Twa 02 09 18 p01

Page 1

VALENTINE’S DAY EVENTS B1

-2 1987 01 8

because

tters ma

ART FROM LOCAL STUDENTS A4

com

STARS IN PLAYOFF HUNT A10

muni ty

Because Community Matters.

TACOMAWEEKLY NEWS FREE • FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2018

RUSTON ANNEXATION

SPAT ENDS WITH PERMITTING DEAL

WWW.TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

Tacoma nonprofits, housing services win big in capital budget

PHOTO CREDIT ???

A $2.5 million grant from the state capital budget has catapulted Tacoma Community House’s new building project that makes possible the expansion of job-placement services for immigrant and refugee populations. By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

and Ruston for permit review in the portions of the Point Ruston development within the City of Ruston, which will, in theory, result in streamlined permit processing and greater consistency across the project. Tacoma will process the permits on projects to be built on the Ruston

The $4.2 billion 2017-18 state capital budget signed by Governor Jay Inslee on Jan. 19 is delivering more than $47 million in funding to the 27th Legislative District, representing much of Tacoma, helping social service organizations, the arts, healthcare providers, and universities and community and technical colleges to grow programs and bolster infrastructure. “Every time I look at projects that are funded in Tacoma, I get really excited about it,” said House Democrat Representative Laurie Jinkins, 27th District. “Jeannie Darneille, Jake Fey and I work really hard together to make sure that we get as much funding as we can for our district.” In the neighboring 29th District, which represents parts of south Tacoma, Tacoma Community College received $1.6 million for repairs, maintenance, and minor work. In the 27th District, organizations receiving

u See RUSTON / page A9

u See BUDGET / page A9

PHOTO COURTESY OF PIERCE COUNTY

The negotiating parties signed the terms of the agreements in Executive Dammeier’s office on Feb. 5 with the expectation that the agreements would be ratified by each city’s council at their regularly scheduled council meetings on Feb. 6. From left: Loren Cohen, principal, MC Construction Consultants; Bruce Hopkins; mayor, City of Ruston; Bruce Dammeier, Pierce County executive; Victoria Woodards, mayor, City of Tacoma; and Elizabeth Pauli, Tacoma City Manager. Steven Dunkelberger

T

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

he City of Ruston and the Point Ruston development have reached an agreement for addressing permitting activities at the Point

Ruston development with the assistance of the City of Tacoma. The agreements was ratified by each city’s council at their regularly scheduled council meetings Tuesday night after their mayors penned the deal on Monday. The agreement creates a collaborative process between Tacoma

City seeks diverse pool of applicants for new immigrant commission By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma City Council has extended the application deadline for its recently established Commission on Immigrant and Refugee Affairs to Feb. 12, allowing for extra time to attract community residents to fill 11 positions and one alternate position. The 11 positions will include one youth or young adult under the age of 25. Interviewing applicants is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 22, after which City Council will nominate and appoint by a majority vote. The Council desires that commission members are reflective of the “diversity and national origin of the immigrant and refugee communities,” according to the city website. Commission members will serve a three-year term. “We are seeking residents of Tacoma from various backgrounds and experience with the issues affecting immigrants and refugees,” said Alison Beason, senior policy analyst for the City of Tacoma’s Office of Equity and Human Rights. “There is a misconception that there is a required skill set or education level for civic engagement. The City of Tacoma needs residents who have a pas-

sion for change and/or to participate in their local government activities.” The City’s journey toward developing this commission started in 2014 when the Council expressed a desire to make the city a more welcoming and immigrant friendly city. Beason said the City made it official when it joined the Welcoming Cities and Counties Initiative (Resolution 39116). “This movement encouraged communities across the United States to maximize opportunities for economic growth and cultural vitality,” Beason said. The Council took the next step of establishing the Immigrant and Refugee Affairs Task Force. Composed of more than 30 members representing a variety of ethnicities, the task force helped the City identify the needs of the immigrant and refugee community and recommended three priorities to the Council and former Mayor Marilyn Strickland. The three priorities were to establish a deportation defense fund, a language access policy, and form a permanent commission on immigrant and refugee affairs. In regard to the deportation defense fund, the City last October made an initial allocation of $50,000 to start the u See COMMISSION / page A9

COUNCIL MEMBER THOMS DEPLOYS TO AFGHANISTAN

District 2 City Councilmember Robert Thoms, a veteran of the Persian Gulf War who currently serves as a commander in the U.S. Navy Reserves, has been involuntarily recalled to active duty for a six-month tour of duty in Kabul, Afghanistan starting in March 2018 in support of Operation Resolute Support. State and federal law allow for elected officials to take extended leave for involuntary recalls to military service. “It is always an honor to respond to our nation’s call to service; I will be serving as a public affairs officer in support of the war on terror and ISIS,” said Thoms. “My family, friends and council colleagues support my commitment to serving in the U.S. Navy and, while I will miss my family, I look forward to representing Tacoma and our community members in District 2 while supporting the capabilities of our troops in Afghanistan. Fighting to ensure our nation and community are safe will be my top priority while I am there.” At-Large Councilmembers Lillian Hunter and Conor McCarthy have agreed to pay special attention to the needs of community members in District 2 during Thoms’ absence. At the

KATY PERRY AT THE TACOMA DOME

CLASSICAL TUESDAYS

A12

B2

B5

Pothole of the Week.....A2 Bulletin Board...............A2

conclusion of his deployment, Thoms plans to return to Tacoma and resume the rest of his term. Mayor Victoria Woodards, who served as a soldier in the U.S. Army while stationed at Fort Lewis, said of Thoms’ involuntary recall to active duty: “I’m extremely proud of Tacoma’s strong military heritage and I support Robert and his service. His military career and experience continue to be a tremendous asset to our community.”

CONNECT WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

TACOMA BAPTIST HOOPS

GUEST EDITORIAL We have a temporary resident of the White House whose definition of loyalty to the United States of America is loyalty to, and expressed enthusiasm for, his boneheaded ideas and false claims of greatness. PAGE A5

THOMS

Sports..........................A10 Hot Tickets..................A11

Look for daily updates online: tacomaweekly.com

FACEBOOK: fb.com/tacomaweekly TWITTER: twitter.com/tacomaweekly INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/tacomaweekly

City Life....................... B1 Culture Corner............. B3

Calendar..................B6 Word Search............B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

Pothole of the Week

Authorities apprehend rape suspect who hid under woman’s porch By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

SOUTH 50TH AND A STREET

After appearing on the side of area milk cartons for months and months, we’ve come to the realization that our beloved Percival, the Pothole Pig, is not coming home to us. The celebrated swine has either found a new life somewhere else, or perhaps became a delicious and nutritious part of someone’s breakfast at some point. Whatever the case, we will miss him and be forever in his debt as his dedication to the City of Destiny led to so many nasty potholes being filled. This week, Carter the Crater Gator found another impressive road divot to stretch out in. To be honest, we’ve had a difficult time with this critter. He can’t get over the fact that he’ll always be second-fiddle when compared to Percival, and frankly, he’s been getting a little snarky. While we’ve let him know that his replacement could waddle through the front door of the Tacoma Weekly office at any moment, the toothy sourpuss has countered with his own threat of “pulling a Percival” and disappearing. With this in mind, we are still in the process of trying out new pothole seeking varmints. If you’ve got any ideas, please send them to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

CASCADIA TAX PROFESSIONALS

CAPTURED: Lewis County Sheriff's deputies responded to a report of a possible suicidal man on Feb. 6 in the area of Guerrier Road and State Route DAVID ROSE 508 in Chehalis. Deputies located David Love and detained him on his warrants for rape in the first degree, burglary in the second degree, unlawful imprisonment and violation of a felony domestic violence court

order. Deputies say Love had a black bag on him when he was arrested containing a shotgun and shells. He is prohibited from having a firearm so he was charged in Lewis County with unlawful possession of a firearm, second degree. Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives had been asking for the public's help to find Love. “He hid under the porch of his ex-girlfriend’s house, waited for her roommate to leave, broke into the house, tied her to a chair and forcibly raped her and assaulted her,” said Det. Ed Troyer. The 53-year-old took off when the woman’s roommate came home.

Pawul re-arraigned on new charges in death of Deputy McCartney The Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office re-arraigned Frank William Pawul, 32, on Feb. 6 for the murder of Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputy Daniel McCartney. He was previously charged with first degree murder. Now he is charged with aggravated first degree murder, the most serious charge in Washington State, and the only charge that is punishable by death or life in prison without the possibility of release. “In January I promised that we would hold fully accountable everyone involved in the murder of Deputy Dan McCartney. Today was another step toward fulfilling that promise,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. Forensic testing indicated that the bullet recovered from McCartney’s body was fired from the gun that was found approximately 175 feet away from the deputy and along the path taken by Pawul as he fled the scene. A shell casing was found about 15 feet away and to the left of

the deputy’s body. The casing was fired from the same gun. Messages recovered from Pawul’s cell phone show he was in possession of two .45 caliber Kimber handguns in the days leading up to the murder. The two handguns found at the scene were Kimber .45 caliber weapons. On Jan. 7 at 11:24 p.m., residents in a home on 45th Avenue Court East called 911 after intruders entered their home. Three adults and two children were in the home at the time. The two suspects broke in and demanded money. Both were wearing masks and armed with handguns and “bowie” style knives. At 11:30 p.m., McCartney notified dispatch that he had arrived in the area. Approximately three minutes later, McCartney notified dispatch that he was in foot pursuit of the suspects. A short time later, he called out “shots fired.” No further transmissions were made. Other deputies responded to the

area and found McCartney unresponsive. McCartney was transported to St. Joseph’s hospital, and was later pronounced dead from a gunshot wound. Deputies also located the body of Henry Carden, also unresponsive. Carden sustained several gunshot wounds, including a gunshot wound to the head, which was self-inflicted. He died from his wounds. Officers secured the area to locate the other suspect. The next morning, an officer reported a male matching the description of the second suspect walked to his traffic control point. That person was later identified as Pawul. Pawul was taken into custody. Pawul is also charged with kidnapping in the first degree, unlawful possession of a firearm in the first degree, and conspiracy to commit robbery in the first degree. Charges are only allegations and a person is presumed innocent unless he or she is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Prosecutor files lawsuit against big pharma Serving the South Sound area with 10 years of experience!

Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist filed a federal lawsuit on Feb. 1 against the three largest manufacturers and marketers of prescription opioids in the United States: Purdue, Endo, and Janssen. Prescription opioids are a class of powerful pain relievers, including OxyContin. The chemical make-up of these prescription drugs is nearly identical to heroin. Revenues for the pharmaceutical companies that manufacture these drugs have skyrocketed. Purdue has generated estimated sales of more than $35 billion from opioids since 1996. The lawsuit contends the opioid crisis was created by the aggressive marketing practices of pharmaceutical companies that provided false and misleading information to doctors and patients. The companies claimed opioids were not addictive and were a safe way to treat longterm and chronic pain. Opioid overdoses are the leading cause of death in the United States,

surpassing fatal car accidents. In Pierce County, opioid use has reached crisis levels. From 2012 to 2016, the number of opioid-related deaths in Pierce County rose to 423. More than half of the local homeless population is reported to be addicted to opioids. Crime is also driven by opioid addiction. “Where there is harm to the community, there should be accountability for the corporations,” said Lindquist. “I'm a career prosecutor going on my ninth year as the elected prosecutor and this is the first time I’ve asked the County Council to file a lawsuit. I’m confident we have a strong case.” County Council Chair Doug Richardson said, “The opioids crisis has impacted nearly every department in our county. Whether it’s the Sheriff’s Office, emergency management, public health, or the court system, Pierce County has shouldered a heavy burden in dealing with this crisis.” The rise of prescription opioids in

Pierce County was followed closely by a dramatic rise in heroin use. For many, heroin replaced prescription opioids when they could no longer obtain these prescriptions. The crisis has also dramatically impacted the youth population in Pierce County. From 2006-14, five to 10 percent of tenth graders in Pierce County reported using painkillers to get high. “Opioid manufacturers profited from business practices that have done enormous damage to our community,” said County Councilmember Derek Young. The complaint alleges the defendants violated the Washington Consumer Protection Act and the federal RICO statute, and that their conduct constitutes a public nuisance, negligence, gross negligence, and unjust enrichment under Washington law. Pierce County has retained the law firm Keller Rohrback, experts in large-scale litigation, as outside counsel on a contingency-fee basis in this case.

Bulletin Board NEW TRAFFIC SIGNAL SYSTEM ACTIVATED A new traffic signal system was activated on Feb. 6 at the intersection of 78th Avenue East and 184th Street East to improve intersection operations. The intersection was widened to add left turn lanes for 78th Avenue East. Crews previously added street lighting at the intersection, built a new stormwater pond on the west side of 78th Avenue East, and added a sidewalk along the south side of 184th Street East. The new signal system will be connected to the existing traffic signals at 192nd Street East and at 176th Street East to allow for coordination between the signals. Active Construction, Inc. is the contractor. The construction cost is approximately $1.7 million. The project is funded by County Road Funds. A project webpage: www.co.pierce.wa.us/2855/78thAve-E-184th-St-E. BETTER MERGING, TRIP RELIABILITY COMING TO WESTBOUND SR 16 People who use westbound State Route 16 between Sprague Avenue and Pearl Street in Tacoma may soon have a quicker trip during peak commute hours. Beginning Tuesday, Feb. 13, the Washington State Department of Transportation will meter traffic entering westbound SR 16 from the following four on-ramps: • Sprague Avenue • Union Avenue • South Orchard Street • Pearl Street Ramp meters are traffic signals that operate according

to real-time conditions on both the highway and the ramp. They help improve safety and reduce congestion at merge areas by providing consistent gaps between vehicles, rather than allowing multiple vehicles to flood the highway at once. “Ramp meters installed on eastbound SR 16 have been active since 2007,” said WSDOT Freeway Operations Manager Tony Leingang. “They continue to be a proven, cost-effective approach to reducing freeway congestion and collisions, providing drivers a better, more reliable trip.” WSDOT installed ramp meters and roadway vehicle sensors on State Route 16 at these four interchanges during a high occupancy vehicle (HOV) improvement project in 2007. As with all WSDOT’s ramp meters, they will not operate continuously and will only be activated when traffic conditions warrant their use. Daytime testing of each ramp meter is scheduled for offpeak hours on Monday, Feb. 12. Once activated, WSDOT will monitor the traffic patterns on the ramps and nearby surface streets, and will make adjustments as needed. CITY WORKS TO INCREASE AWARENESS OF CRISIS TEXT LINE As part of its continued efforts to help address the mental health needs of the Tacoma community, the City of Tacoma has partnered with Crisis Text Line, a notfor-profit organization that provides free crisis intervention via SMS text message to people in crisis. Although individual mobile phone usage rates may apply, the organization’s services are available at no charge, via SMS text message, 24 hours a day, every day. Helping to raise awareness of this free service, the City has put up new “Crisis Counseling – Crisis Text Line – Text HEAL to SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A3


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2 741741” signage on East 34th Street Bridge in Tacoma. “We care deeply about our community members,” said Mayor Victoria Woodards. “Tacoma was the very first city in Washington state to enter into this type of partnership with Crisis Text Line, which allows live, trained counselors to rapidly analyze – using texted keywords – the various situations that individuals may be experiencing.” Based on the keywords they see over text messages, Crisis Text Line counselors identify how to best address the individual needs of those in crisis. Every texter is connected by Crisis Text Line with a live crisis counselor trained to bring texters from a hot moment to a cool calm through active listening and collaborative problem solving. Crisis Text Line also collects data which will be used to inform future efforts. The City uses special tax revenue to provide services that support mental health and substance use disorder services to Tacoma residents. More information about Crisis Text Line is available at crisistextline.org. Information about the City’s Neighborhood and Community Services Department is available at cityoftacoma.org/NCS. CITY LAUNCHES YOUTH HISTORICAL FICTION COMPETITION The City of Tacoma’s Historic Preservation Office, in partnership with local literary non-profits Write253 and Creative Colloquy, has launched an inaugural youth historical fiction competition, “Bringing Tacoma’s History to Life.” The competition, which is geared towards high school age students, offers a series of four prompts about decisive but little-known moments in Tacoma’s history. “These prompts ask students to reflect on the local landmarks and landscapes that they already know in a new, creative way,” said Assistant Historic Preservation Officer Lauren Hoogkamer. The prompts range in location, time period, and focus, and are all included in a new resource guide for teachers, complete with the competition guidelines, discussion guide, and historical prompts. Each prompt provides historical background information for students, historic photos, and excerpts from era newspapers. The prompts then ask students to develop their own cast of characters, locate them in this particular time and place, and develop a narrative related to these historical events. The resource guide is available digitally on the Write253 and City of Tacoma websites. “These are important moments in Tacoma’s past, and all of them have present-day relevance,” said Michael Haeflinger, executive director of youth writing and literary organization Write253. “These prompts offer rich canvases for youth to imagine what life was like in Tacoma in the 20th century.” Youth writers can pick any of the four prompts to develop a piece of original historical fiction. Submissions will be judged by a panel of local historians and writers. Each submission must be under 2,000 words in length, include a short bibliography, and be written by someone 18 or under who lives in Pierce County. Submissions are being accepted Feb. 15-March 30. To download the resource guide with writing prompts and competition guidelines, visit cityoftacoma.org/youthfictioncompetition. To find out more about the competition, email landmarks@cityoftacoma.org, or call (253) 591-5254. OPIOID RESCUE KITS AVAILABLE FREE OF CHARGE The Tacoma Fire Department (TFD) is pioneering

community distribution of free rescue kits containing the life-saving opioid overdose medication, Narcan, packaged as an easy-to-administer, fast-acting nasal spray. The free kits also include information about recovery programs available in the community. “We want to move beyond simply treating opioid overdoses to treating the underlying addiction,” said Tacoma Fire Chief Jim Duggan. “After reversing a life-threatening overdose, TFD paramedics are well-positioned to provide referral information at a time when an individual might be most receptive to encouragement to enter a recovery program.” After providing emergency treatment to an opioid patient, TFD paramedics would offer the patient or their companion a free kit. “Included in that referral information is the phone number for our highly successful TFD CARES program,” said TFD Medical Services Officer Mike Newhouse. “Through TFD CARES, TFD nurses can help opioid patients navigate their way through the local healthcare system and find medical care for their addiction.” “We recognize that the distribution or later use of the free kits is not the end solution, but it serves as a mechanism to begin the conversation of access to care, treatment and recovery,” said TFD firefighter and paramedic Kurt Gordon, who is coordinating the pilot program. According to the Washington State Department of Health, statewide, approximately two individuals die each day from opioid overdose. Locally, TFD has seen a 50 percent increase since 2013 in the administration of Narcan by paramedics for opioid-related emergency incidents. This pilot project has been made possible through the Tacoma Fire Department’s partnership with the University of Washington Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute and the Point Defiance AIDs Project. Funding comes from a statewide, five-year grant through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. BILL WOULD KEEP NARROWS BRIDGE TOLLS FLAT A bill sponsored by Sen. Steve O’Ban, R-University Place, would solve the problem of escalating tolls on the Tacoma Narrow Bridge by freezing them at a fixed rate and then borrowing funds from the multimodal transportation account to cover the amount necessary to pay any difference between toll revenue and rising debt service until the bonds are fully paid off. SB 6547, which was discussed in hearing on Feb. 5 before the Senate Transportation Committee, would use transportation funds to cover costs of future increases to debt payments, keeping toll rates flat instead of rising, as expected, to cover escalating debt payments and operating costs. This bill would set up a series of loans to cover the debt payments and costs from 2020-2030. With this bill, it is expected that the toll rate will remain flat for Good To Go! users at $5.50. The east end of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge is located in Sen. O’Ban’s district. “This presents a genuine opportunity to solve the everincreasing toll rates on the bridge and keep more money in the pockets of residents who depend on this critical transportation artery,” said O’Ban. “Tolls have increased dramatically and are scheduled to continue increasing under current law. With this legislation, it will be like refinancing an adjustable rate mortgage that is going up every year and converting it into an affordable, fixed rate mortgage.” The Tacoma Narrows bridge debt service is currently funded without drawing from any state tax dollars. As a result, construction costs, interest payments and other debt service costs are taken directly from tolls.

TOP STORIES ON

tacomaweekly.com

 ANNEXATION OF POINT RUSTON GETS HEARING IN OLYMPIA  WALDORF SCHOOL RELOCATES TO FORMER WEYERHAEUSER ESTATE  TACOMA GOLDEN GLOVES TURNS 70  NEW COMMUNITY CENTER SET TO BRING RENEWED INVESTMENT TO THE EASTSIDE  PLAYOFF TIME HAS ARRIVED FOR TACOMA HOOPSTERS  TACOMA STREETS INITIATIVE REPORTS PROGRESS BUT HITS BUMP IN THE ROAD

Changes Coming to Paid Sick Leave cityoftacoma.org/employmentstandards

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN BEING A PART OF A FOSTER CARE COMMUNITY! We are now recruiting homes to be a part of a Mockingbird Family Model Constellation offering Therapeutic Foster Care!

Family Behavioral Health

Stop by our Foster Parent Informational Open House every Wednesday from 4:30-6:30!

We are located at 5219 N. Shirley St. Suite 3 in Ruston.

Join Family Behavioral Health as we build an intentional community of support around foster families. Interested in learning more?

Reach out to us at 253.348.0684 or email amyso@ccsww.org

UNSOLVED HOMICIDE

Tacoma Police detectives need your help to identify the suspect(s) responsible for the murder of 45-yearold James Timmons. At 2:25 a.m. on Saturday, November 4th, 2017, Tacoma Police responded to a 911 call from a witness who reported hearing shots fired near S. 66th St. and S. Tyler St. in the City of Tacoma. When officers arrived they found victim James Timmons on the sidewalk in front of the Manitou Apartments; Timmons was suffering from a life-threatening gunshot wound and

Fridays at 10:30pm on

later died from his injuries. Detectives have learned that Timmons was staying at a residence less than 3 blocks from where the homicide occurred. The victim reportedly often walked around the neighborhood playing the game Pokemon Go and was well known by young people living in the Manitou Park area. Victim James Timmons was not known to be involved in illegal activities and did not have any known enemies. Detectives are looking for information on any possible suspect(s) or motive(s) for the homicide.

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

6824 19th Street W, #139 • University Place WA 98466


Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

ARTWORK, POETRY, AND WRITING FROM TACOMA STUDENTS Inspiring, Thought-Provoking Work from Meeker 8th Graders

Judgment “This painting represents the judgment people pass on you and everyone else.” — Bryce A. Kilpatric, 8th grade, Teacher: Mr. Bader

Finding Myself, a Short Story

My name is Katy, and my project for class was to think about, and write what life’s true meaning was, and what was within reach. I sat there quietly, thinking about what to write. I didn’t have a lot of time to think about this project, for I had slacked off, and thought this was another silly one of Miss Nancy’s assignments. I wasn’t imagining my life to be interesting. I got out a piece of paper and pen and began to write, what I thought the meaning of “Within Reach” meant: Within Reach means to me what you can physically reach. To me, I can reach my phone, my makeup, and my favorite peach flavored chap stick that I wear every day. These items mean a lot to me and are important. I can reach them and I need them. By Katy. I turned in my project a few days early because I felt like that was what a good student should do, and I figured other people would think I’m super smart if I turned it in early. Miss Nancy took one look at my paper and gave it right back. She shook her head. She told me it wasn’t complete. It needed DEPTH! Miss Nancy said I needed to talk about my life outside of my styles or technology. She told me to be inspired by my culture and my background. By what makes me, well ME! Last, she told me this isn’t a silly project. It was an opportunity to think deeper. To think about how I grow and form into a better person. So that was exactly what I was going to do! Dig deeper. Find out what makes me ME…

Pt. Defiance Students Sparkle! “I feel happiness within reach when I am outside!” — Betty Walz, 2nd grade, Teacher: Mrs. Rossman

My Final Within Reach Project: Within Reach means to me not just what is in front of you, but what is behind you. It is the things and people who support and strengthen you and allow you to reach for the things you strive for. For me, that is my family, the people who catch me when I fall. Like my Mom, who says, “Hold on to the memories; they will hold on to you,” and I stand by that. If you forget who you truly are, or what makes you you, then you are focusing on what makes you pretty, or what everyone thinks of you when you slip up. For dreams to be within reach, we must reflect on our culture, past and present, and the strength it gives us. I am proud of my culture, I honor my relatives, and I am a role model for my native community. My culture has passed down ancient traditions that I want to pass down to kids like me when I am older. I’ve learned to take my time and help others put their goals within reach, as others have done for me. The most important thing to me is my family, culture, and memories I have with others. It is these things that give me confidence to accomplish whatever I want. I learned that within reach doesn’t mean things that you physically reach, but rather a statement about reaching goals, dreams, and having hope for your future. I finally had taken time to patiently write my final draft of what within reach meant to me. I was also the last one to turn in my assignment this time. When Miss Nancy read it, she was joyous. There was a glow on her face that I had never seen. I, Katherine Peterson, have never felt so accomplished before and happy! In conclusion, our dear friend Katy’s old reputation was destroyed. She was now an amazing writer, and became an author when she was older. She is inspiring others, one story at a time.

Shoot for the Moon

“When you reach for the stars, everything is in reach, even the moon.” — Steven Woolbright, 4th grade, Teacher: Mr. Pittrof

“My short story talks about a girl named Katy Peterson. She is unaware of her true self, and becomes self aware of who she is, and what the meaning of within reach means to her.” — Maya López, 8th grade, English Teacher: Ms. Adams Page Editors’ Note: Miss Maya, your story will warm many teachers’ hearts!

Stunning Work from Artists at Brown’s Pt. Elementary!  Got Change?

“I remember cooler summers. I remember seeing snow in the winter. I remember cleaner water. Everything is different now. I want a world where I can swim with dolphins without having to worry about them becoming extinct. I want a world where I can see the bottom of the water I am swimming in. Pollution is like cigarettes. It’s bad for us, but we are doing it to ourselves anyway. It’s time to make small changes that can all add up to big ones. It’s all within reach, and it can all start with someone as small as me.” —Rachel Sim, 3rd grade, Teacher: Mrs. Hathorn

“I have been reading the Eragon and the Wings of Fire series. I love them both: They are about adventures and dragons. In the Eragon series there are warriors fighting alongside the dragons. The shield symbolizes the warriors’ power to protect themselves. Drawing dragons and making a shield to use as a warrior, is my way to make this fantasy world “Within Reach” for me.” — Yesce Dillehay, 4th grade, Geiger Montessori, Teacher: Mrs. Biddle

Great Skills are within Reach! 

“This picture represents Within Reach by my little brother climbing a tree with my other little brother helping him reach for the top of the tree.” — Logan Meyers, 4th grade, Crescent Heights Elementary, Teacher: Ms. Geile

“Any great skill a person might have takes a lot of effort, practice, and patience. My picture represents a girl mastering a skill after many fails. As long as you believe and try your best, anything is possible. Great skills are within reach.” — Kristian Yi, 4th grade, Teacher: Mrs. Hasenauer

Grant School for the Expressive Arts Students Amaze us Again!

“My artwork is inspired by the theme Within Reach, because they reached the sunset in the mountains.” — Zoe Herbertson, 2nd grade, Teacher: Ms. Rossetto

Reflecting  “This is a picture of a stained glass window tower at my synagogue. Every week when I walk through the synagogue on my way to Hebrew class I pause and look up. As I do this I think about the many people who walked this path before me. I think about how in a few years I will celebrate my Bar Mitzvah in this building. I reflect on how lucky I am to have the freedom to express my beliefs, and on those who are not so fortunate. I am lucky to have this important milestone Within Reach.” — Ephraim Peterson, grade 5, Teacher: Mr. Johnson

Razzle Dazzle Battleship

“I drew a cartwheel because it is something I am learning, and if I practice, I will be good at it.” — Ellery MorrisBurgard, Kindergarten, Teacher: Ms. Miller

“During WWI artists helped the war effort by painting ships “Razzle Dazzle.” This made it difficult for the enemy ships to tell which direction the targeted ships were sailing. This resulted in saving the lives of all the people on the ships.” — Elizabeth Kindt, 4th grade, Jefferson Elementary, Teacher: Ms. Koukles

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 or at 8ssheltonz8@gmail.com, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or donnamccra@comcast.net. View this page and others online at www.tacomaweekly.com.


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

Guest Editorials

Washington’s carbon tax differs from B.C.

By Don C. Brunell

In Olympia, Gov. Jay Inslee is pushing lawmakers to enact a new tax on carbon gas emissions before the legislature adjourns on March 8. Inslee wants Democrats, who now control the legislature, to approve a $20 metric ton levy. He says it is necessary to combat the effects of climate change and would start in 2019. There would be no corresponding tax offsets as provided in British Columbia and under I-732, which is the ballot measure Washington voters rejected in 2016. Nor is there a cap on future tax increases. The additional money would go to pay for projects that reduce greenhouse gases, manage stormwater and reduce wildfire risks. Unlike B.C.’s scheme, Inslee’s plan includes exemptions for aviation petrol and fossil fuels used in agriculture. The governor’s office reported the tax increases on consumers would range from 4 to 5 percent for electricity, 9 to 11 percent for natural gas, and 6 to 9 percent on gasoline. “Over four years, the tax would

By Tom H. Hastings

generate $3.3 billion. Averaged across the state’s 2.7 million households, that’s about $1,200,” Seattle Times columnist Brier Dudley wrote in late December. Dudley examined B.C.’s carbon levy enacted in 2008. He found that it is failing to reduce carbon pollution as promised. “Emissions from driving are rising faster than population growth in B.C., despite a carbon tax higher than Inslee’s proposal.” Recent data says greenhouse discharges increased 2.3 percent from 2013 to 2015. That includes a 7.2 percent increase in transportation emissions, the main focus of the B.C. and Washington plans. B.C. isn’t likely to meet its 2020 carbon-reduction goals. On its current trajectory, the province will miss its target of an 80 percent reduction by 2050. If the carbon tax was the only costly climate-oriented proposal in Olympia this year, that would be one thing. But simultaneously, other legislators are pushing a Low Carbon Fuel Standard. If lawmakers approve both taxes, Washington families could be facing 35

to 45 cents more per gallon at the pump – on top of the 68 cents we already pay in federal and state gas taxes. Then there is the tax cap issue. Without a cap, B.C.’s rate went from an initial $10 per ton (Canadian) to $30 by 2012. British Columbia polling shows citizen and business support for the carbon tax is increasing. Even though gas was about 20 cents a gallon higher in 2016, the selling point was the tax offsets. Carole Taylor, the provincial minister of finance when the legislation was approved, told the New York Times the parliament “provided critical political cover by ensuring every single carbon tax dollar would be returned to families and businesses through a variety of breaks.” The province’s corporate income tax was cut from 12 percent to 10 and personal rates dropped. All total, the B.C. government returned $1.7 billion (Canadian) to businesses and families in 2016. The problem is only $1.2 billion was collected from the carbon tax. Even though Canadian tax advocates

Trumped up treason

“Somebody said ‘treasonous.’ I mean – yeah I guess, why not. Can we call that treason? Why not? I mean, they certainly didn’t seem to love our country very much.” – Donald Trump on Democratic Senators and Congress members who didn’t clap for him in his State of the Union speech. Really? We have a temporary resident of the White House whose definition of loyalty to the United States of America is loyalty to, and expressed enthusiasm for, his boneheaded ideas and false claims of greatness? We would expect such autocratic, monomaniacal pronouncements from Vladimir Putin, Kim Jong-un, Rodrigo Duterte, or any other egomaniac warlord. Hitler and Stalin were such demented oppressors. Saddam Hussein, Augusto Pinochet – the anti-democratic autarchs are easy to name. If the new definition of treason is being willing to not clap for Trump’s utterances, I hereby formally and publicly admit to treason. If we still live in a democracy, I charge Trump with treasonous statements. If there were one united value embedded in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights, it is the right to dissent, politically and publicly, without fear of reprisal. Let the views contend in our public discourse. Instead, this is how a country slides from democracy toward dictatorship, one thought control episode, one veiled threat, after another. We are on a very slippery slope here and the signs are not good. We have zero guarantees of the future of democracy in

the U.S. Indeed, Freedom House, a nonpartisan think tank which measures and ranks all countries on Earth every year in the aggregate values and indices of democracies, has us sliding downward. They analyze both the U.S. role in promoting democracy worldwide and practicing it at home. They note that this slide began slowly in 2010 – the year the Republican right wing gained control of the House – and is accelerating dramatically since Trump took office. Meanwhile, we see the strongman sort of government using Trump’s tactics now and in history. In Cambodia in September, dictator Hun Sen trumped up charges of treason against a candidate for office, Kem Sokha, who dared to call for peaceful changes toward more democracy and more human rights. Sokha faces 30 years in prison, where he has been since his arrest five months ago. In Venezuela in August, despot Nicolas Maduro engineered a path to charge political opponents with treason, targeting Julio Borges and other opposition leaders with potential arrest and imprisonment. Borges is out of office as of last month. This is a slippery slope toward tyranny. Trump is the most treasonous occupant of the White House since Richard “Break-and-Enter” Nixon. He too deserves a swift exit from power for his foul rule, his abdication of responsibilities to defend democracy and right to dissent, and his lies about collusion with Russian government operatives to steal our election. Dr. Tom H. Hastings is PeaceVoice director and on occasion an expert witness for the defense in court.

Pierce County’s oral health hero By David Branch, DDS Washington has long been a leader in improving the health of its citizens. Home to world-class research institutions like Fred Hutch, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, PATH and some of the best-ranked hospitals and health clinics in the nation, our state proves its dedication to healthier communities every day. In Tacoma, Good Samaritan and Tacoma General were recently recognized as “Best Hospitals” in the region, and community-based healthcare organizations such as Sea Mar and Community Health Care provide medical and dental care to lower-income families in our area. Just last month, Tacoma native Burt Goodman, DDS was honored as an Oral Health Hero for his decades of service to expanding access to oral health care in Pierce County and across Washington. More than half of all Washington’s Medicaid-enrolled children under 6 see a dentist, making our state a national leader – another result of strong community-healthcare partnerships. In Pierce County, 53 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children under 18 were able to get dental care. But it wasn’t always this way. Anthropologist Margaret Mead once famously said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” In 1954, the Longshoremen’s Union decided to finance an experimental dental benefits program, partnering with the King County Dental Society, so that the children of union members

could have better access to dental services. This led to the establishment of Washington Dental Service (WDS), the parent company of Delta Dental of Washington, and eventually in 1985 the Washington Dental Service Foundation, now known as Arcora Foundation. Washington Dental Service was the very first dental benefits company in the country. Both WDS and Arcora Foundation continue to work toward universal access to dental care in Pierce and Kitsap Counties (and beyond), where close to 600 Delta Dental memberdentists care for more than 230,000 patients and where hundreds of these private practice and community health dentists also serve lower-income Medicaid-insured or uninsured patients in need of dental care. Fortunately, we have leaders who long ago recognized that oral health is part of whole-person care and have worked tirelessly to improve oral health for all. As chair of the Arcora Foundation, I recently had the great honor to present an Oral Health Hero award to Tacoma’s own Dr. Burt Goodman. As a founder of nonprofit Washington Dental Service, the first president of the company’s foundation and past president of the Pierce County Dental Society, Dr. Goodman was a pioneer in the original movement to ensure dental care for all. His work has shaped the landscape of dental care in Washington for both public and private coverage. Persistently, he has improved the health of millions in our state, especially lower-income children, who would otherwise be suffering from the harmful effects of

untreated tooth decay. People with dental coverage are more likely to receive essential oral health care. Dr. Goodman’s commitment to his community laid the groundwork for the state of oral health coverage in Washington today, where more than 3 million people are covered by DDWA and one million lower-income adults had their Medicaid dental coverage restored in 2014 due to the work of Arcora Foundation and its partners. Yet, eligibility does not always lead to care, and barriers remain for lowerincome patients. Delta Dental and Arcora Foundation are working with dentists across Washington to increase prevention and expand access to dental care, especially for those most at risk for disease. Improving oral health is essential because despite the fact that it is almost totally preventable, oral disease is widespread, debilitating, costly and linked to heart disease, diabetes, pregnancy complications and many other serious medical conditions. Poor oral health also negatively affects learning and employment opportunities. It’s difficult to learn if you’re in pain from untreated cavities and it’s hard to get a job if you’re missing teeth. As the New Year begins, we should remain committed to continuing the legacy of Dr. Goodman by advancing altruistic leadership and public policies that support the health and well-being of our communities, and benefit those who need it most. Dr. David Branch is chair of Arcora Foundation and a recently retired private practice dentist.

insist it works, they’re seeking an overhaul and rate increases in hopes of meeting future climate and revenue goals. Before our state lawmakers pass a tax proposal of this magnitude, they need to look at the progress our state already is making on reducing greenhouse gases and ask if it is needed. While Washington’s population has increased 43 percent since 1990 and the economy has grown by 260 percent, carbon emissions are down by 18 percent, according to EPA. The key question is Washington’s carbon tax simply an added way to fund state government. If it is, lawmakers need to make to their case to voters at election time. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, (Re: “Count your blessings” by Willie Dickerson, TW Nov. 22, 2017) The Global Partnership for Education (GPE) had its pledging conference last week, with mixed results. The 263 million children out of school got some good news: the countries where these children live pledged $110 billion for education programs. Donor countries and private donors have pledged $2.3 billion, falling short of the money needed to put 25 million of these children into school over the next three years. Although America has not pledged yet, Congress can still put money in the budget to help this effort. Good signs: More than 100 members of Congress have co-sponsored resolutions (House Resolution 466 and Senate Resolution 286) supporting the GPE. Also, since America has more than tripled its funding since its first pledge in 2012, we can hope and take action to continue its increased funding of the GPE. First, we can thank our representatives who co-sponsored this resolution (introduced by Rep. Reichert and co-sponsored by Reps. DelBene, Larsen, Smith, Hererra Beutler, Kilmer, and Heck) and ask our senators to do the same (S. Res. 286). Second, ask them to make sure Congress budgets money to help the GPE put 25 million children in school over the next three years. Imagine the better future for all when education helps create a more peaceful and healthier world. Willie Dickerson Snohomish, WA CORRECTION In the sidebar to the Feb. 2 story, “New community center set to bring renewed investment to the Eastside,” it was inaccurately stated that Metro Parks’ opening of the new Eastside Community Center was contingent on when a tenant or tenants move into the current Portland Avenue Community Center. Metro Parks will, in fact, open the Eastside Community Center in late summer 2018 regardless of when a tenant or tenants move into the Portland Avenue Community Center. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

Tacoma Weekly News® LLC 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305 PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Dave Davison / dave@tacomaweekly.com Andrew Fickes / andrew@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chance Pittenger, Josiah Rutledge, Barb Rock COPY EDITING John Larson CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar, Lisa Lemmer WEB DEVELOPERS Ed Curran, Mike Vendetti PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard

E-MAIL US YOUR OPINIONS! Tacoma Weekly welcomes your opinions, viewpoints and letters to the editor. You can e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Please include your name, address and phone number when submitting your letter.

ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

Council calls for pause to study Citizens Forum options By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Citizen Forums are back. At least for now, and lower down on the City Council’s agenda. At the end of 2017, Tacoma City Council suspended the council’s practice of holding Citizens Forums during the second council meeting of each month. The council is now working with the Center for Dialog and Resolution – at a cost of $25,000 – to develop a replacement way for people to voice their thoughts on city governance. The January forum, therefore, was canceled. The council had suspended the forums after a series of progressively uncivil forums included profanity, shouts and personal threats against individual councilmembers while addressing the whole council on topics. People have always been able to offer their thoughts on specific topics on that particular meeting’s agenda as well as during specific public hearings. A council motion on Jan. 30, however, restarts a version of the Citizens Forums, at least for Feb. 13, March 13, April 10 and May 8. The forums, however, will be held after the unfinished business on the regular agendas. The mark on the plus side of the shuffle to the last position on the agenda is that it allows people to generally go home after work and still be at the council chambers by the time the forums would generally start. A minus, however, is that a deep agenda could mean that people wanting their three minutes at the microphone could take their places close to their usual, workweek bedtimes. “This council still believes that that Citizens Forums are still very much a part of government,” Mayor Victoria Woodards said, while outlining the motion. “Citizens Forums should be an opportunity for anybody to show up and give their public testimony about any issue.” The council will continue to work with the Center for Dialog and Resolution but will also form a focus group of residents regarding the issue as well as launch an online survey to gather opinions, thoughts and suggestions on what any future incarnation of Citizen

Lighthouse Laundry Stay Warm this Winter!

HUG

E WA SHER

S!

Wash & dry your comforter in our HUGE 8 load washers! Open pm 8am - 9

26th & N. Pearl • Westgate S. Shopping Center Free Wi-Fi www.LightHouseLaundry.biz

FILE PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Alan “OldStudent” Stancliff was a common sight at City Council comment periods and will likely be returning to voice his thoughts on local government. The next Citizen Forum, under the new format, will be Feb. 13.

Forums will take. “Citizens Forum have to work for the people who show up,” Woodards said. “We know it’s our job to show up and listen.” The group’s recommendations and online survey

results will be gathered through May in hopes of having council develop a revised format in late spring. Outgoing Councilmember Lauren Walker Lee first proposed the suspension of the Citizens Forums in November. She then proposed a substitute resolution.

HAPPY HOUR

Corcoran’s Lock & Safe LLC

3-7PM & 9-11:30PM

Residential • Commercial • Auto Bonded • Licensed

7 DAYS A WEEK!

253-756-5000 Emergency Service

Bob Corcoran, C.R.L. Fax: 253-756-0694

2519 N. Stevens Tacoma, WA 98407

Sunday All Day Happy Hour!

GREAT BAR FOOD SPIRITS & ROTATING MICRO HANDLES

EXTENDED HAPPY HOUR DRINKS & APPETIZERS

Dentures Complete Set Check us out at 2502 6th Avenue, Tacoma, WA 98406 Mon-Fri. 11am-7pm Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 12pm-5pm Intuitive Readings available daily www.crescentmoongifts.com

649

$

Relines $195 each PT. DEFIANCE DENTURE & DENTAL CLINIC

5904 N. 45th St. • Tacoma 98407 • 253-238-1783

YOUR BUSINESS FEATURED HERE! ADVERTISE WITH US: (253) 922-5317


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

CITY EDGES TOWARD FINAL DETENTION RULES By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma City Council is set to pass permanent zoning rules regarding detention and correctional facilities, following a study session public hearing on the proposed rules this week. The changes would replace the interim rules put in place last year that are set to expire in early March. While the new rules also mention the Pierce County Jail and Remann Hall Juvenile Detention Center, most of the focus of review and debate centered on the Northwest Detention Center. Last year’s interim rules, in fact, came after the council approved an emergency moratorium on construction or expansion of correctional facilities out of concern about the Northwest Detention Center, a private detention center on the Tideflats that GEO Group operates through a federal contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, commonly known as ICE. The 1,575-bed facility has drawn local and national attention as the Trump administration steps up efforts against undocumented workers and illegal immigrants. The facility, which opened in 2004 and then expanded five years later, has long been the target of immigrant rights advocates and complaints about living conditions for the detainees. It is also the focus of a state lawsuit over the wages paid to detainees for doing work around the center, $1 a day. That lawsuit is one reason that the city’s proposed zoning changes make the distinction between a “detention” and “correctional” center. A “detention”

center houses people who are in custody pending the outcome of their legal proceedings, while a “correctional” center houses people following conviction of a criminal offense. The state allows for token pay for inmates doing work at a correctional center, but makes no concession for wages paid for work done by detainees. That’s the crux of the state’s case against GEO Group. The distinction in the city’s code avoids undermining the state’s case by including both terms. The rules for any current or future centers, whether correctional or for detainment, remain identical, however. The proposed zoning rules up for council vote would prohibit any correctional and detention facilities in port naritime industrial and heavy industrial areas, such as where the Northwest Detention Center is located now, in an effort to halt further encroachment of what is essentially a dense residential facility on land that is zoned for heavy manufacturing. The Northwest Detention Center would become a legal but nonconforming use, meaning it would have to undergo a public review process. The zoning proposal, as it stands now, doesn’t include an amortization timeline like the city’s nonconforming use rules regarding billboards did. That could change. “From my time on the planning commission and what I anticipate in terms of public comment is likely that we do not feel that the detention center fits within moral compass of the city,” Councilmember Chris Beale said. “… Some folks have made comments to the effect that they would like that facility gone

at some point in time.” Any future correctional and detention facilities would be allowed in light-industrial and multi-family neighborhoods only after a conditional-use permitting process that would require public notification and a preapplication community meeting. Changes in capacity to one of the three existing facilities would also trigger a public review. Anyone thinking that the “permanent” rules the council will adopt will actually stay permanent would be wrong, however. Since the Northwest Detention Center is located on the Tideflats, its operations and compatibility with its industrial neighbors will be under review again soon, as the Tideflats area is currently the focus of a subarea plan that could take years to develop. That process isn’t likely going to make any possible expansion of the center easier. “The (manufacturing and industrial center on the Tideflats) is an important, unique and finite-sized economic engine for Tacoma and the region,” stated Planning Commission Chairman Stephen Wamback in his letter to council. “Housing inappropriately competes with industrial uses and many industrial uses create unavoidable impacts on human health and well-being. …The commission commented on how previous generations’ poor planning allowed residential subdivisions to encroach on the port. We feel the same about correctional facilities and detention facilities. The city should have done more to engage the community in the past. The commission's recommendations, if adopted, will require early engagement in the future.”

FILE PHOTOS BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Tacoma City Council is primed to enact zoning changes for detention and correction centers, largely following rising unease about the Northwest Detention Center on the Tideflats being located in a heavy-industrial zone.


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

T & T Hair Salon doors reopen, owner welcomes back customers By Andrew Fickes

andrew@tacomaweekly.com

For Teresa Tong, owner of T & T Hair Salon at 6409 Sixth Ave. in Tacoma, the past five weeks have been a tumultuous time for her business – full of uncertainty and heartache. But since opening her business back up two weeks ago, she’s quickly realized the incredible loyalty of her customers. “Due to my father’s death, I had to close my salon for a few weeks,” she said. “That was inconvenient for customers. I would like to share with customers that I am back in business. I appreciated the support and customers’ concerns during the time I was closed.” Tong said losing her father was a rough time but that customers repeatedly checked in on her, helping to ease her mind and making the loss of her father a little more bearable. “I hope to see them soon, and I thank them for their support and business,” she said. Following 14 years of working professionally in the hair and beauty industry, Tong decided to open her own business. The grand opening of T & T Hair Salon was June 1. Since then, Tong has quickly built a loyal following. Her specialty services include haircuts, colors, highlights, perms, facials, wax, and color corrections. T & T Hair Salon also sells highquality hair and salon products and supplies.

PHOTO BY ROSE THIELE

T&T Hair Salon owner Teresa Tong loves her loyal customers, and is ready to welcome new ones to her full service salon.

T & T Hair Salon is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and closed Sundays. Haircuts are $20 for women and $18 for men. Seniors, military, and children are $15. Tong said customers who sched-

ule an appointment and mention they read this article will receive 20 percent off for service and products. For information about T & T Hair Salon and to make an appointment, call Teresa at (253) 507-3795.

Magazines, DVDs, Novelties, Gifts for Lovers

TT Hair Salon & Supplies Theresa T., Cosmetologist BUSINESS HOURS: Monday - Friday 8am - 8pm Saturday 9am - 7pm Sunday By Appointment ns Statio se! for lea

6409 6th Ave., #14, Tacoma, WA 98406

(253) 507-3795

tthairsalon72@gmail.com

YOUR BUSINESS FEATURED HERE!

’ LO

E

M

S

ADULT BOOKS & VIDEOS

TO ADVERTISE WITH US, CONTACT ROSE AT

BUY • SELL • TRADE ADULT VIDEO – OPEN 7 DAYS PRIVATE VIDEO VIEWING BOOTHS

LOWEST PRICES AROUND! 5440 So. Tacoma Way Tacoma

(253) 474-9871

=

3922 100th SW Lakewood

=

(253) 922-5317

338 N. Callow Bremerton

(253) 582-3329 (360) 373-0551

WESTGATE CENTER

GRAND OPENING!

on North Pearl Street

(next to Chase Bank & Anytime Fitness)

(253) 507-5005

7 $ 99 9

$ 99

this location only March 1, 2018

this location only March 15, 2018


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

t Ruston From page A1

portion of the development, using Ruston’s rules and standards. Pierce County will inspect the final work on Ruston’s behalf. Ruston can then challenge the permits, prompting an arbitration process. The waterfront condominiums, apartments, entertainment, shopping and dining options at Point Ruston that straddles the Tacoma-Ruston city lime along Commencement Bay represent $1.2 billion in private economic investment, making Point Ruston one of the largest privately funded projects in Pierce County history. “This partnership allows the Point Ruston project to move forward and results in significant benefits for the residents of Ruston,” said Mayor Bruce Hopkins. The deal came as bills were being considered in Olympia that would have allowed the entire project to annex into Tacoma without Ruston’s approval, which was the latest twist in a longstanding tiff between Point Ruston developers and the Ruston officials over permit delays and snags to redevelop the former Asarco Superfund site. “We are grateful for the leadership that has helped ensure Point Ruston can finish its transformation from a former smelter to a positive community amenity

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Point Ruston cranes might get even busier under a deal that would have Tacoma processing the construction permits for the development, even those on the City of Ruston side, in an effort to end a longstanding dispute Ruston have had with the developer.

that benefits the entire region. For the residents of Point Ruston, the businesses that are located there, our neighbors and this whole community, we’re ready to get to work,” said Point Ruston developer Loren Cohen. Once one of the largest environmental

clean-ups in the nation, the Point Ruston neighborhood now hosts a wide range of activities for individuals and families from trivia nights to blood drives, fun runs and birding classes. “I have great confidence in the collaborative process that we have put

t Budget From page A1

funding include Tacoma Community House, Tacoma Housing Authority, Peace Community Center, and education centers: UW-Tacoma and Bates Technical College. Tacoma Community House, now in its 108th year of serving the immigrant and refugee population, will receive a $2.5 million Building Communities Fund Grant, allocated in the capital budget, to go toward a $12.8 million budgeted 27,000-square foot building on its property at 1314 S. L St. in the Hilltop neighborhood. “We are staying here with our new building,” said Liz Dunbar, executive director of TCH. “Over the last 20 years, we have acquired all the property on the block. We will double our space. The existing building will be demolished for parking. Our goal is to break ground this summer.” The $2.5 million grant is something TCH was counting on since capital budget negotiations started last July. “It’s a key piece to our financial planning to this building,” Dunbar said. With the $2.5 million, TCH has now surpassed 60 percent of its budget goal, enabling it to apply for a significant grant from a larger private organization. Last November, the nonprofit received a $1 million grant from the Gates Foundation. Dave Wright, a TCH board member, as well as director for spiritual life and civic engagement and university chaplain at University of Puget Sound, said the board was waiting anxiously for the state to come through. “We were very exuberant to hear the news,” Wright said. “It will be nice to have a new building. It will literally change the whole block.” The new building will help TCH serve more people and expand its services, which include education and job-placement services, immigration services and crime victim advocacy. “We (currently) have very inadequate space,” Dunbar said. “This will allow us to grow our services over time.” Meanwhile, Tacoma Housing Authority is grateful

t Commission From page A1

fund. Beason said that to date, the City has received more than $2,000 in community donations. The City is now conducting an active search for an entity to administer the contracts for legal services to help individuals facing possible deportation.

JINKINS

DUNBAR

for a $3 million Housing Trust Fund grant from the state to contribute to a $23 million housing for homeless youth and young-adult campus called Arlington Drive, planned for a 3.5-acre lot at the corner of South 38th Street and Portland Avenue. The City of Tacoma, Pierce County, and THA are contributing to the overall budget. THA Executive Director Michael Mirra said the majority of funds will derive from private sources: tax credit investor equity and commercial debt. “This campus will be a major step forward in addressing a growing crisis of homelessness among youth in Pierce County and the Puget Sound region,” Mirra said. “These young people are not in school, not working, not in a hospital, not in jail, and without a home. They have fallen off the radar, in many cases, into a life of prostitution, trafficking, and drug addiction. This campus will give them a second chance at a reasonable adolescence, an education, a job, and a self-sufficient adulthood without fear. This campus will be a chance for Pierce County to show how to do this hard work right and at scale.” The campus is anticipated to serve more than 500 youth ages 12-17 daily with the 12-bed Crisis Residential Center. In addition, the campus will provide 40 apartments to rent for homeless young adults ages 18-24. THA will provide rental assistance during their stay and a housing voucher to help them find new housing when they leave. Social enterprises for job training will be provided. Peace Community Center, which provides educational

Beason said the commission will help to identify the needs of the community and advise on how to provide positive outcomes for the immigrant and refugee population. The commission will also play an advisory role in enacting and implementing the language access policy legislation. Tacoma’s population encompasses 31 percent minority, so a commission like this makes sense. Approximately 13 percent of the city’s population is foreign born,

in place to guide future development at Point Ruston,” said Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards. “I’m glad Tacoma could assist Ruston and Point Ruston in completing this regional destination project.” U.S. Congressman Derek Kilmer helped broker the deal to avoid a vote on the annexation option and the potential loss of tax revenue for the cash-strapped City of Ruston. The permitting deal triggers the withdrawal of those bills, which had already passed out of committee. “I am pleased that there is now a clear path forward, and I am hopeful this represents a new chapter of folks working together. I commend everyone who helped reach this consensus, including the cities, developer and the county executive,” he said. “If our community follows the path they charted, we will fully reclaim what was once a hazardous waste site and reimagine it into a great addition to our community that leads to new jobs and new businesses.” Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier led negotiations among the parties and hopes the deal will benefit everyone. “I’m encouraged by the agreement reached by all of the parties involved in the continued development of Point Ruston,” said Dammeier. “When completed, Point Ruston and the upgraded Point Defiance Park will be an incredible place for local families and visitors alike.”

support to youth in the Hilltop neighborhood, received $330,000 in state funding to contribute to $1.5 million in renovations of classroom space, a commercial kitchen to serve more than 100 meals daily, community area and student computer lab renovations, and a new 1,200-squarefoot office wing to improve staff collaboration. The $1.5 million in renovations is part of the broader Hilltop: Where Scholars Grow Campaign, valued at more than $2.3 million. To date, $2.2 million in community support has been raised. “Peace Community Center is thrilled to have the state support to help expand opportunities for Hilltop students,” said Jay Thomas, executive director of Peace Community Center. “This grant is significant for our community, and we extend sincere appreciation to our senators, representatives and neighbors for joining with us on such a special project.” Other winners in the state capital budget for Tacoma include:

• UW-Tacoma, which will receive $500,000 to support

predesign work for its next academic building that will accommodate growth for up to 800 full-time students and expand high-demand degree programs; and $1 million for ongoing soil remediation after historic contamination left chemicals from commercial degreasers, oil, and fuel in soil and groundwater

• Bates Technical College will receive $3.2 million for its Medical Mile Health Science Center

• MultiCare Franciscan Joint Venture will receive $3

million for development of a behavioral health center

• Tacoma’s Historic Theater District will receive $1 million

• More than $24 million for the ASARCO Cleanup • A $560,000 Heritage Capital Grant for the Foss Waterway Seaport

• A $1 million grant to the Benaroya building expansion for the Tacoma Art Museum

Beason said. “This can range from Africa, East Asia, Eastern Europe, Pacific Islands, and South America,” Beason said. “We are seeking members from these communities to represent the various struggles.

The top languages spoken in Tacoma are Spanish, Khmer, Korean, Vietnamese and Russian. In an effort to be more inclusive we are currently translating our (committees, boards, and commissions) application into these languages.”

Now located in University Place A truly local community bank serving Puget Sound for over 60 years We care about our community - giving over $160,000 to local area causes and non-profits in 2016

C A L L IN G A L L C O M IC A R T IS T S !

ST LOOKING FOR CARTOONIATURING FE P FOR WEEKLY COMIC STRISUES! LOCAL PEOPLE/IS work Submit a sample of your om ly.c ek we ma to lisa@taco

Member FDIC

4922 Bridgeport Way West University Place, WA 98467 soundcb.com | 800.458.5585

Follow us on Facebook!

facebook.com/tacomaweekly

Follow us on Twitter!

twitter.com/tacomaweekly

Follow us on Instagram!

instagram.com/tacomaweekly


Sports

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2018

FEVER ON THE PITCH PLAYOFF RACE HEATS UP FOR TACOMA STARS

SECTION A, PAGE 10

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Top) Henry Foss guard Demetrius Crosby continues to show why he will again be named to the Tacoma Weekly All-City team in a few weeks. The senior guard dropped 35 points on a Renton squad that entered the game 18-2. (Middle) Foss junior guard Micah Pollard has become a force on the offensive and defensive ends for the Falcons, while averaging just over 20 points per game. (Bottom) The Falcons are going to need 6'6" freshman Kenzel Massey to step up large in the postseason if Foss expects to bring another 2A state championship trophy back to Tacoma.

Lincoln’s Jones nets 100th – Playoffs tip-off By Justin Gimse

PHOTOS BY QUINN WIDTH / GOALWA.NET

(Top) Tacoma Stars' Nick Perera fights for control of the ball. Since acquiring the veteran in a trade that involved later considerations, Perera has been lights-out for Tacoma. In the seven games he has suited up for the Stars, Perera has tallied an incredible 16 goals, while adding seven assists. After dropping four goals and an assist against the El Paso Coyotes on Friday, Feb. 2, Perera was named to the Major Arena Soccer League's “Team of the Week.” (Second-left) Philip Lund has also had a sensational first season with Tacoma. The Dane has scored 15 goals, including a hat trick against the Coyotes. (Second-right) Goalkeeper Danny Waltman has kept Tacoma within striking distance all season. (Third-left) Former Stadium Tiger Jamael Cox has been mixing up goals and assists to go along with his blazing speed this season. (Third-right) Tacoma head coach Darren Sawatzky works to keep the troops focused on the plan. (Bottom) Taylor Walter Bond, Evan McNeley and Perera return to the bench following a goal. By Justin Gimse

W

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

hen it comes to the world of sports, nothing really compares to the fever pitch of an exciting playoff run. As the regular season winds toward the final contest, if one’s team happens to still be in the mix for a postseason berth, that fan base is usually reaching new heights of euphoria. The atmosphere in the arena becomes more electric, and the level of play by the teams involved tends to heat up like never before. This is the state of affairs for the Tacoma Stars of the Major Arena Soccer League, as well as their fans. With just five games remaining in the regular season, Tacoma sits within prime striking distance of a playoff berth. Standing in their path is the Ontario Fury, a team that in these three short years, has easily become the Stars’ most heated rival. With only two tickets to the playoffs available from each of the four divisions in the MASL, it looks as though the race for the second spot in the Pacific Division could go down to the last weekend of the season. Sure, Tacoma (8-9) has topped the Fury (9-8) twice this season, but Ontario still has a one-game cushion in the standings. The two teams will do battle on Thursday, Feb. 15, in Ontario, and again on Friday, Feb. 23, at the

Accesso ShoWare Center in Kent. The two games could make or break it for either team, and fans should expect two of the fiercest matches of the season when the opening whistles blow in these contests. Both teams have a difficult road to close out the regular season. Besides their two matches with Ontario, the Stars will host the San Diego Sockers (12-3) on Friday, Feb. 9, will travel to face the Turlock Express (2-16) on Friday, Feb. 16, and close out the season at home against the Kansas City Comets on Friday, March 2. The finale with the Comets could be for all the marbles for both teams. With Cedar Rapids in the midst of an apparent free-fall in the MASL Central Division standings, the Comets sit just 2.5 games behind, and well within striking distance. That final game against the Stars could be an absolute dog fight. Snatch up your tickets now for that one. On the flipside, Ontario will host the undefeated Monterrey Flash (15-0) on Thursday, Feb. 8, followed by a road match against El Paso the following night. After two dips against Tacoma, Ontario will host San Diego on Thursday, March 1, to close out the season. Tacoma was able to keep pace with Ontario in the standings with an exciting 10-7 victory over the El Paso Coyotes on Friday, Feb. 2, in front of 2,981 fans at the ShoWare Center. What began as a runaway blowout u See STARS / page A13

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

It’s been a long and winding road to the playoffs for many Tacoma-area high school basketball teams this season. While several squads ran away with league championships, even more fought tooth and nail to stay in contention for postseason berth. After 20 regular season games, the seeds have been set for the various district tournaments and you can basically throw the records out. Now it’s time to put up or shut up. There is no time for do-overs at this stage in the game. The one thing that looks very clear this season is that more than a few local teams look like legitimate contenders to not only win a district championship, but some also look like serious contenders for a state title. Before we jump into who is playing who, and where, there are some big-time kudos to be doled out to a Tacoma head coach. When the Lincoln Lady Abes closed out the regular season with a decisive 72-39 road win over the Lakes Lancers, the victory marked the 100th career win for Lincoln head coach Jamila Jones. So far, we have not been able to find another Lincoln coach to reach 100 wins in such a short amount of time. Being the second-oldest school in Tacoma, that makes this century mark even more impressive. Speaking of the Lady Abes (19-1), they will now do battle in the 3A West Central District tournament with six seeds available to move on to the state regional round of 16. Currently ranked second in the 3A RPI standings, Lincoln will open play against Yelm (8-12) shortly after this issue of the Tacoma Weekly goes to press. A Lincoln victory will see the Abes likely playing Peninsula (17-3) on Friday, Feb. 9, at Bellarmine Prep at 6 p.m. Top-ranked Gig Harbor (16-4) and Prairie (18-2) also look like strong contenders for the district title. Wilson (13-7) will have to tussle with the Tides if they want to even make it to the semifinals. On the boys’ side, the 3A WCD tournament looks like the makings of a barnburner. The u See BASKETBALL / page A13


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

Sportswatch

TACOMA AREA PREP SCORES BOYS BASKETBALL TUESDAY, JAN. 30 WILSON - 70, SPANAWAY LAKE - 65 LAKES - 49, BONNEY LAKE - 44 STADIUM - 79, MT. TAHOMA - 61 BELLARMINE - 52, SUMNER - 44 OLYMPIA - 53, PUYALLUP - 57 ROGERS - 58, SO. KITSAP - 42 EM. RIDGE - 53, SO. KITSAP - 44 HENRY FOSS - 76, LINDBERGH - 63 FR. PIERCE - 79, WASHINGTON - 57 STEILACOOM - 43, CLOVER PARK - 57 PENINSULA - 63, CEN. KITSAP - 60 GIG HARBOR - 72, YELM - 44 CHARLES WRIGHT - 34, SEA. CHRIS. - 64 CASC. CHRISTIAN - 64, BEL. CHRIS. - 52 TAC. BAPTIST - 47, MT. RAINIER LUTH. - 38 WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 LINCOLN - 89, BETHEL - 51 THURSDAY, FEB. 1 LINCOLN - 71, LAKES - 47 WILSON - 83, STADIUM - 56 BONNEY LAKE - 58, MT. TAHOMA - 56 SPANAWAY LAKE - 93, BETHEL - 72 CURTIS - 74, GRAHAM-K - 33 BELLARMINE - 57, EM. RIDGE - 53 SUMNER - 61, ROGERS - 52 PUYALLUP - 73, SOUTH KITSAP - 39 CAPITAL - 58, GIG HARBOR - 24 PENINSULA - 56, NO. THURSTON - 48 CHIEF LESCHI - 82, RAYMOND - 56 FRIDAY, FEB. 2 HENRY FOSS - 83, RENTON - 65 CLOVER PARK - 60, FIFE - 40 FR. PIERCE - 57, STEILACOOM - 50 LINDBERGH - 80, HIGHLINE - 76

VASHON - 56, CASC. CHRIS. - 54 BELL. CHRIS. - 51, CHARLES WR. - 43 LIFE CHRISTIAN - 68, OCOSTA - 51 SATURDAY, FEB. 3 TAC. BAPTIST - 95, QUILCENE - 25 M.R. LUTHERAN - 56, NW YESHIVA - 32 MONDAY, FEB. 5 TAC. BAPTIST -68, PS ADVENTIST - 52 MUCKLESHOOT - 96, M.R. LUTH. - 56 DECATUR - 62, SUMNER - 61 OLYMPIA - 81, BEAMER - 48 TUESDAY, FEB. 6 CASC. CHRIS. - 67, SEA. CHRIS. - 60 GIRLS BASKETBALL TUESDAY, JAN. 30 LINCOLN - 46, BETHEL - 25 WILSON - 65, SPANAWAY LAKE - 48 MT. TAHOMA - 51, STADIUM - 30 LAKES - 58, BONNEY LAKE - 37 BELLARMINE - 59, SUMNER - 48 ROGERS - 64, SO. KITSAP - 39 OLYMPIA - 32, PUYALLUP - 24 EM. RIDGE - 68, SOUTH KITSAP - 39 FR. PIERCE - 44, WASHINGTON - 39 FIFE - 61, FOSTER - 47 LINDBERGH - 54, HENRY FOSS - 37 STEILACOOM - 81, CLOVER PARK - 22 GIG HARBOR - 55, YELM - 24 PENINSULA - 72, CENTRAL KITSAP - 50 CHARLES WRIGHT - 43, SEA. CHRIS - 76 CASC. CHRISTIAN - 36, VASHON - 34 MT. RAINIER LUTH. - 51, TAC. BAPTIST - 18

FRIDAY, FEB. 2 FIFE - 54, EATONVILLE - 31 FOSTER - 66, STEILACOOM - 62 RIVER RIDGE - 40, FR. PIERCE - 16 CASC. CHRISTIAN - 57, VASHON - 15 BELL. CHRIS. - 56, CHARLES WR. - 15 LIFE CHRISTIAN - 54, OCOSTA - 35 SATURDAY, FEB. 3 SUMNER - 54, ROGERS - 42 ILWACO - 55, LIFE CHRISTIAN - 40 RAINIER CHRIS. - 34, TAC. BAPTIST - 26 MONDAY, FEB. 5 KENTWOOD - 59, EM. RIDGE - 46 TAC. BAPTIST - 32, MUCKLESHOOT - 27 TUESDAY, FEB. 6 OLYMPIA - 43, AUBURN - 36 CASC. CHRIS. - 40, SEA. CHRIS - 44

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 RAYMOND - 47, CHIEF LESCHI - 21

SEATTLE MARINERS PARTNER WITH METRO PARKS FOR KIDS PROMOTION

The Seattle Mariners and Metro Parks Tacoma have announced a partnership to promote baseball and softball to thousands of elementary school aged boys and girls in the greater Tacoma area. Through a new initiative known as On BASE (Baseball and Softball Everywhere), the Mariners will provide team-branded jerseys for 2,400 kids aged 5-12 who participate in the upcoming baseball portion of the Elementary Sports Program, which offers after-school sports at all Tacoma elementary schools. In addition, the Mariners will contribute financial support to the Jack C. Wilson Active Kids Fund, which offers scholarships for Metro Parks Tacoma registration fees so that all Tacoma youth have access to recreation programs. “We believe that every child should have the chance to play baseball or softball,” said John Stanton, Seattle Mariners managing partner and chair. “Through On BASE, we will strive to give every girl and boy in the region the opportunity to get outside and to play America’s favorite sports.” “It’s a great gesture. The Mariners will help keep a lot of dreams alive with this partnership,” said Aaron Pointer, a member of the Metro Parks Board of Park Commissioners and a former Major League ballplayer. “More kids in Tacoma will have the opportunity to be physically active after school and to learn about teamwork.” The Elementary Sports Program includes T-ball, coach pitch, baseball and softball and is available to K-5 students at Tacoma Public Schools, private schools and those who are home schooled. The program is administered by Metro Parks Tacoma in partnership with Tacoma Public Schools, Boys & Girls Clubs of South Puget Sound, and YMCA of Pierce and Kitsap Counties. The program also offers soccer, golf, volleyball, basketball and flag football at various times during the school year. The baseball/fastpitch season runs April through June. Registration closes March 19; details are available on the Metro Parks website. On BASE In addition to the partnership with Metro Parks, the Mariners On BASE initiative includes such things as cash grants to support Little League and high school baseball/softball programs in Washington, a series of instruction clinics for youth coaches and players, Mariners Grand Slam skills development camps, Major League Baseball’s Pitch, Hit & Run competition, the RBI (Reviving Baseball in Inner-cities) League partnership with Rainier Vista Boys & Girls Club in Seattle and PLAY BALL, a partnership between MLB, USA Baseball and the U.S. Conference of Mayors to promote participation in casual as well as organized baseball activites. Metro Parks Tacoma is an independent park district that leads efforts to build a healthy, sustainable community. Governed by an elected five-member Board of Park Commissioners, Metro Parks offers a wide range of recreational programs. The district maintains and cares for more than 100 parks and recreational facilities in the Tacoma area, including Point Defiance Park, Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Northwest Trek Wildlife Park and four community centers.

FEATHERWEIGHT TITLE UP FOR GRABS AT CAGESPORT 49

THURSDAY, FEB. 1 LINCOLN - 72, LAKES - 39 WILSON - 66, STADIUM - 53 BONNEY LAKE - 37, MT. TAHOMA - 33 BETHEL - 71, SPANAWAY LAKE - 31 BELLARMINE - 72, EM. RIDGE - 27 CURTIS - 54, GRAHAM-K - 42 PUYALLUP - 53, SO. KITSAP - 35 ROGERS - 56, SUMNER - 54 PENINSULA - 64, NO. THURSTON - 47 GIG HARBOR - 50, CAPITAL - 29 SHELTON - 58, YELM - 44 WHITE RIVER - 56, RENTON - 53

While it sounds like a comic book title –“Superman versus Agent Orange” – the CageSport title fight between Nathan Stolen and Daniel Swain could prove to be one of the hardest-hitting fights in the organization’s 10-year history given the reputation of both athletes. “Superman” Stolen will face off against “Agent Orange” Swain for the CageSport featherweight belt in the main event of CageSport 49 on Saturday at the Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma. The five-round title fight will be one of nine bouts on the card. Tickets are available through the EQC box office and all Ticketmaster outlets. Preliminary bouts start at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Stolen, who is undefeated in two career fights with the promotion, brings a record of 7-2 with five KOs into the championship contest, while Swain, who holds wins over UFC veteran Sam Sicilia and former CageSport champion Drew Brokenshire, is 16-8-1. “Since my last fight at the EQC I’ve improved greatly overall as a fighter. I’m more experienced now as a professional, having had more fights, wins and losses,” Stolen said. “I’ve got to train with other professionals from all over the world. I’ve seen many different styles that has better prepared me for my future fights.” Four fighters appearing on the undercard – Terrance McKinney, Quinten Wyland, Chris San Jose and Chase

Hooper – will all look to stay undefeated. The 18-year-old Hooper has been nothing short of spectacular during the early months of his pro career, having won both his previous fights in impressive fashion. Hooper will square off against Wyatt Gonzalez in a matchup of 156 pounders. “I know that it’s going to be a tough fight, and there are things that I have to worry about, but I know that he has more to worry about than I do especially on the ground,” Hooper said. “Overall, I’m feeling good about the fight, but I’m definitely not writing this guy off.” McKinney will also attempt to go a perfect 3-0 when he meets Tyrone Henderson in a 146-pound bout. Tacoma-based Team SNRG will have a pair of fighters on the card in a debuting Emmanuel Carter, who faces the 2-0 Wyland, and Dominique Smith (1-1). Smith is coming off his first career victory and will meet fellow 171-pounder Eric McConico. “We’d like to think of CageSport as our show,” said James Pagdilao-Duras, who oversees Team SNRG’s MMA striking and Jiu-Jitsu training, about the promotion being in his team’s hometown. “Of course we need to train hard and continue to be successful to be able do that, but we like the challenge.” Rounding out the list of undefeated fighters is 3-0 San Jose, who will fight veteran Anthony Zender (7-10) in a 136-pound bout. CageSport 49 is brought to you by Brian Halquist Productions and CageSport MMA. For more information, please visit the CageSport MMA Facebook page and www.halquistproductions.com

FEBRUARY 8 – MARCH 3 THURSDAY, FEB. 8 - BASKETBALL Girls - Skyview vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine HS - 7 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 8 - BASKETBALL Boys - Shelton vs. Lincoln Lincoln HS - 7 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 8 - BASKETBALL Boys - Central Kitsap vs. Wilson Wilson HS - 7 p.m. THURSDAY, FEB. 8 - BASKETBALL Boys - Evergreen vs. Spanaway Lake Spanaway Lake HS - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, FEB. 9 - MASL SOCCER San Diego Sockers vs. Tacoma Stars Accesso ShoWare Center - 7:35 p.m. FRIDAY, FEB. 10 - BASKETBALL Boys - TBD vs. Henry Foss Henry Foss HS - 7 p.m. TUESDAY, FEB. 13 - BASKETBALL Women - UPS vs. Pacific Lutheran Pacific Lutheran - 6 p.m. TUESDAY, FEB. 13 - BASKETBALL Men - Puget Sound vs. Pacific Lutheran Pacific Lutheran - 8 p.m. FRIDAY, FEB. 16 - WRESTLING Washington State Mat Classic Tacoma Dome - 8:45 a.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17, WRESTLING Washington State Mat Classic Tacoma Dome - 8:45 a.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 3A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 12 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Girls - 3A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 2 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 2A WCD District Title Game Wilson HS - 2 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 4A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 4 p.m. SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Girls - 2A WCD District Title Game Wilson HS - 2 p.m.

CageSport 49 – Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018 Emerald Queen Casino, Tacoma

SATURDAY, FEB. 17 - BASKETBALL Boys - 4A WCD District Title Game Puyallup HS - 6 p.m.

Main Event – Five Rounds CageSport Featherweight Championship Nathan Stolen (7-2) vs. Daniel Swain (16-8-1)

FRIDAY, FEB. 23 - MASL SOCCER Ontario Fury vs. Tacoma Stars Accesso ShoWare Center - 7:35 p.m.

Undercard – Three-Round Bouts • 146-pounds: Tyrone Henderson (5-3-1) vs. Terrance McKinney (2-0) • 150-pounds: Emmanuel Carter (debut) vs. Quinton Wyland (2-0) • 156-pounds: Chase Hooper (2-0) vs. Wyatt Gonzalez (1-4) • 171-pounds: Eric McConico (debut) vs. Dominique Smith (1-1) • 136-pounds: Chris San Jose (3-0) vs. Anthony Zender (7-10) • 171-pounds: Fay Bursell (2-1) vs. Zach Conn (7-8) • 206-pounds: Jay Radick (debut) vs. Darrio Mobley (5-6) • 126-pounds: Cody Simpkins (1-1) vs. Jacob Romero (0-1)

GAME WINNER AND SCHOOL RECORD IN PUGET SOUND WIN

Easton Driessen drilled a game-winning 3-pointer with three seconds left as the Puget Sound men’s basketball team gutted out a 101-100 win over George Fox in Memorial Fieldhouse Saturday, Feb. 3. The Loggers (14-6, 7-5 NWC) trailed, 98-92, with just over one minute left when Stellan Roberts came up with a steal and fast-break layup. The Loggers got another defensive stop, and Roberts was subsequently fouled on the offensive end. He made both free-throws to make it a 98-96 game with 55 seconds left. The Bruins (6-15, 2-10 NWC) answered with a bucket, but Driessen hit a turn-around jumper in the paint to cut the deficit to 100-98 with 18 seconds left in regulation. Puget Sound intentionally fouled to put the Bruins on the line. George Fox missed the front end of a one-and-one, and Max Basile grabbed the rebound to set up Dressen’s heroics in the Loggers’ final possession. Basile finished with a career-best 15 rebounds. During the game, Jimmy Wohrer set the Puget Sound single-season record for 3-pointers in a season. He hit his 84th trey of 2017-18 midway through the second half, eclipsing Curtis Medved’s record set during the 2003-04 season. Wohrer will continue to build on his record as the Loggers have four regular-season games remaining. Wohrer scored a career-high 36 points against the Bruins, surpassing his previous best of 32 points against Wis.-Stout earlier this season. Jeremiah Hobbs scored 15 points for Puget Sound, and Driessen finished with 13. The Loggers return home to take on Linfield, Friday, Feb. 9, at 8 p.m. The following night, the Loggers host Pacific at 6 p.m. Puget Sound will than visit crosstown rival Pacific Lutheran on Tueday, Feb. 13, at 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. THURSDAY, MAR. 1 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys/4A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 3:45 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys/4A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 5:30 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys/3A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 7:15 p.m. FRIDAY, MAR. 2 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys/3A Girls - Semifinals Tacoma Dome - 9 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A/4A State Hardwood Classic Tacoma Dome - 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 4A Boys State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 4A Girls State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A Boys State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, MAR. 3 - BASKETBALL 3A Girls State Championship Game Tacoma Dome - 9 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

TACOMA BAPTIST HEATING UP

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

(Top-left) Tacoma Baptist senior guard Joey Pascua beats his defender and soars to the basket for two. (Top-right) Sophomore guard Jeremiah Lynn goes up for two. (Mid-left) Co-captain Kyongjin So goes to the rack with his left. (Center) Senior PJ Talen is all intensity after ripping down a rebound. (Midright) Logan Kitselman may only be 6'1", but the junior can mix it up in the paint for the Crusaders. (Bottom) As a 1B school, Tacoma Baptist is able to draw from their eighth grade, if needed, to augment their varsity lineup. While it's been the usual for several small schools around the state, it's new ground for the Crusaders. Eighth-grade guard Bradley Swillie has turned into a force for the Crusaders. Standing at 6'2", the newcomer has been blowing by defenders, sticking the jump shot and setting up his teammates for a multitude of scoring chances. With the postseason now in full swing, Swillie could very well be the "x-factor" for the Crusaders' chances at making it to the 1B Hardwood Classic at the Spokane Coliseum. Tacoma Baptist demolished Quilcene 95-25 to begin Sea-Tac League Tournament play on Saturday, Feb. 3. Two nights later, the Crusaders turned away Puget Sound Adventist by a score of 68-52 to secure a spot in the Sea-Tac League tournament championship. The Crusaders will then move on to the Tri-District tournament where they are assured of a home game to open tourney play on either Saturday, Feb. 10 or Tuesday, Feb. 13.


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Basketball From page A10

undefeated Abes (20-0) are currently second in the 3A RPI, with crosstown rival Wilson (17-3) sitting in the seventh position. The two teams are on opposite sides of the bracket, so don’t be surprised if the two teams square off in yet another district title game. However, fifthranked Timberline (16-4), eighth-ranked Prairie (15-5) and North Thurston (19-1) are going to put up a considerable fight. Six teams will advance to the state regionals. Lincoln hosts Shelton (8-12) on Thursday, Feb. 8, at 7 p.m. Wilson hosts Central Kitsap (10-10) at the same time. Stadium (9-10) will have their hands full on the road against Timberline. The 4A WCD girls’ tournament is probably the toughest 4A district field in the state. While 4A SPSL champion Bellarmine (17-3) looks strong to make it out with one of the seven seeds to the regionals, the path for Curtis (137) will be considerable tougher as they open play against No. 10 Kentlake (16-5), with a probable contest with No. 8 Todd Beamer (16-4) should they win. Bellarmine opens play hosting Skyview (6-10) on Thursday, Feb. 8, at 7 p.m. On the boys 4A side, the 4A WCD tournament looks like quite the obstacle course. Undefeated Federal Way (21-0) looks like a monster at the moment, and the other 15 teams

t Stars

From page A10

turned into a much-closer game than the fans expected after a dominating first half by Tacoma. Before 10 minutes had ticked off of the scoreboard, the Stars led the Coyotes by a score of 3-0 and it looked as though there were no brake lights in sight. The Stars kicked off the night’s scoring off a sweet goal by Trevor Jensen. Taking a feed from former Stadium standout Raphael Cox, Jensen put a left foot on the ball and snuck it inside the left post for the 1-0 Tacoma lead. Less than two minutes later, Philip Lund would catch the El Paso defense out of position. A long pass into the corner careened off the edge of the wall and bounced into the middle of the top circle. Two El Paso defenders had a chance at the ball, but were unable to get off their heels. Meanwhile, Lund flashed into the picture and slapped a low burner straight into the back of the net for a 2-0 Stars’ advantage. With 5:21 remaining in the first quarter, Tacoma’s newfound leader got into the act. Now playing in his seventh game for the Stars, Nick Perera continued his torrid scoring pace as he took a feed from Troy Peterson

in the field are going to need a minor miracle to snag the title from them. Unlike last year, district placings matter, because the RPI data will continue to tally wins and losses all the way through the regional round. No teams are going to get into a placing game and put it in cruise control, as their RPI ranking will be on the line for the ensuing state tournament. Curtis (15-5) hosts Auburn Mountainview (5-16) and Bellarmine hosts Auburn (14-7) shortly after this issue goes to print. Both teams could face top-five opponents in the quarterfinals, should they advance. The defending 2A state champion Foss Falcons look like considerable favorites in the 2A WCD tournament. With five seeds to regionals on the line, strong contenders for a ticket to regioinals include Clover Park (14-7) and Fife (174). Don’t be surprised if the title game on Saturday, Feb. 10, at Wilson High School is another matchup between Renton (18-3) and Foss (17-3). The fourth-ranked Falcons knocked off Renton in the 2A South Puget Sound League championship game on Friday, Feb. 2, by a score of 83-65 after three quarters of close play. On the girls’ 2A side, the Fife Trojans (14-7) look like they’ve got a decent, but tough, shot at one of the district’s five seeds to the regionals. A rematch with league champion White River (18-4) in the quarterfinals looks like a possibility for the Trojans, which would then send Fife onto a track where they would need to win three consecutive loser-out games to advance to regionals. The Cascade Christian boys (12-8) and girls (12-8) both

and made a quick turn near the top of the circle. Without hesitation, Perera planted the ball into the upper-left corner of the goal to give Tacoma a 3-0 lead. El Paso finally got into the act off a goal by Jorge Rios just 30 seconds later. Perera would answer again just 27 seconds later off a left-footed blast to give Tacoma a 4-1 lead. Rios would answer the bell for El Paso just over two minutes later to narrow the score to 4-2. With just over a minute left in the first quarter, Raphael Cox found himself out in front of the Coyotes’ defense and he slipped one past goalkeeper Eduardo Arevalo, leaping over diving keeper following the blast. Tacoma would tack on two more quick goals in the second quarter. Lund scored off a rebound blast from Perera to make the score 6-2 just 47 seconds into the period. Perera would then earn his hat trick after taking a cross-field pass from defenseman Evan McNeley to make it 7-2 Stars with just under 11 minutes remaining in the second quarter. Rios would than earn his own hat trick off a goal just over 30 seconds later to make it 7-3 Tacoma. Following a hard foul, Perera would score on a penalty kick to earn his fourth goal of the night and gave the Stars an 8-3 advantage going into the half. El Paso would strike twice midway through the third quarter to close

the score to 8-5 Stars. Lund would then earn his own hat trick after taking a feed from former Wilson Ram Joey Gjertsen, sliding full-bodied into the El Paso goal and Tacoma would take a 9-5 lead into the final period. Former Stadium Tiger Jamael Cox would deliver a cannon shot from deep on the wing into the upperright corner of the goal to give Tacoma a 10-5 advantage with just over 13 minutes remaining in the contest. El Paso would tack on two quick scores two minutes later to make the score 10-7, but were unable to gain any further ground on the Stars as the Tacoma defense stiffened and put the rest of the night on shutdown. In seven games with Tacoma, Perera has now scored 16 goals, while adding seven assists. His addition to the team, along with newcomer Taylor Walter Bond, has turned the tide for the Stars, making them much more potent on the offensive end. Tacoma hosts San Diego on Friday, Feb. 9, at 7:35 p.m. The Tacoma Stars Reserves open Western Indoor Soccer League play the following night at the Tacoma Soccer Center against the Olympic Force. It is a single-elimination game, with the victors heading to the WISL championship game the following weekend. Tacoma won the inaugural WISL championship three seasons ago, only to see Bellingham take the next two trophies.

WELCOME

TACOMA C H E N E Y S TA D I U M 2 0 1 8 WILL YOU BE THERE? SEASON TICKETS AND SCHEDULE AT

look like legitimate threats to win out in the 1A WCD tournament. The boys’ field will send two to regionals, while the girls’ field will send three. Life Christian is sending their girls’ and boys’ teams to the 2B district tournament and both fields are about as tough as they come. The Lady Eagles (14-3) and the boys’ team (18-2) are both ranked fifth in their respective 2B RPI standings. There are five seeds to regionals on the line in both tournaments with both squads owning quality bracket draws due to excellent regular-season runs. The boys’ field also includes Chief Leschi (14-6), who will also be looking for a return to the Hardwood Classic in Spokane. Eight out of the top 14 teams in the boys’ 2B RPI standings will take part in the Southwest District tournament. Something’s going to have to give. The Tacoma Baptist boys (19-2) look like they are peaking at the right time of the season. With six seeds available out of the 1B Tri-District tournament, the Crusaders look like one of the stronger teams in the field. While the Lady Crusaders (6-15) will need some minor miracles to advance, the boys’ team may be able to punch a ticket to the Spokane Arena.

Cost Less Pharmacy is back in Fircrest! NEW LOCATION! Low cash prescription prices and the same great customer service 1375 Regents Blvd. Ste 101, Fircrest | 253-564-1104

52nd Annual

February 17 & 18th 2018


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

GIVE YOUR BUSINESS A FRESH LOOK!

TWadvertising DESIGN SERVICES FOR: • ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS • BRANDING • DESIGN CONSULTATION • COMPANY GRAPHICS • SOCIAL MEDIA • MARKETING

and gRAPHIC

SERVICES WE KNOW WHAT WORKS IN TACOMA! NOW OPEN!

AND MUCH MORE!

ENC E ESS EXP ERILS A WI LDE RN CK TAI WI TH BIG CO

TT Hair Salon & Su pplies Theresa T.,

EV ER Y DAY HA PP Y HO UR- 6p m 12 pm• • •

GERS $5 ANGUS BUR

ALL DAY $5 PIZ ZAS SUNDAYS: FRE E POO L • es on all TVs Hawks gam S • Showing DED HOT DOG LOA OFF 1/2 MONDAYS: GO w/host BIN TTY GRI TUESDAYS: Sin-dee - 7pm J No-Pants KARAOKE w/D FRIDAYS: large groups parties and *Available for

e of Featuring somessional rof the most unp art in wilderness a Tacom

(253) 507-37ma, WA 98406

tthairsalon72@g 95 mail.com

-THURS IDNIGHT SUN OPEN 12PM-M ON FRI & SAT • 21+ TILL 2AM

M AMPBAR.CO W W W . T H EPCB A R T A C O M A #CAM

E C N E I R E EXP ING

Cosmetologist

BUSINES Monday - Frida S HOURS: y 8am - 8pm Saturday 9am - 7pm Sunday By Appointment Stations 640 9 e! 6th Ave., #14, Taco for leas

PS, ACE, TIN CU FAKE FIRE PL D "THE LOG" SMORES AN DAY,

AV E S, 131 0 TA CO MA, WA TA CO MA

S R A E Y 30

EVERY DAY

JOHN WE PU B LI SH YMER ER

jweymer

C: 253.22

@tacom

aweekly.

com

P. O. BOX 9.1729 | O: 25 71 85 , TA CO M A, W3.922.5317 A 98 41 7

TIS IN ADVER ES! S E RV I C

CONTACT US FOR RATES & INFORMATION

253.922.5317

Tree Hugger’s Corner A guide for those who want to get out there and take action on behalf of the environment and social justice Thursday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m. ARTISTS, IMMIGRATION, AND ACTIVISM: PANEL AND COMMUNITY TALK Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma What is the role of the artist in addressing social issues? What does it mean to be American? How has art been a catalyst for immigrant justice? Participate in a timely conversation with four local artists who create artwork that engages with the topic of immigration. Moderated by activist, critic and curator Susan Platt, the panelists will demonstrate how their art is a springboard for conversation around contemporary immigration issues. Moderator: Susan Platt. Artist panelists: Zhi Lin, Tatiana Garmendia, Humaira Abid, and Fulgencio Lazo. Before the panel, be sure to visit “Zhi Lin: In Search of the Lost History of Chinese Migrants and the Transcontinental Railroads” (bit.ly/TAMzhiLIN) and “Immigrant Artists and the American West” (bit.ly/TAMimmigrantw). This program is free and open to the public. Info: www.tacomaartmuseum.org

Thursday, Feb. 15, 6 p.m. TACOMA LABOR FOR REVOLUTION ILWU Local #23, 1306 Alexander Ave. E, Tacoma This is the first meeting. Are you a worker who wants to strengthen your political influence to see a system that works for the working class, not just the elite? Are you ready to stand up and demand that our politicians start truly working for us? Then let’s get together and continue this political revolution. This first meeting will have a brief history of Labor for Our Revolution followed by some examples of successes that other Our Revolution groups have accomplished. After that, we can focus on a set up for this local organization, establishing a mission statement and establishing what issues are most important to us should be our initial focus. Bring your passion and ideas. Looking forward to working together. Info: facebook.com/587886724647050/ photos/790863541016033/

Saturday, Feb. 24, 9 a.m. RESTORE FORT STEILACOOM PARK Fort Steilacoom Park, 8714 87th Ave. SW, Lakewood As you walk through beautiful Fort Steilacoom Park, you’ll see that nonnative, destructive plants are taking over. Scotch broom, English ivy and Himalayan blackberries are the main culprits but other invasive plants are also gaining ground. Left unchecked these plants will steadily crowd out native plants and destroy the habitat our local birds, butterflies, bees and other animals live in and rely on. Help change this. Come and help to eradicate these invasive species and replace them with native plants. We meet the fourth Saturday of every month and welcome new volunteers whenever they are available. Contact Tari Norris (tari.poe.norris@ gmail.com) for more information about where to meet and what to bring. Info: www.facebook.com/lakewoodparks/


City Life FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2018

YOUR TICKET to TACOMA

Katy Perry at the Tacoma Dome

TA C O M A W E E K LY. C O M

B2

SECTION B, PAGE 1

DON’T LOSE YOUR HEAD, IT’S ONLY VALENTINE’S DAY

THINGS TO SEE AND DO WITH YOUR SWEETIE PIE our Valentine’s Kids Dash. Info: www. metroparkstacoma.org/valentinerun/ VALENTINE’S WEEKEND HEARTBREAK PARTY Saturday, Feb. 10, 9 p.m.

Doyle’s Public House, 208 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma

By Dave R. Davison

I

dave@tacomaweekly.com

n the Calendar of Saints, Feb. 14 is designated as the feast day of Saint Valentine. In addition to his role as patron saint of lovers, happy marriages and affianced couples, Valentine is also the patron saint of beekeepers and is invoked as a protector against plague, epilepsy and fainting. The historical identity of Valentine, however, is shrouded in myth and legend. There appear to have been a number of Valentines canonized by the Catholic Church. One of them was a priest in Rome who was martyred in 269. Legend has it that he performed forbidden marriage ceremonies for Roman soldiers who, at the time, were forbidden to wed. During his imprisonment, Valentine is said to have restored his jailer’s blind daughter to sight. The legend also says that, on the night before his execution, Valentine sent his jailer’s daughter a note, which he signed, “Your Valentine.” The following day (Feb. 14), Valentine was beaten with clubs and then beheaded. In time, the date of Valentine’s feast gelled with folk traditions and ideals of courtly love, which were spreading amongst the courts of the European nobility. By the early 14th century, English poets were writing love poetry associated with the feast of Saint Valentine. Over time, the celebration of the patron saint of romantic love was coupled with the growth of commercial and communications networks and evolved into our contemporary Valentine’s Day: a time for acknowledging those dear to one’s heart with messages of love and gifts of greeting cards, sweets and flowers. In the 20th and 21st centuries, the

ONE

TRIPOD SLIDE SHOW Show up on Friday, Feb. 9 from 7-9 p.m. at Feast Arts Center (1402 S. 11th St, Tacoma) to see three mini “slide” shows presented by Sharon Styer, Mike Waller and Christopher Paul Jordan. Styer reached a place in her life where she either had to collage or had to throw all the paper stuff away. And now that she loves collaging in combination with her photography, she’s collecting more stuff. It’s a vicious, vicious cycle. Info: www.facebook.com/TripodSlideshows

TWO JASON GILLIAM ON EUPHONIUM On Saturday, Feb. 10 at 8 p.m. Pacific Lutheran University’s Lagerquist Concert Hall hosts an installment of its musical

custom of Valentine’s Day as an occasion for sending tokens of love to sweethearts and those secretly admired has continued to spread to the East, Middle East and Far East. It has spread so rapidly as to raise alarms in India and parts of the Islamic world, where there are efforts to stamp out Valentine’s Day as neocolonial or un-Islamic. In Saudi Arabia, for example, it is against the law to sell anything red on February 14. In Japan, Taiwan, South Korea and China, on the other hand, Valentine’s Day has taken off in a big way and has developed in fascinating ways. Nowadays, Valentine’s Day, as an occasion for small, intimate celebrations of personal romance, falls nicely between the big, family-oriented winter holidays and the springtime that lay ahead. It is a big event not only for purveyors of greeting cards (it is estimated that a billion Valentine cards are exchanged in the United States each Valentine’s Day) but it is also a boom time for chocolate makers, cut-flower dealers and sellers of fancy underpants. It is also an opportune time for couples old and new to acknowledge their couple-ness by going out on the town for a fine meal and refined beverages with maybe some music and dancing thrown in. In our City of Destiny, there is no dearth of opportunities for places to go and things to do with your beloved this Valentine’s Day. Here is a Valentine’s sampler of options for Tacoma’s lovers to enjoy on the feast (and days surrounding) of their patron saint: VALENTINE’S 5K Saturday Feb. 10, 8 a.m.

Point Ruston, 5005 Ruston Way, Tacoma

This is an out-and-back, chip-timed, 5k along Ruston Way, beginning at the park near the Point Ruston playground. Bring the kids to participate in

“Artist Series” of concerts featuring Jason Gilliam on the euphonium. Gilliam is a native of Tacoma and holds a bachelor of music and master of arts in teaching from the University of Puget Sound, where he studied with Peter Ellefson, Ron Munson, and Steve Fissel. Gilliam currently holds the position of lecturer of euphonium at Pacific Lutheran University. For information, visit www.plu. edu/calendar/#/?i=2

THREE AUTHOR MIN JIN LEE AT KING’S BOOKS Korean author Min Jin Lee will be visiting King’s Books (218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma) Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. Min Jin Lee, author of

No candlelight dinner, no roses, no heart-shaped candies asking possessive questions. Just some good old fashioned music by two of Tacoma’s finest songwriters: Travis Barker (aka Smoke Perkins) from Smoke Perkins and the Bad Winter Cough, and Jordani Sarreal from Jordani & The Sun Kings. Come join the party and bring your friends to celebrate love and its heartbreaks just in time for Valentine’s Day. Info: www.facebook. com/events/1989972511275696/ VALENTINES FOR VETERANS Saturday, Feb. 10, 10 a.m.

Studio 6 Ballroom, 2608 6th Ave., Tacoma

Show veterans your gratitude for their sacrifices in serving our country. Join us as we create Valentines for Veterans. We will provide all supplies and just need your creativity. Info: www.facebook.com/events/127060851343771/ TACOMA IS FOR LOVERS VALENTINE’S CRAFT FAIR Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 10 and 11, 11 a.m.

King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., Tacoma

Join us at King’s Books and Destiny City Comics for our annual Valentine’s Day Craft Fair. We are excited to have some of our favorite returning vendors, as well as some new faces. We can’t wait to see you there. Info: www.kingsbookstore.com/event/craftfairfeb8 VALENTINE MAKER MARKET Saturday, Feb. 10, 10 a.m.

Blooming Kids, 3810 N. 27th St., Tacoma

Join us for this amazing event featuring new makers and some our old favorites too. Shop for your kiddos, teachers, friends, moms and significant others. We’ll truly have something for everyone. Light refreshments provided, kids always welcome. Info: www.facebook.com/bloomingkids/

FREE VALENTINE’S CARD MAKING Saturday, Feb. 10, 10:30 a.m.

events/1100149396994189/ TMP WINE AND CHOCOLATE MY WAY Sunday, Feb. 11, 4:30 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma

Enjoy an elegant event with music, locally crafted wines, and chocolates to delight your palate. You’ll get a TMP logo wine glass to take home. Info: tmp.org GALENTINE’S DAY AT UXC Sunday, Feb. 11, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

UrbanXchange, 1932 Pacific Ave., Tacoma

Our annual Galentine’s day is almost here. Join us in celebrating women everywhere. Enjoy rosy beverages and some sweet treats as you shop our curated racks of romantic hued vintage and designer pieces. Dance around to some live music, featuring our very own DJ Maneater. 10 percent of sales that day will be donated to Rebuilding Hope of Pierce County (http://www.sexualassaultcenter.com) Info: www.uxctacoma.com KIDS DAY WORKSHOP: VALENTINE’S DAY STYLE! Sunday, Feb. 11, 11 a.m.

Soap & Clay, 2712 6th Ave., Tacoma

In this workshop, all participants will make a full batch of bath bombs and will have the option to include heart shaped bath melts, toys, and soapy decorations inside their bombs to celebrate the season of love. Great for Valentine’s Day gifts for mom, dad, grandparents, BFFs, or just for themselves - the kiddos are going to have a blast creating their very own fizzies. Class price is $30 for each parent/child pair and $10 for each additional kiddo. All materials and instruction provided to completely customize a batch of bath bombs. Space is limited, so contact Mrs. Soap & Clay to reserve your seat. Info: www.facebook.com/events/565493893784780/ VALENTINE’S DAY COUPLES’ KARAOKE CONTEST Wednesday, Feb. 14, 9 p.m.

Puget Sound Pizza, 317 S. 7th St., Tacoma

Bring your sweet someone to Puget Sound Pizza on Valentine’s Day for an

u See VALENTINE / page B2

Artist & Craftsman Supply Tacoma, 616 St. Helens Ave., Suite 102, Tacoma

Stop by Artist & Craftsman and make a card for your cutie this Valentine’s Day. We will be providing assorted supplies for folks to make a special handmade memento for their loved one. Info: www.facebook.com/

the New York Times Bestseller “Pachinko,” will be discussing her novel and signing books. Recently released in paperback, “Pachinko” was King’s Books’ bookseller Kenny Coble’s favorite book of 2017. About “Pachinko:” In this saga, four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan, exiled from a home they never knew. For information, visit www.facebook.com/ events/2016997858576532.

FOUR BILL BAARSMA HISTORY TALK Points Northeast Historical Society will hold its annual meeting on Thursday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. at St Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Browns Point (6800 Eastside Dr. NE). Former Tacoma Mayor and current President of the Tacoma Historical Society Bill Baarsma will be the special speaker. The title for his speech is “A Tacoma

Story: From the Perspective of a Former Mayor and History Buff.” The meeting is free and open to the public. For information visit www.pointsnortheast.org.

FIVE CRYSTAL SKULL Max, the ancient crystal skull, and its guardian, JoAnn Parks, will be at Crystal Voyage (3802 S. Cedar St., Tacoma) on Feb. 16, 17, and 18. Max was found in Guatemala between 1924 and 1926. There have been eight documentaries made over the past 20 years about Max presented on the Discovery Channel, History Channel, TLC Network, Sci/Fi Channel, and International Channels in 22 countries. To register for a private meditation session, call Crystal Spirit Spiritual Center at (253) 272-4367. Register early, as this event fills up quickly. All appointments must be prepaid. Cost: $60 per person, $45 per person for up to four people sharing one, 30-minute session. Info: crystalvoyage.com


Section B • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

MIRANDA LAMBERT PICKING UP HER GUITAR AND MOVING ON

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

KATY PERRY WOWS THE CROWD By Bill Bungard

Tacoma Weekly Ace Photographer

The Tacoma Dome was filled with more than 18,000 Katy Perry fans for The Witness World Tour’s 50th show and the last U.S. show. The extravaganza was part fashion show, part theatrical stage production, and part pop/rock concert. The bedazzling show started with Perry being transported through the pupil of an eye as wide as the stage wearing a red-hooded, sequined dress and sunglasses while singing “Witness.” The band and backup singers sported futuristic fashion outfits as they coursed over the long stage runways. It took the cases and cases of stage props from back stage to support the incredible stage production of costumed and brilliantly choreographed dancers, robots on stilts, large Venus flytraps with dancers in them, Lefty the shark, giant salt and pepper shakers to sprinkle the Queen of Pop, pole dancer on an eight-foot tall rose, huge glowing dice, an oversized basketball game and a whole galaxy of planets and stars with Perry riding planet Saturn around the Dome. At one point, Perry sang from a 40-foot pair of moving lips. All of this was accompanied by a rocking band with Perry performing at the top of her game. At one point of the show, in keeping with her New Year’s resolution, Perry called her mom with a 6-foot, red phone as a prop. Perry’s mother was informed that this was the largest

of all the 50 shows that Perry has done in the U.S. The phone call was broadcast over the sound system where Perry’s mother called her daughter “Feather.” As they spoke, Mom took the opportunity to inform Feather that Tacoma was the home of Baskin Robbins, LeMay, the world’s largest car museum, Almond Roca and where the Mars Bar was invented. Perry ended the call saying, “I got to go and sing that song you don’t want me to sing…. ‘I Kissed a Girl.’” Katy Perry Witness World set list: • Witness • Roulette • Dark Horse • Chained to the Rhythm • Teenage Dream • Hot N Cold / Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) • California Gurls • I Kissed a Girl • Déjà Vu • Tsunami • E.T. • Bon Appétit • Wide Awake • Thinking of You • Power • Part of Me • Swish Swish • Roar • Encore: • Firework

YEAR OF THE DOG

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

By Bill Bungard

Tacoma Weekly Ace Photographer

Miranda Lambert came to T-Town’s Tacoma Dome on Feb. 1 for her 23-city “Livin’ Like Hippies Tour” with opening acts Turnpike Troubadours and Jon Pardi. With her divorce final after her 2015 split from Blake Shelton, Lambert was dressed to kill and she kicked it in gear performing hits from her double platinum album “The Weight of These Wings,” which tells the story of the shake up and break up from Lambert’s side. Lyrics from the album’s “Highway Vagabond” were the inspiration for the tour name. To see more photos, visit TacomaWeekly.com. “Livin’ Like Hippies” set list • That’s the Way That the World

CELEBRATE THE LUNAR NEW YEAR TACOMA STYLE the Center for Intercultural and Civic Engagement (CICE) for a traditional lion dance performance. Authentic Asian desserts and snacks will be sold, with proceeds going to the Asian Pacific Islander scholarship. This event is free and open to the public; all identities are welcome. Info: www.pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/events-calendar/ details/lunar-new-year-traditional-lion-dance/2018-02-16/

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

The Lunar New Year, the start of the Year of the Dog, falls on Feb. 16 (the Lunar New Year is the date of the new moon between Jan. 21 and Feb. 20). That means that the mischievous minions of Ms. Monkey – the Monkeyshiners who make glass balls and other treasures to hide in Tacoma’s parks, fountains and beaches – will be out hiding their Year-of-the-Dog-themed orbs. The University of Puget Sound will host a traditional Lunar New Year lion dance and the Lincoln District will throw a celebration to bring in the Year of the Dog in style.

LINCOLN DISTRICT LUNAR NEW YEAR 2018: YEAR OF THE DOG Sunday, Feb. 18, 10 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Tacoma’s Lincoln District (South 38th Street and Yakima to S. 39th and Yakima)

MONKEY SHINES Dates falling before and after Feb. 16 Locations around Tacoma

For the past 14 years, Tacoma has been fortunate to be visited by Monkeyshines, an art project undertaken by a mischievous and mysterious group of artists and volunteers that make glass balls emblazoned with the Chinese zodiac symbol for each particular year. In 2004, the year of the monkey, the group started their annual tradition with 200 glass balls hidden around Tacoma. This year, the mystery monkeys aim to distribute 2,000 glass spheres and other objects on local beaches, in branches of trees, around downtown and in neighborhood parks. Monkeyshines is not an organization; it is an event put on by anonymous artists as a random act of kindness and a celebration of the city. Akin to a giant scavenger hunt, glass gifts are hidden in public places throughout Tacoma. Other artists have joined in the fun. For the past several years, the poster-makers of Beautiful Angle have placed Chinese zodiac posters around town. A dude dubbed “Marbleman” began leaving handmade marbles all over town some years back. Another entity called “Moonsnail” drops decorated shells on public pathways. There is also talk of a group called “The 12th Girls” who make glass stones emblazoned with the number 12 on them and hide them here and there. “We make stuff and we hide it,” is Monkeyshines in a nutshell. If you’re a maker of things, you too can become a Monkeyshiner. Ms. Monkey reminds those wishing to leave their own Monkeyshines creations that all gifts

t VALENTINE From page B1

oh so romantic karaoke contest and a heartshaped pizza combo including a bottle of wine or pitcher from Hop Valley Brewing Co. and a dessert pizza too. All for just $40. Karaoke contest is free to enter. Win fun prizes and have a lovely time. Info: www. facebook.com/events/144553612853957/ ‘SAY ANYTHING’ VALENTINE’S DAY EDITION OF SCIENCE ON SCREEN Wednesday, Feb. 14, 6:45 p.m.

The Grand Cinema, 606 Fawcett Ave., Tacoma

Grand gestures, young love and a little bit of science for thought. See the 1989 classic romantic comedy, “Say Anything,” starring John Cusack and Lone Skye at The Grand Cinema only on Valentine’s Day. There will be a brief talk about the science of how song birds attract the right partner before the film through our Science

Goes ‘Round (John Prine cover) • Kerosene • Highway Vagabond • We Should Be Friends • Vice • Heart Like Mine • Bathroom Sink • Over You • All Kinds of Kinds • The House That Built Me • Gunpowder & Lead • Ugly Lights • Mama’s Broken Heart • Willin’ (Linda Ronstadt cover) • Tin Man • Airstream Song • Pink Sunglasses • Rocky Mountain Way (Joe Walsh cover) • Automatic • White Liar • Encore • Little Red Wagon

should be distributed only on public property. Monkeyshines is soliciting financial help. Those who make a contribution of $100 or more will receive a candle cup embossed with the Year of the Dog symbol. The cups will be available for pick-up at Creative Forces in the Hotel Murano Tacoma. Join the citywide treasure hunt. Around the Lunar New Year get out into town and try to find your own prize. Remember, however that the first, second and third rule of Monkeyshine is: Take only one. Leave surprises for others to find. Hint: while the treasures are said to be hidden from Brown’s Point to South Tacoma, the buzz is that places to look are the Chinese Reconciliation Park, Wright Park, Titlow Beach and fountains around town. The Feb. 16 date is not hard and fast. There may be several rounds of treasure-hiding. Some may be earlier and some later than the actual date of the lunar new year. Inquiries can be directed to Ms_Monkey@hotmail.com. Info: www.facebook.com/MonkeyshinesTacoma/ LUNAR NEW YEAR: TRADITIONAL LION DANCE Friday, Feb.16, 4:15–5:15 p.m.

University of Puget Sound, Wheelock Student Center

Celebrate the first day of the Lunar New Year by joining

Join the Lincoln District in this year’s Lunar New Year event where Asia Pacific Cultural Center is partnering to bring you an event full of great performances. The event is family friendly, free admission, filled with vendors, kids’ activities, live performances and features a food walk from local businesses. Parking will be available on side streets and Lincoln High School student lot. Info: www.facebook. com/events/1990841764531480/ Performances by: • 10-10:30 a.m. Lion Dance Opening Performance and Speeches • 10:30-11 a.m. Variya – Traditional Thailand Dance • 11-11:30 a.m. Stewart Middle School Poly Club – Haka • Noon-12:30 p.m. Esplendor Mexicano – Hispanic Style Dance • 12:30-1 p.m. Okinawa Arts Karate – Okinawa Heritage and Tradition • 1-1:30 p.m. Hula Halau “O Kealaakua Naniloa Mana’oakamai • 1:30-2 p.m. Rukio - Traditional Somalian Dance • 2-2:30 p.m. Khemarak Samaki – Traditional Cambodian Performance • 2:30-3 p.m. Hearts for Kids - Samoa Traditional Performance • 3-3:45 p.m. OkinawaTaiko Team OKK- Odori-Okinawa Folk Dance

on Screen program and thanks to guest speaker, Melvin Rouse, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Puget Sound. Screenings in this series sells out, so we highly recommend purchasing tickets in advance at the box office or online. Find tickets and more information at http://www.grandcinema.com/films/sayanything/

beginners, they are danced mainly with walking steps and prompted by a caller. The repertory ranges from lively jigs and reels to elegant, flowing waltz tunes. Purchase your ticket now. Cost is $30 per person. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/150638022310173/

bit.ly/TAMmembers. Cost: Free for TAM members, $15 for non-members. Purchase tickets online at bit.ly/TAMvdaytix.

VALENTINE’S MASKED BALL Wednesday, Feb. 14, 7-9:30 p.m.

VALENTINE’S DAY AT TAM Wednesday, Feb. 14, 5 p.m.

Tacoma Art Museum, 1710 Pacific Ave., Tacoma

Black Kettle Bites and Brew, 744 Market St, Tacoma

Post Hall Gallery, 1102 A St., Tacoma

Dessert, drinks and dancing! Find your fanciest formal wear, add a mask, and enjoy an elegant evening with your Valentine, dancing under the crystal chandeliers. Or find a Valentine there! Orchestra of the Moon, a Portlandbased early music band, will provide music. Peter and Mary Zarich will provide the know-how. Country dancing flourished from 1650 to 1850 as a social activity and a welcome alternative to the formality of court dancing. Easily accessible to

Looking for something out of the ordinary to do this Valentine’s Day? Come celebrate at Tacoma Art Museum. Explore the artwork with short gallery tours, watch the Oscar-nominated film “Loving Vincent,” snap a picture with the photo kiosk, enjoy a no-host bar, draw your sweetheart’s portrait with YMCA of Pierce and Kitsap Counties and make Valentines in TAM Studio. As a special treat to parents, drop your children off at the Children’s Museum of Tacoma and fully enjoy your date night. Members can enjoy exclusive desserts. Not a member? Join today at

VALENTINE’S DAY OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH KAREN Wednesday, Feb. 14, 7-9 p.m.

Taken? Single? It’s complicated? Come sing and play this Valentine’s Day...you might even need a new color by the end of the night. Spoken word and comedy welcome. Meet our new open mic host, Karen, and enjoy $3 select craft cans. 21+, LGBTQ friendly, no cover. Info: www. facebook.com/blackkettlebitesbrew/

SEE MORE VALENTINE’S DAY EVENTS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

TMP BRINGS SINATRA Culture Corner TRIBUTE TO THE STAGE A GUIDE TO CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS OF TACOMA Coming theatrical attractions:

“Carmen”

Tacoma Opera at Pantages Theater, 901 Broadway, Tacoma Friday, Feb. 9, 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 11, 2 p.m. A classic opera, “Carmen” is an opera in four acts by French composer Georges Bizet. The libretto was written by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy, based on a novella of the same title by Prosper Mérimée. The opera was first performed at the Opéra-Comique in Paris in March of 1875, where its breaking of conventions shocked and scandalized its first audiences. “Carmen” has since become one of the most popular and frequently performed operas in the classical canon. The opera is written in the genre of opéra comique with musical numbers separated by dialogue. It is set in southern Spain and tells the story of the downfall of Don José, a naïve soldier who is seduced by the wiles of the fiery gypsy Carmen. José abandons his childhood sweetheart and deserts from his military duties, yet loses Carmen’s love to the glamorous toreador Escamillo, after which José kills her in a jealous rage. The depictions of proletarian life, immorality, lawlessness and the tragic death of the main character on stage broke new ground in French opera and were highly controversial. For more information, visit: www.tacomaopera.com

Muh Grog Zoo – Improvised One-Act Plays

Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma Friday Feb. 16, 8 p.m. Muh Grog Zoo is a truly unique experience, born from relying on openness, skill and imagination to spontaneously create meaningful, impactful and moving plays. They will perform two entire, improvised one-act plays. For mature minded persons. For more information visit www.muhgrogzoo.com.

“Polkadots: The Cool Kids Musical”

PHOTOS BY KAT DOLLARHIDE

(front l to r) Tasha Smith, Allyson Jacobs-Lake, Jessica Hanson, Nancy Herbert Bach. (back row l to r) Colin Briskey, Mauro Bozzo, Mark Rake-Marona, and Jonathan Bill. Lower photo shows the cast performing the “Moon Medley.”

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Musical Playhouse continues its 2017-18 season with “My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra,” which functions as the playhouse’s romantic Valentine’s show, featuring a bounty of songs about love and romance. The cast of eight singer/actors are backed up by a live band on stage: Jeffrey Stvrtecky on piano, Jessie Kuras on string bass and Iris McBride on drums. Behind the band is an understated backdrop consisting of the silhouettes of skyscrapers. The rest of the background can be lit with a variety of brooding hues and projected effects (such as a beautiful big, full moon.) The show is a musical revue, a series of medleys of Frank Sinatra songs, clustered according to theme, beginning with favorite hits before going to Broadway music, songs about cities, odes to young love, homages to summer and songs of love and marriage. Act II kicks off with bittersweet songs of “losers” before progressing to songs of flirting and moody musings on the moon. The “Survivors Medley,” featuring the titular “My Way,” brings the show to a close. During the course of the medleys, the actors recount stories and provide facts from the life of Sinatra. Did you know, for example, that Sinatra recorded more than 1,300 songs during his long career? In all, the TMP show features material from 56 different songs. The actors do not simply stand and sing, they act out scenarios, engage in a variety of dances and generally keep the audience engaged as they breathe life into the musical legacy of “old blue eyes,” one of Sinatra’s multitude of titles. (He was also called Swoonatra, La Voz, The Voice, Chairman of the Board and the Sultan of Swoon.) The success of the show rests on the voices and the acting talent of the cast of four women and four men. Here, the women are much stronger than the men in keeping the luminous contraption aloft. Nancy Herbert Bach, lately seen as Ursula in TMP’s production of Disney’s “The Little Mermaid,” has a magnetic stage persona, with piercing eyes, a vigorous presence and a strong, self-confident voice. Allyson JacobsLake is equally powerful, but gives a sweet and creamy delivery to her lyrics. Tasha Smith is a revelation in this show: with sparkling eyes, she delivers a flow of velveteen lyrics that at times swell to a delightful crescendo. Jessica Hanson is also sharp and crisp in her delivery. The menfolk blend some rich tenor and baritone into the mix, making for a rich mosaic of vocal combinations. Colin Briskey, who recently received his bachelor of music degree in musical

theater from Oklahoma City University, is a talent to watch. Tall, fabulously mustachioed Mauro Bozzo is a lively and animated presence on the stage. Mark Rake-Marona and Jonathan Bill both have a jaunty and jovial air. The latter is the source of the low, baritone vocals that flow like aged scotch over a weather-beaten bar. The show flows seamlessly along, a medley of medleys, in which there is an ever-shifting combination of voices. Sometimes the men sing, sometimes it is just the women. Sometimes the couples perform lovely, heart-felt duets. At times, the show hits a big crescendo with the whole cast joining together in a full-blown song and dance. “My Way” was created by David Grapes and Todd Olson with musical help from Vince di Mura. Grapes and Olson began work on the show after watching the many tributes to Sinatra in the wake of his death in May of 1998. TMP’s Managing Artistic Director Jon Douglas Rake directed and choreographed the TMP production. Born to Italian immigrants in 1915 in Hoboken, N.J., Sinatra had a career as a singer, actor and producer that ran from the swing era of the 1940s to the popular music of the 1970s and 80s. In the 1950s, he was part of the Las Vegas-based group of performers known as “The Rat Pack.” In 1953 his acting role in “From Here to Eternity” earned him an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor. He received Kennedy Center Honors in 1983, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1985 and the Congressional Gold Medal in 1997. Over the span of his career, Sinatra also won 11 Grammy Awards, including the Grammy Trustees Award, Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. “My Way” runs through Feb. 25 with showings at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. There are also 2 p.m. matinee shows scheduled for Saturdays, Feb. 17 and Feb. 24. For further information, call (253) 565-6867 or visit tmp.org.

Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma Saturday, Feb. 10, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 17, 11 a.m.; Sunday Feb. 18, 7 p.m. TMP Family Theater is a regional theater favorite specializing in musicals for families, young audiences and the very young. These fully-produced musical productions are adaptations from children’s literature and feature many favorite adult TMP Mainstage performers. “Polkadots” follows 8-year-old Lily Polkadot, who just moved to the “Squares Only” small town of Rockaway. As the first Polkadot in an all Square school, Lily faces an almost impossible task of gaining acceptance from her peers. From daily bullying to segregated drinking fountains, Lily’s quest seems hopeless until she meets Sky, a shy Square boy whose curiosity for her unique polkadot skin blooms into an unexpected pal-ship. Inspired by civil rights pioneers Ruby Bridges and the Little Rock Nine, Polkadots serves as a colorful history lesson for the world, reminding us that our differences make us awesome, not outcasts. This is the musical’s West Coast premiere. For information, visit www.tmp.org.

“The Glass Menagerie”

Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd. SW, Lakewood Feb. 16 through March 11: Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m.; Sundays at 2 p.m. Pay-what-you-can performances Thursdays, Feb. 22 and March 1, 8 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse is bringing the Tennessee Williams play “The Glass Menagerie” to the stage for the first time in its 79-year history. Directed by Michael O’Hara and stage managed by Alyshia Collins, this 1944 drama tells the story of Amanda Wingfield, who strives to give meaning and direction to her life and the lives of her children, though her methods are ineffective and irritating. Tom seeks escape in alcohol and the world of the movies and Laura, handicapped, has receded more and more into herself. When Tom invites Jim, a young friend, to dinner with the family, the guest is at once pounced upon by Amanda as a possible husband for Laura. This American classic of drama has some mature subject matter, but is a regular part of high school educational curriculums. The show features a cast of returning favorites including Dayna Childs (Amanda), Jess Weavah (Laura), Niclas Olson (Tom) and Nick Fitzgerald (Jim). For information, visit: www.lakewoodplayhouse.org


Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

ASHES, ASHES

GET READY FOR THE LENTEN FAST IN TACOMA By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

2018 is already shaping up to be an interesting year (let us hope interesting in a good way). We have already had a super-blue-blood moon and we will have another blue moon at the end of March. Another odd feature of this year’s calendar is that Ash Wednesday arrives on Valentine’s Day, so you might find yourself in a bit of a quandary if you are one of those that gives up chocolate for Lent. Around here, Mardi Gras/Shrove Tuesday/Fat Tuesday – that last bash before the 40-day Lenten fast – is not that big a deal. There are a few places in Tacoma, however, where you can celebrate that happy occasion, if you are so inclined. You will find those venues listed below, followed by a list of many of the churches where you can go to acknowledge “that you are dust, and to dust you shall return” and have ashes smudged on the forehead as a poignant reminder of that fact. Mardi Gras/Fat Tuesday/Shrove Tuesday Fifth Annual Red, White & Blue Mardi Gras Party Saturday, Feb. 10, 9 p.m. Steel Creek Tacoma, 1114 Broadway, Tacoma At Steel Creek’s fifth annual Red, White & Blue Mardi Gras party, you’ll be partying

like they do on Bourbon Street. Steel Creek is giving away thousands of beads plus Mardi Gras masks and red, white and blue light-up L.E.D. batons for the first 400 guests starting at 9 p.m. Plus, they’ll be spinning their famous drink wheel for a new Mardi Gras drink special every half hour. Wear your best red, white and blue outfit and get into the party for free (before 11 p.m.). Steel Creek is also giving away a pair of Aaron Watson tickets. Info: steelcreekwhiskey.com Shrove Tuesday: From Feasting to Fasting Tuesday, Feb. 13, 6 p.m. Browns Point United Methodist Church, 5339 Browns Point Blvd. NE, Tacoma Come to Browns Point United Methodist Church for a pancake dinner and then a worship service to prepare for the start of Lent. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/365331507272973/ Fat Tuesday Mardi Gras Party Tuesday, Feb. 13, 10 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 6th Ave., Tacoma Enjoy two dollar tacos and two dollar well drinks with dance music brought to you by DJ Reign. Info: jazzbones.com Ash Wednesday: Mass for Ash Wednesday Wednesday, Feb. 14, 7:15 a.m. Our Lady of the Holy Rosary parish, 424 S. 30th St., Tacoma Join us bright and early – before work or school – for Mass to begin the season of Lent. Let the ashes on your forehead be a sign to the world. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/1713923255326353

Ash Wednesday Mass Wednesday, Feb. 14, 8:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Saint Patrick Catholic Church, 1001 N. J St., Tacoma Students will join the parish for Ash Wednesday Mass. Soup supper follows the evening mass. Info: www.saintpats.org/parish Ash Wednesday Wednesday, Feb. 14, noon Center for Intercultural and Civic Engagement, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Our Ash Wednesday service this year will be in the Murray Boardroom and go from noon-12:45 p.m., with 15 minutes of quiet reflection to begin. Ash Wednesday begins the season of Lent, a time of preparation for Easter. Lent can be a time for prayer, fasting, self-examination, and penitence as we prepare to celebrate Easter. We will be doing the imposition of ashes, as well as a short service, to remember Ash Wednesday this season. If you are unable to attend the service, there will also be a quiet space to impose ash on yourself, and/or to simply take a short time to center yourself throughout the day. Info: evensi.us/ash-wednesdaycenter-intercultural-civic-engagement/243979243 Midday Ash Wednesday Service Wednesday, Feb. 14, noon Urban Grace, The Downtown Church, 902 Market St., Tacoma In partnership with Bethany Presbyterian Church, we will join together on Wednesday, Feb. 14, for a meditative and reflective Ash Wednesday service, which marks the traditional beginning of the Lenten season.

Weekly on Wednesdays throughout Lent, we will be holding Vespers services in the Chapel. Gather in this community space for prayer and reflection in the midst of your workday. The services will feature a mix of prayer, music, silence, poetry and a brief homily offered by pastors throughout the city. You can also bring your lunch and eat during the service. Info: www.urbangracetacoma.org Evening Ash Wednesday Service Wednesday, Feb. 14, 6 p.m. Urban Grace, The Downtown Church, 902 Market St., Tacoma In partnership with Bethany Presbyterian Church, we will join together on Wednesday evening, Feb. 14, for a meditative and reflective Ash Wednesday service, which marks the traditional beginning of the Lenten season. Info: www.urbangracetacoma.org Ash Wednesday Mass Wednesday, Feb. 14, 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Our Lady Queen of Heaven Church, 14601 A St. S., Tacoma “The ashes mean I’m a sinner. The shape of the cross means I have a savior.” – Fr. Mike Schmitz Info: www.ourladyqueenofheaven.org Ash Wednesday Wednesday, Feb. 14, 7 p.m. Browns Point United Methodist Church, 5339 Browns Point Blvd. NE, Tacoma You are invited to come walk the labyrinth on Ash Wednesday as we reflect on our mortality and ask God to change our hearts so that we can follow Jesus more faithfully. All ages are welcome for this quiet contemplative time. Info: brownspointchurch.org

UPS OBSERVES BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH TREASURES FROM BLACK PANTHER PARTY ARCHIVE

By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

In celebration of Black History Month, the University of Puget Sound’s Collins Memorial Library is presenting an exhibit about the Black Panther Party, which were active in the 1960s and 70s. The Puget Sound region had a particularly active branch of the party. The exhibit is called “Louder Than Words: A Portrait of the Black Panther Movement.” It is a collection of Black Panther Party newspapers, posters, flyers, pamphlets, photographs, political pins and other materials that were gleaned from the personal archive of Bill Jennings, who joined the Black Panther Party in Oakland in 1968, soon after the party began. Jennings was active in the party through 1974, during which time he accumulated a treasure trove of the kind of materials that

BRING IT TO BARB

Answering your questions on mental health, relationships and life issues

By Barb Rock DEAR BARB, I am bored most of the time and a little depressed. I have not been able to find a job and I don’t have a lot of hobbies. I love to read and be with my friends when I am not looking for a job. I should be happy that I have a place to live, a car and good friends. What are the symptoms of depressive disorder? How can I get back on track? Signed, Bored and Hating Life DEAR BORED AND HATING LIFE, An analogy comes to my mind when reading your question which is this: If you are driving on the freeway heading

are currently on display. During the 1990s, Jennings realized that the history and legacy of the Black Panther movement needed to be preserved lest this important chapter of American history be forgotten. Since then, he has added to his collection and archive of materials. He also runs a website called “It’s About Time” (www.itsabouttimebpp. com), which is a repository of memory for party members. The organizers of the exhibit hope that it will inspire people in our region to share their stories of the movement, so that an oral history can be preserved for posterity. Those with stories of the Black Panthers are encouraged to contact libref@pugetsound. edu. The exhibit is contained in the space where books are checked out, just beyond the library’s entry area. Individual glass cases feature materials relating to different themes. There is a case with materials on the Seattle Panthers, one on Huey P. Newton, one on social programs, one on women in the movement and others. Interspersed through the exhibit are copies of books from the Black Panther reading list, a list of more than 30 books that new members were encouraged to read. On one wall is a blown-up copy of a flyer that lists the Black Panthers’ 10-point program, which south and you want to go north, do you continue driving south or do you turn around and head the correct direction? You identified your boredom and slight depression, which is the initial step or symptom. But unfortunately, everybody seems to forget the second step because it’s the hardest step, which is to turn around and change direction. This takes conscious effort, habit and many times enormous self-discipline. Addressing boredom first, my response is not too terribly sympathetic. There is no such thing as boredom in my opinion. I’ll prove this to you by asking you to simply walk over to any window in your home and look down at your window track. I would venture to guess that there would be many dead flies and grime settled in the tracks from the last few summers, right? You are not bored; you just are not looking for what to do or what to focus on. No excuses because you are renting a home; the same flies live and die in a rental home window track as are in a home that is owned. So, grab the Windex and paper towels. This is a great winter job and that’s just a start. Need I say more about an anti-boredom fix? When you are busy, it actually low-

is called “What We Want Now!” Sadly, much of it could easily have been written in 2018. Employment, housing, health care and police brutality are some of the issues raised. There is a book and writing materials here so that visitors can add to the “manifesto area.” The Black Panther Party started off in 1966 in Oakland, Calif., initially in response to tactics used by the Oakland Police Department. The party experienced dramatic growth, spreading throughout the United States and expanding its reach into the realms of community programs like the Free Breakfast for Children and establishing community health clinics. They also published a weekly Black Panther newspaper, which was shipped to 48 states. The exhibit includes many copies of the newspaper, which was the main organ of information for the Party. There is also a glass case showing prints of the revolutionary art of Emory Douglas, who did many of the illustrations for the newspaper. Douglas’ art is reminiscent of some of the art associated with the Mexican Revolution. The exhibit offers a glimpse into the depth and sense of purpose that formed a focal point for many people during the hard struggles of post WWII America. It suggests an intellectual involvement and ideological commitment that had as its goal the betterment of the lives of many. The movement was not without its flaws, but its project was and is a noble one. ers your susceptibility to becoming depressed. Certainly running, lifting weights, playing basketball and other fitness activities that get your heart pumping can help, but even physical activities such as gardening, washing your car, walking around the block or engaging in other less intense activities can change your mood. Any physical activity that gets you off the couch and moving can help. Textbook symptoms of depression are irritability, fatigue and a feeling of sadness that you can’t shake. Loss of confidence in oneself and negative thoughts about the future can certainly be signs of depression. Depressed people feel poorly about themselves and their future. I would guess that your job searching may be very daunting and discouraging for you, and thereby causing you some emotional fatigue. There are also physical warning signs of depression. Muscle aches, tummy troubles or waking up before dawn can directly be linked to something deeper going on. I would suggest talking with a therapist who could help circumnavigate your perspective and provide you with some new insight. I would also like to suggest

The Collins Memorial Library is hoping that school groups will come to visit the show. Interested teachers can contact the library at libref@pugetsound.edu. “Louder Than Words” runs through May 15. In conjunction with the exhibit, there will be an event called “A Conversation with Bill Jennings of the Black Panthers” on Monday, Feb. 12, 4-6 p.m. at University of Puget Sound’s Trimble Hall. The event is free and open to the public. Jennings will also be available for an informal conversation Feb. 13 4-5:30 p.m. in Collins Memorial Library’s Archives Seminar Room. Visit www.pugetsound.edu/news-and-events/ events-calendar/details/a-conversation-withbill-jennings/2018-02-12/ for more on the Jennings visit. For more on the Black Panthers exhibit visit research.pugetsound.edu/blackpantherparty Trimble Hall is located near the University of Puget Sound entrance at North Alder Street and North 15th Street. Collins Memorial Library is near the corner of North Warner Street and North 18th Street. Ask any student for directions! For directions and a map of the University of Puget Sound campus: pugetsound. edu/directions. For accessibility information, contact accessibility@pugetsound.edu or (253) 879-3931, or visit pugetsound.edu/ accessibility. that it’s time for you to regroup and get back on track by beginning a schedule or a daily routine. This routine should be hand written on paper and placed somewhere obvious. It should require 15 minutes of fun each day. This minimum of 15 minutes should be something you really enjoy doing. Schedule yourself specific times to job search, dividing up time for daily duties, responsibilities and social interaction. This will really help balance out your days, making you feel in control of your life. Journaling daily is very effective in decreasing feelings of depression, making sure to only reflect and record what is right in your life, not what is wrong. What you focus on is the direction you will go. You will always move in the direction of your most dominant thoughts. That is the way our brains are wired. It’s your choice of thinking that decides if you will be loving your life or hating your life.

Barb Rock is a mental health counselor for the House of Matthew Homeward Bound program in Tacoma, and the published author of “Run Your Own Race: Happiness after 50.” Send any questions related to mental health, relationships or life issues to her at BarbRockrocks@yahoo.com.


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

CLASSICAL TRIPLE HEADER PLAYING IN TACOMA THIS WEEK TW PICK OF THE WEEK: JAZZ LIVE AT MARINE VIEW (8469 Eastside Dr. NE, Tacoma), featuring The Peter Sprague Trio, is coming Sunday, Feb.11 at 5 p.m. Admission is free to all ages. Peter Sprague (www.petersprague.com) is considered one of the premier guitarists in the country and has enjoyed a rewarding career in the music industry as a performer, composer, record producer and audio engineer. From his PHOTO COURTESY OF JAZZ AT MARINE VIEW roots in Del Mar, Calif. and his first ensemble called The Minor Jazz Quintet to his move to Boston, where he took lessons from Pat Metheny, to the formation of The Dance of the Universe Orchestra, his musical influences took hold, despite his lifelong love of surfing. A four-album contract followed; during that time a reach-out to Chick Corea led to gigs with his band and eventually the organization and publishing of the last of Corea’s Elektric Band music books. Over the years he has toured and recorded with David Benoit and shared the stage with numerous influential musicians including Sergio Mendez, Al Jarreau, Charlie Haden, Dianne Reeves, Ivan Lins, John Klemmer, Russell Ferrante, Mark O’Connor, Stanley Clarke, Nathan East, Jimmy Haslip and many others. For his appearance at Jazz Live at Marine View he will be joined by his brother Tripp Sprague on saxophone and flute and Leonard Patton on vocals and percussion. Don’t miss an exciting, creative evening of jazz in the beautiful confines of Marine View. Visit www.marineviewpc.org for more.

Friday, Feb. 9 PHOTO COURTESY OF CLASSICAL TUESDAYS

Saxophonist Erik Steighner will join the Camas Woodwind Quintet Feb. 13 at the Classical Tuesdays in Old Town concert at Slavonian Hall.

Three great classical musical performances are coming up this week:

Jacobsen Series The Puget Sound Piano Trio performs Friday, Feb. 9, 7:30 p.m. at Schneebeck Concert Hall, near Union Avenue and North 14th Street on the University of Puget Sound campus. For its 2018 opening concert, Puget Sound Piano Trio is treating audiences to a novel program: two award-winning young composers from China and Texas juxtaposed with two luminaries of the Classical and Romantic eras. Trio members Maria Sampen, violin; Alistair MacRae, cello; and Tanya Stambuk, piano, will perform works by contemporary composers Tianyi Wang and Jason Haney, and by Austria’s classical giant Joseph Haydn and the “father of Czech music,” Bedrich Smetana. Wang, born in China, has had his works performed internationally. His repertoire spans solo, chamber, choral, orchestral and electronic as well as film scoring. Following music instruction at Moscow Conservatory, William Jewell College and Bard College, he is currently continuing his studies at New England Conservatory in Boston. Haney, born in Dallas, has had works performed at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and other venues in the United States as well as in Canada, Europe, South America and Hong Kong. He currently is on the faculty of the School of Music at James Madison University in Virginia. Haydn and Smetana remain towering figures in the music world. Haydn, a teacher of Beethoven, is credited with playing a key role in the development of chamber music. His “Piano Trio No. 44 in E Major” has been praised for its wide expressive range and virtuosity. Smetana’s music is often identified with the revolutionary protests that sought to give the Czech lands independence from Austro-Hun-

PITCH PERFECT 3 Nightly @ 7:00 pm Sat. & Sun. Matinee at 3:15 pm

Saturday @ 11:30 pm

2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500

gary. He wrote only the one piano trio, which has been described as a piece of unbridled passion and a milestone of romanticism. This concert is part of UPS’s Jacobsen Series, named in honor of Leonard Jacobsen, former chair of the piano department at Puget Sound, and has been running since 1984. The Jacobsen Series Scholarship Fund awards annual music scholarships to outstanding student performers and scholars. Tickets are available online at tickets.pugetsound.edu, or at Wheelock Information Center, (253) 879-3100. Admission is $15 for the general public; $10 for seniors (55+), students, military, and Puget Sound faculty and staff. The concert is free for current Puget Sound students. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door. For information, visit www.pugetsound.edu/ news-and-events/campusnews/details/1599.

trios for three flutes and harpsichord by Johann Sebastian Bach, Georg Philipp Telemann, James Hook, Joseph Bodin de Boismortier and others. St. Luke’s Memorial Episcopal Church, which provides the ideal setting and acoustics for this early chamber music, is an exact replica of an English country church that was built in 1883 and later moved stone by stone to its present site on North Gove Street. Suggested donation is $15, $20 or $25. 18 and under free. For more visit www.salishseafestival. org/tacoma. Classical Tuesdays in Old Town Join Classical Tuesdays in Old Town at Slavonian Hall for the closing concert of their 13th season on Feb.13. The Camas Woodwind Quintet and saxophonist Erik Steighner are members of the music faculty at Pacific Lutheran University. Classical Tuesdays is happy to welcome Steighner and clarinetist Craig Rine for return performances. The program includes Samuel Barber’s “Summer Music,” Darius Milhaud’s “Chimney of King Rene” (a charming, Renaissance-inspired work), an arrangement of Bela Bartok’s “Roumanian Dances,” the “Sextet” by Pierre-Max Dubois (with Steighner on sax), and a trio by Georges Auric. Shows are performed at Slavonian Hall, 2306 N. 30th St., Old Town Tacoma. The show is free with donations appreciated. All ages welcome. For information, visit classicaltuesdays. blogspot.com.

Salish Sea Early Musical The Salish Sea Early Musical festival continues its series of concerts on Sunday, Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. at St. Luke’s Memorial Episcopal Church (3615 N. Gove St., Tacoma). These are performances pre-1800s chamber music played on period instruments. The Feb. 11 edition is called “Flute Trios” and features three masters of the baroque flute: Janet See, Mindy Rosenfeld and Jeffrey Cohan, the man who coordinates the annual regional festival. They will be accompanied by Jonathan Oddie on harpsichord. This Baroque Flute Extravaganza will include

Stingy Brim Blue Project FRIDAY, FEB. 16 from 7-10 P.M.

Pacific Brewing & Malting Co. 610 Pacific Ave., tacoma

BUDGET

BLACK PANTHERS

REFUGEE COMMISSION LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE BLUEBERRY PARK

LUNAR NEW YEAR

CITIZEN FORUM

EARLY MUSIC FESTIVAL

CITY PRISON

CLASSICAL TUESDAY

VALENTINE

MARINE VIEW JAZZ

ALEGRE BAKERY AND GELATO: Emily McVicker (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m. AIRPORT TAVERN: The Bitter Ex Lovers, The Know Nothingz, The Sky Rained Heroes (power pop) 9 p.m., $5 EMERALD QUEEN CASINO: Ann Wilson (rock), 8:30 p.m. EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Nite Crew (dance tunes), 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: Old Foals, Heyfields, Eljun (rock) 9 p.m., $3 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: For the Likes of You, Follow the Lights, Time Spent, Wanting, As Pillars Fall (rock) 8 p.m., $10 ODD OTTER BREWING: Chad Shue (singer/songwriter) 8 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: The Requisite, Bunny N Bear, With Roots Above, Aylen Trees, Shakim (acoustic) 8 p.m., $7-$10 THE SWISS: Palooka, Big Wheel Stunt Show, The National Guard (rock) 9 p.m., $8 TACOMA BREWING CO: Amocat Live (monthly music showcase) 7 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Gabriel Rutledge (comedy) 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock) 8 p.m. UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK HALL: Puget Sound Piano Trio (classical) 7:30 p.m., $10-$15 THE VALLEY: The Sky Giants, Nosretep, Thunders of Wrath, Bog (prog rock, psychedelic) 8 p.m., $5

Saturday, Feb. 10

THE VALLEY: Supercrush, Criminal Code, Casual Hex (punk rock) 9 p.m., $5 AIRPORT TAVERN: Funk Jam (funk) 9 p.m., NC DOYLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE: Travis Barker, Jordani Sarreal (singer/songwriter) 9 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN BRIDGE NIGHTCLUB: Nite Crew (dance tunes), 9 p.m. JAZZBONES: Washed in Black, Stargazer, Superfekta (rock) 9 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Dr. Crue, Almost Human (rock) 8 p.m. NEW FRONTIER LOUNGE: Sidecar and Friends (acoustic) 7 p.m. OWEN BEACH: The Fabulous Johnsons (rock) 10 a.m. PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Ciara Flanery (piano recital) 8 p.m. PANTAGES: A Cappella Competition (popular) 7 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: Tacoma Love Show (rock) 7 p.m., $15-$25 ROCK THE DOCK: The Elevators (rock) 9 p.m. ST. MARK’S LUTHERAN CHURCH: Jekesa Marimba Band (Valentine’s music) 6 p.m. THE SPAR: U253 (rock) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Zero Down Band (rock) 9 p.m. THE SWISS: South Sound Blues Fest Assoc. Festival (blues) 2 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Tyler Smith (comedy) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Gabriel Rutledge (comedy) 10:30 p.m. TACOMA DOME: Asia Pacific New Year Celebration (ethnic) 11 a.m. TEMPLE THEATRE: Theo Huff, Nu Agenda Band, Big Ro Williams, Lomaz Spaulding (southern soul) 7 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock) 8 p.m. VINO AQUINO WINERY: Niko Johnson (singer/songwriter) 7 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 11

ODD OTTER BREWING: All Ages Open Mic with Kristen Marlo (open mic) 5 p.m.

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH: The Esoterics (choral) 7 p.m. DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH: Terry Robb (fingerstyle guitar) 5 p.m. JOHNNY’S DOCK: Dave Roberts Band (rock) 5 p.m. MARINE VIEW CHURCH: Peter Sprague Trio (jazz) 5 p.m. NEW FRONTIER: Electric Bluegrass, 4 p.m., NC PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY, LAGERQUIST CONCERT HALL: Jason Gilliam (classical euphonium) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Country Music Jam (jam) 8:30 p.m. THE SWISS: Open Mic Night (open mic) 7 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Tyler Smith (comedy) 8 p.m.

Monday, Feb. 12

ALEGRE BAKERY AND GELATO: Open Mic Monday (open mic) 6:30 p.m. ODD OTTER BREWING: Angie Lynn (singer/songwriter) 6 p.m. THE SWISS: Open Mic Night (open mic) 7 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Graduation Show (comedy) 7:30 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Bartlett on bass (jam) 7 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb. 13

SLAVONIAN HALL: Camas Wind Quintet with Erik Steighner (Classical Tuesdays) 7 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Stoops (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH: Tacoma TotemAires Barbershop Chorus (barber shop) 7 p.m. METRONOME: Open Mic (open mic) 7 p.m. ROCK THE DOCK: Bingo (it’s a game) 7 p.m. STONEGATE: Blues Jam with Roger Williamson (blues) 8 p.m. THE SWISS: Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz (trivia) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: New Talent Tuesday (comedy) 8 p.m., 18+, NC UNCLE SAM’S: SOB Band (jam) 7 p.m., NC

Wednesday, Feb. 14

EMERALD QUEEN CASINO: Air Supply (rock), 8 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC JOESEPPI’S ITALIAN RISTORANTE: Robin Miller-Richardson (piano and vocals) 5:30 p.m. KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Karaoke (hit & miss musicianship) 9 p.m. STONEGATE: The Blu Tonez (blues) 8 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Lachlan Patterson (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (jam) 7 p.m., NC UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND, SCHNEEBECK HALL: Jazz with Joshua Redman (jazz) 7:30 p.m., $7-$14

Thursday, Feb. 15

TED BROWN: Bombooshay Drum Circle (participatory drumming) 6:30 p.m., free THE AGAVES GRILL: Ed Taylor Band (jazz), 6 p.m. DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 8:30 p.m., NC ROCK THE DOCK: Open Mic with Dustin (rock) 8 p.m. STONEGATE: Power Rock Jam (rock jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Lachlan Patterson (comedy) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m. THE VALLEY: Gleewood (Americana) 8 p.m.

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS IS SEEKING AN

EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING

SALES REPRESENTATIVE Tacoma Weekly News is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated self-starter with a proven record of achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers. REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be self motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Attendance of community events, organizational skills, and attention to detail, negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

Coming Events ‘A TACOMA MAYOR’S LIFE JOURNEY’ Mon., Feb. 12, 7 p.m. University of Puget Sound’s Kilworth Chapel, 1500 N. 18th St., Tacoma Victoria Woodards took office as Tacoma’s 39th mayor in January 2018, and Tacoma Historical Socity is honored to present her as special guest speaker on Lincoln’s birthday, Feb. 12. Woodards will share stories from her journey of life, work and service in Tacoma. University of Puget Sound professor Dexter Gordon will provide an introduction for Mayor Woodards prior to her talk. Gordon is director of the African American Studies Program and Race and Pedagogy Institute at UPS. Earlier this month, he received the 30th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Service Award from the City of Tacoma. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: www.TacomaHistory.org

‘MY WAY: A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA’ Fri., Feb. 9, 7:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 10, 7:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 11, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma The Voice. The Sultan of Swoon. The Chairman of the Board. Ol’ Blue Eyes. The Greatest Singer of the Popular Song. These are all nicknames for one of the greatest entertainers of the 20th century, a man whose career successes spanned more than 50 years, enjoying popularity with each successive generation. This is a musical tribute to the Crooner, Grammy- and Academy-Award Winner, the one-and-only Frank Sinatra! “My Way,” “Fly Me to the Moon,” “I’ve Got the World on a String” and “New York, New York” are some of his greatest hits that will have you singing along! Legendary singer, actor, and producer Frank Sinatra was one of the best-selling musical artists of all time. Songs like “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Fly Me to the Moon” and “Strangers in the Night” still resonate with a crowd today. “My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra” is a tribute to the musical legend containing 56 songs, both iconic and lesser-known, that are sung by a spectacular cast of four men and four women in a jazz club setting. Get ready to end the night singing, dancing and feeling grand after seeing “My Way!” Plays through Feb. 25. Ages: All ages. Price: $31 adults; $29 senior, military, students; $22 children (12 and younger); $27 groups of 10 or more. Info: All seating is reserved. Tickets available at TMP’s box office located at 7116 Sixth Ave., at (253) 565-6867, and at  www.tmp.org. WINE & CHOCOLATE – MY WAY! Sunday, Feb. 11, 4:306:30 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave., Tacoma Enjoy the elegant music of grand concert pedal harpist Twyla Eddins while trying locally crafted chocolate port, sparkling and red wines paired with decadent chocolates – all to delight your senses and palate. Each attendee will receive a Tacoma Musical Playhouse logo wine glass to take home, and the chance to win various raffle items valued at $50 to $250. All event proceeds to benefit the many programs at TMP. The Wine & Chocolate event follows the Sunday 2 p.m. performance of “My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra.” Ages: This event is 21+. I.D.s will be checked at the

door. Price: $25 per person (price includes TMP logo wine glass). Info: 253-5656867, www.tmp.org

LIVE MUSIC WITH EMILY MCVICKER Fri., Feb. 9, 9 p.m. Alegre Bakery and Gelato, 3820 N. 27th St. Emily McVicker is a master at looping and always puts on a great show. Grab your friends — this is a night you don’t want to miss. Price: No cover. Info: (260) 225-3473; facebook.com/ events/147882645871329 FRIDAY NIGHT MAGIC Fri., Feb. 9, 6-10 p.m. Comiks the Gathering, 15022 Pacific Ave. S. Join us at Comiks the Gathering for Friday Night Magic. This Friday will be standard constructed format and will start at 6 p.m. Compete for this month’s promo and pack prize support. Price: $5. Info: (253) 240-1943; facebook.com/ events/386119668478498/ BEAUTIFUL RAINIER PAINT & SIP Sat., Feb. 10, 2-5 p.m. Uncorked Canvas, 711 St. Helens Ave. Ste 202 Uncork your creativity – no experience necessary. We will guide you through every step of the painting. Price: $40; Registration required. Info: (253) 4324052; facebook.com/events/ 1944122289186678/ POINT DEFIANCE OPEN HOUSE Sat., Feb. 10, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. A lot of improvements are coming to Point Defiance Park. There are so many projects underway this year that Metro Parks wants to update park visitors faceto-face. This free open house is your chance to learn more and ask questions. Price: Free. Info: (253) 305-1000; facebook.com/ events/165796327482340/ SECOND SATURDAY STUDIO & STORY-TIME: NATIVE PORTRAITURE Sat., Feb. 10, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. On the second Saturday of every month, Tacoma Art Museum hosts a variety of fun experiences especially for children ages 2-8 and their families. Try out a new art style in TAM Studio with an activity led by TAM staff and volunteers. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-4258; facebook.com/ events/174452359951160/ OPEN STUDIO Sat., Feb. 10, 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Artful Dreamers Studio,

2926 S. Steele St. Please join in this opportunity to finish one of your paintings, bring a new canvas, or paint over an old painting. Artful will supply the paint (canvas can be supplied at an additional cost of $10). Price: $15. Info: (253) 2094706; facebook.com/events/ 2132835316940456/ TACOMA IS FOR LOVERS VALENTINE’S CRAFT FAIR Sun., Feb. 11, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join King’s Books and Destiny City Comics for their annual Valentine’s Day Craft Fair, with some favorite returning vendors, as well as some new faces. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 272-8801; facebook.com/ events/165322667432475/ IMPROV COMEDY AUDITIONS Sun., Feb. 11, 1-5 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. Now is your chance to join the Tacoma Improv Comedy scene. Fools Play Improv’s ensemble entertains audiences in Tacoma, Olympia, and Seattle regularly, but we are always searching for new Fools. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-2281; facebook.com/ events/140483709975408/ SUNDAY ZEN RECOVERY RUN Sun., Feb. 11, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. The second Sunday of the month, recover from your week with an easy run around Point Defiance. Meet in the Ft. Nisqually parking lot for a five-minute warm up, followed by three minutes of meditation and then off for an easy three-mile run. Price: Free. Info: (253) 305-1000; facebook.com/ events/153127848758997/ DUNGEONS AND DRAGONS OPEN PLAY Sun., Feb. 11, 12-4 p.m. Tacoma Games, 3013 6th Ave. $5 table fee. Setting and character level may vary with rotating DMs. Seating is limited. See store for details. Price: $5. Info: (253) 301-2137; facebook.com/events/ 1973812506229199/ TEA FOR THE SOUL Mon., Feb 12, 4-6 p.m. Carol Milgard Breast Center, 4525 S. 19th St. Whether you are newly diagnosed or celebrating 10 years cancer-free, this gathering gives you the room to reflect on your journey, learn from one another, and get some tips about personal care. RSVP to: Barbara McHenry, spiritual care coordinator (253) 301-

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

6556 | bmchenry@tranow. com. Info: (253) 759-2622; facebook.com/events/ 1776818665683343/

events/980864172071353/

BEGINNING BELLY DANCE WITH KAT (TUESDAY) Tues., Feb. 13, 8-9 p.m. Belly Dance Classes in Tacoma, 1127 Broadway This introductory 10-week course is designed to teach students the basic skills necessary to develop their strength, muscle awareness, and mind-body connection to learn the basics. Price: Drop in $12; five-class card $55 plus tax; ten-class card $108 plus tax. Info: (253) 219-8870; facebook.com/ events/123747474962026/

ADOPTEES CONNECT TACOMA Mon., Feb. 12, 6-9 p.m. Pierce County Library (Parkland/Spanaway), 13718 Pacific Ave. S. Adoptees Connect is a peerled adoptee centric support group for adult adoptees. This group is designed to be a “safe space” for adult adoptees to gather and share their experiences, tough times and hopes. Price: Free. Info: (253) 548-3304; facebook.com/ events/137809327028481/

UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND JAZZ BAND WITH JOSHUA REDMAN Wed., Feb. 14, 7:30-9 p.m. University of Puget Sound Schneebeck Concert Hall, 1500 N Warner St. University of Puget Sound Jazz Band with special guest Joshua Redman at Schneebeck Concert Hall. Price: $14 for general admission; $7 with Puget Sound ID. Info: (253) 879-8564; tickets.pugetsound.edu

FASTELAVN Mon., Feb. 12, 6-8 p.m. Scandinavian Cultural Center at Pacific Lutheran University, 12180 Park Ave. S., Tacoma Join us in the PLU Scandinavian Cultural Center for an evening filled with friends, food and fun. There will be games, treats, costumes and much more. Price: Free. Info: (253) 535-7349; facebook.com/events/ 2005171233056325/

VALENTINE’S DAY OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH KAREN Wed., Feb. 14, 7-9 p.m. Black Kettle Bites and Brew, 744 Market St. Come sing and play this Valentine’s Day – you might even need a new color by the end of the night. Spoken word and comedy welcome. Meet our new open mic host Karen. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 3832233; facebook.com/events/ 1876123999279168/

CORKS & CRAFTS: ROCK PAINTING Tues. Feb 13, 7-9 p.m. Vino Aquino Winery, 4417 6th Ave., Ste 1 Rock painter Cheryl Crosswy will be back for another class. Our class will be a heart/love theme. We always have a big crowd, so reserve your spot early. Price: $35 and includes use of supplies, rocks, and one glass of wine. Info: (253) 272-5511; facebook.com/

R M Q Z Y I R U G K H L O D U Y V E Q M

F Y Z A Y R H Z B Z J U O B V O K M I S

X P D N B L A C K P A N T H E R S U A L

C L A S S I C A L T U E S D A Y Q E E C

L E B L C V V T E G D U B D Y W N T K O

B L U E B E R R Y P A R K O A A D I T C

A Y P W M U R O F N E Z I T I C Y D M C

J R N N U B Q R Y C I T Y P R I S O N T

Q Z U E I S R S A G E U Y T W Y E Q N R R D A D N W U M L W L J H Z X S B M H R

K K N A H V N O U O X U T P O B L H B C

Z E H X S F I S X V L H H Y J O U W E O

L A V I T S E F C I S U M Y L R A E L C

K G T M A R I N E V I E W J A Z Z Z H F

I J J J P S G I X P C U M N C T O N K I

K O Y V S L B M M K T U V C E L U M T T

N O I S S I M M O C E E G U F E R B X N

N K R H Y F T I R H J M A U P O G B H C

X L G I H T D V A L E N T I N E A W A P

K M L A K E W O O D P L A Y H O U S E J

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

BLUEBERRY PARK How many words can you make out of this phrase?

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 7

Classifieds

CALL 253.922.5317

253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

Services Advertise your business for home, garden, pet, personal service needs and more right here! Call 253-922-5317 ADVISOR

ADVISOR

SPIRITUAL READER AND ADVISOR PAST • PRESENT • FUTURE Ask for Miss Georgia $20 WITH THIS AD 253-263-2213 EXTERIORS

EXTERIORS

THE NORTHWEST’S PREMIER EXTERIOR CLEANING COMPANY

Services CASH FOR CARS

Cash for Cars or RVs $100 up to $5,000 Free Estimate Free Tow 253-341-9548 HAULING

360-440-6301 NOW SERVICING NORTH TACOMA AND UNIVERSITY PLACE Get scheduled for your free estimate at Johnnytsunami.com!

Sales $1.00

HAULING

ALEX’S MAINTENANCE SERVICES Happy Holidays! Gutter Cleaning and Hauling

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you.

CONTACT US Phone: 253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 Mail: 304 Puyallup Ave., Tacoma, WA 98421

LIMO

ROOFING

TriState Roofing Your Local Roof Experts “Repairs or Replacement” TriState Roofing, Inc. TRISTI*931QH

LIMO

1901 Center St., Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

LIMO

LIMO

PATRIOT LIMOUSINE SERVICE

24 Hour Service

Weddings • Anniversaries • Birthdays • Proms • Graduations Funerals • Round Trip Airport Service • Corporate Holiday Parties • All Other Special Occasions

253-848-7378

www.patriotlimowa.com HAULING

Licensed & Insured

ELECTRICAL

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Allied Electric Service

Father AND Son Hauling

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

Garage Clean Out Yard Clean Up

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

253-926-2000

CELL

253-222-9181

www.alliedmarinecorp.com

Employment

OFFICE

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

ALLIEE1963CQ

Employment

Employment

PIERCE COUNTY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER GROUP SEEKING AN

EXPERIENCED ADVERTISING

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

512 112th St. S. Parkland

(253) 752-8105

FREE Hauling (253) 397-7013 for Metal

253.473.7621 253.732.1419

Bargain World

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

ROOFING

 Storm Clean-up  Handyman

Squeaky Clean

Plus Daily Discounts

WANTED:

LAWN CARE

Big John’s Lawn Care

CLEANING

Clothing S ale EVERY MONDAY

Wanted

LAWN CARE

Services

253-564-5743

ELECTRICAL

• ROOF CLEANING • GUTTER CLEANING • PRESSURE WASHING • WINDOW CLEANING

CASH FOR CARS

Services

PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking an extremely talented sales professional to join our team. The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated selfstarter with a proven record for achieving sales goals. They will demonstrate the ability to develop new business and possess excellent time management skills. Additionally, they should be able to manage all aspects of the sales cycle: prospecting, cold calling, setting appointments, performing needs analysis, presentation, negotiation, and closing, all while maintaining a high level of customer service to existing customers.

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

REQUIREMENTS: 2 years of prior sales experience, preferably newspaper, online and special section experience. Must be a self-motivated, outgoing individual with the ability to work with the public and advertisers in a positive way. Be willing to attend community events, have organizational skills and attention to detail with negotiation and problem solving. Starting salary depends on qualifications.

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESUME TO: PUBLISHER@TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com


Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

Notices

Notices

TO: Gerardo Ortiz

NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0144

Case Name: In re the guardianship of L-B.E (DOB: 01/24/2003)

WILLIAMS, RITA, Petitioner, vs. CHARLES, MELISSA, Respondent.

Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 2/6/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 3:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 2:00-3:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 2/8/2018. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

TO: CORA MCNUTT Case Name: In re the guardianship of A.A. (DOB: 09/25/2012) Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0028 Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the abovenamed Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for A.A. (DOB: 09/25/2012), a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: MARCH 5th, 2018 TIME: 10:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the Court: 1. The right to be present before the Court; 2. The right to present written and oral testimony; 3. The right to subpoena witnesses; 4. The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; 5. The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and 6. The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250 – DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585. TO: Steve Clark Case Name: 01/14/2016)

In re the guardianship of C.S (DOB:

Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0039 Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the above-named Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for C.S (DOB: 01/14/2016), a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: March 19th , 2018 TIME: 9:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the Court: • The right to be present before the Court; • The right to present written and oral testimony; • The right to subpoena witnesses; • The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; • The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and • The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250 – DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: MELISSA CHARLES (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY March 6, 2018 at 1:30 p.m., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED January 9, 2018 Signed, Jamey LaPointe-McCloud NO. PUY-CS-CS-2006-0226 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON Shelia Pelt

Petitioner,

v. Galen Yallup Jr.

Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for January 24, 2018 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated November 29, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585 NO. PUY-CS-CS-2017-0044 Summons in a civil action And notice of hearing IN THE PUYALLUP TRIBAL COURT PUYALLUP INDIAN RESERVATION TACOMA, WASHINGTON Shelia Pelt v. Galen Yallup Jr.

Petitioner, Respondent,

The petitioner filed a child support (civil) action against you in the above named court. In order to defend yourself, you must file an answer by stating your defense in writing and filing it with the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing. If you fail to respond, a DEFAULT JUDGMENT may be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the Petitioner for what has been asked in the Petition. This Summons in issued pursuant to Section 7.24.090(4.08.100) of the Puyallup Parental Responsibility Act. NOTICE OF HEARING: A hearing on the petition is set for January 24, 2018 at 9:30 am at the Puyallup Tribal Court. Dated November 29, 2017 Kasandra Gutierrez Clerk of the Court Puyallup Tribal Court 1451 East 31st Street Tacoma, Washington 98404 (253) 680-5585 IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, DAVID, Petitioner, vs. WILLIAMS, CHRISTINA GRACE, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0143 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: CHRISTINE GRACE WILLIAMS (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY March 6, 2018 at 1:30 p.m., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED January 9, 2018 Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

Notices Auction Notice

IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE

Notices Case Number: PUY-G-JV-2017-0046 Nature of Case: Guardianship of a Minor Child SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition has been filed asking the Court to appointed the abovenamed Petitioner(s) to be the guardian(s) for L-B.E (DOB: 01/24/2003), a minor child under PTC 7.12 (Guardianship of Minors Code). YOU ARE SUMMONED to appear at a guardianship hearing in this Court on the Puyallup Indian Reservation at: DAY: MONDAY DATE: March 19th, 2018 TIME: 11:00 AM LOCATION: 1451 EAST 31st ST., TACOMA, WA 98404 The guardianship hearing is private and closed. Only those persons the Court finds to have a legitimate interest in the proceedings may attend. The Court will hear testimony to determine whether guardianship is in the best interest of the child and the Tribal community. The Court will consider all guardianship reports submitted for review. All parties shall be given the opportunity to contest the factual contents and conclusions of the guardianship reports. Any party may file recommendations regarding the guardianship with the Court at least 10 calendar days before the hearing. You also have the following rights before the Court: • The right to be present before the Court; • The right to present written and oral testimony; • The right to subpoena witnesses; • The right to submit relevant evidence to the Court for consideration; • The right to counsel at your own expense and effort; the Court has a list of attorneys who are admitted to practice before the Puyallup Tribe; and • The right to appeal a final decision in this matter. If you do not appear at the hearing or file a written response to the petition within 20 days from the date of this notice, the Court may enter an order in your absence. NOTICE PURSUANT TO PTC 4.08.250 – DEFAULT JUDGMENT WHEN A PARTY AGAINST WHOM A JUDGMENT IS SOUGHT FAILS TO APPEAR, PLEAD, OR OTHERWISE DEFEND WITHIN THE TIME ALLOWED, AND THAT IS SHOWN TO THE COURT BY A MOTION AND AFFIDAVIT OR TESTIMONY, THE COURT MAY ENTER AN ORDER OF DEFAULT AND, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO THE PARTY IN DEFAULT, ENTER A JUDGMENT GRANTING THE RELIEF SOUGHT IN THE COMPLAINT. Copies of the Petition and this Summons are available at the Court Clerk’s Office located at 1451 E. 31st St., Tacoma, WA 98404. If you have any questions, please contact the Court Clerk’s Office at (253) 680-5585.

IN THE COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS WILLIAMS, DAVID, Petitioner, vs. WILLIAMS JR, DAVID, Respondent. NO. PUY-CV-PO-2017-0141 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION The COURT OF THE PUYALLUP TRIBE OF INDIANS to: DAVID WILLIAMS JR. (Respondent) YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear on TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2018 at 2:30 p.m.., At the Court of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, 1451 East 31st St, Tacoma, WA 98404 and respond to the petition filed against you pursuant to the provisions of the Domestic Violence Protection and Anti-Harassment Civil Code (PTC ch. 7.16). If you fail to respond, an order of protection will be issued against you for one (1) year from the date you are required to appear. A temporary order of protection has been issued against you, restraining you from the following: (contact the court for a complete copy of the Temporary Order) (1) You are restrained from causing petitioner or any of the minor children residing with petitioner any physical harm, bodily injury, assault including sexual assault, and from molesting, harassing, threatening, or stalking the same. (2) You are restrained from coming near or having any contact whatsoever with the parties, in person or through others, direct or indirectly. (3) You are further restrained from entering the petitioner’s residence, school or place of employment. A copy of the petition, notice of hearing, and ex parte order for protection has been filed with the clerk of this court. DATED February 1, 2018 Jamey LaPointe-McCloud, Court Clerk

Pets Pet of the Week

Abandoned Vehicle Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 02132018 Auction 01302018 Date 01/30/2018 02/13/2018 Sign in & View @ 1NOON pm Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

Volunteers WANTED: PIANO PLAYER Tacoma Banjo club is looking for a piano player to play 20’s 30’s & 40’s Music. This is a very rewarding and fun activity for a person. The group performs at retirement centers, puyallup fair, private events, senior care centers. This is a volunteer position. We have about 20 Banjo players and two piano players that share performances. If you are interested to be apart of this great and fun group please contact Gary Hauenstein at 253 686 2413.

THE FIFE MILTON FOOD BANK WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE COMMUNITY FOR ITS SUPPORT IN 2017. LOCAL BUSINESSES, SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, AND INDIVIDUALS CONTRIBUTED A LARGE AMOUNT OF FOOD PLUS OVER $24,000 WHICH ALLOWED US TO PROVIDE FOOD TO MORE THAN 1,900 FAMILIES (7,300 CLIENTS) WITH OVER 129,000 POUNDS OF FOOD. WE HAVE 54 VOLUNTEERS WHO LOGGED MORE THAN 4,000 HOURS THIS YEAR. THE FOOD BANK IS SPONSORED BY ST. MARTIN OF TOURS CHURCH AND IS LOCATED BEHIND THE CHURCH (2303 54TH AVE. E., FIFE).

Volunteers Volunteer to help an Isolated Elder Make a difference in someone’s life! Senior Companions and Senior Friends are volunteers whose friendship helps seniors maintain their independence through regular visits and assistance with errands. Senior Companion volunteers must be 55+, low-income and serve 15 hrs/week to receive a tax free stipend. Senior Friend volunteers must be 18+ and serve 2 hrs/ month – no stipend. Eligible volunteers will pass a background check and attend training before being matched with an elder needing your help. Call Sarah (253-722-5686) or Linda (253-722-5691) at Lutheran Community Services for more information & an application VOLUNTEER ADVOCATES NEEDED FOR RESIDENTS IN LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES The Pierce County Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is looking for people who are empathetic, diplomatic, assertive, and skilled communicators to be volunteer ombudsman. As a LTC Ombudsman, you will visit an assisted living community or a skilled nursing community, working to ensure that resident rights are being protected and helping residents resolve problems they are unable to solve on their own. Volunteer ombudsman are trained and certified and dedicate 4 hours a week or 16 hours a month. Ongoing support, case staffing, team-meetings, and trainings are provided each month. For more information please call 253 798-3789 or Email Kgavron@co.pierce. wa.us. Or visit www. co.pierce.wa.us/index. aspx?NID=1302 Wanted: Volunteers for groceries.

ELLIE

Meet Featured Pet Ellie. This shy little princess is looking for a very special home. Ellie has a chronic medical condition called Addison’s disease that requires regular vet visits and medications, and it is very important that she have a low-stress lifestyle. But that’s okay — Ellie told us that she is a bit of a homebody anyway. The seven-year-old wants nothing more than to have a quiet corner with a soft bed to curl up on and regular attention from her humans. Kids are a bit too much for Ellie, and she is going to need a family with lots of patience who can take plenty of time — and treats! — to help her continue to come out of her shell. It would also be a plus if her new family has a regular vet to start her off on the right foot. Ellie would probably do fine with the company of another mellow dog or cat, or she may be perfectly content as your one and only. The little love is being fostered in an office here at the Humane Society, so please ask about her at the front desk.

www.thehumanesociety.org

The Empowerment Center currently has a limited number of openings for volunteers in our food bank. These positions will be filled on a first come, first served basis. Come volunteer and receive free groceries! El Shaddai Christian Ministries/The Empowerment Center, 4340 Pacific Ave., Tacoma WA 98148. For more information contact us at 253-677-7740.

City of Fife Needs You! We are looking for passionate applicants for open positions on our volunteer Boards and Commissions. Openings are on the Arts Commission, Parks Board, Tree Board and Youth Commission. Applications are accepted year round, but first review will be 3/24/17. Online Application: www.cityoffife. org/getinvolved. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto w w w. c h i f r a n c i s c a n . org and click “hospice and palliative care” in the “our services” tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253538-4649 #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJECTFEEDTACOMA to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www.projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/ Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perishable snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE.


Friday, February 9, 2018 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 9

Classifieds

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES

Serving the Community Since 1991

WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs

Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

Home Buyer Course Topics • Down Payment Assistance Programs— and how to get your share • Getting qualified and approved for a loan • Choosing the right loan type for you • Understanding credit scores and how to use credit in ways to improve your score • Learn the How and Why of working with a realtor, the home purchasing process and how to make an offer

CLASSES ARE FREE! CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION CLASSES HELD REGULARLY Call Stephanie for information:

253-203-8985

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

Learn about the... Home Advantage Loan DO NOT NEED TO BE FIRST TIME HOMEBUYER! HOUSEHOLDS THAT EARN UP TO $97,000 PER YR USE WITH FHA, VA, & CONV. LOANS (Loan Specific Criteria applies)

Down Payment Assistance 0% INTEREST - 2ND MORTGAGE NO MONTHLY PAYMENT! (Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

UP TO 4% OF THE 1ST MORTGAGE AMOUNT USE FOR DOWN PAYMENT OR CLOSING COSTS

www.stephanielynch.com

FOR SALE 808 Alameda Ave, Fircrest, 98466

$429,900

5 beds, 1.75 baths, 2,492 sq. ft. Located in the heart of Fircrest, this gorgeous mid-century home awaits! From the curb this home shines. Fabulous layout with all the right features. The foyer leads to a wide open and updated kitchen/dining/living area, perfect for entertaining. A warm fireplace is the centerpiece of the main living room. Dining room access to 900’ azek deck and newly fenced backyard. Refin. hardwoods upstairs, heated bathroom floors, and new wool carpets downstairs. New windows and new Gaco 50yr roof material.

Your Go-To North Tacoma Experts and Neighbors

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

UNDISCLOSED , WELL-ESTABLISHED LANDSCAPING BUSINESS in Gig Harbor for Sale.

$85,000 Cash. Seller will disclose the name & address when showing appointment is made with Prospective Qualified Buyer and after buyer signs a confidentiality agreement.

COLLISION CENTER, PORT ORCHARD, SIDNEY AVE. Longtime established, includes Real estate. Price reduced. $900,000. SBA Financing Possible. Price includes business, equipment, several outbuildings. Over 38,000 sq feet of land. Excellent road exposure. Seller Retiring. Call Ed: 253-224-7109

BAR & GRILL INCLUDES REAL ESTATE. Same

location since 1934. Same Owner last 10 yars. Owner Retiring. Annual lGross income $500,000 Approx. Excellent Net. Abscentee Run Package Price $495,500. ($145,000 for the Business, $350,000 for the Real Estate). Seller prefers all cash. Currently owned free and clear. SBA financing possible. Excellent Condition Call Ed: 253-224-7109

NON-FRANCHISE COFFEE SHOP & DELI. Great Location. Business for Sale, $100,000. Owners’ Terms Available.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

TACOMA TACOMA APARTMENT

3228 UNION AVE AVE. 8425SPACIFIC

UNIV. PLACE LAKEWOOD HOME 22088111 GRANDVIEW DR. W 48TH AVE

1BED 1 BATH 1 BED 1 BATH 500450 SF. SF. FULLY CLEAN, COZY APARTRENOVATED ONE BEDROOM MENT IN TACOMA, WITH UNIT AVAILABLE EASY ACCESS TONOW! WA-16.

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL4 BED 2.5TO BATH 6212SF. STUNNING COME THIS 3 BED 2 BATH 4 BEDROOM AND 2.5 BATHROOM U.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD GATED COMMUNITY HOME. FLOORS ON THE MAIN LEVEL.

$625 $800

UNIV. PL. APT. DUPONT 7514 41ST ST CT W 2205 BOBS HOLLOW LN

$995 $1850

$1450 $2295

PUYALLUP TACOMA HOME

9007 115TH ST. E 6126 G STREET

$1475 $1150

32BED 2.51BATH 2274800 SF. 2SF. STORY W/ BED BATH SPA3 SPACIOUS UPSTAIRS CIOUS 2ND BEDROOMS, FLOOR APARTMENT OPEN LANDINGSETTING AREA HOME INLOFT, THEAND WOODSY PERFECT A WORK STATION. OF FIR FOR PARK COMPLEX.

BED 2.5 2.5 BATH BATH 1157 SF. ADORABLE REMOD32ELED BED 1631SF. TOWNHOUSE W/ 2 BEDS 3&BED/2.5 HOME THAT FLOORING, FEATURES AN 1.5 BATH. NEWER OPEN KITCHEN WITH ALL APPLIANCES APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT.

14406 AVE 14309PACIFIC 44TH AVE CTS

5121 ST. CT.ST E 1402203RD N ORCHARD

1 BED, BATH1350SF. 575 SF.LOVE GREAT 2 BED, 1.51BATH THE VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDQUIET IN THIS SMALL COMMUNITY ROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE TOWNHOUSE W/NICE OPEN FLOORPLAN IN THE PACIFIC OAKS APTS.

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 2 BED 1 BATH 1026FANTASTIC SF. GREAT CENTRAL MUST SEE!! 2 LOCATION THIS CHARMING 2 BED/1 STORY IN HOME, 3 BEDROOM BATH DUPLEX NORTH END. 2.5 BATH ONIN A THE CORNER LOT.

TACOMA GIG HARBOR DUPLEX

$695 $1350

N SPANAWAY TACOMA DUPLEX

$1425 $1200

Park52.com ·· 253-473-5200 Park52.com 253-473-5200

Viewpictures, pictures, discounts discounts & & more more properties properties online. View online.

Professional Services ProfessionalManagement Management Services

Advertise Your Real Estate Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, February 9, 2018

Ann Wilson

CageSport MMA 49

Air Supply

February 9, 8:30pm

February 10, 7pm

February 14, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $45, $80, $120, $130

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $70, $75

Blue Öyster Cult

Battle at the Boat 115

Sinbad

March 10, 8pm

March 17, 7pm

March 24, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $60, $65

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 • EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424 You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.