response in the Port of Tacoma tide flats area to address safety concerns and increase local police & fire response.

TRIBE, WSDOT PARTNER TO IMPROVE TRANSPORTATION AND SAFETY In keeping with their mutual agreement reached in 2014, the Puyallup Tribe and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) continue to partner on WSDOT’s HOV construction project on Interstate 5 on the Puyallup Indian Reservation. The agreement provides that work will be conducted in a manner respectful of the Tribe’s lands and treaty rights. For example, in late 2015 WSDOT crews focused on several excavation activities with the Tribe’s archaeological monitors present during the work. The agreement further conveys several parcels of land to the Tribe to offset the lost use of lands on which the Tribe has given WSDOT easements for the project. A right of first refusal gives the Tribe an opportunity to purchase additional lands. The agreement deals particularly with replacement of Interstate 5 bridges across the Puyallup River, as the bridges are more than 50 years old and would not withstand the impact of a serious earthquake. The new bridges will provide a much greater degree of safety in such an event, and the HOV lanes will improve transportation significantly in the area. In addition to providing room for one HOV lane on this portion of I-5, as part of this project WSDOT will also rebuild the northbound I-5 Puyallup River Bridge to make it straighter and wider than the existing bridge; improve the I-5/Portland Avenue interchange; and repave all the lanes of northbound I-5 within the project limits. Construction of the first bridge shafts for the new northbound I-5 bridge over the river has started near State Route 167, and work on the new ramp bridge from northbound I-5 to SR 167 is also progressing. Part of the agreement is to protect the fishery habitat and resource and to preserve Tribal members’ opportunity

to fish, a right guaranteed by the Treaty of Medicine Creek. To accomplish those goals, WSDOT has focused its work in the Puyallup River at times other than fishing season and fish migration periods. The work will use construction methods that minimize impact on the resource. With the project to rebuild the bridge will come in-water work in the Puyallup River that WSDOT is keeing tribal fishermen informed of. This work includes monitoring equipment for water quality to be placed in the water to meet water quality standards for the river established by the Tribe and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The placement of floating booms will outline an 80-foot channel for boats and behind the booms temporary work platforms will be constructed on both sides of the river. Isolation casings for the in-water bridge piers will also be installed. STATE ROUTE 167 In 2015, Gov. Jay Inslee formally signed a transportation package that will flow $16.2 billion toward roads and transportation routes around the state for the next 16 years. On the roster of projects slated for those dollars is the final leg of State Route 167 that would provide a roadway between the distribution and warehouse hubs of Kent and Auburn to Port of Tacoma waters. The Tribe is working with the state and other partners to ensure that the project remains a top priority and again remains respectful of the Tribe’s lands and treaty rights. The funding package includes $1.85 billion to continue the SR 167 roadway, which currently ends just short of the waterway. The roadway had been first pondered back in the 1970s. Construction started in the 1980s only to stall ever since. It was called a “top priority” for lawmakers for the last generation only to go unfunded year after year

A computer-enhanced image of what I-5 will look like after the new northbound bridge is complete. Note that both northbound and southbound I-5 traffic will temporarily be shifted onto the new northbound bridge while crews demolish and rebuild the southbound bridge.

for the last 25 years. The Tribe, Port officials, business groups and transportation boosters have lobbied for the roadway as a way for the state to be competitive for international shipping traffic, which could avoid transportation delays found through the Puget Sound by routing cargo through Canadian ports and eventually route larger ships through the Panama Canal. Washington is the most tradedependent state in the nation, with 40 percent of jobs related to international trade. Pierce County is the most trade-dependent county in the state, so any threat to that industry raises alarms for businesses and lawmakers alike. The project will receive $2.5 million between now and 2017 and then ramp up to a peak of $395 million between 2021 and 2023 during the main construction period with a final $200 million between 2029 and 2031 to finalize the work. Washington State Department of Transportation estimates a completed SR 167 could fuel job growth to the tune of $10.1 billion.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, February 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

54TH AVENUE CROSSING REMAINS A DIVIDER BETWEEN CITY, TRIBE By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The Fife City Council and Puyallup Tribe remain at odds over the best way to reopen a railroad crossing along 54th Avenue that was closed in 1999, following an agreement in 1997 between the city and the Fife School District that led to the construction of Columbia Junior High School. The settlement required landscaping and other features to be added. That landscaping was never completed, so the state and the railroad consider the crossing technically still open. The guard arms and lights still flash when a train comes along the tracks some 16 times a day, but the tracks themselves are blocked to pedestrian traffic by a chain link fence. Since the crossing is treated on state and railroad ledgers as being open, a state review to remove the fence that blocks the crossing is not required. But this is where the complicated issues gets downright surreal. Union Pacific railroad officials have acknowledged they have no authority to block the city from removing the fence and allowing traffic to flow over the 54th Avenue crossing. But UP argues that safety improvements, such as sidewalks, would be needed to meet current safety standards. The addition of a sidewalk or other safety improvements, however, would trigger a crossing change review by Washington Utilities and Transportation. UP is on record as saying the railroad would then oppose the addition of sidewalks as a way to keep cars from crossing the tracks at a crossing that is technically open. The city has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on consultants to design underpasses and overpasses at the crossing, options that would cost between $2 million for an at-grade opening with a sidewalk to upward of $50 million for the construction of a two-lane underpass alongside a pedestrian walkway, separated bike lane and roundabouts at Radiance Boulevard and David Court. The at-grade crossing is the least expensive and seemingly most logical, but having an at-grade crossing would violate the city’s agreement with the school district, which worries about student safety at the crossing as well as the possibility of a derailment caused by a car-versus-train accident at the crossing.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

The crossing at 54th Avenue has divided the city of Fife in more ways than just geographically.

An accident there could result in rail cars being derailed onto the junior high school grounds. The at-grade option would also face tough challenges from the railroad and the Washington State Utility and Transportation Commission. The Union Pacific Railroad has had plans on its project lists for decades to add a second track in the area to stage train cars but has not acted on those plans. The crossing has divided Fife geographically ever since it was fenced off and has become increasingly important to cross-city traffic because the former prairie and farmland has now been developed into planned communities, businesses and community services. One of those additions is the Puyallup Tribe’s youth center. The only ways to cross from the south side of Fife to the rest of the city are at Frank Albert Road, 70th Avenue and Freeman Road, since the 54th Avenue railroad crossing remains blocked with an emergency-vehicle-only gate. The growth of homes and businesses on the south side of the tracks has brought many tribal and nontribal people in the neighborhood to call for it to be opened to car traffic. The city had filed plans to open the at-grade crossing in 2009 only to withdraw the application after railroad and state regulators first voiced their concerns. The

railroad has since been given the greenlight by state officials to build a siding track in the area that will extend through the 54th Avenue crossing and mean more train cars will flow over the tracks. That makes an atgrade crossing even less likely because of safety concerns surrounding derailments. That stumbling block prompted the city to look at ideas for an over or underpass before settling on an underpass at 54th Avenue as the best option at a cost of about $24 million. The building of an underpass would likely take years and still not include access for walkers or bike riders, so the city began pondering pedestrian bridge routes as a way to get a crossing sooner rather than later. A pedestrian bridge could be paid for through bonds, partnerships and grants if the city, school and tribe could agree on a plan. “To resolve issues of mutual interest you have to start talking,” City Manager Subir Mukerjee said. “That is an issue we need to work on.” Members of the Fife City Council and the Puyallup Tribal Council are planning to meet sometime in March to discuss a host of issues, including 54th Avenue crossing options. “Several years ago, the tribe did develop a plan to open 54th which met all safety concerns and used tribal

dollars,” stated a letter from Tribal Chairman Bill Sterud to Fife Mayor Winston Marsh. “However, that plan was summarily dismissed. Although we are skeptical any plan other than at grade is economically feasible, in the spirit of cooperation we agree to study in more depth the city’s options for opening 54th Avenue.” None of these arguments are new to Mike Kelley. He had many of them a decade ago when he served on the Fife City Council that included a stint as mayor between 2000 and 2008, and worked on an earlier deal to open the roadway. He said any change to the roadway would have to involve the city, the school district, the tribe because of the many uses and interests in the area. It also has to please the railroad since it owns the land and has its own level of rules and safety procedures. “Without them being part of the program, nothing is going to happen,” he said. The railroad, for example, owns most of the land of nearby Dacca Park, land the city leases until some of it is sliced off for construction of the second set of tracks. That is why the city, school district and tribe agreed to build a soccer field at Surprise Lake Middle School rather than Dacca Park, since a field there would have ended any hope of an underpass, which Kelley believes is the best alternative. “The underpass, at least to me, is the only way to go,” he said, noting that not everyone on the council or area residents back then agreed with him, so it didn’t become a priority. “Once I got off the council, no one really followed up. Nothing ever happened. Nobody has a vision. So here we are still talking about it. Even if the tribe didn’t want it open, it needs to be open just to keep traffic going.” One plan to solve the traffic issues in the area involved the tribe building a bypass road from Frank Albert Road to 54th Avenue. Talks about that roadway, however, quickly fizzled, adding yet another wrinkle to a convoluted history of the road opening controversy, something all sides could continue to argue over or agree to move forward. “We are where we are, and the only way I see that opening is if the railroad was a partner and the school district was a partner and the city was a partner and the tribe was a partner,” Kelley said.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 17, 2017

Our View

MYSTERY OVER BIRD DEATHS SHOWS FRAGILITY OF ECOSYSTEM

Something killed up to 80 seagulls around the Tacoma Tideflats last month and state biologists still don’t know what caused it. While initial results suggest whatever poisoned the seagulls doesn’t likely pose any risk to human health, nothing is for certain other than that something happened and dozens of seagulls are dead because of it. Reports of dead birds started coming in on Jan. 23, and trickled in through the following days with calls of dead or dying birds found along Ruston Way, the tideflats and as far north as Des Moines. Adding to the mystery is that the birds are all the same species, glaucous-winged gulls or glaucous-winged/western gull hybrids, some of the most common gulls on the West Coast. That fact makes it unlikely that there was some spill, chemical accident or toxic algae bloom that hit local waters, since such incidents would affect other animals. Avian influenza and avian cholera have also been ruled out, as has possible lead poisoning. No additional dead or dying birds have been reported in the area since initial reports came in almost a month ago. State biologists, and a number of agencies are continuing their investigation and tests of the seagulls in hopes of finding answers. What is clear, however, is that nature and the animals living on this earth – including humans – can be simultaneously powerful and resilient, as well as tragically fragile. Sometimes Mother Earth reminds us of that fact. We would be wise to listen.

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Guest Editorial

REMEMBERING WHO WE ARE

By Winslow Myers

Our young nation is enduring a period of farce, though it doesn’t feel so amusing for stranded immigrants or unemployed coal miners. There is a more determinative context for immediate events that we fail to call upon because at first glance it doesn’t seem remotely relevant: in addition to being Americans, we are citizens of Earth. Even beyond that, we are integral with the stupendous unfolding story of the Universe. Okay, so the elements that make up our bodies were formed in the atomic furnace of stars. Really, so what? Here’s what. The scientific story of the Universe is not an alternative fact. We all share the story, Shia and Sunni, Israeli and Palestinian, Christian and Muslim, Trump supporter and Trump resister. It is an astounding story of emergence, creativity and survival on every level, from the formation of galaxies, to cells learning how to replicate themselves using DNA, to the development of mammalian care for offspring over millions of years. And, though it is 13.75 billion years old, for us it’s a new story, about which we have learned more in the last 50 years than in eons of gazing up at the mystery of the stars. This story is not only what every human shares; it is the deepest resource for our own creativity as we address our looming challenges. It is a story, from the cooperative ecology of coral reefs to nations in complex trade agreements, that verifies the golden principle of interdependence. It is a story whose cycles, because nature leaves no waste, provide the best design models for human-manufactured materials and processes – even for the design of our institutions. And it is a demonstration of why we can feel optimistic about our species and the Earth system even at difficult moments: we’ve come through so much. Not one of our ancestors going back to the absolute beginnings of cellular life made a fatal mistake before it was able to reproduce. We are the near-miraculous result of that unbroken chain of reproduction linking us to the entire emergent process. Our shared scientific story is a great unifier. There is not a Muslim and a Christian science, or a Capitalist and a Socialist science; there is only an endless patient positing and testing of hypotheses. Tentative, seemingly impossible hypotheses gradually become generally accepted truths. The world goes from flat to round. The sun replaces the Earth as the center of the solar system. Cholera, once thought to be airborne, turns up in water, becoming easier to control or even conquer.

What is really important about this moment in the history of the Earth? Is it the boiling up of race-based nationalism we have been seeing in the U.S. and Western Europe? Surely the scientific fact that the human species has exceeded the carrying capacity of its life-support system transcends in significance nationalist responses to events like the tragic movement of refugees around the globe. The strains of global climate instability have been one of the very causes of the great migrations of people away not only from murderous social chaos, but also from disease-infested water and untillable soil. Meanwhile, the overwhelming majority of the victims of terror are Muslim. Is this not also the moment we have arrived at the realization, even if it is not yet universally shared, that the collective destructive power of the weapons deployed upon the Earth has become so great that war as a solution for our conflicts has become obsolete? All war is civil war. “We build/ they build� weapon cycles are a poor substitute for meeting human and ecological needs directly and strengthening real global security. Our most difficult challenges cannot be met except on a whole new level of international cooperation built upon shared insight, listening to other frames of reference, collaboration more than confrontation, and sacrifice for the common planetary good. This can feel frightening, making “America First� a tempting illusion. Instead a fragile system of international law is emerging as an appropriate response to the unavoidable fact that all nations share one ocean and atmosphere, and no one will be secure unless all are secure – ecologically, militarily, politically, educationally, medically, economically. We cannot maintain a healthy market system upon an ailing Earth. How does our own nation take its place among the rest? Our constitutional guarantees have unleashed a tremendous prosperity and a technological creativity, which will be essential to meeting the ecological challenges the world faces together. But, to use the 1967 terminology of Martin Luther King Jr., there are materialist, militarist and racist forces at work in our country that resist, in favor of their narrow self-interests, our evolution toward new sources of sustainable energy, greater participatory democracy, and healthier manifestations of King’s vision of a beloved community. Astronomically wealthy individuals and their agents seem unable to see that their own wellbeing depends ultimately upon the health of the Earth out of which they are attempting to extract fossil fuels as

if more Earth-friendly technologies did not exist. They control much of the major media, which coin money off the dark energy of political polarization and a clickable sea of distracting trivialities. It is not trivial when so many young black men languish in corporate prisons for minor drug offenses, when we are falling behind in the strength of our public education and medical insurance systems, when student debt has become unsustainable, when so many other nations are further up the curve of conversion to solar and wind. One antidote is remembering who we are in the context of the true story of the Universe and Earth. What follows from that is ownership of America’s own real story, a story that includes the unearned suffering of the native peoples, who have everything to teach about sustaining our resources into the future. Central also to the American story is slavery and the unearned suffering of African-Americans. A spiritual resilience that wears the faces of Douglass and King and Baldwin and so many others could be a core resource for an American identity and strength available to all the races. But it isn’t yet, because whites still haven’t come to terms with the sins of our origins. Black lives matter for so many reasons, not least that until they do we cannot authentically celebrate national diversity in equal liberty. Only then will our light illuminate an Earth struggling with the tension between heartfelt democratic longing and heart-shriveling fears of the “other.� Finally, it comes down from Universe to Earth to America to me, who, in Ta-Nehisi’s provocative phrase, happens to be white – already a minority on Earth and soon to be one in my country, but as yet a privileged one. As such I bear a special responsibility to resist the polarization that erupted in this last Presidential election cycle. I may be white and progressive, but I pledge to a flag that stands for one nation, indivisible. I bear a special responsibility to work for not only racial, but also political and economic, inclusiveness, reaching across artificial divides to understand those who chose to vote for an inexperienced leader. If we remember who we are as children of the Universe, of Earth, and of the American ideal of diversity in community, a new world is still possible. It begins with me. Winslow Myers, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of “Living Beyond War: A Citizen’s Guide.� He also serves on the Advisory Board of the War Preventive Initiative.

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@ tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.


Friday, February 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

t Gathering From page A1

and personal networks across cultures,” said Montgomery. A number of local elected, nonprofit and business leaders have registered to attend and bring their staffs to The People’s Gathering, including Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson. “I am excited for this conference experience to intentionally advance my cultural competency and ultimately enhance my ability to lead in the workplace and serve diverse communities,” said Anderson. “The People’s Gathering will provide a meaningful chance to take information and tools back to the office and implement immediately.” Event organizers say The People’s Gathering was conceived in response to the culturally divisive 2016 election, and other racial tensions that have recently frequented local and national news. “Many citizens are finally acknowledging the depth of our racial differences and divide in America and are crying out for opportunities to learn and more deeply understand their role in it,” explained Montgomery. “How people talk – or don’t talk – about race at work and in the classroom is a strong indicator of whether the organization, school or community has an inclusive culture,” Montgomery continued. “Our hope is that our community can have an organized base of folks equipped to move these difficult conversations forward towards solution-based strategies.” Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland will be issuing a proclamation acknowledging the racial divisions in America, affirming the City of Tacoma’s commitment to diversity and dialogue, and declaring Feb. 24 the day of The People’s Gathering, “Professional Development Day” in Tacoma. In the spirit of The People’s Gathering, the proclamation encourages “all government agencies, corporate and small business entities, nonprofit organizations, educational institutions and individual citizens to educate themselves in the areas of cultural awareness, literacy and competency as a way to strive towards unity.” Conference registration is $250 for general attendees and $125 for students. Discounts are available for teams of five or more from the same organization and scholarships are available to eligible students. For more information contact PLU Director of Multicultural Outreach and Engagement Melannie Denise Cunningham at cunninmd@plu.edu or call (253) 535-7467.

DR. RANDAL PINKETT

Dr. Randal Pinkett, an entrepreneur, author and scholar, is founder and CEO of BCT Partners, a consulting and research information technology firm headquartered in Newark, NJ. His book, Black Faces in White Places: 10 GameChanging Strategies to Achieve Success and Find Greatness, was named one of “The Best Books of 2010.” He holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from Rutgers University; a M.S. in computer science from the University of Oxford; and a M.S., MBA and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of

Technology. He is a former captain of his collegiate track and field team, and was the winner of NBC’s hit reality television show “The Apprentice.”

DR. EDDAH MUTUA

Eddah Mbula Mutua, Ph.D. is a Professor of Intercultural Communication at St. Cloud State University, Minnesota. She teaches in the area of intercultural communication. Her research focuses on peace communication in post-conflict societies in Eastern Africa with a special interest in the role of women in postgenocide Rwanda and grassroots peace building initiatives in Kenya. In the U.S., her areas of research include East African refugee and host communities’ interactions in Central Minnesota, Africans and African-Americans relations, and critical service-learning as a pedagogical practice in peace education.

DR. ROBIN DiANGELO

Robin DiAngelo, Ph.D., is director of Equity for Sound Generations, Seattle/King County, and a consultant and trainer for over 20 years on issues of racial and social justice. Growing up poor led her to explore class oppression and how her experience differed from others in poverty because she is white. Her work on “white fragility,” a defensive response to real conversations about race, has been featured in Salon, NPR, Slate, Alternet and The Seattle Times. Dr. DiAngelo earned her PhD in Multicultural Education from the University of Washington in Seattle and earned tenure at Westfield State University before returning to the Northwest. She was twice honored by her university students as educator of the year.

JEWEL DIAMOND TAYLOR

Jewel Diamond Taylor is a dynamic speaker, messenger of hope and life coach. She is known as “the self-esteem doctor.” In the late 1980s, Taylor was one of the first women of color to become a national and international motivational speaker. She has made presentations at the Pentagon and in prisons, for corporate America and on college campuses, and for community groups and on military bases. Taylor is author of seven books, an ordained elder in her church, founder of Women on the Grow Ministry and frequent radio guest.

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DR. BETH KRAIG

Beth Kraig, Ph.D. strongest interests center on the history of discrimination and oppression (and resistance to those forces) in the United States, and especially in the 20th century. Her research into the subject include examinations of anti-gay ballot measures in the 1970s, racism in the military in World War II, and feminist voices in popular literature in the post-WWII decades. She is actively involved in interdisciplinary programs and fields of study, including Women’s Studies and Peace Studies, and has participated in research and projects that center on the importance of historical thinking in interdisciplinary contexts. Dr. Kraig is a professor of History at Pacific Lutheran University.

JOHN SCOTT

John Scott, MA, Ph.D.(c) is an artist, educator, counselor, writer, facilitator, consultant, who has been providing support to organizations and individuals for over 15 years. His areas of expertise are in issues of cultural competency, community leadership development, social justice, nonviolent communication, and community building processes. Through his socially conscious interactions with audiences, John provides practical tools participants can use in making positive, sustainable changes in their lives, communities, and organizations. John has a Master’s Degree in Counseling Psychology with a concentration in Drama Therapy. He is currently finishing his PhD work at CIIS in San Francisco focusing on social justice, ecology, and indigenous studies.


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 17, 2017

#Z8JMMJBN.BO[BOBSFT

UWT BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION REACHES OUT TO VETERANS

william@tacomaweekly.com

The Veterans Incubator for Better Entrepreneurship at University of Washington-Tacoma has launched its first ever business plan competition. With the goal to create future business leaders in Pierce County, and Tacoma in particular, the competition is open to all colleges and universities in the South Sound and members of the broader community as well. The winning team will receive inkind services from businesses in the area and a cash prize that can be used as seed money for their entrepreneurial project. VIBE Director Thomas Kuljam said that this competition is in keeping with his efforts to help create “an epicenter of entrepreneurial culture” in the South Sound and to help people think outside the box when it comes to doing something with their time and talents that satisfies their soul as much as their bottom line. “I want people to realize, especially veterans, that they have talent and can create something bigger for themselves,” Kuljam said. “Just because you went to trade school doesn’t mean you have to work in that trade – you can still get more education and learn to understand the language of business to create and retain jobs in the Tacoma/Pierce County/South Sound areas.” Kuljam is frustrated that local talent commutes to Seattle during the work week and he’s out to change that. “Everybody says there is no talent in Tacoma and I have to argue that. If there’s no talent in Tacoma, then why do we have traffic jams? Because everyone is taking their talents to Seattle.” Through the VIBE business plan competition, Kuljam is doing his part to bring better opportunities to Tacoma and the South Sound both for entrepreneurs and the folks that entrepreneurs need to run their businesses. Here is how the competition will work: Every team must have a student and a veteran (one person can fill both of these roles) and there is no limit to how many people can be on the team. Kuljam, himself a military veteran with many additional years of experience in the banking industry, said putting students and vets together is intentional. “The beauty of what I’m trying to do is slowly transition the veterans and students together. Once they get out into the real world, a veteran might be working for a civilian and a student might be working for a veteran, so we want to make sure they’re ready for this.”

The deadline to enter the competition is March 24, as it is on this day that executive summaries are due via online submission. This will launch the Screening Round, the first round in the four-round competition. Over the course of a weekend, each business plan executive summary will be read and scored by judges who will be encouraged to provide written feedback for students. After this Screening Round, teams advancing to the Investment Round will be announced. The Investment Round on April 14 will be the most exciting event of the competition, as it will follow a tradeshow format in which teams set up intricate displays and interact with judges to pitch the team’s idea. The judges, all prominent members of the local entrepreneurial community, will be given 1,000 “VIBE dollars” to invest in a portfolio of teams that they consider have the best chance for success in the real world. At the end of the event, investment dollars will be collected and tallied. The teams receiving the highest “funding” will be announced at a reception immediately following and advance to the final round.

BE WELL

Next comes the Coaching Round on April 28, a noncompetitive round in which no teams will be eliminated. This round gives teams the opportunity to practice their presentations in front of a panel of coaches from the local entrepreneurial community. This round is designed to provide teams with in-depth and constructive feedback that they can use to hone their business plans and pitches prior to the Final Round. Teams will be assigned a mentor for one-on-one coaching. The Final round on May 5 will have all remaining teams present throughout the day for 10-minute formal pitches and Q&A with judges that will select the advancing teams based on criteria including team dynamics, whether the business model is viable and whether the team made a quality presentation. After all presentations are finished, judges will discuss the merits of each of the teams and by process of consensus select the winning team and the runner up to be presented in the afternoon. For the full contest calendar and more details on each round, visit www.tacoma.uw.edu/VIBE/BPC.

inside & out

SOUTH HILL MALL TO HOST CHILDREN’S DENTAL HEALTH DAY

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Healthy oral hygiene habits are built starting as early as two years of age and can help ensure the development of strong and healthy adult teeth. This is just one of the reasons why the American Dental Association sponsors a National Children’s Dental Health Month each year in February. It may not be as glamorous as National Pizza Pie Day (earlier this month) or National Straw Hat Month (that’s in April). But it’s essential to raise awareness about the importance of oral health in children to inform and guide them to a lifetime of positive dental care practices with the proper resources. That said, the Pierce County Dental Society is hosting the 26th annual Children’s Dental Health Day (DHD) on Saturday, Feb. 25 at the South Hill Mall in Puyallup from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. DHD festivities include a plethora of free activities aimed to make dental care fun and accessible for kids from infants through 18 years of age. Some basic dental care is available onsite as well, with Pierce County dentists providing dental screenings, fluoride varnish applications on the spot and referrals for care to children with special dental needs like cavities. Even caring for your pearly whites can be entertaining, with special appearances by Steve the Cartoon Guy and Chompy the Carrot. Though carrots provide loads of minerals that help kill germs in a satisfying crunch that proves to be a natural way to rid teeth of sticky plaque, Chompy is not to be bitten but will be on hand to captivate the little ones and provide live demos on oral care. Clean teeth mascot Super Tooth will accompany

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Children can meet clean teeth mascot Super Tooth and the Tooth Fairy (left), among other colorful characters, which is sure to make their dental visit a lot more fun.

everyone’s favorite toothy superstar, the Tooth Fairy, to hand out tooth boxes that she will later collect from under little ones’ pillows when those itty-bitty teeth fall out. Plus, there’s lots of opportunity for photo opps and fun as well. Other perks of the gathering include sport mouth guards available for the wee athlete in your life and low cost bike helmets for those on the go. Safety first, kids. Professional staff will be available at informative table clinics throughout guiding young and old alike through basic dental health education. Essentially, the entire event is produced in a way that adults can leave with their dental care inquiries fulfilled while kids can depart feeling excited about brushing and flossing their chompers, their smiling mugs adorned by one of the face painters in attendance and a fistful

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of a goodie bag loaded with dental swag. This event is sponsored by Pierce County Dental Society, Pierce County Dental Foundation and Washington Dental Services Foundation.


Friday, February 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

t Tideflats From page A1

out lead poisoning. She also said that additional lab tests are looking for botulism toxin, even though the gulls’ symptoms don’t perfectly match what would be expected from such toxicity. Given the scavenging nature of gulls, they may have been exposed to the bacterial toxin from contaminated food sources. Testing is also underway for heavy metals and viruses. Port of Tacoma workers and beach watchers first reported on Jan. 22 that at least 30 gulls were found dead or dying in and around Commencement Bay. That number then grew to between 60 and 80 after initial reports, when 31 sick sea gulls were taken to rehabilitation centers for treatment. The dead and dying birds were all the same species of gull, the glaucouswinged gulls or glaucous-winged/western gull hybrids, some of the most common gulls on the West Coast. No other birds are apparently affected by whatever killed or paralyzed the sea gulls. No additional sea gulls have been reported in the area since the first few days of the initial report. WDFW biologist Emily Butler noted that since crows, waterfowl and other birds in the area were not affected, water

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

TRASH. Volunteers spent their Saturday morning cleaning a Tacoma beach of glass shards and plastic bottles, gathering several bags in a matter of hours.

Atmospheric Administration lab. State biologists collected six of the dead gulls and sent them to the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Washington State University in Pullman

pollution or contamination is highly unlikely. Marine algal toxins are also an unlikely cause because no other affected animals were found, but testing for them is underway at a National Oceanic and

for testing. Another nine gull carcasses were sent to the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin. About two-dozen of the 31 sick gulls were taken to the Progressive Animal Welfare Society in Lynnwood. Other gulls went to Puget Sound WildCare, Fair Isle Animal Clinic, and West Sound Wildlife Shelter. At last report, 20 of the gulls were still alive and showing signs of improvement. All final lab results are expected later this month. As a happenstance, volunteers with the South Sound Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, were cleaning the shoreline along Commencement Bay this weekend. They didn’t spot any new dead birds but collected a half dozen bags of trash – mostly plastic bottles and shards of glass and pieces of tires and car bumpers that had likely washed down the hillside and into the bay during the recent rainfall. The group last cleaned the beach in the fall. “I’m encouraged that this is no longer on the beach,” organizer Ken Campbell said, noting that while the beach cleanups are still gathering more trash than he would like, the beaches are generally cleaner than when he first moved to the area in 1987. “You have to kind of take the long view of it. The overall arch is better.”

t State of the City From page A1

at a time when housing prices and rents are outpacing wage increases. “We need to get everyone together," she said. Strickland is term limited for running for reelection in November, a fact she noted as a key decision facing Tacoma this year along with the selection of a new city manager after T.C. Broadnax assumed his top-executive spot in Dallas. Other key projects on the horizon this year include: the Tacoma Police department's pilot program on body cameras, which was a product of last year's Project Peace effort; the formation of the Eastside Community Center; the Pantages renovations; and the potential expansion of Internet access as the municipally owned Click Network moves toward going “all in” as a provider of phone, television and Internet services. Road improvements will continue to dot Tacoma for years to go now, after voters in 2015 approved $325 million in street repairs, the first time in 40 years that Tacomans voted to increase taxes for streets. Those streets will become more trafficked as new residents continue to come to the city, with 2,000 new housing units under construction, including apartments and condominiums in the works at the historic Washington Building, the landmark Point Ruston development and in the city's Stadium district, which already has the highest residential density in the county. Other marquee activities this year include the selection of Cheney Stadium to host the Minor League All Star Game and the return of Tall Ships at the Festival

t Boyd From page A1

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"Star Spangled Banner." (Right) Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber CEO Tom Pearson talked about growth in the community.

of Sails this summer. Those events will bring thousands of visitors to the city and feed an already growing sector of the economy. Travel Tacoma President Bennish Brown, for example,

ful man and they run a Montessori school. I think my mom’s story shows what’s possible.” Out of high school, Boyd joined a Tacoma Christian youth group and went on a mission, visiting the Virgin Islands, Guyana and small villages along the Amazon in Brazil. It opened her eyes to other people, other worlds. “We were driving these terrible dirt roads in Brazil to get to a village, and I saw a turtle by the road, picked him up and named him Herbert,” Boyd said. “We got to the village and I showed him off. I talked to other villagers, and when I came back, Herbert was in a stew. “They didn’t have turtles as pets. They considered them food.” By 26, Boyd was married and then had two children, daughter Chayanne and son Hatcher. She divorced before she turned 30 and was working for State Farm Insurance. When she first considered law enforcement, she asked to ride along with patrol cars throughout Pierce County, and settled on Tacoma as the safest department. Before she applied, however, she talked to her kids. “They were excited but nervous. They put together a ‘yes,’ or ‘no’ ballot, and everyone in our family voted,” she said. “After that, I was free to apply.” A former body builder with a killer smile, Boyd became an officer in 2006, and daughter Chayanne pinned her first badge. Five years after joining the force, she and another officer, Josh Boyd, met in an alley when both responded to back up a third patrolman. Police chemistry followed, and the two married in 2012. “I married my husband, Josh, who's now a sergeant. I got a 'bonus daughter' in the deal, Ava, and we have a three-yearold daughter, Sierra,” she said. “Through Cheyanne, we met Michael,

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pointed out that tourism is a $1 billion a year industry, making Pierce County the second most tourism dependent county in the state, a title that has jumped between Pierce and Spokane counties in recent years.

who went to school with her in Steilacoom High School. He was going through some of the same things I'd gone through as a teenager, and he's now in our house, too.” Shelbie was named the Tacoma Weekly’s Officer of the Year in 2014, an award that delighted and surprised her. “The first thing I thought was, ‘But I didn’t enter anything!’” she said.

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made a small difference.” It often has over the past decade, since Boyd joined the Tacoma Police Department as a 34-year-old patrolwoman. “I got a late start, but I was someone who needed experience before I was ready,” Boyd said. “I've seen diversity, and I've seen the changes that can be made in people. “In my life, personal experiences are part of my tool box in the field.” In 2012 she added another job description: Public Liaison Officer (PLO), and it fits her approach to those in her communities. “The people know me, and I know them. If I stop by a park, the kids know me. If I respond to a call, neighbors come out and talk to me, try to tell me what happened. I’ve found a home here. “One thing I learned was to treat everyone like your grandmother, like your son. I get a lot of hugs on this job, and I'm a proud godmother,” she said. “You work in a community, and your heart gets involved. “I attend three community night meetings a month and do follow-ups with individuals all the time.” Boyd is a natural nurturer, a woman who finds sharing her own experiences – including those some might keep private – with others. “I was born when my mother was 16 and never knew my father,” Boyd said. “She struggled, had my younger brother, and got into some bad relationships. Over time, she changed her life and ours. “My mother went back to school, learned a trade and opened her own cleaning business. She married a wonder-

PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

GROWTH. (Left) Catering Sales Director at Greater Tacoma Convention & Trade Center Emily Cook sings the

Now her career path may change. Tacoma has a ‘career rotation’ policy, and Boyd will likely return to patrol work and give up her PLO duties. “There will be detective exams this fall, and I’ll probably take them,” she said. “I enjoy what I do, but the challenges of detective work kind of call to me, too.”


SI DE TH E

Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2017

QUEENS OF THE COURT

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 10

SIXTH RANKED LOGGER WOMEN ROLL PLU

PHOTOS BY KAYLA MEHRING

HOME SIZZLE. (top) Tacoma has ben-

efited from the return of veteran Ty Hall to the lineup. After returning to the lineup just a few games ago, Hall is beginning to work his way back into regular time on the field. (second-down) Everett native Evan McNeley delivers a left-foot blast that finds its way into the back of the net. (third-down) Former Stadium Tiger Alex Megson is constantly in the thick of the action when he's on the field. (bottom) Nobody loves the Tacoma Stars' fans like defending MASL Goalkeeper of the Year Danny Waltman. Fans will say that the feeling is mutual.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME FOR TACOMA STARS By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

By Justin Gimse

T

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

elevision and radio announcers often say that you can throw out the records when it comes to a rivalry game. When dealing with any sort of crosstown or league rivalry, it’s usually a safe bet that the action is going to be tight, and outcome never certain for the favorites. When the University of Puget Sound Loggers paid a visit to Pacific Lutheran University’s Olson Auditorium on Tuesday, Feb. 14, the teams’ numbers were an odd reflection of each other, and it didn’t bode well for the host Lutes. The sixth-ranked Logger women entered the contest against their historic rivals with an eye-popping 22-1 record. Meanwhile, the host Lutes, wrapping up what was a rebuilding year in Parkland, came into the game with a 1-22 mark. With legendary broadcaster Bob Robertson doing the radio play-by-play at the scorer’s table, there’s a good chance that he began the night’s transmission by saying you can throw out the records in this game, but he probably wasn’t feeling it in his bones. A 21-game win difference is about as big as any basketball fan is bound to see, and frankly, the UPS Loggers are worthy of their lofty national ranking and the hype. Despite hanging in there for the first quarter, the Lady Lutes just couldn’t match the Loggers bucket for bucket for very long, and make no mistake; the Lutes have some very talented players. The main problem going for the hosts was just how similar this Logger team is to the incredible squad assembled just a short drive up I-5 at the University of Washington. While most of the college basketball attention in the state has been focused upon the top-ranked and undefeated Gonzaga Bulldogs men’s team, as well as the Washington Huskies women’s team, not as many eyes have been following what the Loggers have accomplished so far this season. As a matter of fact, the nightmarish season performance of the Washington Huskies men has garnered more attention. That’s just how it rolls for Tacoma sometimes. That’s also why so many of our teams play with a chip on their shoulder. Last weekend, the Loggers hit the road to face 17thranked Whitman and for the second time this season finished

u See LOGGERS / page A13

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

LOGGING WINS. (top) With the game well out of reach, Puget Sound freshman Kristen Ahn works the ball up the court with Pacific Lutheran sophomore Lauren Furu keeping her in check. (left) UPS freshman Jamie Lange racked up 17 points and 17 rebounds against the Lutes. The six-footer has averaged over 11 points per game in her first year. (second-right) UPS sophomore Kirsten Hafeman works against Furu. (third-right) UPS sophomore Samone Jackson put up 28 points against PLU, including six three pointers. Jackson leads the Loggers with 17.5 points per game. (bottom) PLU redshirt junior Kaelyn Voss goes up for two against UPS junior Mikaela Limper.

Coming home on the heels of four consecutive road losses was exactly what the doctor ordered for the Tacoma Stars. Playing in front of an enthusiastic crowd Sunday, Feb. 12 at the ShoWare Center in Kent, the Stars welcomed the most hard-luck team in the Major Arena Soccer League to the Puget Sound. The St. Louis Ambush rolled into the arena with just one victory on the season, and from the opening whistle against the Stars, it was clear that they didn’t bring enough firepower along with them to overcome the hometown boys. With their rival, the San Diego Sockers trying to run away with the MASL Pacific Division, it has begun to feel like do or die time for the Tacoma Stars, and they passed the first test of their final four-game run toward the playoffs. The previous four road losses had also opened up the backdoor for their most-heated rival to sneak up right behind them in the Pacific Division standings. After the Ontario Fury suffered an 8-3 loss to Soles de Sonora, just three nights prior, Tacoma found themselves with just a single game advantage in the loss column at 9-7 against Ontario’s 7-8. On the flipside, the Sockers have built a small lead over the Stars that may be just big enough to see them through to the division title. San Diego (11-5) also has just four games remaining in the regular season and they would need to drop three of the contests for the Stars to have a shot at the division crown. The Sockers will face winless El Paso for what should be a walkover, and then they will face a difficult trip to Soles de Sonora (14-3) on Saturday, Feb. 25. The following day they will host the always dangerous Atletico Baja (9-8), setting up the season finale showdown with the Stars at the ShoWare on Saturday, March 4. Tacoma would need to win their final three matches against Ontario, Chicago and San Diego to have a shot at the division. So coupled with three Sockers’ losses is going

u See STARS / page A13


Friday, February 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

SPORTSWATCH

top, we are really proud of how we swam and put up some incredible performances in high pressure moments,” said Sellman. “I told the team before we even started training this year ‘champions aren’t determined by point totals. We have to act and prepare to be champions every day and when you do that, the score at the end of the meet is irrelevant.’” On Saturday, Reese Ackman won the 100-yard butterfly in a school record time while Danielle Booth and Victoria Nguyenle finished 1-2 in the 100-yard breaststroke with Booth securing an NCAA B Cut time. Other notable performances from the opening two days was Muller finishing second in the 500-yard freestyle and third in the 400-yard individual medley, Danielle Booth finishing fourth in the 50-yard freestyle, Ackman placing fifth (200-yard individual medley) and sixth (100-yard backstroke) along with efforts from both Luna Kim (5th100-yard backstroke) and Darcie Booth (6th- 200-yard Freestyle). The Lutes also had a pair of seventh place finishes from Taylor Bingea (400-yard IM and 500 free), a seventh place finish from Nguyenle in the 200 IM and Whitney Mundle placing eighth in the 100-yard breaststroke.

PLU MEN ALSO NAB RUNNER-UP FINISH AT NWC SWIM CHAMPIONSHIPS

PHOTO BY BRIAN DALBALCON

TACOMA’S OWN ISAIAH THOMAS OPENS AL DAVIES BASKETBALL GYM

Teens’ cheers and smiles erupted when the purple doors opened to the new Boys & Girls Clubs gym—and NBA star Isaiah Thomas was there to greet them. Thomas, a Tacoma native and alumni of Boys & Girls Clubs of South Puget Sound, was the headliner for the gym’s ribbon-cutting today at the Club’s Al Davies Branch in Tacoma. The new facility is named Isaiah Thomas Court, honoring the former Al Davies Branch Club member who played for the University of Washington before turning pro. Isaiah, the 60th and final pick in the 2011 NBA draft, is now a point guard for the Boston Celtics and is a twotime NBA All-Star. “Thank you to everyone who helped me. Without Tacoma I wouldn’t be where I am today. I represent it proudly everywhere I go,” Thomas said during the ceremony. “I always dreamed of having a gym, and now I’ve got one. So you better use it.” The new 5,700-square foot gym will allow the Al Davies Branch to serve about 80 teens a day, double the number they could before the new space. Funding and development support for the $150,000 gym were provided by the Lowe’s Renovation Across the Nation grant, the National Basketball Players Association Foundation and Thomas himself. Lowe’s awarded a $50,000 Renovation Across the Nation grant to one Boys & Girls Club in every state. Boys & Girls Clubs of America and Lowe’s selected the Al Davies gym project as the grant recipient for our state. The grant was unsolicited and was awarded specifically to upgrade teen spaces as part of a national focus on teen retention. Thomas contributed $80,000 to the project to help pay for the renovations, flooring and banners around the gym. The National Basketball Players Association Foundation donated $20,000. The new gym floor is decorated with a custom illustration of the Tacoma Dome, Mount Rainier and city skyline. Gifford Industries of Edmonds, Wash. led the construction work for the project. A unique feature of the gym is a purple line painted at Thomas’ height, 5’ 9” above the floor. The line is meant to be an inspiring reminder to youth: Don’t let your height—or any other obstacle—hold you back from your dreams. “I was picked last in the draft, but I embraced it. All I ever wanted to do was play in the NBA,” Thomas said. “Take the opportunities you get and just keep going. Don’t give up. Believe in yourself.” Thomas also recently supported BGCSPS when he received the NBA Cares Community Assist Award for December. The award includes a $10,000 charitable donation from Kaiser Permanente and the NBA, and Thomas chose BGCSPS as the recipient.

PLU WOMEN FINISH RUNNERS-UP AT NWC SWIM CHAMPIONSHIPS

The Pacific Lutheran University women’s swimming team captured two more event titles on Sunday but was unable to secure its fourth consecutive league title, placing second at the 2017 Northwest Conference Championships at the King County Aquatic Center. The Lutes finished the three-day championships with four individual titles and 576 points to collect the runner-up finish as Whitman College wrestled the team title away from the Lutes after scoring 622.5 points. The University of Puget Sound was 118 points behind PLU in third with 458 points. “The women were great individually we just didn’t have the relays to compete for the top spot,” said PLU Head Coach Matt Sellman. “Whitman was just as well prepared a team as I’ve seen at a championship meet. They swam incredibly well and Jenn Blomme proved herself, once again, as one of the great coaches in college swimming.” Erica Muller kicked off the evening session with a victory in the 1,650-yard freestyle, owning an eightsecond gap on the rest of the field and finishing in 17 minutes, 27.11 seconds to win the title for the second consecutive season. Teammate Jessica Stenberg placed seventh, finishing in 18:22.99. Victoria Nguyenle claimed the Lutes’ second title of the night, securing the win in the 200-yard breaststroke in a school record time of 2:23.15 with Ingrid Straume finishing seventh (2:30.58) and Whitney Mundle placing eighth (2:30.70). Sarah Ameny finished sixth in the 200-yard butterfly (2:14.33), while Morgan Commander finished seventh in the 200-yard backstroke (2:09.85). PLU closed the meet by placing fourth in the 400-yard freestyle relay, logging a time of 3:35.50. “However disappointed we are in not coming out on

The Pacific Lutheran University men’s swimming team utilized a strong finish on Sunday to place runnerup at the 2017 Northwest Conference Championships, leaving the King County Aquatic Center with the Lutes’ best finish at the meet since the 1996 season. PLU accumulated 533 points in the team standings in a championship race that saw only 18 points separating first from third. The Lutes finished 14 points shy of League Champion Whitman College (547 points) while Whitworth University was third with 529 points. All three teams held the lead at one point on a wild final day, including the Lutes with two events to go. Linfield College was a distant fourth at the eight-team championships with 464.5 points. “It was a super exciting meet and one we will remember for a long time,” said PLU Head Coach Matt Sellman. “It’s not that often you find yourself in a meet that tightly contested. Whitman was just as well prepared a team as I’ve seen at a championship meet. They swam incredibly well and Jenn Blomme proved herself, once again, as one of the great coaches in college swimming.” Dennis Liu followed up yesterday’s title in the 100yard breaststroke with a runner-up showing in the 200yard breaststroke, touching the wall in two minutes, 8.33 seconds, with Bennon VanHoof securing fifth in 2:09.10. Hunter Cosgrove tallied a runner-up finish in the 1,650yard freestyle, touching the wall in 16:14.07 with Bradley Jerome trailing in fifth with a swim of 16:24.19. Cody Hartman secured a third place showing in the 200-yard backstroke, stopping the clock in 1:53.31 while Bryson Baligad was sixth in 1:56.43. Paul Jett placed sixth in the 100-yard freestyle in 47.29 with teammate Elijah Singstad securing eighth in 48.08 while the 400-yard freestyle relay closed the meet in third (3:08.84). In addition to Liu’s championship swim on Saturday the Lutes secured 16 additional top eight finishes on the opening two days of the championships including Paul Jett placing second in the 200-yard individual medley and third place showings from Jett in the 100-yard butterfly in a school record time, Bryson Baligad in the 100-yard backstroke, and Bradley Jerome in the 200-yard freestyle, along with a school record setting swim in the 200-yard freestyle relay.

PLU’S BOCKELIE HONORED AS NWC HITTER OF THE WEEK

Pacific Lutheran University’s Jacob Bockelie landed Northwest Conference Hitter of the Week honors on Tuesday for his performance over the weekend in southern California. After sitting out all last season with an injury, Bockelie made his presence felt in the Lutes’ (2-1) opening series of the year against Pomona-Pitzer Colleges, hitting .455 at the plate with five RBIs and two home runs. The Shoreline, Washington native collected a hit in all three games against the Sagehens, including driving in five runs in PLU’s 7-3 victory on Saturday. The left-handed hitter closed the week with five hits in 11 at-bats, scoring four runs while boasting a slugging percentage of 1.000 and an on-base percentage of .600. The junior was additionally lights out in the field, collecting 15 putouts and one assist with no errors. The Lutes embark on NWC play this weekend, traveling across town for a three-game series against the University of Puget Sound. First pitch on Saturday’s doubleheader is set for 11 a.m. with the series concluding on Sunday at noon.

LOGGER BASEBALL COMES FROM SIX BACK TO INCH CLOSER TO .500

The Puget Sound baseball team erased a six-run deficit to beat Lewis & Clark, 10-9, in a non-conference game at Wilsonville High School on Sunday, Feb. 12. The Loggers (3-4) entered the home half of the seventh inning trailing, 9-3, but they ended the frame within one run of the Pioneers (0-3). Jordan Hirae and James Dejesus started the rally by drawing consecutive one-out walks. Ian Hughes struck out for the inning’s second out, but Hirae stole third and soon came home on a wild pitch. Dejesus also scored on the play thanks to a throwing error by the catcher. Alex Wojtysiak, Tyler Brazelton, and Ryan Moeys earned consecutive walks to load the bases with two outs. Nick Ultsch drew a walk to force in a run and make it an 8-5 game. Ricardo Barazza reached base on a fielder’s choice, which was combined with an error by the third baseman that allowed two more runs to score. The Loggers took the lead in the eighth inning. With Dejesus and Hughes on first and second and one out, Mason Quinlan singled to load the bases. Moyes came through with a clutch two-run double to put the Loggers in front, 10-9. David Follett earned his first save of the season by allowing just one hit and no runs through the eighth and ninth innings. Nolan Wiler (2-for-3) was the only Logger to log multiple hits. Puget Sound opens its home and conference schedule on Saturday, Feb. 18, against crosstown rival Pacific Lutheran at 11 a.m. to start a doubleheader. The teams will meet for a third contest the following day at 12 p.m.

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS FEB. 16 – MAR. 4 THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Girls – Prairie vs. Lincoln Olympia HS – 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Girls – Mountain View vs. Wilson Timberline HS – 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Girls – Rogers vs. Curtis Clover Park HS – 6 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Boys – Rainier Chr. vs. Tacoma Baptist Auburn HS – 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Girls – NW Yeshiva vs. Tacoma Baptist Tacoma Baptist HS – 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Boys – Federal Way vs. Curtis Mt. Tahoma HS – 7:45 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 – BASKETBALL Boys – Olympic vs. Fife Curtis HS – 7:45 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 – SWIMMING

Boys State Swim & Dive Prelims King County Aquatics Center – 9:45 a.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 – WRESTLING State Mat Classic – First Session Tacoma Dome – 10 a.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 – WRESTLING

State Mat Classic – Second Session Tacoma Dome – 4 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – SWIMMING

4A Boys State Swim & Dive Finals King County Aquatics Center – 9:30 a.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – WRESTLING State Mat Classic – Third Session Tacoma Dome – 10 a.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – BASKETBALL Girls – 3A WCD Championship Puyallup HS – 12 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – BASKETBALL Boys – 3A WCD Championship Puyallup HS – 2 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – WRESTLING State Mat Classic – Fourth Session Tacoma Dome – 2 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – SWIMMING

2A Boys State Swim & Dive Finals King County Aquatics Center – 2:15 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – BASKETBALL Girls – 4A WCD Championship Puyallup HS – 4 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – BASKETBALL Boys – 2A WCD Championship Foss HS – 5:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – BASKETBALL Boys – 4A WCD Championship Puyallup HS – 6 p.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 18 – SWIMMING 3A Boys State Swim & Dive Finals King County Aquatics Center – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEB. 24 – MASL SOCCER Chicago Mustangs vs. Tacoma Stars ShoWare Center, Kent – 7:35 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1 – BASKETBALL State Hardwood Classic – First Round Tacoma Dome – TBA

THURSDAY, MARCH 2 – BASKETBALL State Hardwood Classic – Second Round Tacoma Dome – TBA

FRIDAY, MARCH 3 – BASKETBALL State Hardwood Classic – Third Round Tacoma Dome – TBA

SATURDAY, MARCH 4 – BASKETBALL State Hardwood Classic – Finals Tacoma Dome – TBA

SATURDAY, MARCH 4 – MASL SOCCER San Diego Sockers vs. Tacoma Stars ShoWare Center, Kent – 6:05 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 17, 2017

PLAYOFF FEVER HITS TACOMA’S HOOPSTERS

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

GRIT GAMERS. (left) Bellarmine senior Joey Bodoia was nearly unstoppable against Auburn, dropping 35 on the Trojans, via spectacular dunks, drives and three point-

ers. Two nights later, Union (#1 RPI) was able to hold Bodoia to just six points, and the rest of the Lions couldn't make the adjustment as they fell 63-53. (middle) Fife junior Tavis Johnson mixes it up against North Kitsap. The Trojans have remained alive in district play with some gutsy play. (right) Bellarmine sophomore Charles Elzie has put up over 10 points a game for the Lions, and they'll need it all and more if they want to continue their postseason run. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

The district basketball crunch is nearing its end, and a host of Tacoma schools are still in the postseason mix, while some have already secured a spot to the big dance. If the Tacoma-area schools can continue notching wins, this year may very well go down as one of the largest bumper crops of basketball talent that the City of Destiny has ever produced. With as many as 16 Tacoma-area teams still in the hunt for a trip to the state tournament, let’s take a look at how they’ve reached this point and what is now standing in the way of the state tournament. Bellarmine Prep’s Lady Lions have had an incredible season. The 4A South Puget Sound League champions dispatched Union by an embarrassing score of 58-15 to open district play. Up next was 20-4 Todd Beamer, a team that has given Bellarmine problems in recent years. At one point, it looked as though Beamer was going to pull away from the Lady Lions, but Bellarmine stepped up and closed out Beamer by a score of 53-46. Up next for Bellarmine is a semifinal date with powerhouse Kentridge (22-2), which will happen a few hours after this issue goes to print. Should the Lions win, they will face either Camas or Auburn Riverside on Saturday, Feb. 18, at Puyallup High School at 4 p.m. The Bellarmine boys are also still in the hunt, however they are attempting to make it through the consolation bracket now. The Lions made short work of Auburn to open district play with a 76-54 win. Up next for Bellar-

7 THINGS YOU MUST KNOW BEFORE PUTTING YOUR TACOMA HOME UP FOR SALE

mine was a matchup with Union (17-3), the top-ranked team in the WIAA’s Rating Percentage Index. Union was able to pull away from Bellarmine for a 63-53 win. The Lions can punch a ticket to state with a victory over Camas on Wednesday, Feb. 15. It’s a loser-out game, so everything will be on the line for Bellarmine. Both Curtis teams have already punched a ticket to the regional round, with the boys already earning a spot in the Tacoma Dome due to their own RPI ranking, with is currently eighth. The Curtis boys (20-2) will face topranked Federal Way (22-1) on Thursday, Feb. 16 at Mt. Tahoma at 6 p.m. The Curtis girls (17-7) have advanced to the regional round with a 45-32 win over Tahoma and a 52-48 victory over Puyallup in a loser-out game. The Lincoln boys (22-0) are still without a blemish on their record. After dropping a 101-65 thumping on Evergreen to open districts, the Abes dispatched Central Kitsap to assure themselves a spot at the Tacoma Dome, as well as a date with Timberline (17-5) in the district semifinals on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Not to outdone, the Lincoln Lady Abes have also advanced to the Tacoma Dome, and will play Prairie (19-3) in the district semifinals on Thursday, Feb. 16 at Olympia High School at 6 p.m. Wilson’s boys have assured themselves a spot in the regionals with a 69-62 win over North Thurston and a 62-59 last-second, half-court buzzer beater over Kelso to push them into the district semifinals. It’s quite possible that Wilson could meet Lincoln in the district finals on Saturday, Feb. 18 at Puyallup High School at 2 p.m. The Wilson Lady Rams (14-9) will face Mountain View (1012) on Thursday, Feb. 16 at Timberline High School at 6

Tacoma

L L C

p.m. in a loser-out contest. The Lady Rams would also need another win two days later over either Peninsula or Timberline to advance to regionals, since the district only sends five teams this season. The Foss boys (18-5) will play Kingston (16-6) in the 2A district semifinals on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Already assured of a spot in the regionals, a victory will send Foss to the district title game at their home gym on Saturday, Feb. 18 at 5:30 p.m. Life Christian’s boys (22-1) have notched their third straight ticket to the state tournament in Spokane. The Eagles will face Adna (18-4) in the 2B district semifinals with a shot at a district matchup with 21-0 Napavine to the winner. The ingredients may be just right for this year’s team to make it to the big game in Spokane. Chief Leschi (18-5) is still alive in district play with a loser-out, winner to state matchup on tap with Toutle Lake (17-6) on Wednesday, Feb. 15. A win for the Warriors will send them to regionals and also might sew up a high enough RPI slot to be assured of a trip to Spokane. The Tacoma Baptist girls continue their magic run, reaching 22-0 for the first time in school history. The Crusaders will face Northwest Yeshiva (15-9) at home on Thursday, Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. A win sends the Crusaders to state, while a loss would mean the Crusaders would have to win one more game to advance. The Tacoma Baptist boys (16-8) began a second-half season surge that just may push them all the way. The Crusaders will play Rainier Christian (13-6) on Thursday, Feb. 16 at Auburn High School at 7 p.m. A victory sends the Crusaders to the regional round, while a loss would mean a loser-out game two days later.

THE SIDELINE

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The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sportsonly blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy!

www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

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Friday, February 17, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Loggers From page A10

their opponent with an overtime victory. The most-recent victory sealed a Northwest Conference championship for the Loggers, who could finish a perfect 16-0 in conference play with a victory at Pacific (7-16) on Saturday, Feb. 18. The only blemish on the Loggers’ record this season was a slim 68-65 loss to ninth-ranked Trinity at the PLU Holiday Classic in December. Puget Sound will host Lewis & Clark (15-8) in the semifinals of the NWC Tournament on Thursday, Feb. 23. Should the Loggers win, they will host the NWC title game on Saturday, Feb. 25 against either Whitman (20-3) or George Fox (19-4). Inside an unusually warm, if not sweltering Olson Auditorium, the Loggers took a 26-19 lead over the Lutes into the second quarter. It was as close as PLU would get for the remainder of the contest as UPS turned the heat up on both ends of the court. The Loggers were forcing turnovers, owning most of the rebounds and if they were within spitting distance of the three-point line, the shots were soaring and finding pay dirt. By the end of the first half, the Loggers had built a 51-32 advantage that already looked insurmountable for the Lutes, with 20 minutes of action still in the offing. The Loggers extended their lead in the third quarter, outscoring PLU 24-17 in the stanza and took a commanding 75-49 lead into the fourth quarter. The only question remaining was whether the Loggers were going to possibly hit the century mark on the scoreboard. While the heaters continued to blast away inside Olson Auditorium, the action on court cooled a little in the fourth quarter. With several reserves taking over to close out the game, the Loggers were still able to extend their lead even further to end the game at 91-60 to improve their record to 23-1, and dropping the Lutes to 1-23. The records truly meant something coming into this one. In the second half of the rivalry doubleheader, the Puget Sound and Pacific Lutheran men squared off in another mirror-like matchup. The Loggers entered the game at 12-11, with the Lutes coming in at 11-12. It looked like an even matchup on paper, even though the Loggers

t Stars From page A10

to be some long odds, making a secondplace finish much more realistic and allimportant. The playoff stakes have been raised for MASL teams this season. Last year, the top-three teams in each of the four divisions advanced to the playoffs. This season, the playoff-bound clubs have been trimmed to the top-two. To keep their hopes alive, the Stars were going to need to send the Ambush home with their 18th loss of the season. In front of 2,719 fans, Tacoma would push their unbeaten mark at home to 8-0 on the season. The only other undefeated team

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

RIVAL TIME. (left) UPS senior Carlos Mancasola tries to find an avenue to the basket. While the veteran has delivered 14.5 points a game for the Loggers this season, he was unable to overcome the iceberg shooting that gripped UPS in the second half and would only muster six points. (right) PLU junior Jared Christy broke away on a fastbreak, grinned back at the sole UPS defender trailing on the play, and then went up for the dunk. The rim had the final say, and blocked the attempt.

owned an 88-73 victory over the Lutes back on Jan. 17. With the Lutes still in the hunt for a fourth and final NWC playoff spot, the pressure was on PLU to bounce back from their prior meeting. For the first 30 minutes of the basketball game, it truly was anybody’s contest. UPS looked like they might make a run at the end of the first half, but it was stalled and countered by the Lutes and the Loggers had to settle for a 39-38 lead going into the locker rooms. Early in the second half, it looked like UPS may try to take over the game, but their momentum wore out at 46-39 and the Lutes began to reel them in. At the 12-min-

at home in the MASL is Soles de Sonora, putting the Stars in good company on that end. Tacoma got on the scoreboard first with 9:11 remaining in the first quarter. Derek Johnson skipped a short pass to Joseph Cairel on the right wing and the California kid wasted no time, plowing a one-timer inside the right post and the Stars were starting to get their home cooking together. However, St. Louis was able to answer a little over two minutes later as Richard Schmermund blasted a free kick past the Tacoma defensive wall, finding the back of the net to knot the game at 1-1. The goal played like a wake-up call for the Stars as Tacoma punched three goals in before the end of the first stanza. Mike Ramos got Tacoma’s second goal on an assist from Joey Gjertsen with four

! Wh a t a Feelin ''!

ute mark, PLU took a 49-46 lead on a three-point bucket by senior Brandon Lester and never let go of the reins. Meanwhile, the Logger shots were not falling. Whether it was from the outside, or a few feet from the basket, the UPS shooting ran cold and PLU capitalized on it on their way to a commanding 71-54 victory. The Pacific Lutheran men host Linfield on Friday, Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. A win by the Lutes would pull the two teams into a tie for fourth in the NWC, with PLU owning the tie-breaker due to beating Linfield both times this season.

minutes left in the first quarter. Thirty five seconds later, Raphael Cox scored on an assist from Chase Hanson and Tacoma was up 3-1. Hanson then got into the act two minutes later, getting a second crack at a good look and punched the ball into the back of the net to give the Stars a 4-1 lead going into the second quarter. St. Louis would score on a power play goal less than two minutes into the second quarter, only to have Tacoma answer a minute later on a goal by Cairel off an assist by Dan Antoniuk. The 5-2 lead would only last for a little over four minutes as Victor France delivered a solo blast that made the game much more interesting at 5-3 with eight minutes left in the second quarter. Tacoma would extend the lead to 7-2 by halftime on goals from Dan Antoniuk and Evan

McNeley, both assisted by Alex Megson. St. Louis would put two goals on the board within the first two minutes of the third quarter, and that was all they had left in the tank as Megson got into the act with his own goal with 8:34 remaining in the third quarter to give Tacoma an 8-5 lead. McNeley would put the icing on the cake with a goal on an assist by Antoniuk with three minutes left in the third stanza to build a 9-5 Stars lead that would remain until the final buzzer. Tacoma’s match in Ontario on Thursday, Feb. 16 can be viewed for free at 7:35 p.m. on the MASLTV channel on Youtube. The Stars return home to face the Chicago Mustangs (9-7) on Friday, Feb. 24 at 7:35 p.m. For tickets and more information, visit Tacomastars.com or call (844) STARS-TIME.

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Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 17, 2017

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Stop LNG Now!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the west coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!” The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER Pristine waterways next to an industrial complex such as LNG could cause an environmental disaster in the Puget Sound from which we may never recover.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleaner-burning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our roadways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need. Thousands of oil train cars enter and leave the Port of Tacoma daily. A train derailment in the river would be catastrophic.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned.

The I-5 corridor is well known for traffic congestion, which greatly increases the risk of toxic accidents on the highway.

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.

r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another. r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.


Printmaker Craig Cornwall at PLU

City Life

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

SYMPHONY TACOMA TO FEATURE VIOLIN SOLOIST KRISTIN LEE

PHOTO BY SOPHIE ZHAI

PHOTO BY DANE GREGORY MEYER

PRODIGY. Rising violin star Kristin Lee will make her debut with Symphony Tacoma during performances of “Classics III: Mozart & Tchaikovksy” next week. Sarah Ioannides will conduct. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

A

ward-winning violinist Kristin Lee - a rising star in the world of classical music - will make her debut with Symphony Tacoma next week. Lee will be a featured soloist during “Classics III: Mozart & Tchaikovsky,” a program that will begin at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 25, at Gig Harbor’s Chapel Hill Presbyterian Church and 2:30 p.m. Feb. 26, at Broadway Center’s Rialto Theater. The shows will mark Lee’s fourth time collaborating with conductor and Symphony Tacoma Musical Director Sarah Ioannides in a relatively short span. Ioannides first became enamored with Lee’s playing in 2015, the year she had won a prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant; and she hired her to perform Jean Sibelius’ “Violin Concerto, op. 47” with South Carolina’s Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, which she also directs. However, a serendipitous turn of events would find them sharing another far away stage weeks before that performance: Both had been hired to appear in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic that October with the National Symphony Orchestra. “So I got the second opportunity within a month to work with her,” Ioannides recalled last week, speaking by phone from home in New Haven, Conn. “We got on great. We had a lovely time and developed a fondness and respect. ... She is a very intelligent, sophisticated, thoughtful artist with just unbelievably phenomenal technique and richness to her musicianship.” “We had to delve into learning this violin concerto by Carl Neilsen,” Lee recalled. “It’s notoriously difficult for

the orchestra and for the violin. I was doing it for the very first time, and Sarah was doing it for the first time. Our first meeting created a very strong bond right away because of this wonderful piece that was such a huge challenge for both of us. “The concert ended up being extremely successful with great reviews, standing ovations. When I went down to Spartanburg to play Sibelius with her, I had a very high level of trust in her, the integrity of what she brings across with her music and also the charisma that she has. She’s a very petite woman, but something about her presence was just so huge and large on that stage.” They worked together for a third time in October with the Nordic Chamber Orchestra in Östersund, Sweden. It was there that Ioannides learned that Lee, a resident of New York, would be spending more time in the Pacific Northwest: For two years, she had been helping her friend, Seattle resident Andrew Goldstein, develop the Emerald City Music series which, in its inaugural season, has showcased highquality chamber music in unconventional settings. “We bring it to places that are very intimate (and,) we keep our dialogue very open with our audience to make it much more of a social experience,” Lee explained. The series brought her to the University of Puget Sound’s Schneebeck Hall in November, her first appearance in Tacoma. “It seemed to be an obvious match that she’d be in Seattle and Tacoma anyway,” Ioannides said, “and what a wonderful thing if she’d come and play with us.” Next week’s program juxtaposes the works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. “I’m really happy with this program because it pairs

two of the greatest composers of all time,” Ioannides said. “Tchaikovsky completely revered Mozart. In particular, the overture that we’ve playing is ‘The Don Giovanni Overture,’ which starts with the scary moment of the opera where the Commendatore is there as a ghost. This work was a really, really important piece (that influenced) Tchaikovsky’s early start as a composer. So when we do Tchaikovsky, the performance is in a way that emphasizes that relationship.” Lee will join Symphony Tacoma to perform Tchaikovsky’s iconic “Violin Concerto,” among the most celebrated pieces of music in history. “I would describe it as a very complete piece of work,” Lee said. “It really captures every single kind of emotion you could imagine. There are moments that are very youthful. It’s very warm, but also very melancholy, and very very dark and sad. “It’s also very notoriously difficult, and it wasn’t very well-received when he first wrote it because people said it’s not playable. That shows a lot of how violin playing has evolved over the years, because now, it’s become one of the standards. It’s a familiar work to many, many people. But I think in a way it’s very challenging in that sense because everybody knows it, and everybody plays it. So I’m really excited to bring my own take and my own personality to this work in Tacoma.” Tickets are still available for next week’s performances, with prices ranging from $19 to $80. To learn more, call the Broadway Center box office at (253) 591-5894 or visit www.broadwaycenter.org. Hear Musical Director Sarah Ioannides discuss the future of Symphony Tacoma online at www.tacomaweekly. com.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE ORMSBY TRIBUTE “Buck’s House Party” will be held from 1 to 6 p.m. on March 26 at the Temple Theatre, 47 St. Helens Ave., in honor of Tacoma rock icon John “Buck” Ormsby – of Fabulous Wailers, Little Bill & The Bluenotes and Etiquette Records fame – who died on his 75th birthday on Oct. 29. The lineup will include Little Bill & The Bluenotes; the Fab Wailers, featuring member of the Wailers’ later lineups and Gail Harris, who sang with the band in the 1960s; “Angel in the Morning” singer Merrilee Rush; The Ad Ventures, featuring Don Wilson and Nokie Edwards of The Ventures; The Kingsmen who had a national hit covering the Wailers’ arrangement of Richard Berry’s “Louie Louie”; City Zu; Jim Valley; The Daily Flash; Billy Mac; The Galaxies; and Tacoma guitar hero Jerry

Miller, of Moby Grape fame. Promoter Mike Mitchell said there will be no cover charge for the event, but there will be an auction of signed rock memorabilia, and donations will be accepted to help cover costs.

TWO ‘NIHONJIN FACE’ “Nihonjin Face: A Civil Rights Legacy Tour Per fo rm a n c e ” is a new play inspired by the true stories of South Sound families impacted by Executive Order 9066 which, 75 years ago, led to the internment of roughly 120,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II. Three performances will begin at 1, 3 and 5 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 19, at Broadway Center’s Studio 3. There will also be a panel discussion at 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the general public; www.broadwaycenter.org.

THREE BAVARIAN EATS The longawaited Rhein Haus will celebrate its grand opening at 649 Division Ave. on Saturday, Feb. 18. Patrons of the new, German-themed restaurant will be able to enjoy an assortment of bratwursts, shnitzel, freshly baked pretzels, craft lagers, bocce ball and music from the Bavarian Village Band from 5 to 8 p.m. Find hours and other relevant details online at www.rheinhaustacoma.com.

FOUR ‘13TH’ SCREENING Ava DuVerney’s critically acclaimed documentary “13th” will be screened at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at the Center for Spiritual Living, 206 N. J St. The film – originally created for Netflix – is named after the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, and

is a stirring treatise on the prisonindustrial complex through a nexus of racism, capitalism, policies and politics. The Center is showing the documentary as part of its “Meaningful Movies” series, and a discussion will follow; www.meaningfulmovies.org.

FIVE WINDOW REPAIR Homeowners can learn how to repair their classic, wooden window frames during a workshop being held at 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, at Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. Curt Stoner, a NSHD home owner, and Darrell Haire, a WA State contractor, will teach participants the skills they need to master do-it-yourself restoration of historic wooden windows. Cost is $125. Call (253) 203-5072 or email lhoogkamer@ ci.tacoma.wa.us to register and for further details.


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY &EBRUARY 

WEEKLY REWIND

Photos by Bill Bungard Among local bands that Tacoma Weekly photographer Bill Bungard caught this month are (L-R from top) American Wrecking Company on Feb. 11 at Louie G’s Pizza; the Morning After on Feb. 4 at Louie G’s (drummer Anna Seymour shown); Texas guitarist Eric Johnson on Jan. 30 at Seattle’s Jazz Alley; the rest of Morning After; Sin Circus on Feb. 8 at Stonegate Pizza and Rum Bar; Enuff Z’ Nuff the on the same night at Stonegate.


Friday, February 17, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

PLU’s University Gallery exhibits printmaker Cornwall retrospective

Culture Corner

A Guide to CulturAl orGAnizAtions of tAComA Events of the Week: Tacoma Opera’s Eugene Onegin Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m., Feb. 19, 2 p.m. Theater on the Square, 310 S 9th St., Tacoma, WA 98402 www.tacomaopera.com 253-627-7789

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY GALLERY, PLU

“3500 Kassel,� graphite and found objects, by Craig Cornwall. Part of a retrospective show of work by the printmaker that recently retired from PLU faculty. "Y$AVE2$AVISON dave@tacomaweekly.com

Pacific Lutheran University’s Gallery (housed in Ingram Hall – the school’s art building) just opened “Impressions,� a retrospective show of work by printmaker Craig Cornwall, a recently retired professor of art. The show covers a multiplicity of printmaking techniques: lithography, screen printing, woodcut – even the art of frottage (the technique of rubbing pencil, crayon or pastel over a textured surface or relief image to make a work of art. The method was used to dramatic effect by the pioneering surrealist artist Max Ernst). Cornwall explains his passion for printmaking as something like a precursor to the written word (the written word also finds its way into many of Cornwall’s works as well). “I love mark making. Printmaking and drawing are really about just that, the making of marks,� writes Cornwall. “Marks are abstract but become meaningful when they create a pattern of texture that are then recognized as symbols with meaning.� The works in the show touch on a number of themes that the artist explores through multiple works: the passage of time, religious musings, social inequity and mortality. He often explores a particular theme or idea through the making of a series of images. One series, for example, explores the Biblical narrative of Joseph and his brothers. One scene of the series is also one of the most powerful images in the entire show. Called “The Pit,� the long, vertical composition shows a long strip of black. The viewer is forced to look upward toward the top of the black strip. There, up above, are Joseph’s 10 jealous brothers who’ve tossed him into the pit and will sell him as a slave. Their attitudes range from mockery to aloofness to uncertainty. In another series, Cornwall has attempted to depict each of the “Seven Deadly Sins.� For each, Cornwall uses a pictorial style and combination of media that help to convey the essence of each particular sin. To show “Anger,� for example, Cornwall used a propane torch to draw a face using scorch marks. The problem with this variability is that the artist is more skilled at some techniques than others and the result is that the series is qualitatively spotty and disharmonious. Cornwall is more successful with a three-part series on the Fates from Greek

mythology: Clotho the spinner, Lachesis the allotter and Atropos the unturnable. The first spins the thread of each life, the second determines its length and the third cuts it off. Cornwall uses imagery related to birds and sticks to the same technique (lithography combined with screen-print) to make them. Each is very different in composition and size, yet the bird theme and consistency of media give them a satisfying wholeness as a group. Frottage is used in a series of larger scale works on paper. Cornwall uses graphite rubbings to make collage-like images that combine archeological artifacts, ancient carvings, fossils and other textures to suggest the passage of time on the scale of millennia. A related group of work, collage and assemblage compositions, deals with the passage of time on a human scale. These abstract compositions (reminiscent of the some of the less busy work by the Dada artist Kurt Schwitters) feature old envelopes, stamps, faded photos of unknown persons, found sales receipts and the like. In “A Kiss is Still a Kiss,� Cornwall combines frottage, assemblage and collage. There is sheet music from the titular song (made famous in the movie “Casa Blanca� starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman) as well as a small bundle of old letters – presumably love letters – tied up with a silk ribbon. There is a rustic old painting of a dead bird (once a common image of loss of innocence) and other artifacts. Elsewhere in the show there is a series of musing on the lives of the homeless; dark, haunting portraits and images of battling skeletons that look like book illustrations. Bones and skeletons run through the show. Many of the works shown have images of ghostly backbones buried in the visual background noise of the composition. There is a woodcut print of a skeleton with scythe surrounded by sub-imagery of other skeletons. A similar boundary of a skeleton coming to collect people that are interrupted during their daily routine activities forms the frame of one of Cornwall’s dim portraits. “Each tick of the clock takes something and leaves something behind,� notes the artist. Despite some unevenness of quality, “Impressions� is an impressive retrospective of work by an artist that has granted himself plenty of latitude to explore. The show runs through March 8. For further information visit www.plu.edu/gallery or call (253) 535-7573.

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This romantic gem of the Russian operatic repertoire, by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, has never been presented before by Tacoma Opera. By moving to Theater on The Square, Tacoma Opera will be doing this production as Tchaikovsky originally envisioned it: in an intimate, chamber setting that will better tell this bittersweet tale of a love that could have been. The sensitive young Tatyana, in love with her neighbor, Onegin, overcomes her natural shyness and writes him a letter asking him to marry her. His refusal humiliates her. At her birthday ball, his attentions to her sister Olga infuriate his friend Lenski, Olga’s fiancÊ, who challenges him to a duel. Onegin accepts and kills his friend. After years of repentant wandering, Onegin visits the court of his cousin, Prince Gremin and to his astonishment, finds that Tatyana is Gremin’s wife. Onegin falls desperately in love with her. Though tempted, in the end she remains faithful to Gremin, leaving Onegin alone and remorseful.

Doubt: A Parable Feb. 17 through March 12, Fridays and Saturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 2 p.m. Feb. 23 and March 2, 8 p.m. “Pay What You Can� Night. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. SW, Lakewood, WA 98499 www.lakewoodplayhouse.org 253-588-0042

All the elements come invigoratingly together like clockwork in John Patrick Shanley’s provocative play, “Doubt,� a gripping story of suspicion cast on a priest’s behavior that is less about scandal than about fascinatingly nuanced questions of moral certainty.

Balloon-Powered Car Challenge Feb. 18, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. LeMay America’s Car Museum, 2702 E. D St., Tacoma, WA 98421 americascarmuseum.org 253-779-8490 Design, build, tinker and learn together as you explore the world of automobiles and its relation to science, technology, engineering, art and math. On the third Saturday of each month, you and your child, grandchild, or family can spend quality time together exploring activities available in the Education Studio and Family Zone. Design, build, and test a vehicle that is powered by the force of air escaping from a balloon. Experiment with a variety of materials to see what makes the vehicle go fast, far, and straight. Free, with Museum admission.

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3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY &EBRUARY 

THE PRESCRIPTION FOR CABIN FEVER: A BIT OF URBAN HIKING

McKinley hillside is for you,� Gordon says. “Do it at your own pace. Leave slick-soled street shoes at home. Among McKinley’s trees are some old-fashioned varieties, such as horse chestnuts, likely planted in the years following the park’s creation more than 100 years ago. And because McKinley is mostly wooded, it offers a great escape from summer heat. While you’re there, say thank you to vigilant park neighbors, the folks Metro Parks credits for the park’s restoration and continuing upkeep.� Hikers with an interest in geology might want to pay a visit to Wapato Hills Park. “This big hill in South Tacoma is what geologists call a drumlin, a lump of stuff moved along by a glacier and left behind when it receded,� Gordon explains. “It’s a climb up and down, but you’ll find a wetland and native Oregon white oak trees up on the flat top. “ Intrigued? Grab a map of the city and start exploring. Every neighborhood, it seems, hides a greenbelt or two. Some are more developed than others. Some are better situated or more picturesque. But all of them have one thing in common: they offer a temporary escape, however brief or imperfect, from the concrete jungle. No road trip required.

"Y-ATT+ITE

mattkite@tacomaweekly.com

This has been a long winter, hasn’t it? If, like me, you enjoy exploring the Northwest’s peaks and valleys, but aren’t keen on hiking in snowy conditions, you might be experiencing a bit of cabin fever by now. Since early December, the snowline has been continually dropping. Even relatively low-elevation hikes are buried under a winter’s worth of snow. What to do? Go local. It’s easy to forget that we have access to some lovely pockets of nature right here in Tacoma. No need to stuff a backpack with the ten essentials or set aside a full day for the latest alpine adventure. Plenty of hikes boast a Tacoma zip code. Better still, urban hiking can be done year round. Most people know about Tacoma’s gems. There’s Point Defiance Park, a 702-acre urban oasis that draws more than three million visitors a year. Its amenities include miles of crisscrossing trails in an old-growth forest, which is home to bald eagles and mule deer, among other wildlife. There’s Swan Creek, a rugged 290-acre greenbelt perched on Tacoma’s eastern boundary. Hikers climbing its wooded canyon can trace the contours of a salmon-bearing stream beneath the cool shade of towering cottonwoods, alders and maples. There’s Snake Lake, a nature

PHOTO COURTESY OF METRO PARKS TACOMA

")'"!#+9!2$. It’s easy to forget that we have access to some lovely pockets of nature right here in Tacoma.

preserve bounded on three sides by busy arterials and Highway 16, and nearby China Lake, also sandwiched between noisy roads and the highway. If you can tune out the adjacent traffic while visiting either destination, you might notice a garter snake slithering across the trail, a coyote disappearing into the understory or a hooded merganser scooting across the water’s glassy surface. Both lakes host a never-ending parade of water fowl, from solitary great blue herons to migrating flocks of geese.

And there’s Puget Park, whose main trail cuts through a deep, astonishingly quiet ravine that leads from the Proctor neighborhood to just a few blocks short of Ruston Way and the waterfront. A salmon-bearing stream runs parallel to the main trail. But have you explored all of Tacoma’s nooks and crannies? Susan Gordon at Metro Parks Tacoma offers some insider tips on three local favorites. The most popular is Titlow Park, which provides spectacular views of the Tacoma Narrows, not to mention

those two engineering marvels that span it. “Try the Hidden Beach Trail,� she suggests, “a 1.3-mile loop that snakes through the woods to and from Hidden Beach, treasured by Metro Parks insiders as a peaceful, quiet refuge of escape from the city.� How about a workout that simulates a ridge climb in the mountains? Visit McKinley Park, one of Tacoma’s oldest green spaces. “If you’re looking for a place for strenuous exercise, the

Matt Kite is an avid hiker and masters runner in Tacoma. Check out “3 Minute Hikes,� his hiking channel on YouTube.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: GABRIEL IGLESIAS Gabriel Iglesias is coming back this year. The popular funny man – known for “The Fluffy Movie: Unity Through Laughterâ€? and “Magic Mike,â€? and last seen locally at the Tacoma Dome in 2015 – will headline the Emerald Queen Casino’s I-5 Showroom at 8:30 p.m. on April 29. Tickets are on sale now with prices ranging from $45 to $110. Visit www.ticketmaster.com to learn more about that and the rest of these upcoming shows except for where otherwise indicated. • Blue Oyster Cult: 8 p.m. March 11, Emerald Queen Casino, $25 to $35. • Chris Botti: 8 p.m. March 17, Tacoma Dome, $26.50 to $196. • Lucky 2017 featuring Knife Party, Aly & Fila and more: 6 p.m. March 11, Tacoma Dome, $81. • John Cleese: 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. March 17, Pantages Theater, $39 to $110; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Eric Church: 8 p.m. March 18, Tacoma Dome, $20 to $86. • Lewis Black: 8 p.m. March 18, Pantages Theater, $59.50 to $75.

• Babyface: 8:30 p.m. March 24, Emerald Queen Casino, $40 to $100. • “The Spin Stops Hereâ€? with Bill O’Reilly, Dennis Miller and Jesse Watters: 5 p.m. March 25, Tacoma Dome, $65 to $125. • Jeff Angell’s Staticland: 9 p.m. March 31, Jazzbones, $12 to $15; www.ticketfly.com. • Radiohead: 7:30 p.m. April 8, KeyArena, Seattle, $65.50 to $95.50. • U2 “Joshua Tree Tour 2017â€?: 6:30 p.m. May 14, Century Link Field, Seattle, $35 to $280. • The Flaming Lips: 8 p.m. May 16, Paramount Theatre, Seattle, $45.

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

FLUFFY. Iglesias and fans backstage at the Tacoma Dome in 2015.

• “Sasquatch Music Festivalâ€? featuring Frank Ocean, The Shins and more: May 26 to 28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George, $275 to $295 festival pass.

2016-2017 Season

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Tacoma band Junkyard Jane celebrates 20th anniversary

Friday, February 17, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Nightlife TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

AWARD-WINNING SINGERS OLIVIA NEWTON-JOHN, BETH NIELSEN CHAPMAN AND AMY SKY WILL PERFORM SONGS FROM THEIR NEW ALBUM, “LIV ON,� AT 7:30 P.M. FRIDAY, FEB. 17, AT BROADWAY CENTER’S PANTAGES THEATER. TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW WITH PRICES RANGING FROM $39 TO $110; WWW.BROADWAYCENTER.ORG.

FRIDAY, FEB. 17 PHOTO COURTESY OF JUNKYARD JANE

JUNKYARD JANE. The band’s lineup, circa 1998, included (clockwise

from top left) Randy Oxford, Chris Leighton, Barbra Blue, Leanne Trevalyan and Billy Stoops.

part of a little bit, was kind of an all female band. We had all these projects going, and we decided right around the fall of ‘97 that we were gonna play a festival. We said, “Look, we need to get rid of all three of these projects and just have one band.� So we took players from all those bands and put together what became Junkyard Jane.’ TW: But, like you were saying, there was an earlier incarnation. STOOPS: It was a little side project that we had that was called Junkyard Jane. We thought it was a good band name, and that’s kind of how it got started. Then through the years there have been so many great musicians that have passed through the band. Our original horn player, Sue Orfield, was awesome. Then Randy Oxford and Jim King. We worked with some great drummers. Barb’s (bassist Blue) has pretty much always been there except for a short stint where we were based out of Kentucky (where Stoops’s drawl comes from. The band was based in Louisville from 2003 to 2007.) TW: The description you hear most about you guys is “swamp-a-billy blues.� Tell me about the original concept for the band and how the music has evolved over the years. STOOPS: While we played a lot of blues, we weren’t really what you would call a blues band; but we played a lot of swampy stuff where Leanne had a washboard and stuff like that. What happened with us is we got this really diverse sound that really wasn’t like anybody else. It was somewhat unique, and yet no matter if you were a blues lover, a jazz lover, a country lover, a rock lover – whatever – there was something in that band that would win you over and that you liked. TW: When did you first realize there was a creative spark between you and Leanne? And what has

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

One of Tacoma’s most popular bands, Junkyard Jane, turns 20 this year; and Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located 901 N. J St., will celebrate with a special anniversary installment of its Blues Vespers series, which will kick off at 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19. Primary songwriters “Billy Stoops and Leanne Trevelyan are great songwriters with their own projects, but they always come home to Junkyard Jane, bringing with them the new twists and turns they’ve learned apart,� says Rev. Dave Brown, who books acts for the Vespers series. “Billy and Leanne are leaders in the Tacoma music scene, always eager to lend a hand and a voice for a good cause. I am excited to present this anniversary Vespers, and am very pleased to call this band and its members friends.� The show is free, though IPC collects donations for its performers; www.ipctacoma.org for further details. Earlier this week, Stoops looked back at his band’s first two decades. TACOMA WEEKLY: Take me back to the beginning? Is the band how you met Leanne? BILLY STOOPS: I actually met Leanne when she showed up at a jam that I was running out in Woodinville - in 1996, I think. We kind of hit it off, and I asked her to do a show with me. I always wanted to work with a percussionist, and I always wanted to work with a female vocalist. Then, all of a sudden, there were both of them in one person. So I got her to do a show, just an acoustic show with me. It turned out really good, and we started doing some shows together. There was this band Cobalt Hook that she had been working with. Then my band was The Generators. The original incarnation of Junkyard Jane, which I was

allowed the partnership to flourish for 20 years like that? STOOPS: I have such a respect for her vocal ability. She’s a great singer. Her voice is incredible. She can harmonize with anybody, and her voice with mine just makes everything I do sound incredible. But she’s also a very intuitive percussionist. That gets really passed by a lot. She’s really underrated in that arena because she knows exactly what percussion instrument to put where. Sometimes it’s just one little thing in a song that will accent something that, if it’s not there, the song doesn’t make sense. She’s amazing in that regard. Everything just melds really well with us. TW: Leanne was telling me you’re doing a bigger show later this year. What other events do you have planned to commemorate the anniversary? STOOPS: We’ve got different festivals we’re doing through the summer. We’ll be having some guests, like we’ll have Jim King with us or Randy with us – other people that have been through the band. Our goal – and we’re still putting everything together – is to do a 20th anniversary showcase in Tacoma. We’re still working with a couple of different people to try and put that together.

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B SHARP COFFEE: “Something to Tell� (storytelling open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE’S: Cross Rhythm Trio (funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Good Vibes Trio (Latin jazz fusion) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: 4 More (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Seaan Brooks, Haiku, Chris Nixk, Gage Edwards (hip-hop) 8 p.m., $10-$12 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Riot in Rhythm, Clinton “Dogger� Mullins, Sean the Piano Man (rock) 7:30 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): Shady Day Trio (rock) 7 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: The Madd Hammers, Crossing Crusades, Dedelectric, Professor Sweater (rock) 8 p.m., $8 THE SWISS: Cypress Grove (blues, rock) 9 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: Seaton Smith (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show THEATER ON THE SQUARE: Tacoma Opera presents “Eugene Onegin� (opera, classical) 7:30 p.m., $35-$60, AA THE VALLEY: The Pearls, The Country Lips, Buckley (country, rock, Americana) 8 p.m., $5

SATURDAY, FEB. 18

THE VALLEY: Heiress, Wounded Giant, Tacos! (alternative, sludge-metal) 8 p.m., $5 B SHARP COFFEE: T-Town Blues Revue with Joel Astley (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA DOYLE’S: Speechless (jazz fusion) 10 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Good Vibes Trio (Latin jazz fusion) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: 4 More (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: My Life in Black and White, The Fun Police, Stop Don’t Stop, The Truck Bed Boys (alternative, punk, rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Chronological Injustice, Vultures Above Us, Beyond Theory, 4th Chamber Ritual Habitual (rock, metal) 8 p.m., $10, AA MARKEE (OLD TOWN): Angie Lynn (singer-songwriter, acoustic) 7 p.m., NC, AA METRONOME: The Far Field with Paul Handelman (folk, country) 7 p.m., NC, AA PANTAGES: Eric Burton & the Amimals (classic rock) 7:30 p.m., $29-$85 REAL ART TACOMA: Bone Sickness, Same-Sex Dictator, Kill the Shark, Mind Quad, Sister Act (hardcore, punk, experimental) 6 p.m., $7, AA THE SPAR: The Olson Brothers (country, rock) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: The Nasty Habits (rock, punk, new wave) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: The Hipsters (rock covers) 9 p.m., TACOMA COMEDY: Seaton Smith (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $16-$22, 18+ early show THEATER ON THE SQUARE: Tacoma Opera presents “Eugene Onegin� (opera, classical) 2 p.m., $35-$60, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Lo Lo and Friends (rock) 8 p.m.

SUNDAY, FEB. 19

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REAL ART TACOMA: Jesus Piece, Jukai, Vamachara, Year of the Knife (alternative, metal, hardcore) 5 p.m., $10$12, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Belly Dance Revue (dance) 7 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSON’S: Rene LeMensager (jazz, blues open mic) 5 p.m., NC, AA IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Junkyard Jane (Americana, blues) 5 p.m., NC, AA THE SPAR: Two Scoops Combo (blues) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Puget Sound Music for Youth sixth anniversary show with Bailey Doctor, Suite Clarity and more (rock) |2 p.m., $6, AA TACOMA COMEDY: “The Dope Show� (comedy) 8 p.m., $14.20-$24.20, 18+

MONDAY, FEB. 20

THE VALLEY: Phasers on Kill, Western Settings, Caskitt, Problem Daughter (punk, alternative) 8 p.m., $5 B SHARP COFFEE: “Creative Colloquy� (literary open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Rene LeMensager (jazz, blues open mic) 5 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Michael Langdon (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, FEB. 21

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAWSON’S: Leanne Trevalyan and Billy Stoops (open mic) 8 p.m., NC METRONOME: Open mic night, 6:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: “New Talent Tuesday� (comedy) 8 p.m., NC, 18+

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Leify Green (open mic) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+

THURSDAY, FEB. 23

THE VALLEY: The 44s (blues) 8 p.m., $5

B SHARP COFFEE: Elliott Turner and the Ground Up Trio (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Comfort and Call (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Gary Owen (comedy) 7 p.m., $30-$40, 18+ TACOMA ELKS: Terry West (DJ) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Seeking Freelance Writer Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along with our flagship publication, the Tacoma Weekly, we publish the University Place Press, Fife Free Press, Milton-Edgewood Signal and Puyallup Tribal News. PCCNG is seeking experienced, dependable, community-minded writers. All areas are needed – news, sports and entertainment. Must be a self-starter capable of following up on assignments and also developing in-depth stories independently in a deadline-driven environment. Photography skills are a big plus, as are copyediting/proofreading skills (AP style). Will include some evening work and occasional weekend hours. Send cover letter, resume and at least three examples of published work to matt@tacomaweekly.com or via regular mail to PCCNG, 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife, WA 98424. Please, no phone calls or walk-ins.


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY &EBRUARY 

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: ERIC BURDON & THE ANIMALS Sat., Feb. 18, 7:30 p.m. Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway Eric Burdon has one of the most powerful and distinctive voices in rock and roll. As the front man and driving force of The Animals, Burdon was at the forefront of the British Invasion, helping to shape the movement with his imposing yet stirring vocals. Price: $29, $49, $69, $85. Info: (253) 591-5894; www.broadwaycenter.org

‘DOUBT: A PARABLE’ Fri., Feb. 17, 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 18, 8 p.m. Sun., Feb. 19, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse at Lakewood Towne Center, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood Lakewood Playhouse presents the fourth show of its 78th season, winner of the Tony Award, the Academy Award and the Pulitzer Prize Award for Drama. This production of “DOUBT: A Parable� will place you in the center of a gripping story of suspicion cast on a priest’s behavior that is less about scandal than about fascinatingly nuanced questions of moral certainty. Special Showings: “Pay What You Can� Night at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb 23 and “Pay What You Can� Actor’s Benefit at 8 p.m. Thursday, March 3. AUDIENCE WARNING: This Play Contains Mature Content and Themes. Info: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org; (253) 588-0042 ‘BUDDY: THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY’ Fri., Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 18, 7:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 19, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. From Buddy Holly’s first recording contract and move to New York to his fatal tour of Midwest America, “Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story� explains how, in just three short years, he changed the face of popular music forever. Ages: All ages. Price: $31; $29 seniors, students & military; $22 12 and under. Information: Reservations required: (253) 565-6867; www.tmp.org ‘JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH’ Fri., Feb. 17, 7:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University – Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, 12180 Park Ave. S. A classic story of friendship, bravery and adventure, James and the Giant Peach is sure to fulfill the fantasies of anyone who has ever dreamed of escape. Ages: All ages. Price: $5. Info: (253) 535-7411; www.plu.edu/khp CYPRESS GROVE Fri., Feb. 17, 9 pm. to 1 a.m. The Swiss Pub, 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Cypress Grove is a blues rock power trio from Maple Valley. Their original compositions and covers hearken back to the sounds of 60’s and 70’s classic blues rock power trios. Ages: 21+ Price: $8. Info: (253) 572-2821; www. theswisspub.com KYLE HAUGEN, ORGANIST Fri., Feb. 17, 12:10-1 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church Tacoma, 310 N. K St. Kyle Haugen, organist, plays a richly varied program of music by J. S. Bach and Dieterich Buxtehude, and seven settings of “If Thou But Trust in God to Guide Thee� by baroque and contemporary

composers on the renowned John Brombaugh pipe organ. Price: Donations accepted. Info: (253) 383-1563; www. ccptacoma.org DAN DUVAL GOOD VIBES TRIO Sat., Feb. 18, 7:30-11 p.m. G. Donnalson’s, 3814 N. 26th St. Good Vibes Trio at G. Donnalson’s. Featuring vibraphone, sax and bass the trio performs a mix of jazz and blues with a bit of swing, plenty of Latin and some bebop as well. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 761-8015; gdonnalsons.com EDIBLE GARDENS WORKSHOP SERIES: CARING FOR FRUIT TREES Sat., Feb. 18, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Metro Parks Tacoma, 4702 S. 19th St. Explore the basics of successful vegetable gardening in the Pacific Northwest – from seed to table. This free monthly workshop series is held at five locations around Pierce County. Ages: All ages (may not be suitable for very young children) Price: Free, registration required. Info: (253) 798-4133; www. piercecountywa.org/index. aspx?nid=1558 FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., Feb. 18, 8-9 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. There are no dues, fees, or weigh-ins at FA meetings. Membership is open to anyone who wants help with food. Price: Free. Info: (253) 3108177; www.foodaddicts.org ARGENTINE TANGO BEGINNERS CLASS Sun., Feb. 19, 12-1 p.m. Backstreet Tango, 3505 S. 14th St. Join this group for an Absolute Beginner Level Class. The studio was built with the sole purpose of teaching only authentic social Argentine Tango. Ages: 16 with guardian and up. Price: $10 per class, 8 classes for $40, 10 classes for $70. Info: (253) 304-8296; backstreettango.com HISTORIC “OLD ST. PETER’S CHURCH� INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP Sun., Feb 19, 10-11 a.m.. and 6:30-7:15 p.m. St. Peter’s Church, 2910 N. Starr St. Tacoma’s first and oldest church St. Peter’s (est. 1873), invites you to experience Holy Communion every Sunday at 10 a.m. (Sunday School). At 6:30 p.m., we offer Compline Services the first and third Sundays, and Evening Prayer all others. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 2724406; www.oldstpeters.org WEEKLY MEDITATION CLASS WITH PRAYERS FOR WORLD PEACE Sun., Feb. 19, 10-11:15 a.m. Tushita Kadampa Buddhist Center, 1501 Pacific Ave. S. A peaceful, contemplative

time in your weekend. Join us for guided meditations and uplifting advice on how we can transform our dayto-day life into opportunities for personal and spiritual growth. Ages: All ages. Price: $10. Info: (360) 754-7787; www.meditateinolympia.org/ tacoma NEW SPANISH WORSHIP SERVICE Sun., Feb. 19, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 101 E. 38th St. We are offering a new Spanish worship service for the community. All are welcome to this new outreach that will use the same format as our English service. Ages: All Ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 474-0525; blctacoma.com LEARNING ABOUT ISLAM Mon., Feb. 20, 7 p.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S. 12th St. Led by Dr. Erica Lee Martin, Prof. of Hebrew Scriptures, New Testament and the Qu’ran at Seattle University, the first session will focus on Questions about Islam today and the Formation of Islam, in relation to Judaism and Christianity. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www. saintandrewstacoma.org GUEST ARTIST SERIES, TOWN OF STEILACOOM Mon., Feb. 20, 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Steilacoom Community Center, 2301 Worthington St., Steilacoom Enjoy an art show by awardwinning artist Denise MacDonald, (member of Pacific Gallery Artists). Her art will be on display through the end of February, as part of the “Guest Artist Series� hosted by The Town of Steilacoom. Price: Free. Info: (253) 5811076; www.townofsteilacoom.com/254/CommunityCenter-Park CREATIVE COLLOQUY MONTHLY READING Mon., Feb. 20, 7 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Opera Alley Even though February is proving to be a cold, windy and wet month, Creative Colloquy won’t let you suffer through it alone. Instead, we’re inviting you to our monthly reading and open mic. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-9969; www. bsharpcoffeehouse.com/ CURRAN ORCHARD TREE ADOPTION PROGRAM Mon., Feb. 20, 8 a.m. to dusk Curran Apple Orchard Park, 3920 Grandview Dr. W., University Place Enjoy delicious apples while supporting the Curran Apple Orchard Park in University Place. Tree adoptions are still available for the 2017 growing season. Price: $45 pruning adoption (through April); $70 orchard supporter. Info: www.curranappleorchard. com

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar� link.

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

LINE DANCING Tues., Feb. 21, 6-8 p.m. Asia Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way Beginners and intermediates can get on the dance floor for fun and exercise in this seven-week program. Beginners meet on Tuesdays, Intermediates on Thursdays. Price: $45 for 7-week session. Info: (253) 383-3900; www.asiapacificculturalcenter.org

ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Wed., Feb. 22, 7-9:30 p.m. Cultura Event Center, 5602 S. Washington St. Learn to dance Tango in the style of Argentina, where tango was created. Learn the art of connection and moving with another person in this incredible and versatile dance. Ages: 18+ Price: $10; $15 couple. Info: (253) 2220105; tangointacoma.com

RCIA PRESENTS: WHAT IS LENT? Tues., Feb. 21, 7-8:30 p.m. St. Patrick Catholic Church, 1001 N. J St. Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults: Grow in your Catholic faith, deepen your prayer life, and help build the Church that Christ is calling us to be. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 383-2783; parish.saintpats.org

CLAW OPEN SWIM Wed., Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join the Cartoonist’s League of Absurd Washingtonians for their monthly Open Swim. Participants will draw a word from the fez and incorporate that into their drawing. CLAW meets the fourth Wednesday of every month at King’s Books. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www.kingsbookstore.com

NYNORSK! SONGS AND PIANO WORKS OF EDVARD GRIEG Tues., Feb. 21, 8-9:30 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University – Lagerquist Concert Hall, 868 Wheeler St. S. NW favorite and new artistic director of the Mostly Nordic Chamber Music Series. This concert is sponsored, in part, by the Sons of Norway Tacoma, Auburn and Olympia Lodges, the Daughters of Norway Tacoma Lodge, and the Scandinavian Cultural Center. Price: $8 General, $5 Seniors and Alumni, Free Students. Info: (253) 5357349; www.plu.edu/music/ calendar/home

OPEN-MIC NIGHT @ TACOMA COMEDY CLUB Wed., Feb 22; doors 7 p.m.. show 8 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St Every Wednesday night at Tacoma Comedy Club we have Open-Mic Night. This is where dreams are made, and nightmares come true. Price: Free. Info: (253) 282-7203; www.tacomacomedyclub.com STEINS, VINES & GRINDS: WASHINGTON’S STORY OF BEER, WINE & COFFEE Wed., Feb. 22, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave. The latest exhibit at the Washington State History Museum, Steins, Vines & Grinds, explores the history of three libations that continue to be wildly popular in the Evergreen State. Ages: All ages. Price: Adults $12, Students/Seniors/ Military $8, Kids under 5 free, EBT individual $1, EBT family $2. Info: (888) 238-4373; www.wshs.org

PEELED BANANAS OPEN MIC Tues., Feb. 21, 7:30 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Opera Alley Peeled Bananas Comedy Night presents a brand new comedy open mic to the downtown scene. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-9969; www. bsharpcoffeehouse.com

F Z A W D R P R Q K G J R L L C E W Y G

G Y R N E C J H Y T B D T E C Y V T R M

F Y I M M I G R A T I O N V Y J I C N F

B W N Z N C F P L N O H Q T C U Y V A S

Q T S T A T E O F T H E C I T Y N E V R

B U C K Y S R Z O E B B N G G T O T V H

A M C C I Y E A Q Y E O M R I I H W U G

O L I E R L H Z S T I A S P J V P D M M

Z L M E M C E S Q T X A A T U J M J A H

F A C E B O O K A T R P Y G X Z Y Z Y Z

S Q L P T Z O C F L U I T R P A S L O I

Y M K T I V U F Q O S U C A Q U T Q R W

G T K M G D Z G F P N U S K C M G H M R

N R M F E C G O X L G O R F L O Y I B O

I G P U A T C Z B H R O Z F D A C U I R

L N U A E T C K J Z X R N C P Y N A D E

W E N Z E Z D G C K Z Q L E M U V D T C

O U K Z V Y L G X I X N N M N S S T S Z

B T V H V I N L O C N I L G O T M C P H

E J H B J U H H D G W Q V J I P C C O X

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

STATE OF THE CITY How many words can you make out of this phrase?


Friday, February 17, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Classifieds

CALL 253.922.5317

253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

SERVICES ROOTER

ROOTER

SERVICES DESIGN

DESIGN

SERVICES HAULING

SERVICES

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

WEST COAST LASER DESIGN 253-985-5824 WWW.WESTCOASTLASERDESIGN.COM ELECTRICAL

CASH FOR CARS

Allied Electric Service

ALLIEE1963CQ

CASH FOR CARS WE WILL BUY YOUR UNWANTED CARS & RVS. FREE TOWING. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE. 253-341-9548 RITA

HAULING

HAULING

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 www.alliedmarinecorp.com

ALEX’S WINTER MAINTENANCE SERVICES GUTTER CLEANING

AND

HAULING

  

FOR SALE RV 1997 DUTCH STAR BY NEWMAR. MUST SEE. 37’, ONE LONG SLIDE. 2 A/C W/D TAG AXLE. GOOD CONDITION, READY TO ROLL. $17,500 O.B.O. JOHN AT 253-370-4559

WANTED

WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

  

CONTACT US Phone: Mail:

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424

LAWN CARE

Garage Clean Out Yard Clean Up

LAWN CARE

Big John’s Lawn Care º Storm Clean-up º Handyman

FREE Hauling (253) 397-7013 for Metal CLEANING

CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com LIMO

LIMO

LIMO

LIMO

PATRIOT LIMOUSINE SERVICE

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

EMPLOYMENT

24 Hour Service Weddings • Anniversaries • Birthdays • Proms • Graduations Funerals • Round Trip Airport Service • Corporate Holiday Parties • All Other Special Occasions

253-848-7378 www.patriotlimowa.com

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@ fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

EXPERIENCED TREE CLIMBER

Full Time/Year Round Up to $250.00 Per Day + Potential pay increase after 90 days. $1,000 Incentive can be earned within 60 days Medical after 60 days Voluntary Dental 3-5 years of tree climbing experience Email work experience to Recruiting@treeservicesnw.com

1-800-684-8733 ext. 3321

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

Advertise Your Employment Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com • Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com • Andrea Jay, andrea@tacomaweekly.com


3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY &EBRUARY17 

NOTICES

NOTICES

Kitsap Transit Contracting Opportunities

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT

+ITSAP4RANSITISHEREBYPUBLISHINGNOTICES OF ITS PLANNED FEDERAL PROCUREMENTS FOR &EDERAL &ISCAL 9EAR  +ITSAP 4RANSIT ENCOURAGES PARTICIPATION BY ALL lRMS WISHING TO PARTICIPATE IN +ITSAP 4RANSIT CONTRACTING OPPORTUNITIES )T IS THE POLICY OF +ITSAP 4RANSIT TO ENSURE THAT $ISADVANTAGED "USINESS %NTERPRISES $"%S HAVE AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TO RECEIVE AND PARTICIPATE IN $/4 !SSISTED CONTRACTS 0LEASE VISIT HTTPWWW KITSAPTRANSITCOMAGENCY INFORMATION PROCUREMENTFORBIDDINGOPPORTUNITIES SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PIERCE ./    35--/.3"905",5#!4)/. 2ONALD,-OOREAND#LAUDIA*-OORE (USBANDANDWIFE

0LAINTIFFS 6S .%47/2+).'&5.$).' #/20/2!4)/. A#ALIFORNIA #ORPORATIONANDANYPERSONORENTITY CLAIMINGBY THROUGHORUNDERTHEM IN ANYCAPACITY REGARDINGTHEPROPERTY WHICHISTHESUBJECTOFTHISSUIT $EFENDANTS 4(% 34!4% /& 7!3().'4/. 4/  .%47/2+ &5.$).' #/20/2!4)/. A#ALIFORNIA#ORPORATIONANDANYPERSON OR ENTITY CLAIMING BY THROUGH OR UNDER THEM IN ANY CAPACITY REGARDING THE PROPERTYWHICHISTHESUBJECTOFTHISSUIT 9OUAREHERBYSUMMONEDTOAPPEAR WITHIN SIXTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE lRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISSUMMONS TOWIT WITHIN SIXTY DAYS AFTER THE TH DAY OF &EBRUARY  AND DEFEND THE ABOVE ENTITLED ACTION IN THE ABOVE ENTITLED COURT AND ANSWER THE COMPLAINT OF THE PLAINTIFFS 2ONALD AND #LAUDIA -OORE ANDSERVEACOPYOFYOURANSWERUPONTHE UNDERSIGNEDATTORNEYFORPLAINTIFF $ONALD .0OWELL

ATHISOFlCEBELOWSTATEDAND IN CASE OF YOUR FAILURE TO DO JUDGMENT WILL RENDERED AGAINST YOUR ACCORDING TO THEDEMANDOFTHECOMPLAINT WHICHHAS BEEN lLED WITH THE CLERK OF SAID COURT 4HEOBJECTOFTHELAWSUITISTOQUIETTITLE TOTHEPROPERTYINANDWITH0LAINTIFFSAND TO DECLARE THE LIEN CREATED BY THE DEED OFTRUSTINFAVOROFTHENAMEDDEFENDANT .%47/2+ &5.$).' #/20/2!4)/. A #ALIFORNIA #ORPORATION IS VOID AND OF NOEFFECT HAVINGFULLYPAIDANDSATISlED MORETHANTENYEARSAGO )F YOU WISH TO SEEK THE ADVICE OF AN ATTORNEYINTHISMATTER YOUSHOULDDOSO PROMPTLYSOTHATYOUWRITTENRESPONSE IF ANY MAYBESERVEDONTIME 4HIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO 2EVISE #ODE OF 7ASHINGTON #HAPTERS  AND  AND PURSUANT TO A #OURT ORDERAUTHORIZINGSERVICEBYPUBLICATION $ATEDTHISTHDAYOF&EBRUARY  $/.!,$.0/7%,,73"! !TTORNEYFOR0LAINTIFFS2ONALDAND#LAUDIA -OORE

NOTICES

VOLUNTEERS

./    .OTICE AND3UMMONSBY0UBLICATION $%0%.$%.#9 3-0"

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE

$EPENDENCY/& 49,/24(/-03/. $/" 4/-)#(!%,4(/-03/. 0RESUMED &ATHER ! $EPENDENCY 0ETITION WAS lLED ON .OVEMBER   A FACT &INDING HEARING WILL BE HELD ON THIS MATTER ON -ARCH  ATPMAT4HURSTON #OUNTY &AMILY AND *UVENILE #OURT  ND !VENUE 37 4UMWATER 7ASHINGTON  9OU SHOULD BE PRESENTATTHISHEARING 4HE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DElNED IN 2#7   4HIS BEGINS A JUDICIAL PROCESSWHICHCOULDRESULTINPERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS )F YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE 4O REQUEST A COPY OF THE .OTICE 3UMMONS AND $EPENDENCY 0ETITION CALL $3(3 AT    OR     4O VIEW INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS INCLUDING RIGHT TO A LAWYER GO TO (90%2,).+ hHTTPWWWATG WAGOV$09ASPXv WWWATGWAGOV $09ASPX $ATED    BY ,INDA -YHRE %NLOW 4HURSTON#OUNTY#LERK 4/%URANA&LORES :IEGLER #ASE3TYLE#534/$9 #ASE.UMBER059 #6 #534   .ATUREOF#ASE#534/$9 9/5!2%(%2%"9SUMMONEDTOAPPEARAND RESPONDTOTHE#IVIL#OMPLAINT0ETITIONlLED BYTHEABOVENAMED0ETITIONERINTHE#OURTOF THE0UYALLUP4RIBEOF)NDIANSONTHE0UYALLUP )NDIAN2ESERVATION LOCATEDAT%ST 3TREET4ACOMA 7ASHINGTON !N ).)4)!,(EARINGISSCHEDULEDATTHE ABOVE NAMED#OURTON!PRIL  AT PM 9OUMUSTRESPONDINWRITINGTOTHECIVIL COMPLAINTPETITIONWITHINTWENTY DAYS AFTERTHEDATEOFTHElRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHIS SUMMONS9OUMUSTSERVEACOPYOFYOUR WRITTENANSWERONTHE0ETITIONERANDlLEWITH THIS#OURTANAFlDAVITOFSERVICE &AILURETOlLEAWRITTENRESPONSEMAYRESULTIN ADEFAULTJUDGMENTENTEREDAGAINSTYOU 4HEPARTIESHAVETHERIGHTTOLEGAL REPRESENTATIONATTHEIROWNEXPENSEAND EFFORT4HIS#OURTHASALISTOFATTORNEYSAND SPOKESPERSONSWHOAREADMITTEDTOPRACTICE INTHIS#OURT #OPIESOFTHE#IVIL#OMPLAINT0ETITIONAND THIS3UMMONSAREAVAILABLEATTHE#OURT #LERKS/FlCELOCATEDAT%ST3T 4ACOMA 7! )FYOUHAVEANYQUESTIONS PLEASECONTACTTHE #OURT#LERKS/FlCEAT  

Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 2/21/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 2/21/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 2:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 1:00-2:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan.org and click “hospice and palliative care� in the “our services� tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.

PETS LOST DOG

LOST DOG

Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 02232017 Date 02/23/2017 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

VOLUNTEERS City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www. cityoffife.org/getinvolved Read Across America Day Communities in Schools of Tacoma is working with both Graduate Tacoma and the Rotary Club’s to organize and recruit volunteer guest readers for Read Across America Day, to encourage students to pick up a book and read. And this year marks the eighteenth annual celebration of reading and Dr. Seuss’s

birthday! As we gear up for Read Across America Day, we would like to ask fellow community members to put aside the many hats they wear for work and read to children on March 2, 2017. If you are interested in reading to children on March 2nd, please contact Valerie Sweisthal, Communities In Schools of Tacoma-Early Childhood Outreach Coordinator for more information 253-571-4989 or vsweist@tacoma.k12. wa.us or visit http://tacoma.ciswa.org/news/ join-communities-inschools-of-tacomaand-graduate-tacomafor-read-across-america-day/ to find out what schools are participating. I look forward to working with you to motivate our children to read on March 2 and every day.

Hello My Name is Bella,

I have lost my way home and have a puppy that needs me there desperately. I reside at 1313 Willows Rd E Fife, WA 98424. Please contact my owners who would be more than happy to compensate you for my return home. Contact Information: Email: abass91004@hotmail.com Phone: 253-318-1479, 253-202-4735

Pet of the Week

CODY oo ing for a family dog ou d be ard- ressed to find a better fit t an Featured et ody, as t e ustralian e erd/ astiff mi as lived it it all. ats, dogs, livestoc , young c ildren. ou name it, ody as andled li e a c am . nd if you ve got bac yard s ace, our friendly, social boy is sold. Literally any activity outside is his favorite. s it many dogs getting u t ere in years, ody as been identified as aving moderate tartar on is teet , and e recommend a veterinarian evaluate the oral health of the -year-old. ody s liver en ymes and a fe fatty tumors (most likely only a cosmetic problem) will also need to be monitored. ee t e alentine s s irit going today, and remember, a senior et s love is forever

www.thehumanesociety.org

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Tacoma Weekly 2588 Pacific Hwy Fife WA 98424

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Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

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2 5 8 8 P a c i f i c H w y, F i f e • 2 5 3 - 9 2 2 - 5 3 1 7 TA C O M A W E E K LY

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M I LTO N - E D G E W O O D S I G N A L

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Friday, February 17, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Classifieds REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES

Serving the Community Since 1991

WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs

Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNT‰ BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF t (FUUJOHRVBMJmFEBOEBQQSPWFEGPSBMPBO t $IPPTJOHUIFSJHIUMPBOUZQFGPSZPV t 6OEFSTUBOEJOHDSFEJUTDPSFTBOEIPXUPVTF DSFEJUJOXBZTUPJNQSPWFZPVSTDPSF t -FBSOUIF)PXBOE8IZPGXPSLJOHXJUIB SFBMUPS UIFIPNFQVSDIBTJOHQSPDFTTBOE IPXUPNBLFBOPGGFS

LEARN ABOUT THE...

CLASSES ARE FREE!

Home Advantage Loan

CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4 (Loan Specific Criteria applies)

CLASSES HELD REGULARLY

Down Payment Assistance

Call Amy for information:

0% INTEREST/%.035("(& NO MONTHLY PAYMENT!

206-715-1847

(Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

61500'5)&45.035("(&".06/5 64&'03%08/1":.&/503$-04*/($0454

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

Top Producing Broker 2008-2015 Voted “Five Star Professional� by Clients

HOMES

www.stephanielynch.com

HOMES

HOMES

HOMES

1326 N. HEATHERWOOD W, TACOMA, WA 98406-1433 This MUST SEE newly updated home boasts new hardwood oors, carpets and a large deck that will be finished in a couple weeks. Located in a beautifully quiet part of North Tacoma with a partial view of the sound is just a stones throw from an amazing park and walking distance to a shopping area! With 3 bedrooms on the main level and another in the lower, this home is large yet co y ot to mention the huge rec room downstairs Come and chec it out ou wont regret it 3 5,000

Rachel Lieder-Simeon, Redfin Real Estate (253) 780-6068 FOR RENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

CONDOSCONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, & HOMES TACOMA TACOMA HOME

3228 S UNION 1417 S 50TH AVE. ST

$625 $1250

UNIV. PLACE TACOMA DUPLEX 2208 4109 GRANDVIEW S M ST.DR. W

$1450 $1150

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1BED 1 BATH 450FULL SF.OF 3 CLEAN, BED 1.5BATH 1428SF. 2 BED 1.5BATH 840SF.3 BRAND CONCOME TO THIS BED 2NEW BATH COZY APARTCHARACTER OLDER HOME FEATURES DUPLEX UPPER AND LOWER U.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD MENT IN TACOMA, WITH A STRUCTION LARGE LIVING ROOM WITH FIREPLACE LEVEL UNITSONOFFTHE OF 38TH M ST. FLOORS MAINAND LEVEL. EASY ACCESS TOAWA-16.

UNIVERSITY PLACE DUPLEX DUPONT 5322BOBS 58THHOLLOW AVE ST LN W 2205

$1695 $1850

PUYALLUP TACOMA APT.

9007 E 3228 115TH S UNIONST. AVE

$625 $1150

2 1BED BED 2.5 BATH 1157 SF. REMOD1BATH 450 SF. THE EL BED 2.5 BATH 2274 SF. 2 STORY W/ 2 3BED 2BATH 1667SF. PEMBERW/OFFER 2 BEDSA POPOTOWNHOUSE APARTMENTS 3 SPACIOUS UPSTAIRS TON CREEKBEDROOMS, IS A 55 AND OVER &ELED 1.5 BATH. NEWER FLOORING, OPEN LOFT, AND LANDING AREA CLEAN & COZY 1 BEDROOM COMMUNITY, AND A RAMBLER APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. PERFECTSTYLE FOR A WORK STATION. APARTMENT HOME

TACOMA TACOMA HOME

14406 AVE 9204 PACIFIC E WALLER RDS

$695 $1725

GIGSPANAWAY HARBOR TOWNHOUSE 5121 203RD ST. CT. CT.NW E 14304 44TH AVE.

$1425 $1295

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. BED, 1 BATH 575THIS SF.DELIGHTFUL GREAT 3BED,1VALUE 1.5 BATH 2307SF. 2BED 1.75BATH 1238SF. THIS 2BD 1.52 + MUST SEE!! FANTASTIC IN THIS NICE 1 BEDONE STORYUPPER HOME ISUNIT LOCATED ON THE ANOTHER 1/2BA TOWNHOUSE DUPLEX UNIT IS STORY HOME, 3 BEDROOM ROOM AVAILABLE CORNER OF PACIFIC E WALLEROAKS AND 92ND ST E. PRIVAT AND SECLUDED YET CLOSE TOLOT. SR16. 2.5 BATH ON A CORNER IN THE APTS.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

TREE SERVICE

FOR RENT

ALL UTILITIES PAID. NICELY FURNISHED STUDIO IN VINTAGE VICTORIAN MANSION FOR WORKING SINGLE RESPONSIBLE ADULT. NO SMOKING OR DRUGS. MILLION DOLLAR VIEW. HISTORICAL STADIUM DISTRICT IN TACOMA. PRIVATE SECURED ENTRANCE. CLOSE TO EVERYTHING. ON BUS LINE. $695. WHY PAY MORE. 253-572-7128.

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

• Tree Removal • Pruning • View Trimming • Emergency Service & Storm Cleanup • Tree Health Assessment Licensed • Insured • Bonded

253-234-GROW

(4769)

www.familytree253.com

$

100 off

Jay Brock

Any Tree Service

Johnny Marth

Not valid with other offers or specials. Expires 2-28-17.

Certified Arborist PN-7500A

LIC. FAMILTRC874M6

FREE ESTIMATES!

Certified Arborist PN-7495A

$500 job minimum

FOR SALE FOR SALE 6726 N Parkview LN, Tacoma 1660 S 55th ST, Tacoma

$619,950

$289,000

Beautiful turn of the century Spectacular views of Narrows passage and both Narrows bridges as well as the Gig Harbor and Fox Island. From the kitchen to the master bedroom, these amazing views/sunsets can be enjoyed. Especially from the newer Trex deck. There has been only 1 owner who has taken emaculate care of this custom built home. This home boasts of not 1 but 2 fireplaces that have never been used and incredible storage. All appliances included in this must see home!

Beautiful turn of the century home, located central to all services. Remodeled 2 stories w/ basement detached oversized 2 car garage, fully fenced, hot tub, nicely landscaped. Interior Floor plan features open concept living w/ spacious formal living & dining, enticing Kitchen w/Quartz counter tops, Shaker cabinets, Farm sink, Stainless Steel appliances, Pantry & Island. Evening brings 4 bedrooms 2 tastefully tiled bathrooms one adjoining. Partially finished laundry area in basement for games & hobbies.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

FOR SALE!! 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

$595,000

Good Investment Property, FULLY LEASED , completely remodeled commercial office building, 3350 sq ft, .25 acre commercial lot, owner occupied, 10 offices, 3 bathrooms, Spacious conference room, 2 full Kitchen reception area, 2 parking lots front and rear. Centrally located to all services. 7.5 Cap Rate.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

UNIVERSITY PLACE-COMMERCIAL ZONED, 27th & Bridgeport Way, Former CPA Office - Real Estate Included, $225,000, Now Vacant. temporary off the market EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail. OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease.

price reduction

LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY &EBRUARY17 

CageSport MMA

Blue Ă–yster Cult

Battle at the Boat 110

February 25, 7pm

March 11, 8pm

March 18, 7pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

Kenny “Babyface� Edmonds

Gabriel Iglesias

Keith Sweat

March 24, 8:30pm

April 29, 8:30pm

May 6, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $40, $65, $100, $105

I-5 Showroom $45, $75, $105, $110

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $65, $70

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Twa 02 17 17 p01