Page 1

FREE • Friday, January 13, 2017

STARS KEEP ON WINNING

A10

ART FROM LOCAL STUDENTS

B2

ROCKY HORROR SHOW

B1

.com TACOMAWEEKLY YO U R CO M M U N I T Y NE W S PA P E R - 29 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E

BAY WATCHERS CALL FOUL ON PROCESS TO RESTART GRAVEL MINING By Steve Dunkelberger

KATHY MANKE DIDN'T JUST REOPEN OLD TOWN'S SPAR, SHE SAVED IT

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Citizens for a Healthy Bay (CHB), the non-profit environmental group tasked with monitoring the health of Commencement Bay, wants the city to conduct a full environmental review of a plan to restart surface mining at the former Coski Sand and Gravel Mine facility on the Hylebos Waterway, particularly since plans call for 600 gravel trucks a day streaming from the waterfront location. The mine had stopped operations about 20 years ago. News of the permit application came during the holiday season that announced a public hearing would be held this week. Comments are being accepted only until the end of the month, something CHB director Melissa Malott said seemed far short of the “transparency” pledge by city officials, following the outcry regarding news of the nowdead methanol plant and the planned construction of a liquefied natural gas plant. “We are pretty frustrated,” she said. “We basically think this is ridiculous. I am, honestly, pretty appalled.”

PHOTO BY LARRY LARUE

By Larry LaRue larry@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF COLDWATER RESOURCES

MINING. Citizens for a Healthy Bay wants the city to conduct a full environmental review

regarding plans to restart mining operations at the former Coski Sand and Gravel Mine along the Hylebos Waterway.

A group called Terra5 Company LLC has submitted plans to the former Coski Mine at 2500 Marine View Dr., which is located between the Hylebos Waterway and 450 feet from the residential area of Northeast Tacoma. Plans call for the removal of about

400,000 cubic yards of sand and gravel from the 17-acre site during the next decade, which would call for about 15 truckloads every hour of operation, or 600 trucks a day. Mining would reportedly take place during the day, and loading could occur both day and

night. The permit documents mention two shifts, from 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 5 a.m. “The mine is directly uphill from the Hylebos, a waterway with numerous environmental problems, and is only 450 feet

u See MINING / page A9

EPA, CITY OF TACOMA, CLOVER PARK TECHNICAL COLLEGE AND GOODWILL PARTNER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TRAINING, JOBS AND CAREERS IN PIERCE COUNTY GRANT-FUNDED TRAINING IN 2017-2018

NEXT PROGRAM BEGINS IN FEBRUARY 2017

Kathy Manke fell in love with Tacoma's Old Town district long before she bought The Spar, a pub/diner that first opened there in 1917. “I was doing research into my family and this area, and I found out that my great grandfather, Richard Uhlman, had a butcher shop in Old Town,” Manke said. “We found that Richard's mother took a train here from Sacramento.” Old Town was the area where Tacoma's first post office appeared – in a log cabin – and small businesses developed. Uhlman took advantage of the city's early years as a fishing village, often setting up shop on the beach near the Old Town dock. There, he cut and sold fresh beef to fishermen heading out to sea. Manke shared her great-grandfather's knack for business. “I'd owned the Cloverleaf with my ex-husband and managed the Engine House for three years,” Manke said. “When I saw this place, I realized it was

u See MANKE / page A9

PROCESS TO FILL COUNCIL VACANCY EXPOSES 'EROSION OF TRUST' By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

construction, contamination remediation, hazardous material handling, and more. Environmental careers start at $14/hr and can reach senior management positions paying more than $65/hr. The program is targeting Tacoma or Pierce County residents 18 and older. The

Tacoma City Council talked at a study session about what qualifications they would like to see in the person the council will later select to fill a vacant seat on the dais. The council received 55 applications to fill the at-large position vacated by Victoria Woodards, who resigned last month to concentrate on a run for mayor. The council's Government Performance and Finance Committee of Marty Campbell, Anders Ibsen, Joe Lonergan and Robert Thoms will now draft a short list of three to five candidates at its regular meeting on Jan. 18. Those finalists will then be interviewed by the full council during a study session at noon on Jan. 24, with the City Council likely to announce an appointment at the regular council meeting later that day. The interviews and the appointment will be televised from the council chambers. The timeline allows for the appointee to then participate in drafting council priorities and committee appointments during a day-long council retreat later that week. Councilmember Conor McCarthy criticized Strickland for the short timeline, particularly since the vacancy was announced during the holiday season and outlined in e-mail, without council debate on the process. "I don't necessarily think it is a bad process," he said; however, he thinks the council should have been more involved in determining the process and used it as an example of the "erosion of trust" among members of the council. Councilmember Keith Blocker agreed with

u See GOODWILL / page A9

u See COUNCIL / page A9

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOODWILL

QUALITY JOBS. This new training opportunity will serve as a gateway to $14-$65 an hour career paths with no out-ofpocket education costs. This photo was taken at the last 2016 Clover Park class sessions (shot in October 2016).

T

he Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the City of Tacoma, Clover Park Technical College and Goodwill are providing grant-funded training opportunities in 2017 and 2018 to help the unemployed, underemployed, and transitioning servicemen and veterans in

Pierce County into quality environmental careers. A $200,000 EPA Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Grant (formerly Brownfields Grant) is funding recruiting, entry level training, career counseling and job placement services that are a gateway to careers in

FACEBOOK: facebook.com/tacomaweekly

STARS COLORING CONTEST

A11 OUR VIEW

The City of Tacoma’s call for applications to fill Victoria Woodards' seat drew 55 applicants from all neighborhoods in the City of Destiny. PAGE A6

TWITTER: @TacomaWeekly

VAPE-ORAMA

A5

Pothole Pig .................A2 Crime Stoppers...........A3

TUMBLR: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com

SAUCY YODA

PINTEREST: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly

B5 Sports ........................A10 Hot Tickets ................A11

FLICKR: flickr.com/tacomaweekly

A&E ....................... ....B3 Make A Scene ............B5

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Calendar .................B6 Word Search ...........B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 13, 2017

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

After weeks of rumors and hearsay, it appears Tacoma Weekly’s own Percival the Pothole Pig may be making his way back home. Reports that the porker had been seen in Mexico have given way to new information placing him in California’s Muscle Beach, impressing crowds with his weight lifting feats as he continues to head north. Should The Pothole Pig eventually return to Tacoma, the question must be asked, how will his journey have affected him? What physical and mental changes can we expect? Keep your eye on the Tacoma Weekly for updated reports.

Bulletin Board ANNIE WRIGHT TO OPEN NEW PROGRAM FOR BOYS Annie Wright Schools plan to launch a new program for high school boys starting in the 2017-18 school year. Complementing Annie Wright’s co-ed lower and middle schools and all-girls’ upper school, this program will extend Annie Wright’s inquiry-based experience to boys in grades 9-12. The upper school for boys, based on Annie Wright’s current upper school for girls but specifically designed for the ways boys learn, will extend Annie Wright’s expertise in single gender high school education. Drawing on Annie Wright’s rich traditions while providing innovative and specialized programs, the upper school for boys will open in August 2017 with grade 9, adding a grade each subsequent year. “This initiative is a natural extension of Annie Wright’s student-centered mission and a tremendous opportunity to serve the South Sound and beyond,” said Head of Schools Christian G. Sullivan. “While honoring our tradition of excellence in single gender high school education, we are providing a more inclusive approach to the Annie Wright experience.” While academic classes will be separated by gender, boys and girls in the upper school will have many opportunities for intersection, including arts and social events. New state-of-the-art facilities, designed specifically for how boys learn best, will accommodate the new program within three years. Current Assistant Head of Schools Susan Bauska will serve as director of the upper school for boys. Bauska has worked at Annie Wright for 26 years, previously as director of the upper school for girls. “Annie Wright’s leadership, financial health and supportive community have never been stronger,” said Chair of the Board of Trustees John Long. “The school is in an ideal position to launch this new program which honors the past while looking toward the future.” Once the boys’ program is established, Annie Wright will provide the only independent school option for boys near downtown Tacoma and the only boarding opportunity for boys in the South Sound. ARTISTS OF COLOR INVITED TO APPLY FOR ART INSTALLATION Pierce County artists of color can submit applications now through Feb. 13 to have existing portable pieces of artwork considered for purchase and installation at People’s Community Center in Tacoma. Portable artworks include two-dimensional pieces that fall within certain eligibility guidelines. Media can include, but is not limited to: painting, drawing, works on paper, photography, printmaking, digital, collage, mosaics, fiber, mixed-media and wall-mountable low-relief sculpture. Applicants must be artists of color, live in Pierce County and be 18 years or older. Artists with ties to the Hilltop community will be prioritized. “People’s Community Center has become such a focal point for the rapidly evolving, highly diverse Hilltop neighborhood,” said District 3 Council Member Keith Blocker. “This is a special opportunity for artists of color from the local area to help build and sustain the already welcoming environment of this facility.” Up to $10,000 in total artwork purchases, including any required framing, will be made, with no one artwork costing more than $1,500. Funding for this portable works purchase opportunity comes from Metro Parks Tacoma and the City of Tacoma’s Municipal Art Program which dedicates 1 percent of construction costs from public capital projects to the creation of public art. Artworks purchased through this opportunity will become part of the City of Tacoma’s Municipal Art Collection. For more information, and to apply, go to cityoftacoma. org/artsopps. GIVE MURDER A SPORTING CHANCE Add dinner, murder and mystery to kick off your Super Bowl weekend. The Pacific Northwest’s premiere mystery theatre company will present a special sportsthemed interactive dinner Friday, Feb. 3 at 7:30 p.m. at Chambers Creek Regional Park, 9850 64th St. W. in University Place. The event promises an evening of entertaining mayhem and interaction with an outrageous cast of actors while you try to figure out the culprit in a live “whodunit” mystery that includes a stadium-style buffet dinner from Chambers Bay Grill. To participate in the interactive dinner, reserve your spot online or call (253) 798-4141 by Jan. 27. Cost is $59 per adult (ages 21 and over only). Advance tickets are required and will not be sold at the door. For more information, visit www.piercecountywa.org/murdermysterydinner.

APPRENTICESHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Members of the audience are encouraged to wear their favorite sports attire. The sports-themed buffet dinner includes nachos, garlic fries, crudité platter, buffalo wings, specialty dogs, dessert, and beverages. A no host bar will be available.

NEW CHURCH DESIGNED FOR YOUNG ADULTS Millennials now have a new place to gather. On the corner of North Mullen and 35th Street is an unassuming, quaint church nestled in a quiet neighborhood of Tacoma’s North End community. On the outside, it looks like a place of tradition and reverent history. But, on the inside, there is something completely different happening. On Sunday nights at 7:30 p.m., millennials of Tacoma fill this sacred old building and bring vibrancy like never before. Life Center will launch a ministry focused on targeting the young adults in Pierce County at North End Community Church (NECC), located at 3502 N. Mullen St., Tacoma, 98407. The young adult pastor who is leading the charge, Brandon Perritte, shares, “This group of people is known to be unreachable and disengaged from society. Millennials are yearning for real relationships, community and a life that has impact. They don’t want anything to do with things that appear to be fake, especially church.” He goes on to explain, “Meeting at NECC is ideal because you know what you’re getting when you walk in the door of this old church. This generation values what is real versus what’s relevant.” Life Center Young Adults (YA) is confident and determined they can reach this demographic. The YA leadership team is a dynamic group of millennials, those born between 1980-1999, and they are motivated, with clear vision to draw millennials into meaningful and causedriven community. Perritte goes on to say, “We know what it takes to fix the disconnect with millennials. Our solution is community.” Life Center YA will provide several avenues for young adults to engage in community and make an impact in the city. In addition to weekly church services that are unapologetically Jesus-centered in teaching, Perritte describes, “If it doesn’t bring community, then we simply aren’t going to do it. We’ve planned weekly restaurant take-overs, small and large group hangs during the week, monthly community service projects, annual adopt-ablocks, block parties and whatever it takes to make an impact in the city.” COLUMBIA BANK RAISES $200,000+ FOR HOMELESS SHELTERS Columbia Bank announced on Jan. 6 that $209,335.96 and 8,140 items were raised for 54 local homeless shelters across the Northwest during the second annual Warm Hearts Winter Drive. Through generous donations from customers, employees and the community, Columbia Bank surpassed its 2016 fundraising goal of $160,000 for Warm Hearts by 30.8 percent, and exceeded the funds raised in 2015 by 32.8 percent. “We are so proud of our employees, customers and community, who rallied together again this year to raise awareness of this growing issue, and make a real difference,” said Melanie Dressel, President & CEO of Columbia Bank. “The Warm Hearts Winter Drive was created to benefit the growing number of people who are impacted by homelessness and are struggling to receive essential services during our cold and rainy winter months.” According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the number of people experiencing homelessness in the Northwest has increased six percent since 2015. Columbia Bank launched the Warm Hearts Winter Drive in 2015 to support nonprofit organizations providing warmth to individuals, families and children in need. One hundred percent of the clothing and funds collected during the Warm Hearts Winter Drive are donated directly back to the shelters and relief organizations in the communities where the collections originated. For a full list of benefitting organizations in each county, visit www.warmheartswinterdrive.com. DANCE THEATRE NORTHWEST NEEDS DANCERS Experienced dancers with classical training are needed for upcoming performances of “Arts Are Education,” “Art Inspires Art” and other community arts performances. Positions are open for company members, Junior Dance Ensemble members and guest performers. Jan. 14 at 8:50 a.m. is the next audition for Dance Theatre Northwest Jr. Dance Ensemble Members (ages 9-18). The audition requires advanced completion of a Junior Dance Ensemble performing member application and consists of participation in an intermediate-level youth ballet class. No prepared variation or solo is required. Girls are asked to wear pink tights and ballet shoes, a black leotard, waistband, and to arrive with their hair secured up; they should bring pointe shoes if they are SEE MORE BULLETIN BOARD ITEMS ON PAGE A7

Tacoma

International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 19 Seattle / Western Washington

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP S T A C I A H A R V E Y

Applications must be completed online by visiting www.neiep.org/careers.aspx Completed applications must be received between Jan. 2, 2017 & Jan. 21, 2017 Applicants must be at least 18-years of age and possess a high school diploma or GED. Equal Opportunity for all applicants. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

More information can be found on the IUEC Local 19 website: www.iuec19.org

L L C

F R A M E - M A K E R S . C O M Bring this

a n d g e t

25% off

your custom f r a m i n g ( 2 5 3 ) 5 6 4 - 2 3 2 0 3011 6th Ave. Tacoma, WA 98406


Friday, January 13, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Secti n A • Pa e 3

SEARCH ON FOR ACCUSED CHILD AP S W By David Rose

Washington’s Most Wanted - Q13 Fox

Pierce County Sheriff's deputies are searching for Gilbert M. Greenwood. The 51-year-old is charged with four counts of rape of a child in the first DAVID ROSE degree (aggravated) and one count of child molestation in the 1st degree (aggravated). He was arrested on May 17, 2013 and was out on bail when his trial was scheduled for Sept. 15, 2014. He failed to appear in court and a warrant was issued for his arrest. "At the time, we were told he had left the country. We now believe he is somewhere on the Olympic Pen-

tacomaweekly.com

USA TODAY HONORS THREE ALL-CITY PLAYERS

insula and so we are asking for the public's help to find him" said Det. Ed Troyer. According to the charging documents, Greenwood allegedly showed a 4-5-year-old girl videos of men and women having "really rough" sex before raping her. Prosecutors say the sexual abuse continued for years. Greenwood is 6-feet, 4-inches tall, 265 pounds with black hair and brown eyes. If you can tell deputies where to find him, Crime Stoppers will pay you a cash reward of up to $1,000 for any information that leads to his arrest. Call the hot line at 1 (800) 222-TIPS (8477). This is one of the Pierce County fugitives being featured Friday night on “Washington's Most Wanted” at 11 p.m. on Q13 FOX.

PROSECUTOR FINDS DEPUTIES’ USE OF DEADLY FORCE LAWFUL Independent and concurrent investigations by the Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office, the Pierce County Sheriff’s Department and the Pierce County Medical Examiner’s Office, regarding the shooting death of Justin Christopher Baker, 36, have been completed. Baker died from multiple gunshot wounds inflicted by Pierce County Sheriff’s Deputies David Sutherland, Brian Coburn, Robert Blumenschine, Roger Fuller, and Chad Helligso. Deputies opened fire after Baker advanced on them with a running chainsaw. Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist concluded that the deputies acted lawfully. "This is an unfortunate example of suicideby-cop,” Prosecutor Lindquist said. “It’s also an example of what methamphetamine can do to a person’s mental and emotional stability.” In the early morning hours of Aug. 30, 2016, Baker showed up unexpectedly and uninvited at his parents’ residence, wielding a running chainsaw and making various threats to enter the residence, kill himself with the chainsaw, and to attack the deputies when they showed up. The father also reported that he felt Baker was plan-

TOP STORIES ON

ning to commit “suicide by cop” by making deputies take action against him when they arrived. He also said his son had a history of drug use. This information was relayed to the responding deputies. They arrived a short time later and confronted Baker while he was holding and revving the chainsaw in a threatening manner toward the deputies. The deputies pointed their duty firearms at Baker while giving him verbal commands to put the chainsaw down on the ground and move away from it. Baker continued to hold the chainsaw out towards the deputies while revving it. One of the deputies fired his taser, hitting Baker, but this failed to stop him. Baker charged the deputies with the running chainsaw, and deputies shot and killed him. Medical Examiner Dr. Thomas Clark determined that Baker had 27 gunshot wounds, of which several had the potential to be fatal. The postmortem toxicology report indicated Baker had a large quantity of methamphetamine and amphetamines in his system at the time of his death. Dr. Clark stated that the amount of these drugs in Baker’s system was potentially fatal.

HEAD OF THE PACK - TACOMA BAPTIST GIRLS UNDEFEATED WHAT TO LOOK FORWARD TO 2017 AUTHOR RICHARD WILEY: ONE OF TACOMA’S GREAT UNKNOWNS STARS LOOK TO STAY ON TOP IN PACIFIC

INMATE CHARGED WITH POSSESSION OF METHSOAKED LETTERS The Pierce County Prosecutor’s Office charged Rickey Claude Yandell, 49, on Jan. 6 with one count of unlawful possession of a controlled substance. Letters sent to him in the mail had been soaked in methamphetamine. “This is a new take on an old problem smuggling drugs into jail,” said Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. On Jan. 4, a Pierce County Corrections Officer along with her K9 partner, Rocket, were asked to investigate a letter that had been sent to Yandell while he was in custody at the Pierce County Jail. The letter was addressed to Yandel and was suspicious because of its odd physical appearance. K9 Rocket alerted on the letter addressed to Yandell. It was one of ten letters placed on the floor. Rocket was then taken to Yandell’s cell and conducted a second search. Yandell’s paperwork was spread on the floor, and Rocket alerted on another letter with two sheets of paper. One-third of a page had been torn off. Deputies field tested the pages from both letters and got a positive result for methamphetamine. This type of crime has become more and more common all over the country as inmates try to get drugs inside jails and prisons via the U.S. mail. Bail is set at $50,000. Charges are only allegations and a person is presumed innocent unless he or she is proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK

ace

c

tac

a ee ly

Goodwill brews career training.

Learn more about the Youth Barista Training Program available to ages 16 - 24. CONTACT: Melissa Huddleston 253.573.6828 | melissah@goodwillwa.org /GoodwillBuzz

@GoodwillBuzz

GoodwillBuzz

ARMED ROBBERY Pierce County Sheriff’s detectives need your help to identify the suspect responsible for an armed robbery of a convenience store. At 6:40 p.m. on Thursday, November 17th, 2016, the pictured suspect robbed the Handy Corner Grocery store located on 112th St. S. in Parkland. The suspect walked into the store and pulled a ski mask over his face, then displayed a handgun and demanded cash. The suspect took the money and fled the store. The suspect is described as build, dark brown hair, a goatee/ blue jeans, a white t-shirt, a blacka hispanic male in his 20’s, ap- mustache, and sideburns. During zippered sweatshirt with a gray proximately 5’11”, with a medium the robbery he was seen wearing hood, and a black ski mask. Fridays at 10:30pm on

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) All Callers will remain anonymous

www.TPCrimestoppers.com

6824 19th Street W #139 • University Place WA 98466


Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 13, 2017

TACOMA UNITES FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

LEFT PHOTO COURTESY OF WWW.EVERGREEN.EDU / RIGHT FILE PHOTO

(Above) Dr. Maxine Mimms will be honored with the prestigious 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award. (Right) Keynote speech will be delivered by Julianne Malveaux, a renowned labor economist, author and commentator who will be shedding light on the current state of our country’s stance on equality and our perception of it. By Duncan Rolfson Special to Tacoma Weekly

This year, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day will be observed on Monday, Jan. 16. People of all races, religions and genders will be taking time from the mundanetrenches we call life to observe the legacy that this great man imparted on our nation. Starting as early as the Sunday just before this holiday, there will be gatherings of community and fellowship for a common belief. Spanning nearly half the week, here is a list of a few events aimed and remembering and celebrating this great man. The 11th Annual MLK Jr. Redeeming the Prophetic Vision is being presented on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2:30 p.m. at Urban Grace Church by “The Conversation” and in collaboration with the church and Associated Ministries. Traditionally, it has served as a collaborative effort of community-focused and faith-based volunteers and artists attempting to illuminate the inequities and other hurdles in modern day society. Alongside multi-faith blessings and calls for peace and unity, the event will feature live art expressions via spoken word poetry and live music focused on civil rights and equal justice for all. It is free to the public, and all are invited to attend and share in the message being offered. The goal of this event is to express the need for actively promoting and reiterating Dr. King’s message of the betterment of singular and social justices. In conjunction with the observance, two local activists will be honored with a Social Justice Award. These men are Henry Lyle “Hank” Adams and Dean Jackson. Hank Adams (SiouxAssiniboine), is a local social justice activist whose long-

standing work has been instrumental in working to assert and protect local Native American fishing and hunting rights. Dean Jackson is founder and director of Hilltop Urban Gardens (HUG) located in the landmark Hilltop neighborhood of Tacoma, which serves as an example for the locals on how to work to create and promote food sovereignty and re-connection to the soil by simply changing the lives of local people on the margins of our community. On Monday, Jan. 16 at 8 a.m., the 2017 MLK Jr. Unity Breakfast will be hosted by University of WashingtonTacoma, located in the University Y Student Center. Local artistry, community involvement, and peer recognition are the happenings here, including a presentation of the Dream Awards and a keynote speech from Erin Jones from the Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Please come down and get involved – only you and your community will benefit from your participation in this year’s event. Also on Jan. 16, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., will be the the City of Tacoma’s Annual MLK Celebration at the Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center. This year, Dr. Maxine B. Mimms will be honored with the prestigious 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award, which is presented each year during the city’s annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. birthday celebration before an average crowd of approximately 2,000 attendees from the community. “Dr. Mimms embodies the mission of Dr. King through her extraordinary dedication to opening doors of higher education to the diverse community in Tacoma,” said Committee Chairwoman Erin Lee. “Our event theme is ‘Beloved Community’ and we gave special consider-

ation to nominees whose work focused on understanding our community and its needs, and delivering solutions.” The event will feature keynote speaker Harold Moss, Tacoma's first African American city council member and Mayor. Moss has been active in the Tacoma community since the 1950s when he was a member of the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He served two terms as president of the branch. The celebration will include exhibitions of all types – music, dance and poetry – that highlight the strength, resiliency and creativity of young men of color. Performances will focus highly on Dr. King’s relationship with the communities he affected, how he challenged and changed our nation's very fiber, and his message to honor the dignity and rights of every person, no matter their differences to you or me. The following day the University of Puget Sound is inviting the community to come together for their annual Martin Luther King Celebration. Everyone is welcome to the free evening. Keynote speech will be delivered by Julianne Malveaux, a renowned labor economist, author and commentator who will be shedding light on the current state of our country’s stance on equality and our perception of it. Described by author and activist Cornel West as “the most iconoclastic public intellectual in the country,” Malveaux truly embraces views on race, culture, gender and economics that are helping shape public opinion in 21st-century America. Malveaux’s keynote talk, plus messages from the Puget Sound community and the presentation of the Keep The Faith Alive Award, will take place on Tuesday, Jan. 17 from 7-8:30 p.m., in Schneebeck Concert Hall on campus. The doors will open at 6:30 p.m. No tickets are required.

Local Restaurants

BISTRO

+ BAR

FORMERLY KNOWN AS GOLDFISH TAVERN

FREE APP WITH PURCHASE OF ANY TWO PIZZAS

HAPPY HOUR: 3-7PM & 9-11:30PM

OFFER VALID WITH THIS AD ONLY. EXPIRES 1/30/17.

Sunday All Day Happy Hour!

7 Days a Week!

FAMILY FRIENDLY

GO HAWKS!

9 ROTATING LOCAL CRAFT BEERS TACO TUESDAYS (4 FOR $5 OR 8 FOR $9)

Huskies New Year’s Eve EXTENDED HAPPY HOUR DRINKS & APPETIZERS

$ 3.25 THURSDAYS (ALL BEER) KIDS 12 & UNDER EAT FREE SUNDAYS*

GREAT BAR FOOD SPIRITS & ROTATING MICRO HANDLES

5310 N. PEARL ST, TACOMA • (253) 327-1776 WWW.DEFIANTGOLDFISH.COM

Happy Hour Menu MONDAY $

5 Burger ALL DAY

Rock N Roll Trivia 7pm

TUESDAY

$

5

Steak & Salad 3pm to Close

MON-THUR 3PM-6PM & 9PM-12AM FRIDAY 3PM-6PM

DRINKS SATURDAY - 11AM-6PM

SUNDAY - ALL DAY LONG!

WEDNESDAY

$

5

Any 7” Pizza 3pm to Close

THURSDAY

Trivia

Voted Tacoma’s Best Thursday Night Trivia

$150 Gift Card Giveaway! $

3 Beers!

FOOD

MON-FRI 3PM-6PM & 9PM-12AM SATURDAY - 11AM-6PM & 9PM-12AM SUNDAY - ALL DAY LONG!

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

$ 8 Fish Friday!

Steak Night!

ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR!

ALL DAY LONG!

)FJOFLFOt4USPOHCPX %PT&RVJTt/FXDBTUMF

2 Rainier Tall Boys

7pm to Close

11am to 3pm

$

813 PACIFIC AVE

TACOMA, WA 98402

Your Choice

$

8

Open for Breakfast 9am

253.572.3222

WWW.THEOFFICEONPACIFIC.COM


Friday, January 13, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

PHOTO COURTESY OF VAPE-O-RAMA

LOUNGING. Vape-O-Rama in University Place not only offers a large selection of vaping products, but a lounge to try new flavors or converse with like-minded customers. By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

University Place residents looking for a one-stop vape shop can visit Vape-O-Rama, located at 7406 27th St. W., which offers a large selection of products for all your vaping needs. Vape-O-Rama is a shop dedicated to newcomers and veteran vapers alike. Those unfamiliar with vaping can count on the knowledge of a friendly staff dedicated to customer service that will get you started on the road to vaping. On the other hand, experienced vapers can take comfort in not only the wide variety of products VapeO-Rama offers, but also a space that allows them to talk to other vaping enthusiasts about the pleasures of this revolutionary smoking trend. Owner Chuck Bertrand credits the store’s success to their fantastic customer service and a policy by which Vape-ORama makes sure that every product works as intended. “I think the biggest thing is we take care of our

“I think the biggest thing is we take care of our customers. If something goes wrong, we fix it or replace it. Obviously customer service is important for building long term relationships.” – CHUCK BERTRAND, OWNER OF VAPE-O-RAMA customers. If something goes wrong, we fix it or replace it. Obviously customer service is important for building long term relationships,” Bertrand said. “If you bought [a product] three months ago from us and it breaks, we’ll replace it. “ The store also offers a wide variety of products to buy; everything from equipment to various flavors are displayed throughout the store, which provides a nice environment to talk about vaping for beginners and regular users. Should you want to try new flavors or just hang out

at the friendly store, Vape-O-Rama’s vape lounge should meet all your needs, including “try before you buy.” Through putting an emphasis on customer service and dedication to helping people with their vaping needs, VapeO-Rama has established a reputation as one of the best. Vape-O-Rama in University Place is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Vape-O-Rama also has locations in Kent, Renton, Lakewood and Burien. For more information, visit vape-o-rama.com or call (253) 267-5698.


Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 13, 2017

Our View

CITY COUNCIL SHOULD LOOK FOR AN OUTSIDER TO FILL VACANT SEAT The City of Tacoma’s call for applications to fill the at-large position left vacant when Victoria Woodards announced her resignation to concentrate on her bid for mayor, and avoid the city’s term limit rules along the way, drew 55 applicants from all neighborhoods in the City of Destiny. Some of the applicants are well known commodities in local circles, from former councilmember Lauren Walker to Kris “Sonics Guy� Brannon. It was the largest slate of applicants since David Boe and Ryan Mello were appointed in 2010 from a field of 44 applicants for two at-large positions created when Marilyn Strickland stepped down when she was elected mayor and Julie Anderson left to serve as Pierce County Auditor. Current City Council members should take the volume of applicants to heart and seek a candidate that is both qualified and has views that diverge from the council’s own so that new perspectives, fresh ideas and differing views enter the discussion. That is not to say that this newly minted council member would or should actually drive the conversation, since he or she would just be one of nine voices from the dais, but having the perspective of a small business owner or grassroots activist could add depth to policy discussions as well as dedicate the time to attend meetings, briefings and council sessions required by the position that is technically a part-time post that pays $46,013.92 a year. In reality, the job calls for more than part-time commitments since such meetings are peppered sporadically throughout the regular work week, making it difficult for a nine-to-five worker to manage. The City Council, after all, is not only responsible for enacting all legislation, developing policies and making general decisions on behalf of the city and region at large, but will particularly be focused in the coming months on the task of finding, interviewing and hiring a new city manager now that T.C. Broadnax is leaving for the top administrative post in Dallas. That is an appointment that can’t be rushed or rubberstamped because a “bad hire� could bring a return of deficit spending and less-than-transparent discussions. The next step in the selection process will come when the council's Government Performance and Finance Committee of Marty Campbell, Anders Ibsen, Joe Lonergan and Robert Thoms whittle the roster of 55 applicants down to a short list of three to five candidates at its regular meeting on Jan. 18. Those finalists will then be interviewed by the full council during a study session at noon on Jan. 24. The City Council is then expected to announce an appointment at the regular council meeting later that day. We should all stay tuned as the selection process plays out.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor. (Re: “A voice of reason on the failed behavioral health tax� by Jerry Gibbs, TW 1-6-17): Mr. Gibbs tries to completely muddle the real issue of mental health problems in Pierce County. The Behavioral Health Study delivered to the County Council in September shows that Pierce County has the worst mental health outcomes in the state, a fact that calls for compassion and responsible citizen action rather than the typical anti-tax rhetoric. Most of the editorial is a rant against ST3l taxes, which may not be fair in terms of when we start paying and when we get transit all the way to Tacoma, but the I-5 traffic problem needs to be faced and solved. Taking a selfish perspective on serious mental health problems in our County shows no empathy for the pain experienced by people needing help and their families. The report indicates that lack of affordable housing is the biggest culprit in our mental health crisis. When will the county take responsibility for providing adequate shelter and affordable housing, where we also come in dead last in the state? Connie Brown, Executive Director Tacoma Pierce County Affordable Housing Consortium

TACOMAWEEKLY Pierce County Community Newspaper Group, LLC 2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305

PUBLISHER John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com NEWS DESK news@tacomaweekly.com MANAGING EDITOR Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com STAFF WRITERS Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Derek Shuck / derek@tacomaweekly.com Larry LaRue / larry@tacomaweekly.com ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com SPORTS EDITOR Justin Gimse / jgimse@tacomaweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Dave Davison, Chance Pittenger, Matt Kite, Josh Reisberg, Randy Rutledge, Erica Cooley, Carolin Jones COPY EDITING Garrett Westcott CARTOONISTS Chris Britt, Milt Priggee PAGINATION Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Rachelle Abellar WEB DEVELOPER Ed Curran PHOTOGRAPHERS Rocky Ross, Bill Bungard, David Turnipseed ADVERTISING Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com Marlene Carrillo / marlene@tacomaweekly.com Andrea Jay / andrea@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com.

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY MILT PRIGGEE t WWW.MILTPRIGGEE.COM t8885"$0."8&&,-:$0.&%*503*"-@$"3500/

Guest Editorials

AVOIDING DÉJÀ VU ALL OVER AGAIN

By Don C. Brunell

The late Yogi Berra coined the phrase “it’s dĂŠjĂ vu all over again!â€? It is used extensively to describe political miscues. Case in point: ObamaCare. Recently, Wall Street Journal’s Kimberley Strassel wrote a column describing President Obama’s failure with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). “The vision of the president calling on his party members to – yet again – lay down their political lives for his ‘signature’ law was a reminder of how this disaster began.â€? Unfortunately, Republicans, who now control Congress and the White House, may be poised to repeat the same mistakes Obama and Democrats made in 2010 when they jammed the ACA through Congress – important sections unwritten and devoid of Republican input. When the President signed the law on March 23, 2010 most members of Congress had no time to skim, let alone read, the bill. It was 2,700 pages, which changed by the minute. Then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) admitted she was waiting to pass ACA to learn what was in it. That statement summarized the predicament of lawmakers, eroded public confidence and caused a strong backlash among voters. President-elect Donald Trump and Republicans, holding the majority on Capitol Hill, now find themselves in the Democrats’ shoes. They are poised

to act swiftly to repeal Obamacare and replace it. The “It� is yet to be defined. Democrats and Republicans must realize that making health care affordable and available is an “American� issue, not a political football. The stakeholders are not just party-line voters, but people from every circumstance in life and all parts of our nation. Elected officials must bring all interests together and work diligently to find practical and affordable solutions. The goal needs to be: keep what is working and thoughtfully design and implement new solutions to fix what is not. It can’t wait. ObamaCare may fall of its own financial weight. Our federal government owes over $20 trillion and the ACA subsidies will reach $42.6 billion this year which is up from $32.8 billion in 2016, the Center for Health and Economy reports. According to the Washington Policy Center, 170,000 people in our state receive health insurance through the state exchange and most of these people receive federal subsidizes. Another 600,000 Washingtonians were placed in the expanded Medicaid program, where 90 percent of the costs are paid by federal taxpayers. While Trump and GOP lawmakers are eager to fix health care, they must be surgical in their approach and sell workable strategies to the public. It is possible. Washington State lawmakers did it in the early 1980s. At the time, the insurance gap was among the “working poor� – people

earning too much to qualify for Medicaid, but in low-wage jobs offering no health insurance. In 2016, those individuals would earn between $12,000 and $24,000 yearly. Employers and people with health insurance paid higher premiums. Providers had to raise rates to recover costs for the uninsured. Meanwhile, our state legislature struggled just to fund Medicaid. Lawmakers, health experts, doctors, hospitals, insurers and employers worked together and came up with the “Basic Health Plan.� The legislation passed in 1987 and was fully implemented in 1993. Between 1999 and 2009, the BHP covered over a half million people. The BHP had its share of problems. As expenses mounted, subsidized premiums rose and the waiting list grew, state budget cuts took a toll. However, the process used to develop it is one to emulate. As Strassel concluded: “Long before ObamaCare cratered on the merits, it had failed in the court of public opinion – because of both the manner and the means by which it became law.� Hopefully, that is a lesson learned. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

FAMILY LIFE UNDER THE STIGMA OF UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRATION

By 'Rebecca Schneider'

“You have reached the voicemail box of...â€? “You have reached the voicemail box of‌â€? “You have reached the voicemail box of‌â€? Panic set in. I was supposed to get dinner with him at Chili’s, my pregnancy cravings running wild for those honey chipotle chicken crispers. We had just talked about it on the phone less than an hour before. After a few minutes of waiting in the car, his family saw me, came outside and said, “He was pulled over by the police driving home in the work truck and they took him.â€? I sped back home, tears streaming down my face, and frantically told my parents what was going on. We rushed to the police station, even though he told me not to come. He didn’t want me to see him there under those circumstances. When we got there, an officer told us he didn’t have any documentation, so there was no way they could release him. I went back to his apartment, scrambling to find anything I could that would show that he had lived here a long time – his high school diploma, his bartending license, some cash he had, thinking maybe it would help. When I got back, the officer sneered, “I couldn’t release him if I wanted to.â€? The officers said I could go in to see him. He stood up in his socks, paint and dust still speckled in his hair after a long day at work, asking why I came when he told me not to. But I could see the fear that now replaced the pride in his eyes. I don’t remember what we said to each other. The young officer walked me back out. He told me he was the one who pulled him over. I could feel the remorse as he retold the story - the story that was beginning to pave the path to deportation, all starting with a routine traffic

stop. “He pulled out of the gas station and turned left where there was a ‘no left turn’ sign. I had to pull him over. He’s such a good guy. He’s really such a good guy.� Such a good guy among many other good guys. Undocumented guys. Hardworking, ambitious, and familyoriented guys. He was doing all that he could for the family we were about to start. The day he was taken into custody by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the court officer let me see him before they escorted him out through the back. He kissed my recently protruding stomach. “You’re pregnant?� she asked. I nodded, my face red and swollen from crying. “It’s okay. He’ll be back soon.� I watched as he walked away with the officers, shackled by the wrists and ankles, like a dangerous criminal. I later found out that she, the court officer, was the one that called ICE to report him, violating her job description. Three years later, he says he doesn’t want to tell our son that he was ever detained or that he skipped his meals in the detention center, trading his food for paper, pens, and stamps to write letters to me that I still have not received. But I think these facts are important for my son with caramel skin, chocolate eyes, and dark brown hair to know, because being undocumented will never be an allegation made against me, with my German last name, dark blonde hair and skin the color of Wonder Bread. My son, because of his father’s ethnicity, may be labeled a rapist or a drug dealer, for those who feed into the rhetoric of our President-Elect. He will not be judged by his humor or his character, but for the origin of his last name. I want him to know that his father was able to overcome the struggles he went through, was able to receive Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and was able to

raise him with me, not through phone calls or letters to his home country or visits to a detention center. I want my son to know that, as that young officer got to know his father, he realized that not all immigrants are bad. And I want my son to be able to live a life free of fear for his Guatemalan roots that play such a big part in his life. I want him to proudly speak both of the languages he knows in public without having to feel like he needs to assimilate to the majority group threatened by his culture. There are roughly 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States today. They have children, they work, and they pay taxes that they cannot claim later. They live in constant fear that they will be taken from their children who are citizens of the United States. The year after my son was born, there were 275,000 babies born to undocumented immigrants in this country. Think of how likely these numbers make it for US citizens to know an undocumented immigrant, personally or in passing, and probably unbeknownst to many. But studies show that, the more meaningful relationships a person has with people of different races and ethnicities, the fewer prejudices he or she will have towards others. I want people to get to know my son for who he is, shaped greatly into the fun-loving kid that he is becoming by his huge extended Guatemalan family. Maybe knowing that my little boy almost lost his Papa will make even one person understand the experience of the huge group of children born to undocumented immigrants in our country. “Rebecca Schneider� is a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She is using a pen name for reasons of family security, but correspondence can be sent to her through Professor Jeffrey Pugh (jeffrey.pugh@umb.edu).


Friday, January 13, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

Bulletin Board CONTINUED FROM PAGE A2 dancing on pointe. Leg warmers, extra shorts, jewelry, and skirts are not permitted in the audition class. Boys should wear black shorts or tights and a white T-shirt or leotard. White shoes and socks are preferred. Please pick up your applications as soon as possible. Be prepared and arrive early. Jan. 14-Feb. 10 (by appointment) are audition dates for the Dance Theatre Northwest Regional Performing Company members and guest artists (teens/ adults ages 16-35). The audition requires advanced completion of a performing company member application and consists of participation in an intermediateadvanced-level ballet class. After the class a prepared variation or solo is required. All dancers should have a strong double pirouette and be able to perform adagio combinations at or above the 90 degree level as well as petite and grande allegro combinations. Girls are asked to wear pink tights, black leotards and pointe shoes, and to arrive ready to do a Pointe barre and center with their hair secured up; they should also bring soft ballet and/or jazz shoes. Leg warmers, extra shorts, jewelry, and skirts are not permitted in the audition class. Boys should wear black tights and a white leotard or T-shirt. White shoes and socks are preferred. Active professional company members, not including apprentice members, who are available to perform and are in compliance with company contracts will be provided with a modest artists fee/ stipend and other company benefits. All dancers should have previous performing experience. There may be some exceptions to the age rule if dancers are strong enough and attend daily classes. Call (253) 778-6534 for an application and audition appointment or send DVD audition and resume to: DTNW, 2811 Bridgeport Way W. #24, University Place/ Tacoma, WA 98466. Scholarship information is available Jan. 14-31 for dancers ages 12-21 with five or more years classical ballet training. Also for boys age 11 and up who want to train in the intensive program. Please call (253) 565-5149 for an application and an audition appointment.

‘NEW YORKER’ CARTOONIST TO SPEAK AT UPS The New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast is bringing to Tacoma her love of the absurd, her passion for pictures and words, and her precise sense of the fine line between humor and gravitas. The acclaimed humorist and author will appear at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9, in Schneebeck Concert Hall at University of Puget Sound. “An Evening With Roz Chast,” including a post-lecture Q&A with the audience, is presented by the Susan Resneck Pierce Lectures in Public Affairs and the Arts. Ticket information is below and early reservations are recommended. The Brooklyn-born Chast has published hundreds of cartoons in The New Yorker, Scientific American, Harvard Business Review, and other magazines and has written or illustrated more than a dozen books. Described by Salon as “the first truly subversive New Yorker cartoonist,” and by New Yorker editor David Remnick as “the magazine’s only certifiable genius,” Chast creates cartoons that often reveal the ludicrous in simple domestic scenes or poke fun at the unspoken obsessions that take hold of us all. NPR’s Fresh Air host Terry Gross once asked Chast what her down-to-earth parents – a schoolteacher and a vice principal who grew up during the Depression – thought about her rather esoteric cartoons. In response Chast related how her father used to carry around a Saturday Review cartoon in his wallet showing a man on a psychiatrist’s couch saying, “I feel inadequate, because I don’t understand the cartoons in The New Yorker.” It is a gag that many of the magazine’s readers can relate to. Chast, the cartoonist, makes fun in ways that at times seem to shoot into outer space, turn around, and zap back again – sometimes hitting the mark and evoking a wry smile, at other times crashing to earth. However Chast, the person, is upfront and real. She earnestly explained to Terry Gross that her father’s habit of pulling out his mocking cartoon was simply a sign that he was proud of her – even if he had no idea what she was trying to say. An only child, Chast started drawing cartoons while still young. She later studied at Rhode Island School of Design, majoring in painting “because it seemed more artistic,” she says on her website. But soon after graduating she switched back to cartoons and had her first cartoon accepted by The New Yorker at the age of 24. Many submissions later she was invited to join the staff. Chast’s books have included “Unscientific Americans,” “Parallel Universes,” “Mondo Boxo” and “Theories of Every-

thing: Selected, Collected, and HealthInspected Cartoons by Roz Chast 1978– 2006.” Her most recent best-selling book is “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?,” a searing memoir about her efforts to cope alone with her elderly parents in the final years of their lives. The honors granted to the popular cartoonist are many and include the 2015 Heinz Award in the Arts and Humanities, 2014 National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography, Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction, New York City Literary Honors Award for Humor, and the National Cartoonists Society’s Reuben Award for Best Gag Cartoon, among others. Chast holds honorary doctoral degrees from Dartmouth College, Leslie University, and Pratt Institute, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The lecture by Chast is sponsored by the Susan Resneck Pierce Lectures in Public Affairs and the Arts, University of Puget Sound’s premier lecture series. The series brings intellectuals, public figures, writers, and artists to the university to present challenging ideas that stimulate further exploration and discussion on campus. Past Pierce lecturers have included The Washington Post political writer E.J. Dionne; Pulitzer Prize-winning author Junot Díaz; Nobel Prize laureate Wole Soyinka; economist Robert Reich; author Carlos Fuentes; psychiatrist Kay Redfield Jamison; filmmaker Spike Lee; the Hon. Cory Booker, now a U.S. senator; political commentator David Brooks; columnist Thomas Friedman; writer Leonard Pitts, Jr., playwright Edward Albee; race and religion scholar Cornel West; musician Philip Glass; playwright Suzan-Lori Parks; dancer and choreographer Twyla Tharp; historian and television host Henry Louis Gates Jr.; Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat; former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder; and novelist Marlon James.

WORKSOURCE OPENS NEW HUB FOR JOB SEEKERS While Pierce County’s unemployment rate improved 0.9 percent over the course of 2016, its economic recovery still lags behind the rest of the state and falls short when compared with other Puget Sound communities. From a January high of 6.7 percent to a November low of 5.8 percent, many workers remain unemployed, underemployed or disconnected from the economy altogether. The new and improved WorkSource Pierce Job Center is a hub where job seekers can access tools, assistance and support throughout their search. With a committed team of experts on hand, job seekers benefit by learning about training programs, high-demand positions and opportunities uniquely suited to each skillset. Job seekers, employers and community members alike are invited to drop by the Job Center and enjoy light snacks and beverages while touring the facility, meeting experts and learning about hiring opportunities. The event will take place Thursday, Jan. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the worksource Pierce Job Center at 3650 S. Cedar St. APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR POET LAUREATE The Tacoma Arts Commission is now accepting applications for the seventh annual Tacoma Poet Laureate program. The application deadline is 11:59 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27. The individual selected as Tacoma Poet Laureate will hold the title for two years – from May 2017 to April 2019 – and receive a $4,000 stipend for advancing and actively contributing to Tacoma’s literary community in meaningful ways through readings, performances, workshops, presentations, publications and/or special projects. This individual will also participate in Tacoma Arts Month each October and help produce the 2019 Tacoma Poet Laureate ceremony announcing the next Tacoma Poet Laureate. “The Poet Laureate program provides an incredible opportunity for a unique Tacoma poet to engage the entire city as an ambassador for this important and dynamic art form,” said Tacoma Arts Commission Chair Mike Sweney. “We are excited for the next Poet Laureate to share their talents and passion with all audiences.” Eligibility extends to literary artists who live in Pierce County and are actively engaged in Tacoma’s creative community. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and practicing artists, dedicated to producing poetry in any form, genre or style on a regular basis. Other eligibility requirements apply. Current poet laureate Cathy Nguyen and the Tacoma Arts Commission and will host a poetry event at which the winner of this year’s Poet Laureate competition will officially be awarded the title. The free, public event will be held Saturday, April 29, location to be announced. The application and information about the Tacoma Poet Laureate program, which was founded in 2008 by Urban Grace Church and transitioned to the City of Tacoma’s Arts Program in 2011, are available at cityoftacoma.org/poet.


Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 13, 2017

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT Supporting the Economic Growth of Our Community

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

Federal, regional, state and local leaders gathered with the Puyallup Tribal Council to officially cut the ribbon on the Tribe’s new state-of-the-art Salish Cancer Center (SCC) in the spring of 2015. Joining in on the event were (back row from left): former Fife Mayor Tim Curtis; former Congressman Norm Dicks and Puyallup Tribal Council Vice-Chairman Larry LaPointe; (front row from left) Puyallup Tribal Council Members Marguerite Edwards and Sylvia Miller; Puyallup Vice-Chairwoman Roleen Hargrove; Senator Maria Cantwell; Puyallup Chairman Bill Sterud; Gov. Jay Inslee; Lieutenant Governor Brad Owen; Congressman Denny Heck; and Puyallup Tribal Council Members David Bean and Tim Reynon.

The most urban of Native American tribes, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians continues to be a critical component of the South Sound economy. As Pierce County’s sixth largest employer, a donor to a broad range of charitable organizations, and a major funder of housing, roads, education and environmental projects, the Puyallup Tribe stands as a model for taking care of not only its

own membership, but sharing its wealth among the broader community as well. The Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County. With a payroll of more than 3,100 people that work in the Tribe’s businesses, government, economic development corporation, school, and health and housing authorities – approximately 70 percent of whom are non-Native –

employees enjoy competitive wages and benefits. In 2015 the Tribe spent over $491 million. This spending supports communities by providing good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and through purchases of goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors, construction companies and more.

From sponsoring local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer or cease to exist, to protecting the environment, funding crime prevention, city improvement projects and healthcare, the Tribe maintains its commitment to honoring its destiny as “the generous people,” the meaning of the Tribe’s very name “Puyallup.”

PARTNERING TO ENHANCE LOCAL TRANSPORTATION Partnering with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation over the past seven years, the Tribe has spent more than $40 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the region’s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting and safety improvements to bridges and reconstruction projects, providing hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like. Examples of the Tribe’s expenditures over the past seven years to completed and ongoing projects include: 30TH STREET SAFETY PROJECT, TACOMA Paving, lighting, ADA access, replacement of sidewalks on both sides of 30th Avenue from Portland Avenue to R Street, and one side of 31st Avenue, including relocation

of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed spring of 2013. 31ST STREET REHABILITATION PROJECT, TACOMA 31st Street was a failed road that has received repavement, curb and stormwater facilities, street trees, and relocation of public utilities. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. The project was completed in summer 2015. EAST ROOSEVELT/EAST WRIGHT STREET IMPROVEMENTS & MAINTENANCE WORK The Tribe committed $15,000 to replace a failing section of Roosevelt that was important for access to the Tribal Health Clinic. A new asphalt overlay was applied, alongside curb improvements and alleyway paving. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & COLLABORATION WITH STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS I-5 HOV Project, Tacoma and Fife: Tribal staff has

worked with WSDOT regarding HOV improvements on I-5. East Side Community Projects: Tribal staff is working with the City of Tacoma with respect to long-range transportation planning involving several city streets. Additional Transportation Planning and Administration: Tribal staff works in collaboration with a number of federal, state and local government agencies to plan and administer transportation projects in the region. Inspection Services: The Puyallup Tribe pays for City of Tacoma inspectors for road project oversight; fees to exceed $100,000. Port of Tacoma Emergency Response ITS Study: The Puyallup Tribe has committed $75,000 to partner with the City of Tacoma, Port of Tacoma, and local port businesses to study emergency vehicle response in the Port of Tacoma tide flats area to address safety concerns and increase local police & fire response.

TRIBE, WSDOT PARTNER TO IMPROVE TRANSPORTATION AND SAFETY In keeping with their mutual agreement reached in 2014, the Puyallup Tribe and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) continue to partner on WSDOT’s HOV construction project on Interstate 5 on the Puyallup Indian Reservation. The agreement provides that work will be conducted in a manner respectful of the Tribe’s lands and treaty rights. For example, in late 2015 WSDOT crews focused on several excavation activities with the Tribe’s archaeological monitors present during the work. The agreement further conveys several parcels of land to the Tribe to offset the lost use of lands on which the Tribe has given WSDOT easements for the project. A right of first refusal gives the Tribe an opportunity to purchase additional lands. The agreement deals particularly with replacement of Interstate 5 bridges across the Puyallup River, as the bridges are more than 50 years old and would not withstand the impact of a serious earthquake. The new bridges will provide a much greater degree of safety in such an event, and the HOV lanes will improve transportation significantly in the area. In addition to providing room for one HOV lane on this portion of I-5, as part of this project WSDOT will also rebuild the northbound I-5 Puyallup River Bridge to make it straighter and wider than the existing bridge; improve the I-5/Portland Avenue interchange; and repave all the lanes of northbound I-5 within the project limits. Construction of the first bridge shafts for the new northbound I-5 bridge over the river has started near State Route 167, and work on the new ramp bridge from northbound I-5 to SR 167 is also progressing. Part of the agreement is to protect the fishery habitat and resource and to preserve Tribal members’ opportunity

to fish, a right guaranteed by the Treaty of Medicine Creek. To accomplish those goals, WSDOT has focused its work in the Puyallup River at times other than fishing season and fish migration periods. The work will use construction methods that minimize impact on the resource. With the project to rebuild the bridge will come in-water work in the Puyallup River that WSDOT is keeing tribal fishermen informed of. This work includes monitoring equipment for water quality to be placed in the water to meet water quality standards for the river established by the Tribe and by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The placement of floating booms will outline an 80-foot channel for boats and behind the booms temporary work platforms will be constructed on both sides of the river. Isolation casings for the in-water bridge piers will also be installed. STATE ROUTE 167 In 2015, Gov. Jay Inslee formally signed a transportation package that will flow $16.2 billion toward roads and transportation routes around the state for the next 16 years. On the roster of projects slated for those dollars is the final leg of State Route 167 that would provide a roadway between the distribution and warehouse hubs of Kent and Auburn to Port of Tacoma waters. The Tribe is working with the state and other partners to ensure that the project remains a top priority and again remains respectful of the Tribe’s lands and treaty rights. The funding package includes $1.85 billion to continue the SR 167 roadway, which currently ends just short of the waterway. The roadway had been first pondered back in the 1970s. Construction started in the 1980s only to stall ever since. It was called a “top priority” for lawmakers for the last generation only to go unfunded year after year

A computer-enhanced image of what I-5 will look like after the new northbound bridge is complete. Note that both northbound and southbound I-5 traffic will temporarily be shifted onto the new northbound bridge while crews demolish and rebuild the southbound bridge.

for the last 25 years. The Tribe, Port officials, business groups and transportation boosters have lobbied for the roadway as a way for the state to be competitive for international shipping traffic, which could avoid transportation delays found through the Puget Sound by routing cargo through Canadian ports and eventually route larger ships through the Panama Canal. Washington is the most tradedependent state in the nation, with 40 percent of jobs related to international trade. Pierce County is the most trade-dependent county in the state, so any threat to that industry raises alarms for businesses and lawmakers alike. The project will receive $2.5 million between now and 2017 and then ramp up to a peak of $395 million between 2021 and 2023 during the main construction period with a final $200 million between 2029 and 2031 to finalize the work. Washington State Department of Transportation estimates a completed SR 167 could fuel job growth to the tune of $10.1 billion.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


Friday, January 13, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

t Manke

From page A1

tan institution that had touched many lives over the years.� That was in 1987, and Manke and a partner, Suzanne Simchuk, took a chance on an aging building in complete disarray. “The windows were all painted over, the inside was a mess,� Manke recalled. “We did a lot of what needed to be done ourselves.� Over the decades, The Spar had been a pub, a billiards parlor, a men's store and a soft drink bar. Prohibition took its toll until its repeal in 1933, when The Spar began selling alcohol again. “When we finally got reopened in 1988, we sold beer – no hard liquor – and food,� Manke said. “For awhile, we were the only pub in town, and we had lines out the door. We had a bouncer, until someone cold-

t Council

cocked him.� Careful attention was paid to the history of the place. Billiards tables were reinstalled and an antique bar set off the back room. Wonderful old photos of the district – some of them a hundred years old – prominently decorate one front-room wall. Among the photos is one with Manke's great-grandfather, Richard Uhlman, included. When other taverns opened in Tacoma, like The Swiss, business changed. “We started having music about 20 years ago, Sunday Night Blues,� Manke said. “Every other week, in the beginning, we'd have an Irish band play. We still have blues each Sunday night.� Manke knew before buying the place what kind of diligence it took to run it. “I worked 80 hours a week when we opened, and bought a small house a few blocks away,� Manke said. “After years, I cut it down to about 60 hours a week.

From page A1

McCarthy, saying that he expected that there would have been some discussion by the council about what process it would follow to make the appointment rather than simply receiving email about how the vacancy would be filled. "That did raise some concern," Blocker said. "It just didn't sit right." Strickland defended the process by saying that the city charter doesn't outline a formal process to fill a vacancy. This selection process is the fifth time that the City Council has filled vacancies since 2010. "I am perfectly comfortable with this," she said.

“You own a place like this, this is your life, your family. I've got about 30 employees and love them all.� About 15 years ago, Manke sensed that families wanted to eat at The Spar. It created a business-model dilemma. “We didn't want to change the pub feel, or make any of our regular customers feel uncomfortable,� Manke said. “We opened just the front end to families, and it didn't change the feel – in fact, our regulars seemed to like it.� The Spar and its regulars are a responsibility Manke loves. “I absolutely feel we preserved history here, brought it back to life,� she said. “We have had people meet here and get married. We've hosted wedding receptions. We've had a lot of college students and produced two doctors, a lot of teachers, at least one lawyer. We've had judges who regularly stopped in for lunch. We have one group

The council appointed David Boe and Ryan Mello in 2010 to serve the one year remaining on the at-large terms vacated by Marilyn Strickland, who shuffled seats when she was elected mayor and when Julie Anderson left the council after being elected Pierce County Auditor. That process took about a month and involved 44 candidates. Boe and Mello then won reelection in 2011. Boe left in 2015, while Mello won reelection to another four-year term. Tacoma City Council members selected Robert Thoms from a field of seven applicants to serve the North End district position in 2013, when Jake Fey resigned following his election to the State House of Representatives. Thoms then won the District 2 seat in 2013 and has

that's come for dinner each Friday since I've been here.� The Spar's customers and employees have become a second family, but Manke has an original clan of her own that keeps growing: three children, seven grandchildren, eight great-grand children. As The Spar celebrates its 30th year under Manke's ownership – and its 100th year in existence – ideas for the pub are brewing. “We're planning a big Valentine’s Day dinner for people who met here, got together here,� Manke said. “We've had former employees meet here and marry.� As for Manke, she's not sure how long she'll stay on as owner. “I really am not certain, but I know this: I want The Spar to stay in the family,� Manke said. She has the feeling that Great-Grandpa Uhlman would like that, too.

a reelection campaign to retain the post when the term ends later this year. Tacoma City Council member Anders Ibsen was briefly replaced by Joe Lopez in 2014, when Ibsen left for Marine Corps Reserve officer training. That selection process took about a month and drew a field of 15 applicants. Ibsen returned three weeks later, citing medical reasons. The City Council is responsible for enacting all legislation, developing policies and making decisions for governing the City of Tacoma. City Council duties include adopting and amending city laws, approving the budget, establishing city policies and standards, approving contracts and agreements, and representing the city. The parttime council position pays an annual salary of $46,013.92.

Candidates who applied for the council appointment:

From page A1

from the closest Northeast Tacoma home,� Citizens for a Healthy Bay stated in an alert about the project. “Despite this sensitive location, the City of Tacoma is expected to issue a ‘Mitigated Determination of Non-significance,’ meaning that the project will not need to undergo a full environmental SEPA (State Environmental Policy Act) review. Proceeding without a full SEPA review means two things. First, we will not have enough scientific information to know if the project is safe for the health of our environment and community. It’s difficult to know exactly what hazards the mine might create without the review, but potential air quality, noise and traffic impacts alone from mining and heavy truck usage are enough to warrant a full review. Illegal landfills have also been found on neighboring sites, making possible chemical contamination from an undocumented on-site dump another major concern. Second, the public will have far fewer opportunities to influence the city's decision. If the city grants the Conditional Use Permit, the company will be able to apply for a mining permit with the state.� The city is conducting a SEPA review and has conducted all of its checklist except for a noise analysis, project manager Shirley Schultz stated. “The city has made a preliminary determination that an Environmental Impact Statement is not necessary; the project as presented can be mitigated through either conditions placed on the project (through SEPA or the conditional use permit) or through compliance with adopted regulations and policies. That is not the same as exempting something SEPA reviews; it’s a different path to environmental analysis. However, the determination is preliminary, and public /agency comment can provide additional information about whether an EIS is warranted, and, if so, what the scope of that EIS would be.� The city will accept public comments until Jan. 27, after which planners will issue a final decision on the project. Information about the project is available at healthybay. org. Permit details are available at tacomapermits.org.

23. Christopher A. Gruber 24. Eric Hahn 25. William (Bill) Hanawalt 26. Shalisa Hayes 27. Lillian Hunter 28. Angela Jossy 29. Lisa Keating 30. John Larson 31. Jason LeMaitre 32. Mario Lorenz 33. Maria Crestina Marez

t Goodwill

From page A1

Washington State Department of Ecology’s August 2015 Hazardous Sites List, identifies 141 sites in the City of Tacoma either pending or in the process of cleanup while 54 more are situated across the rest of Pierce County. Even though Tacoma has only 25 percent of the population of Pierce County, it has 72 percent of the hazardous sites – more than 2.5 times the rest of the county. The need for environmental cleanup in Pierce and surrounding counties will offer businesses like TCB project opportunities requiring a labor and management force of Hazmat certified employees through 2026. Goodwill uses its network of education campuses and case managers to recruit, career counsel and help students with job placement. Clover Park Technical College performs the training, the City of Tacoma manages the partnership and provides overall grant administration, and the EPA provides grant resources and funding. Private businesses like TCB Industrial

orner

Ph. 253-759-5354 Fax: 253-756-7429

office@cooperscc.com      

       

Check us out at 2502 6th Avenue, Tacoma, WA 98406

1901 Center St., Tacoma • 253-363-8280     • Lic# tristi*931qh www.tristate.pro

  

Mon-Fri. 11am-7pm Sat. 10am-6pm Sun. 12pm-5pm

HAIR ZONE

& Nail Spa

Intuitive Readings available daily

Brazilian Blow Out

30% OFF Mani or Pedi! Bring this ad in for $10 OFF any hair service Offer expires 1/31/17

253.564.9347 www.hairzoneup.com

1905 Bridgeport Way Ste #104 University Place, WA 98466

Corcoran’s Lock & Safe LLC 2ESIDENTIALs#OMMERCIALs!UTO "ONDEDs,ICENSED

253-756-5000 Emergency Service

3102 Ruston Way Tacoma, WA 98403 253.752.5299

ollision

Domestic & Foreign Auto Body Repair Hybrid & Commercial Work Welcomed Historic Proctor Business District

2709 North Adams Tacoma, WA 98407

Sunday 11:00am - 5:00pm

Now Located inside Miki Spa Salon 3102 Ruston Way, Ste B, Tacoma 98402 PH: 253-460-5935

CCooper’s C

     

Monday Closed

Dr. Cheryl Yokoyama Rachel Gravatt – Master Esthetician Injectables & Laser Therapies www.aestheticalchemy.net

45. Jacki Skaught 46. James Smith 47. Valentine Smith 48. Kathryn Sposato 49. Marcell Upchurch 50. Justin Van Dyk 51. Heber O. (Chip) Van Gilder III 52. Lauren Walker 53. Adam Ydstie 54. Joseph Zawacki 55. John Zelazny

recruit students into their ranks based upon their specific interest areas. Each of these training opportunities is highly valued and includes approximately $1,500 in certifications in HAZWOPER, Underground Storage Tank, OSHA 10 Construction Safety, Confined Space Entry, Forklift, and Asbestos. The six-week training will be offered in 2017 and 2018 at Clover Park Technical College – the first, starting Feb. 3, has just been filled while the second six-week training will be scheduled for this summer or fall. An important career information session for the summer or fall session will be offered Feb. 15 (1 p.m.) at Goodwill’s main Tacoma campus, the Milgard Work Opportunity Center, 714 S. 27th St., Tacoma 98409. For more information visit www.goodwillwa.org.

    

Tuesday - Saturday 9:00am - 6:00pm

Miki Spa Salon is proud to announce

34. John Erling Mork 35. Sarah Morken 36. Korbett Mosesly 37. Meredith Neal 38. Theresa Power-Drutis 39. Sam Ranslem 40. Rich Rhodes 41. Laura Rodriguez 42. Robin Schildmeyer 43. Jamika Scott 44. John Shepherd

Bob Corcoran, C.R.L. Fax: 253-756-0694

2519 N. Stevens Tacoma, WA 98407

www.crescentmoongifts.com

Short Term Got Love?

Foster Parents Parents

Needed in your community today Needed in your community today

Dedicated adults OPEN HOUSE Wednesdays 4:30-6:30 1315 S. 72nd Street Tacoma across from Wapato Park Monthly reimbursement of $1,500 Minimum requirements include: Must be 25 or older, pass a background check, and have a spare bedroom.

For more information contact 253.348.0684 or email amyso@ccsww.org

1384019V01

t Mining

12. Arthur DeLong 13. Olgy Diaz 14. Tara Doyle-Enneking 15. George Edman 16. Michael Faltus 17. John Gaines 18. Douglas Galuszka 19. Anthony Ginn 20. Debra Goodrich 21. Kevin Grossman 22. Jason Grube

A CHILD NEEDS YOU TODAY!

1. Katie Baird 2. Joan Bichsel 3. Adam Boyd 4. Kristopher Brannon 5. Vicky Buford 6. Kit Burns 7. Ken Campbell 8. Timothy Chadd 9. Janis Clark 10. Philip Cowan 11. Marsha Cunningham


SI DE TH E

Sports

LIN E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2017

FALCONS IN OVERDRIVE FOSS AWAITS MLK SHOWDOWN WITH LINCOLN

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 10

PHOTOS BY KAYLA MEHRING

STARSHIP. (top) Even the Tacoma

Stars themselves couldn't believe how fast they scored their first goal. After Raphael Cox stole the opening Baja kickoff, he quickly pushed the ball forward and then dished it off to his left as Dan Antoniuk planted a foot on the ball and drove it into the back of the net. Just seven seconds had evaporated off the clock. (middle) Vincent McCluskey celebrates his own goal just 28 seconds later. (bottom) While he didn't find the back of the net, Mike Ramos just missed on some dazzling efforts.

STARS DROP SIX ON BAJA AND CRUISE By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

By Justin Gimse

T

jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

acoma high schools are now represented in five of Washington’s six classifications. When Tacoma’s big schools were spread between the 3A and 4A levels it was difficult to find a consensus pick for the best boys basketball team in the city. Now that Henry Foss High School has moved to the 2A level, and there are no longer the regular home and away showdowns between the Falcons and the usual top-level suspects like Lincoln and Wilson, figuring out who is at the top of the City of Destiny is proving to be even more difficult. Many folks around the state consider the Falcons to be the top contender for the state 2A basketball championship. Years of challenging for the 3A Narrows title against Lincoln and Wilson made Foss a regular in the 3A state rankings and rightfully got their name and reputation out there. While they narrowly missed out on a ticket to the Hardwood Classic at the Tacoma Dome for several years, they have been considered a program to be reckoned with by whomever they might face. This season, the Falcons are no longer jockeying with their crosstown rivals for a trip to the Tacoma Dome. Instead, Foss is now hammering teams in the 2A South Puget Sound League like nobody’s business. While there are no “sure things” in basketball and upsets happen all of the time, one has to stretch their imagination a little bit to picture a 12-team 2A state tournament field at Yakima’s Sun Dome without the Foss Falcons smack dab in the middle of the picture. But before we continue to roll that way, let’s get back to the conversation about who may be the best team in the city. Foss will not be matching up against Bellarmine or Wilson this season in non-league affairs. There will be just one game during the regular season that could cast some light on who will end up with city bragging rights this season and the contest is nearly upon us. When Foss hosts the undefeated Lincoln Abes at the Tacoma MLK Invitational on Monday, Jan. 16, it will be a meeting between the leaders of the 2A SPSL and the 3A Pierce County League. Both teams have been impressive on the court going into the 3:30 p.m. contest. Lincoln has already defeated Bellarmine 66-50 in a non-league contest to open the season, while also taking the first of their two games against rival Wilson by a score of 86-68. The Abes are a legitimate top-five team at the 3A level and many folks around town are beginning to believe they will be watching them play in the Tacoma Dome again this season. Playing in the 2A SPSL has been a big plus for Foss this season. While they’ve made a clean sweep of their league

u See BASKETBALL / page A13

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

MERCURIAL. Not only do the Foss Falcons have some quality height to throw at their opponents, but they also have a slew of dangerous, ball-hawking guards that span their lineup. Seattle may very well have the Puget Sound's "big men" but if you're looking for dynamite guards, you need to come down to Tacoma. (top) Foss senior guard Trey Tyson dives for it. (left) That's quite a few hands on a rebound. (second-right) Junior Demetrius Crosby has turned into a game changer. (third-right) Senior Donald Scott sweeps the glass. (bottom) Senior Rakim Nelson goes up for two.

Just when you thought you knew how a Tacoma Stars home match was going to go down, they go and try something new. Instead of spotting the visiting team a few points and clawing their way back to close out a tight, heart-stopping victory, the Stars decided to flip the script on Saturday, Jan. 7 at the ShoWare Center in Kent. From the sound of the opening whistle, the Stars jumped all over Atletico Baja and built themselves a sizeable lead, only to have the visitors try and claw themselves back into match in the end. However, there wouldn’t be enough time for Baja as Tacoma cruised to a 6-4 victory, pushing its Major Arena Soccer League record to 7-3 on the season. Had there been another 10 minutes or so, it’s quite possible that Baja could have tied the match up, but we’re not dealing in fantasy land here. The game is only 60 minutes long, and if you can’t take care of business inside that timeframe, tough luck and so long. Tacoma wasted no time getting its first goal on the scoreboard. With many fans still making their way to their seats, Tacoma’s Raphael Cox bolted down the field, skipped a pass to Dan Antoniuk, and the team’s leading scorer did the rest, pounding the ball into the back of the net. When the shocked crowd looked up at the scoreboard, a mere seven seconds had evaporated off of the clock. While folks were amazed at the speed in which Tacoma scored, there would be no time to discuss what had just happened as the Stars would strike again. It would take just 28 seconds for former UPS Logger Vincent McCluskey to snatch a loose ball and turn toward the goal. When he looked up, McCluskey had no one between himself and the net except Baja goalkeeper Mario Escobar. McCluskey wasted little time, advanced the ball just a hair and sent a blast past Escobar and the Stars were ahead 2-0 with just 35 seconds elapsed off the clock. The ShoWare Crowd was both in a state of disbelief and in an absolute frenzy.

u See SOCCER / page A13


Friday, January 13, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

SPORTSWATCH

Back by popular demand, your Tacoma Community College women's basketball team is hosting its second free youth basketball clinic, this time in the newly remodeled TCC gym. Girls and boys in the 2nd through 6th grades are encouraged to attend our clinic on Martin Luther King Day, Monday, Jan. 16. The clinic will cover offensive and defensive fundamentals with registration beginning at 10:30 a.m. and the clinic running from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The first 30 registrants will receive a free t-shirt. However, space is limited, so early registration is highly recommended. Invite your friends, teammates, and family to attend our special day full of basketball, fun, and reflection. Please contact DHaley@tacomacc.edu for more info.

Conference men's player to be honored this season in the fifth installment of the weekly award that includes nominees from all 416 NCAA Division III institutions. The business major, who also earned Northwest Conference Player of the Week accolades, tallied a career-best 31 points on Friday, Jan. 6, helping PLU (7-6, 2-2 NWC) tear through George Fox University 92-75 before closing the home stand inside Olson Gymnasium with a 14-point, 16-rebound effort against Willamette University the following evening in the Lutes' 81-70 win. Pacific Lutheran returns to the hardwood on Friday, Jan. 13, traveling to Walla Walla to face second-ranked Whitman College, followed by a trip to Spokane to face Whitworth the following evening. The Lutes will return to Tacoma on Tuesday, Jan. 17 as they pay a visit to their crosstown rival University of Puget Sound Loggers. Tipoff is set for 8 p.m. with the women’s matchup starting at 6 p.m.

NATIONALLY RANKED UPS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CONTINUES TO IMPRESS

PLU FOOTBALL RANKED AMONG THE NATIONS BEST IN NCAA D-III

TCC WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TO HOST FREE MLK HOOPS CLINIC

The Puget Sound women's basketball team dominated the glass in route to an 85-58 victory over Lewis & Clark in the UPS Memorial Fieldhouse on Saturday, Jan. 7. The Loggers are ranked 18th in the D3Hoops.com poll and 19th in the WBCA coaches’ poll. The Loggers (12-0, 4-1 NWC) outrebounded the Pioneers (9-4, 2-2 NWC), 51-25. Claire Fitzgerald nearly posted a double-double by finishing with 11 points and nine rebounds. Jamie Lange added seven boards and 15 points off the bench. Elizabeth Prewitt and Caitlin Malvar scored 11 points apiece. Malvar added seven assists in the win, and the freshman has at least seven dimes in each of her last four games. Freshman Mara Henderson scored in double figures for the first time in her collegiate career, netting 10 points in 14 minutes off the bench. Puget Sound shot over 50 percent from floor (53.2 percent) for the second consecutive game. The Loggers shot 53.7 percent in Friday's win over Willamette. The Loggers dominated the opening quarter, 22-10. The Pioneers kept pace in the second quarter, as Puget Sound entered the half with a 43-33 edge. Puget Sound has a tall task next weekend, when it travels to the "Whits." The Loggers tipoff at Whitworth on Friday, Jan. 13, at 6 p.m., and then take on Whitman on Saturday, Jan. 14.

PLU’S CHRISTY EARNS WEEKLY NATIONAL BASKETBALL HONOR

Pacific Lutheran University men's basketball student-athlete Jared Christy's stellar performance over the weekend continues to turn heads, earning a spot on the D3Hoops.com Team of the Week. Christy was one of five men's players to be recognized from around the nation after averaging 22.5 points per game, 14.5 rebounds per game, and 5.5 assists per game in a pair of Lute victories. Christy is the first Northwest

The Pacific Lutheran University football team finished the 2016 season ranked among the nation's best in NCAA Division III in several statistical categories. Safety and All-Northwest Conference selection Travis McMillion came out of the season with impressive numbers, posting an average of 6.8 solo tackles per game. This earned him a ranking of 12th nationally. “I'm very honored to be acknowledged, but the best part is that my teammates treat me the same no matter what,” said McMillion. The PLU offense ranked 24th in 3rd Down Conversion Percentage at 46.3 percent and 19th in Red Zone Offense (87.1 percent efficiency). The Lutes' special teams had an especially successful season, ranking among the nation's best in multiple stat categories. Most notably was the PLU punt return defense which finished the season ranked fourth nationally, allowing just 1.18 yards per return. PLU additionally ranks 34th in net punting (35.4), while All-NWC honoree Dallan Rodriguez ranks 29th in field goals per game (1.0), and 25th in field goal percentage (75.0). The Lutes have been known for their unique team chemistry and united attitude. This cohesion on the field has led to several team successes, including a ranking 12th nationally for time of possession (33:45), 13th in fewest fumbles lost (four), and 17th for fewest turnovers (12). PLU additionally didn't allow a blocked punt all season and ranks 11th in fewest blocked field goals allowed with just one all year. The NCAA Division III statistical rankings include 244 total teams. “We play selfless and free and live by the slogan: 'It's amazing what we can accomplish, when no one cares who gets the credit.' “ The Lutes wrapped up 2016 with a 5-4 record and a 4-3 mark in Northwest Conference play. It was PLU's sixth winning season in the last seven years. – By Sarah Cornell-Maier, PLU Sports.

TACOMA’S HOT TICKETS JAN. 12 – JAN. 16 THURSDAY, JAN 12 – BASKETBALL Boys – Graham-K vs. Bellarmine Bellarmine Prep – 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, JAN. 12 – BASKETBALL Girls – Rogers vs. Curtis Curtis HS – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 – BASKETBALL Boys – Mt. Tahoma vs. Lincoln Lincoln HS – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 – BASKETBALL Girls – Fife vs. Foss Henry Foss HS – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 – BASKETBALL Girls – Lincoln vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma HS – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 – BASKETBALL Boys – Foss vs. Fife Fife HS – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, JAN. 13 – MASL SOCCER Cedar Rapids vs. Tacoma Stars ShoWare Center, Kent – 7:35 p.m.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14 – BASKETBALL Girls – Bellarmine vs. Wilson Wilson HS – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, JAN. 14 – BASKETBALL Girls – Puyallup vs. Curtis Curtis HS – 7 p.m.

MONDAY, JAN. 16 – BASKETBALL Boys – Timberline vs. Wilson Henry Foss HS – 2 p.m.

MONDAY, JAN. 16 – BASKETBALL Girls – Lincoln vs. Foss Henry Foss HS – 3:30 p.m.

MONDAY, JAN. 16 – BASKETBALL Girls – West Seattle vs. Wilson Lincoln HS – 3:30 p.m.


Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 13, 2017

CURTIS GIRLS UPSET DRIVE FALLS SHORT AGAINST BELLARMINE

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

ENERGY. (left) Curtis junior Jalaiya Frederick is shadowed by Bellarmine sophomore Reyell Frazier. The two guards are among the best in the business in the

area and they're always a threat to steal the ball and score points from all over the court. (middle) Viking senior Hailey Marsh tries to find some room between a host of defenders. (right) Curtis freshman Kayrena Taylor is already proving to be a strong performer for the Vikings. Taylor would leave the Bellarmine game midway through the fourth quarter after taking a whack to the nose. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

Whenever Curtis and Bellarmine Prep meet up in the gymnasium or on the field of play, there’s a pretty good chance that the contest is going to go down to the wire. With a scant four miles separating the two schools, the players always seem to get up for the contests and give it their all. Needless to say, the crowds are also always into it, lending a playoff feel to the game, no matter where it lands in the season’s schedule. Now that the two teams are competing in the same league, it’s beginning to feel like these affairs have been turned up a notch. The Curtis girls’ basketball team paid a visit to Bellarmine on Tuesday, Jan. 10 and while it wasn’t the most well-executed basketball game this season, it certainly fit the bill as a true Curtis versus Bellarmine battle. At times it seemed as though neither team could remember how to get the ball in the basket, and then the floodgates would open up for one of the teams. In the end, it would be Bellarmine sitting a little higher in the water as the 4A South Puget Sound League

leaders fought off a late Curtis surge to take the win by a score of 53-47. A frenzied pace was set following the opening tip-off and it had the feel of a runaway train for both teams. Turnovers began to mount as both defenses swarmed to the ball, forcing turnovers and rushed shots. It was only a matter of time before the two squads remembered that there was still going to be three more quarters of play and that perhaps the exuberance was outpacing the game plans set out by the coaches. At the end of the first quarter, Bellarmine led by a score of 6-2. However, if the amount of energy put out by both teams were added up, the score would have been closer to maybe 30-28. As we know, basketball doesn’t work that way. It was clear though that if the defensive pressure mounted by both teams continued at the first quarter level, there wasn’t going to be a whole lot of scoring going on in this affair. The first team to get their offense on track was Bellarmine, as the Lions took a 16-6 lead a little over two minutes into the period. The double-digit deficit seemed to slap the Vikings awake and Curtis began

chipping away at the Bellarmine lead. With three minutes left in the first half, the score sat at 20-18 Bellarmine. There were probably several fans in the gym who must have been wondering how this had come about, because it seemed as though just a moment before the momentum of the game was going the Lions’ way. Before a clear answer to that question arrived, Curtis junior guard Jalaiya Frederick launched a deep three-point shot from the wing that found the bottom of the net and the Vikings had taken the lead at 21-20 with 1:30 left in the second quarter. A minute later, Curtis freshman Ella Brubaker took a feed from senior Kaelin Williams-Kennedy for open layup and Curtis led 23-20 going into halftime. A quick tabulation at halftime found that the Vikings had forced the Lions into an astounding 18 first-half turnovers. While Curtis’ nine turnovers were nothing to really brag about, the number dialed up by their defense was something very impressive. If this trend continued into the second half, it looked as though Curtis may very well pull off the upset over the league leaders. One thing that was playing to Bellarmine’s disadvantage was a huge one. Twotime Tacoma Weekly All-City selection Shalyse Smith was in street clothes on the Bellarmine bench. The team was obviously missing their center and leader and game plan tweaking was going to be needed at halftime to counter Curtis’ swarming pressure. Smith is still recovering from a concussion and injured neck that she suffered in a recent game against Sumner, when her head collided with her opponent’s. She is expected to return as early as next week. Without the cool hand of their big gun, Bellarmine would turn to a couple of other veterans to get the Bellarmine offense back on track and under control. Juniors Madeline Garcia and Jenny Hagle settled things down for the Lions in the third quarter and the results began to show immediately on the

scoreboard. Halfway into the quarter, Bellarmine had regained the game’s momentum and led 34-27. On the flipside, it felt like someone had put a cover over the Vikings’ basket. Curtis was only able to muster just nine points in the third quarter, even though they had some excellent opportunities. Bellarmine led 45-32 at the end of the period. Going into the fourth quarter, the flow of the game looked as though Bellarmine had all the mojo going for themselves. However, the Vikings still had a surprising amount of their own still left in the gas tank. The fourth quarter was not friendly to the Lions. From the opening whistle to just under a minute left in the game, Bellarmine was able to muster just five points on free throws. Meanwhile, the Vikings were clawing their way back into the game with the sort of ferocity that saw them shock Bellarmine at the end of the first half. With 1:02 left in the game, Hagle hit one of two free throws to give Bellarmine a 50-45 lead. For the second consecutive trip down court, Williams-Kennedy was unable to convert a shot attempt at close range, and Bellarmine got the ball back with time running out. After chewing up a bit of time off the clock, Hagle found Mary Joyce open under the basket and the senior converted the Lions’ only field goal of the quarter, and it would turn out to be the deal breaker. Another Curtis miss on their own end closed out the Vikings’ upset run. Frederick would score a lay-in with two seconds remaining, but it wasn’t going to be enough as Bellarmine took the 53-47 win. A scoring check between the University Place Press and Bellarmine’s shot tracker following the game found that Bellarmine was incorrectly awarded an extra point between the third and fourth quarter. A three-point shot was awarded after the fact on a play that was actually a layup, so in reality the score should have been 52-47.


Friday, January 13, 2017 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

t Basketball

From page A10

opponents so far this season, the overall records of their league foes have hurt them in the WIAA’s early run of RPI rankings. These RPI rankings will be hugely important at season’s end because they will be used to decide the seeding for the 2A state tournament’s 12 teams. As of this issue, the Falcons sit at 39th in the 2A RPI rankings, while many sports outlets around the state consider them to be the number one or two team in the state. Since the final RPI tally will end at the 20-game mark and will not include league playoff and district performances, it’s not a stretch to imagine a situation where Foss ends the season ranked number one by the Associated Press, follows that up with a district championship, and then enters the state tournament seeded closer to 12 than number one. Since the RPI rankings don’t take margin of victory into consideration, the Falcons are not going to get much help

t Soccer

From page A10

Stars’ fans wouldn’t have to wait much longer for the third goal, as former Franklin Pierce star Derek Johnson took a feed from Mike Ramos and slammed a shot past Escobar into the back corner of the goal. Tacoma now led 3-0 with 13:11 still remaining in the first quarter. At this point, Baja was able to finally gather their wits about them and they held the Stars at bay for the next 10 minutes, holding Tacoma scoreless, despite several point-blank opportunities in front of the Baja goal. Finally, with just two and a half minutes left in the first stanza, Joseph “the Jet” Cairel was able to get into the act. Gathering a blast from Tacoma’s Evan McNeley that just missed the top-left of the goal, Cairel leapt into the air, kneed the ball to himself, and without the ball touching the turf, planted a left foot on the ball that just skimmed inside of the goal into the far side of the net. Tacoma led 4-0 going into

from the rest of their league. It’s become clear that the 2A SPSL has two legitimately strong teams, and the Falcons already beat the other one by 20 points in their first meeting. If we were talking about margins of victory, one would be hard-pressed to find a squad to top Foss. When the Falcons topped Franklin Pierce by a score of 96-24 on Tuesday, Jan. 10, it marked the fifth time that Foss has defeated an opponent by 40 points or more. In fact, when Lindbergh flirted with an upset at Foss on Friday, Jan. 6 for three quarters, the 20-point, 80-60 defeat was the closest margin of victory for the Falcons. But of course, we must remember that the Falcons have lost some games this season. To open the season, Foss fell to Timberline by a score of 80-70. This same Timberline squad is tied atop the 3A South Sound Conference with Capital, and is currently ranked sixth in the 3A RPI standings. Foss also lost three of four games at the Max Preps Holiday Classic in Palm Springs against some talented squads from California, Las Vegas and Arizona. The eyeball test says those losses have rekindled a fire

the second quarter. Antoniuk would bring the crowd to its feet yet again early in the second quarter. After a close miss by Cox, Cairel took the rebound and sent in a left footer that missed wide right. Escobar was unable to gather the ball in and Antoniuk wasn’t hanging around watching. He was charging on the ball. Once Antoniuk reached the loose roller, he spun to his left and sent a cannon shot into the far corner of the net. Tacoma now led 5-0 with over 10 minutes remaining in the second quarter. Two minutes later, Baja was unable to

under the Falcons, and ultimately have no bearing on their run at a title shot in Yakima. But there’s still a lot of basketball to be played before the postseason, and it’s possible that the city’s best game may be going down when the Falcons (8-4) meet the Abes (12-0) in a matter of days. It won’t settle the argument of who is the best in town, but it will go a long way toward that end. More importantly, it’s going to a true test for both teams, as these two rosters match up so well side by side. Timberline (8-3) is the only in-state team to top the Falcons, and they will be facing Wilson (10-2) at the MLK Invitational at 2 p.m. Both games look like exceptional matchups and worthy of the big bucket of popcorn for the entire duration. Congratulations are in order for Foss senior Roberto Gittens and Life Christian senior Luke Lovelady. When the McDonald’s All American nominations came out on Tuesday, Jan. 10, the two talented big men were the sole representatives from the city of Tacoma among the all-stars selected out of Washington state.

clear the ball from their end as Troy Peterson stole a kick up the boards and sent it toward the Baja box. Johnson got a foot on a fifty-fifty ball, sending it back toward former Bellarmine Lion star Alex Megson. The veteran wasted no time and sent a onetimer past a leaping Escobar and the scoreboard said the Stars had a 6-0 lead. The first half shutout disappeared 30 seconds later as Baja’s Timothy Liermann sent a screamer past Tacoma goalkeeper Danny Waltman, and Baja was on the board. The score remained 6-1 going into halftime. Baja would score a power play goal

with nine minutes remaining in the third quarter to draw closer at 6-2 Tacoma. After pulling its Escobar for a sixthattacker in the fourth quarter, Baja (5-5) was able to knock to more into the nets, the last coming with just 23 seconds left in the match. Tacoma will host the Cedar Rapids Rampage (8-3) on Friday, Jan. 13 at 7:35 p.m. in the ShoWare Center. It is $2 beer night for those of proper age and that sort of thing doesn’t happen too often in 2017, so it’s worth mentioning. Tickets and more information can be found at tacomastars.com.

Nanny for your pets, caretaker for your home. Serving Old Town, Ruston, West End, Stadium, Proctor, Sixth Avenue, North & Northeast Tacoma

253.661.7488 the-sitters.com • insured & bonded

A sellout, once rare, is now common sight. Fans line up at the gates to fill the ballpark each night. They come for a show and a show they do get. Always bigger and better. Who knows what to expect? They see hits and home runs, but that’s just a small part. Proudly displayed is Tacoma’s big heart. Yes, Cheney Stadium is something to see...

Welcome home to

 

at the ShoWare Center The first 1000 fans will receive a FREE TACOMA STARS BEANIE courtesy of

House It’s a great place to be.

FOR TICKETS CALL 1-844-STARS-TIME OR VISIT TACOMASTARS.COM

For tickets call 1-800-745-3000 or visit tacomarainiers.com


Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, January 13, 2017

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Stop LNG Now!

KEEP TACOMA BEAUTIFUL Once upon a time, Tacoma had an ugly reputation for being a dirty city – even giving off its own smell that became notorious as “the aroma of Tacoma.” Adding to this, tourist traffic was low, crime was high and it seemed that Tacoma didn’t matter because Seattle was just a short drive away. This all changed in recent years, as Tacoma has made a stunning comeback and is now one of the most beautiful and livable cities on the west coast. Tacoma is back on the map and no one wants to return to those dark and dreary days.

PUYALLUP TRIBE: “NO LNG!” The extinction of salmon throughout Puget Sound is upon us.

Among the most ardent Tacoma boosters is the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, which has been a forward thinking and financially generous leader in keeping Tacoma beautiful. The Tribe’s active protection of this area’s pristine waters, the salmon and all natural resources has benefitted the entire region. The Tribe vigorously opposes the prospect of an LNG plant being sited in the metropolitan Tacoma area. Not only would the plant be placed right on the Tribe’s reservation, it would mar Tacoma’s great scenic beauty, put natural resources at risk and endanger the lives of everyone who lives and works here in the event of a catastrophic LNG accident.

A PLANT WITHOUT A CUSTOMER Pristine waterways next to an industrial complex such as LNG could cause an environmental disaster in the Puget Sound from which we may never recover.

Puget Sound Energy is in the final permitting stages of the proposed LNG plant even though at this point PSE lacks any customers for LNG. The proposal started after the private utility company landed a contract with Totem Ocean Trailer Express (TOTE) to provide ships with cleaner-burning LNG rather than diesel, but TOTE has since put those plans on hold, announcing in a news release that the company does not have an exact date for when it will retrofit its ships to use LNG. In other words, PSE wants to build a plant without a customer.

LNG PUTS AREA RESIDENTS IN JEOPARDY Also among its plans, PSE wants to form a for-profit subsidiary to handle the commercial sales of LNG to TOTE and other yet-to-be-determined customers while also storing the LNG for its utility customers to use during extreme weather conditions. Transporting LNG for local ratepayers presents the threat, and the inherent risks, of tanker trucks on our roadways and the potential for gas truck accidents in our neighborhoods or at the plant. Moreover, we would face potential risks to our health, the environment and our wallets for something PSE has yet to prove utility customers need. Thousands of oil train cars enter and leave the Port of Tacoma daily. A train derailment in the river would be catastrophic.

THE HISTORIC DANGERS OF LNG The construction of an LNG plant would require a large capacity natural gas pipeline to be constructed through the heart of the city of Fife, another booming city that lies right on the Interstate 5 corridor through Pierce County. This should deeply concern local residents considering historic on-site accidents that have occurred involving or related to LNG: r On Oct. 20, 1944 in Cleveland, 128 people died when an East Ohio Natural Gas Company’s LNG tank ruptured and exploded. LNG spilled into the city’s sewer system, vaporized and turned into a gas, which exploded and burned.

The I-5 corridor is well known for traffic congestion, which greatly increases the risk of toxic accidents on the highway.

A catastrophic LNG explosion could ignite the entire Port of Tacoma.

r On Oct. 6, 1979 in Lusby, MD a pump seal failed at the Cove Point LNG facility, which released natural gas vapors that settled into an electrical conduit. The gas vapors ignited when a worker switched off a circuit breaker, causing an explosion that killed one worker and severely injured another. r On Jan. 19, 2004 an explosion at Sonatrach LNG facility in Skikda, Algeria killed 27 people and injured 56. Three LNG trains were also destroyed. The massive hydrocarbon gas explosion was ignited when a steam boiler that was part of an LNG liquefaction train exploded near a propane and ethane refrigeration storage site. A report from a U.S. government inspection team cited that a leak of hydrocarbons from the liquefaction process initiated the domino effect of explosions. r On April 7, 2014 a “processing vessel” at a Williams Co. Inc. facility near the small town of Plymouth, Wash., exploded, spraying chunks of shrapnel as heavy as 250 pounds as far as 300 yards. The flying debris pierced the double walls of a 134-foot LNG tank on site, causing leaks. Five workers were injured, and local responders warned that vapors from the leaks could trigger a more devastating, second explosion. A county fire department spokesman said authorities were concerned a second blast could level a 0.75 mile “lethal zone” around the plant.


City Life

“COLORED” independent art exhibit

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2017

SECTION B, PAGE 1

Lakewood Playhouse brings the razzle and dazzle of ‘Rocky Horror’ to the stage

PHOTOS BY TIM JOHNSTON

THE HORROR. Left photo: Brandon Ehrenheim brings down the house starring as Frank ‘N’ Furter. (l to r, back row) Tony Williams as Rocky, Brandon Ehrenheim as Frank 'N' Furter, Winnie Bean as Columbia. (l to r, front) Jake Atwood as Brad, Xander Layden as Dr. Scott, and Jenna McRill as janet.

gaining steam until the specter of AIDS threw a wet towel on things in the 1980s.) Opening weekend of Lakewood Playhouse’s scintillating spectacle is marred by technical difficulties involving the use of wireless microphones. These cut in and out causing gaps in the otherwise great vocal performances of the actors. Sometimes a character is belting out a line only to have it be inaudible to the audience. This technical glitch (which one hopes will be ironed out as the show goes on) disrupts the flow of the story and undercuts the performances of the fine cast. Starring as Frank ‘N’ Furter – the alien, transvestite, mad scientist –Brandon Ehrenheim towers over the show both figuratively and literally. Tall and confident, Ehrenheim vamps to and fro across the stage, dressed in a corset, fishnet stockings and glittering platform shoes. His flawless performance is a delight to behold. Equally adept is Gary Chambers as Riff-Raff, Frank’s chief henchman. Chambers performs his musical parts with all the gothic vibrato of a heavy metal diva and has a gift for inhabiting his characters to the point that the acting is seamless. Slender LaNita Hudson, possessed of a brassy and sassy set of windpipes, is great in her two roles as the Usherette that sings the opening number and as the mad housemaid Magenta.

Atwood and McRill both are brilliant in their performances as nerds seduced by the pleasures of the flesh in Frank ‘N’ Furter’s castle. They are also brave enough to perform much of the show in their underwear. The pigtailed, tutu-wearing groupie Columbia is played by Winnie Bean. Her energetic performance is a vital ingredient in the dynamism of the spoof. Likewise, the high octane show put on by Xander Layden, as both Eddie and Dr. Scott, helps boost the dance numbers to a fever pitch. Clad in a skin tight, golden muscleman outfit, Tony L. Williams breaths life into Rocky, the hunk created by the mad scientist Frank that is meant to be an object of carnal desire. Good natured and somewhat gawky, Williams nevertheless is becoming a crowd favorite of Lakewood Playhouse shows. The theater’s artistic director John Munn performs the part of the jovial narrator who talks back to audience remarks and gets increasingly drunk as the show goes on. One of the best features of the show is the live band, conducted by Josh Zimmerman who is a wizard on the keyboards and keeps things stirred up with clever asides shouted at the narrator. Kayla Crawford’s choreography is also a key ingredient of the show. The cast is continually forming piles and configurations of human bod-

ies that make things seem like an evershifting game of Twister. Staging “Rocky Horror” brings with it the dicey problem of how to deal with the audience participation aspect so vital to the cult movie experience. Many in the audience exhibit intimate familiarity with this cinematic experience that involves shouting things at the actors, throwing things and even dressing up as the characters and acting out some of the parts (in what are called shadow performances). Lakewood Playhouse wants to encourage some of this and discourage some of it. Throwing, lighting and squirting are prohibited. Shouting, dancing and dressing as characters, on the other hand, are encouraged. For a mere five bucks, theatergoers can buy an “audience partica-pation goodie bag” that has little LED lights and confetti that can be used at given parts of the show. While some members of the audience are obvious aficionados, many others are “virgins” and are taken unawares by the various shouts ejaculated by their fellows. Overall, the show is a dazzling spectacle. If Lakewood Playhouse can get its microphones to cooperate, this could be something more. “The Rocky Horror Show” runs through Jan. 29. The run includes two midnight performances that will go even further to capture that cultic, cinematic experience. For further information visit www.lakewoodplayhouse.org.

ONE

TWO

MLK UNITY BREAKFAST The 11th annual Martin Luther King Unity Breakfast will be held at 8 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16, at the University of WashingtonTa c o m a ’ s University Y Student Center, 1710 Market St. This gathering honors the message of Dr. King and the progress he continues to inspire. The theme of the 2017 MLK Unity Breakfast is “Let’s Talk About Action.” Erin Jones, the first African-American woman to run for executive office in the state of Washington, will give the keynote address at this year’s MLK Unity Breakfast. The program recognizes students, faculty, and community members for outstanding service to the community through the Dream Awards which will be presented during the program. Tickets are $10 to $20, and they are available online at www.tacoma.uw.edu/ mlkregister.

SHORELINE CLEANUP Winter weather and tides push trash to the north side of Commencement Bay and onto local beaches, where it can harm wildlife and people alike. To combat this problem, organizers are asking Tacomans to help remove plastic and other debris during an MLK Day cleanup event that will kick off at 12:40 p.m. Monday at Tyee Marina, 5618 Marine View Dr. Citizens for a Healthy Bay will provide gloves, supplies and refreshments. Participants just need sturdy, waterproof footwear and warm clothing. Email cruz@healthybay.org to RSVP.

of noisy, high-flying action. Start times are 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, 1 and 7 p.m. Saturday and 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are on sale now with prices ranging from $10 to $69; www.ticketmaster.com.

plaunch to explore a virtual version of the venue and find clues that will allow you to unlock the lineup launch video and win prizes, including a pair of VIP tickets allowing you to catch all the action from the stage viewing deck.

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

L

akewood Playhouse continues its 78th season with a production of Richard O’Brien’s “The Rocky Horror Show,” a zany, genderbending, genera-blending spectacle that most of us are familiar with from the cult movie phenomenon that has been around since it bubbled up out of New York City in the 1970s. Lakewood Playhouse director Alan Wilkie is a self-professed “Rocky Horror” addict, having frequented the midnight showings that took place at Seattle’s Neptune Theater. Mingling the musical genera with the aesthetic of B-grade horror and science fiction movies, “Rocky Horror” tells the tale of a chaste (stodgy), newly engaged couple – Brad (Jake Atwood) and Janet (Jenna McRill) – that get stranded on a dark and rainy night and go to a weird castle to use the phone. There they encounter a hedonistic group of characters that exist without any kind of sexual boundaries. Representing the kind of stock, “Leave it to Beaver” type of characters from 50s and 60s television shows – the kind where married couples sleep in separate, twin beds – Brad and Janet are plunged into a sexual free-for-all that exemplifies the loosening of mores that was happening at the height of the sexual revolution. (The process was

THE THINGS WE LIKE

FOUR SASQUATCH CLUES

THREE METAL MANGLING ACTION Catch Aftershock, Krazy Train and other massive monster trucks as the Monster Jam Triple Threat series takes over the Tacoma Dome for three days

No, not that Sasquatch. On Friday, organizers of the Sasquatch Music Festival will launch a virtual game with clues on who is playing this year’s event, which will take over the Gorge Amphitheatre during Memorial Day Weekend, from May 26 to 28. Visit www.sasquatchfestival.com/lineu-

FIVE POET LAUREATE At 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, Washington Poet Laureate Tod Marshall will appear at King’s Books, 218 St. Helen’s Ave., as part of the store’s “Distinguished Writer Series.” Marshall teaches at Gonzaga University and is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently “Bugle.” An open mic for poets will follow with sing-up at 6:45 p.m. The event is part of the store’s “Distinguished Writer Series” which takes place the second Friday of each month and is sponsored by the Puget Sound Poetry Connection and the Tacoma Arts Commission; www.kingsbookstore.com.


4FDUJPO#t1BHF rUBDPNBXFFLMZDPNr'SJEBZ +BOVBSZ 

ARTWORK, POETRY, AND WRITING FROM TACOMA STUDENTS Students in Mrs. Hanawalt’s 11th grade English classes at Lincoln High School were asked to do a piece of writing that tied in with language. Kayla Hoy, and her superb writing, is our first of six writers that will appear in the months to come, and shares with us on how she was able to increase her language. Identity Through Reading *UJTBDPME4BUVSEBZNPSOJOHJO%FDFNCFS BOE*BNXBMLJOHUISPVHI,.BSUXJUI$ISJTUNBTHJGUTGPS.PNNZ IPMEJOHPO UPNZCFTUGSJFOETIBOE TUSVHHMJOHUPLFFQVQXJUIIJTTUSJEFT BTIFHVJEFTNFUISPVHIUIFUPXFSTPGQFPQMF#FGPSF*OPUJDF UIFFMEFSMZMBEZBUUIFSFHJTUFSUFMMJOHIJNPUIFSXJTF *TBZ i%BEEZ XFDBOUHPJOUIBUMJOFu*BNTUSBJOJOHUPSFBEUIFCPMESFE MFUUFSTPGGPGUIFXIJUFUFOUTJUUJOHIJHIFSUIBONZZPVOHTFMGT IFJHIUi5IJTMBOFJTDMPTFEu 5IJOLJOHPGOPUIJOHCVUDPODFSOGPSUIFTJUVBUJPO *UVSOGBDJOHNZ'BUIFSTMFH MFGUBSNTUSFUDIFEVQXBSET DIJOIJHIJOUIF BJS XIFO*OPUJDFNZ%BETFYDJUFNFOUBTIFFYDMBJNT i8PX :PV DPVME SFBE UIBU BMM PO ZPVS PXO  :PVSF TP TNBSU  #BCZu .ZMJUUMFCPEZà MMTXJUIBOVQMJGUJOHXBSNUIPGQSJEF*DBOUVOEFSTUBOEUIJTGFFMJOH5IJTGFFMJOHPGDPOàEFODF5IJTGFFMJOHPG LOPXMFEHF5IJTGFFMJOHPGQPXFS $BSSZJOHUIBUFYQFSJFODFXJUINFJONZCBDLQPDLFU *TUBSUFEHFUUJOHUSBOTàYFEJOUPUIFMFTTPOTBUTDIPPMBOEXBOUFEUP LFFQHSPXJOHXJUILOPXMFEHF*GPVOEUIBUUPEPUIJT *OFFEFE UPSFBENPSF4P *EJE*FOKPZFE/BODZ%SFXCPPLTJOUIFGPVSUI

HSBEF )PMPDBVTUCPPLTJOUIFà GUI BOELFQUFYQMPSJOHBT*XFOU JOUPTJYUI*HPUTPJOUVOFXJUIUIJTCMFTTJOHPGFEVDBUJPO BOZ GSFFUJNF*IBE *XBTSFBEJOHBCPPL*TQFOUBMPUPGNZNJEEMF TDIPPM MVODIFT JO B UFBDIFST SPPN  FYQFSJFODJOH OFX UIJOHT XJUIPVUFWFSMFBWJOH 0OF EBZ * SFBMJ[FE * XBT B LJOE PG PVUDBTU UP NZ QFFST  NZ DMPTFTU GSJFOET XFSF UFBDIFST * XBT OFWFS VQ UP EBUF PO UIFESBNBPSUSFOET&WFSZPOFFMTFXBT*MFBSOFEUIBUUIFNPSF CPZTUIBUMJLFEZPVUIFNPSFiQPXFSuZPVIBE4FWFOUIHSBEFJT XIFO*SFBMMZTUBSUFEUPUSZBOEàUJO*QVUEPXONZCPPLTBOE QBJEBUUFOUJPOUPPUIFST)PXPGUFOZPVXFSFUPMEZPVBSFQSFUUZ NFBOUBMPUBCPVUZPVSXPSUIJOUIPTFEBZT*IBEOFWFSSFBMMZ QBJEBUUFOUJPOUPUIBU6OUJMUIFO .Z.PNOPUJDFENZDIBOHFJOGPDVTPOB4BUVSEBZNPSOJOHXIJMFXFESPWFUIFTBNFTUSFFUTPG5BDPNBBTFWFSZPUIFS XFFLFOEUPEPPVSSJUVBMHSPDFSZTIPQQJOH*UXBTJOUIFQBSLJOH MPUPG'SFE.FZFS XJUIBMPUPGDBST CVUOPUNBOZQFPQMFXBMLJOHPVUTJEF*MFGUNZTFBUCFMUPOXIJMFTIFUVSOFEPGGUIFFOHJOF  BOEàEEMFENZUIVNCT–XFBMXBZTIBWFTFSJPVTDPOWFSTBUJPOT JOUIFDBS

#PUIPGVTMPPLJOHTUSBJHIUBIFBE NZ.PUIFSUPMENFBCPVU XIFOTIFXBTZPVOHFS BMMTIFXBTFWFSUPMEXBTUIBUTIFXBT QSFUUZ/PPOFUPMEIFSTIFXBTTNBSU UBMFOUFE BOEOJDF4P  TIFOFWFSUIPVHIUBOZUIJOHFMTFPGIFSTFMGFJUIFS#VU TIFUPME NF  TIF IFME PO UP IFS SFBEJOH 4IF MPWFE IFS SFBEJOH  BOE UISPVHICPPLTTIFDPVMEMFBSOBMMUIFTFUIJOHT.Z.PNTPOFPG UIFNPTUJOUFMMJHFOUQFPQMF*LOPX.Z.PNTPOFPGUIFTUSPOHFTUQFPQMF*LOPX.Z.PNTUIFLJOEPGXPNBO*XBOUUPCF 4P*HPUCBDLJOUPNZSFBEJOH*BMXBZTLOPX XIFO*GFFM BXBZGSPNXIP*BNPSTUBSUUPMPTFDPOÃ EFODFJONZTFMG UIBU UIFSFTTPNFUIJOHBCPVUUBLJOHBWBDBUJPOUPBOPUIFSUJNFQFSJPE BOPUIFSQBSUPGUIFXPSME PSBOPUIFSQFSTPOTNJOEXIJMFTUJMM JOUIFDPNGPSUPGNZIPNF UIBUBMMPXTNFUPUBLFBEFFQCSFBUI BOESFNFNCFSXIP*BN5PSFNFNCFSNZJEFOUJUZ/PUKVTUB TJNQMFBDDFQUBODFUIBU*BNXIP*BN CVUUIBU*BNBZPVOH XPNBOXIPTFNJOEIBTKVTUHSPXOBOEXJMMDPOUJOVFUPHSPX 5ISPVHIUIJTHSPXUI*GFFMBHBJOJOQPXFSXJUIJONZTFMG*HBJO NPSFPGNZJEFOUJUZmBOJEFOUJUZUIBU*MPWF UIBU*XBOUUPCF 4USPOH JTNZJEFOUJUZ*OUFMMJHFOU JTNZJEFOUJUZ(SPXJOH JT NZJEFOUJUZ

WHAT IS YOUR STORY?

Sunset on Spray Park Trail on Mt. Rainier

All About Me! 5IJTQPFNJTBCPVUNF BQBSUPGNZTUPSZ.ZQPFNTIBSFTTPNFPGNZUIPVHIUT  ESFBNT BOEFYQFSJFODFTUIBU*IBWFIBE Malia Kjos, 5th grade, Crescent Heights Elementary, Teacher: Mrs. Day

4UPSJFTBSFJNQPSUBOUUPDVMUVSF*UJTJNQPSUBOUUPSFNFNCFSTUPSJFTBCPVUUIFQBTU*QBJOUFE.U3BJOJFSXJUI áPXFSTBOEHMBDJFST*XFOUCBDLQBDLJOHUIFSFXJUINZQBSFOUT5IFHMBDJFSTXJMMBMMNFMUBXBZCZUIFUJNF*BNB HSPXOVQ CVU*XJMMCFBCMFUPUFMMNZLJETTUPSJFTBCPVUTFFJOHUIFHMBDJFST5IBUJTNZTUPSZ Annika Cushman, 1st grade, Grant Center for the Expressive Arts, Teacher: Mrs. Carini

The Lone Tree *ESFXBUSFFBTBTZNCPMPGNZTFMG5IFUSFFJTBUUIFGPPU PGUIFIJMMT"TBTJYUIHSBEFS *CFMPOHUPUIFMPXFTUHSBEFJO NJEEMFTDIPPM-JLFUIFUSFFUIBUXPVMEUBLFSPPUTBOETQSFBE JUTCSBODIFT *XPVMEBMTPHSPXBOEJODSFBTFNZLOPXMFEHF BT*HPUISPVHINJEEMFTDIPPM Eden Purcell, 6th grade, Truman Middle School

Run! Dance! Throw! Ephrahim Peterson, 4th grade, Grant School for the Expressive Arts, Teacher: Mr. Derbes

Dolphin! Dolphin! 5IJTJTBQJDUVSFPGBTVOTFUBU4VOTFU#FBDI 0SFHPO*UPPLUIJT QJDUVSFXIFO*XFOUPOWBDBUJPOUIJTTVNNFSUP4FBTJEF 0SFHPO* MJLFUIFCFBDICFDBVTF*MJLFUPQMBZJOUIFXBUFSBOEUIFTBOE Lila Kelanic, 1st grade, Pt. Defiance Elementary,Teacher: Mrs. Hansen

The Saddest Story Ever!

Princess Bella *MPWF$BUT*MPWFDBUTCFDBVTFDBUTBSFDVUF GV[[Z DVEEMZ  BOEMPWBCMF$BUTBSFVOJRVFCFDBVTFOPDBUJTUIFTBNF OPS BSFQFPQMFUIFTBNF Madison Duray, 4th grade, Downing Elementary, Teacher: Mrs. McCaffery-Lent

Summer Sunset 5IJTJTBQJDUVSFPGBTVOTFUBU4VOTFU#FBDI 0SFHPO*UPPL UIJTQJDUVSFXIFO*XFOUPOWBDBUJPOUIJTTVNNFSUP4FBTJEF  0SFHPO*MJLFUIFCFBDICFDBVTF*MJLFUPQMBZJOUIFXBUFSBOE UIFTBOE Amiyah Parra, 3rd grade, Downing Elementary, Teacher: Mrs. McCaffery-Lent

.Z.PNDBMMFENFBOENZCSPUIFSJOUPUIFSPPN4IFTBJEB DPVQMFPGXPSETw5IPTFXPSETXFSFi(VZT *IBWFLJEOFZáJFS GBJMVSF u*ONZIFBE*ESFXBCMBOL*TBJE i"SFZPVLJEEJOHNF u 5IFONZ.PNTUBSUFEDSZJOH UIFONF UIFONZCSPUIFS*DPVME TFFFWFSZPOFDSZJOHFYDFQUGPSNZ%BE*DPVMEIFBSTBEOFTT* DPVMEGFFMTBEOFTT *GFMUMPWFEBOEIVHT*DPVMETNFMMPVSEJOOFSUIBUXBTNBEF XJUI MPWF .Z .PN TBJE JG TIF EJFE  * XPVME HFU TPNF PG IFS DMPUIFTBOEIJHIIFFMT8FDSJFE BOENZ%BEHPUVQBOEXFOU UPDIFDLPOUIFGPPE5IFONZ%BEDBNFCBDLBOEXFXBUDIFE BNPWJF8IFOUIBUNPWJFXBTPWFS XFXFOUJOUPUIFMJWJOHSPPN BOE XBUDIFE BOPUIFS NPWJF * DPVME UBTUF UIF EFMJDJPVT GPPE NBEFXJUIMPWF8FBUFBOEIBEGBNJMZUJNF *UJTNZTUPSZBOE*QVUBMPUPGXPSLJOUPJU*XBOUNZGBNJMZ  NPTUMZNZ.PN UPCFQSPVEPGNF Neveah Gonzales, 4th grade, Crescent Heights, Teacher: Mrs. Rucks (Page editor’s note: Neveah’s Mom is doing dialysis three times a week, and takes each day at a time, treasuring the time she has with her family).

Teachers and students interested in submitting work may get guidelines or information from Shari Shelton, (253) 906-3769 or at 8ssheltonz8@gmail.com, or may contact Donna McCracken, (253) 475-8387 or donnamccra@comcast.net. View this page and others online at www.tacomaweekly.com.


Friday, January 13, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

JORDAN CURATES TACOMA EXHIBIT BRINGING TOGETHER BLACK U.S., CARIBBEAN ARTISTS

CulturE CornEr A GuidE to CulturAl orGAnizAtions EvEnts of thE WEEk: The City of Tacoma and Puget Sound Poetry Presents The Distinguished Writer Series Jan. 13, 7 p.m. Kings Bookstore, 218 St. Helens pugetsoundpoetryconnection.org

Featured Reader: Tod Marshall, State Poet Laureate. Marshall teaches at Gonzaga University and is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently “Bugle,� which won the 2015 Washington State Book Award. From 201618, he is serving as the Washington State Poet Laureate.

Writing Workshop

Jan. 14, 10 a.m. Feast Center, 1402 S. 11th pugetsoundpoetryconnection.org Allen Bradem, Nuts and Bolts of Verse: How to break a line, start and end a poem, play with syntax, forms, metaphors and how to revise, read and publish. Email: ckwalle@comcast.net for reservation. $10.

‘A Year With Frog & Toad’

Jan. 14-22, Saturdays: Jan. 14 and Jan. 21, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Sundays: Jan. 15 and Jan. 22, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma, WA 98406 www.tmp.org

ARTWORK COURTESY OF ARTIST

ISLANDER. Untitled painting by Brianna McCarthy is part of the

“COLORED� exhibit that runs through the weekend at the Carpenter’s Building on Fawcett Ave.

Brianna McCarthy, Charhys Bailey, David Gumbs, Devin Morris, Pretty Eyes Ellis, Andre Bagoo and Walidah Imarisha. Some of the highlights include: “The Outer Limits,� a 7,500 square foot panoramic mural by Jordan that spans the perimeter of the space. “Karaoking History� is an interactive video installation by Sharita Towne (Portland) that involves a retelling of colonial and contemporary histories through the repurposing of pop melodies. Via a phone app, the show allows visitors to participate in the dialogue and dynamism of the exhibit. The show is open to all, but “COLORED� is directed at and made for a black audience, which, Jordan suggests, may be more neglected than black artists themselves. “For decades the role of Black artists has been brokering our experiences to white audiences, which leaves our people behind.� To further engage the exhibit, see #COLORED2017 and connect through the Colored.xyz website. A former student of the Tacoma School of the Arts, Jordan is very active in the arts in and around Tacoma. He is a force behind the “Fab-5� organization, created to empower young people. His public murals can be seen at the Manitou Trestle and the St. Vincent de Paul Thrift store (done in conjunction with Kenji Stoll). Jordan won the 8th Foundation of Art Award from the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation in 2015. The exhibit runs through Jan. 15. For further information visit http://cargocollective.com/chrisssjordan.

By Dave R. Davison dave@tacomaweekly.com

During Kwanzaa week (Dec. 26 through Jan. 1), Christopher Paul Jordan – one of the movers and shakers of the Tacoma arts universe – launched an art exhibit called “COLORED� in the Carpenters Building at 1322 S. Fawcett Ave. Jordan curated the show, which consists of artwork and poetry by black artists from the United States and the Caribbean. The show aims to blend “augmented reality,� social media and public art into a venture that will make connections and create dialogue between black communities that are historically separated by space and culture. The show’s opening was so successful that it has been extended through Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. The public hours are Thursday through Sunday, 1-7 p.m., the last public day being Jan. 15. Jordan describes the body of artwork as a “living catalog, which expands and reorganizes around the locus of each community.� The Tacoma exhibition places emphasis on artists and poets from Trinidad and Tobago, where the project is landing next. After the closing, select works will be adapted into public murals and virtual experiences which extend the lifespan of the local dialogue. In total, there is work by 35 artists and poets including: Nkiruka J Oparah, Arnaldo James, Distrakt, Inga Kimberly Brown, Joyce Lee, Sharita Towne, Bertrand Boyd,

Based on Arnold Lobel’s well-loved books, featuring a hummable score by Robert and Willie Reale, this whimsical show is part vaudeville, part make believe‌all charm. “A Year with Frog and Toadâ€? tells the story of a friendship that endures throughout the seasons. The jazzy, upbeat score bubbles with melody and wit, making it an inventive, exuberant and enchanting musical, perfect for introducing theater to youngsters while keeping adults entertained as well. Recommended for all ages.

19th Annual Sounds of Brass Concert

Jan. 15, 3 p.m. Tacoma Community College Auditorium, Tacoma, WA www.brassunlimited.org Sounds of Brass will be playing lots of great transcriptions for brass, and some very virtuosic works that feature Cindy Renander on clarinet. Please plan to come to this free and entertaining concert. Cindy Renander, clarinetist, performs regularly in the Northwest with many orchestras, ensembles and music festivals. In addition to performing and clarinet-related teaching, she teaches at Tacoma Community College, and contributes to the local arts community with her arts administrative experience. A native Tacoman, she has also lived in the south, where she served as Visiting Professor of Music at Lander University in South Carolina. Renander holds a Doctor of Music and Master’s degree from Florida State University, and her undergraduate degree from the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. Her teachers and mentors include Frank Kowalsky, William Wrzesien and Tacoma educators Diana Craig, Rex Turner, Jack Lloyd and Harry Davidson. She resides in University Place with husband John Falskow and children Karl, Dana and Erin.

BEER CAVE

Cheapest Prices in Town! 24 HRS, 365 DAYS – DRIVE THRU Indian Smoke Shop - No Sales Tax

CLEARANCE SALE! WAR CHIEF

KING MOUNTAIN CIGARETTES

99¢ /1 oz. $4. 99 /6oz. $9. 99 /16oz.

$4. 90 /pack

$48 /carton

We carry a large selection of tobacco, glass, cigars and vape products! 2615 PORTLAND AVE, TACOMA 98421 • (253) 627-4179

Snap us at warponycrew! Licensed and regulated by the Puyallup Tribe. War Pony Smoke Shops are individually owned and operated.

C HINESE RES TAURANT & BUFFET

LUNCH

Mon-Fri: 11am-4pm

8

$ 99 DINNER

Mon-Thurs: 4pm-9:30pm Fri: 4pm-10:30pm Sat: 11am-10:30pm

$

12

99

WINE/ M-Th, Sun: 11am-9:30pm BEER F-Sat: 11am-10:30pm 8217 S. Hosmer St, Tacoma

(253) 531-8888

www.greatwallwa.com

walk-in beer cave Over 50+ craft beers including washington brewers! Now Serving 24 hour Espresso 6212 29th st. ne, tacoma, WA 98422


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY *ANUARY 

LOCAL WRITERS PREPARE TO RESIST ANTICIPATED INJUSTICES OF COMING TRUMP ADMINISTRATION "Y%RNEST!*ASMIN ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

A group of local writers will meet on Sunday, Jan. 15 to discuss ways of combining their art with community activism. Tacoma Writers Resist will hold its first public event at 6:30 p.m. at King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave., using readings and workshops to spark conversation about community needs and what life may look like under the administration of incoming President Donald Trump. “We want to come together as a community to figure that out,� said group founder Renee Simms, an author who teaches African-American studies at University of Puget Sound. “What will justice look like here in Tacoma, specifically?� “Clearly, this is in response to our recent national elections and anxiety about free speech, anxiety about the media, anxiety about the un-tethering of facts,� said fellow organizer Laura Krughoff, who also teaches at UPS. “As writers, those are things we’re really thinking about and worrying about,� Krughoff said. “We need resilience to be able to resist. (We are) working to

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

RESISTANCE. Organizers Catalina O’Campo, Renee Simms and Lucas Smiraldo plan for the first public event to be held by Writers Resist.

writes. “We will come together and actively help make the world we want to live in. We are bowed, but we are not broken.� Through social media, Belieu called on writers to organize local events around Martin Luther King Day, which is Monday, and more than 75 are scheduled, according to group’s web site (www.writersresist.

create a community that we’re going to need to sustain and support each other as we figure out what it is we might have to resist. We don’t even know what that looks like.� Writers Resist is a fledgling, national movement founded by poet Erin Belieu in the wake of November’s election. “We will not give in to despair,� she

org). In Washington, events are also planned in Seattle, Olympia, Port Townsend, Bellingham, Spokane, Ellensburg and on Bainbridge Island. The election may have been a catalyst for organizing, but organizers say the Tacoma group has used it as a springboard for exploring a number of issues, including racial profiling, LGBT

rights and gentrification. “I think that all of those issues were important even before the election [sic] were coming to our attention, and those are things that may also come up during our event,� Simms said. “I think the experience for a lot of people felt like we can’t take progress, to whatever extent we had it, for granted – things that we assumed are sort of settled.� For Sunday’s event at King’s Books, writers have been invited to read from their work or passages from other authors that pertain to activism and social justice. Among the writers expected to participate are Cathy Nguyen, Charys Bailey, William Kupinse, Marquis McCrary, Michael Benitez Jr., Keith Blocker, Jane Brazell, Ina Church and Lucas Smiraldo. There will also be a handful of workshops: Playwright Rosalind Bell will discuss researching her family’s history in Louisiana; Catalino O’Campo will lead a workshop on using preexisting documents to create new works; and Tiffany MacBain will lead a session on needlecraft. The event is free and open to the general public. For further details, visit www.kingsbookstore.com.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: DOA AND MDC Legendary hardcore bands DOA and MDC are headed to Jazzbones on Feb. 25 with their “Fight Back Tour,â€? for which MDC says its ever-changing acronym now stands for “Millions of Deceived Citizensâ€?. Adding support that night will be locals Ten Pole Drunk, Dreadful Children and Garbage Type Items. Music starts at 8 p.m., and tickets are on sale for $12 online at www.ticketfly.com. The cost will go up to $15 at the door. See www.ticketmaster.com for info on the rest of these upcoming shows except for where otherwise indicated. • Mystikal with Kokane and more: 9 p.m. Jan. 28, Cultura Event Center, $25; www. culturaeventcenter.com. • Kim Bum Soo: 7 p.m. Feb. 1, Pantages Theater, $75 to $200; www.broadwaycenter.org.

• Louie Anderson: 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. Feb. 3 and 4, Tacoma Comedy Club, $22 to $30; www. tacomacomedyclub.com. • Air Supply: 8 p.m. Feb. 14, Emerald Queen Casino, $30 to $75. • Eric Burdon & The Animals: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18, Pantages Theater, $29 to $85. • Blake Shelton: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 25, Tacoma Dome, $29.50 to $65. • Tommy Castro and the Painkillers: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 25, Temple Theatre, $22.50. • Sky Cries Mary with Sage, The Hula Bees and Ring: 9 p.m. March 3, Jazzbones, $10 to $15; www. ticketfly.com.

Lighthouse Laundry Wash and Dry 8 Loads in 90 minutes! Open m 8am - 9p

• Chris Botti: 8 p.m. March 17, Tacoma Dome, $26.50 to $196. • John Cleese: 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. March 17, Pantages Theater, $39 to $110; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Eric Church: 8 p.m. March 18, Tacoma Dome, $20 to $86. • Lewis Black: 8 p.m. March 18, Pantages Theater, $59.50 to $75. • “The Spin Stops Hereâ€? with Bill O’Reilly, Dennis Miller and Jesse Watters: 5 p.m. March 25, Tacoma Dome, $65 to $125. • Kyle Kinane: 7:30 p.m. April 20 to 22, 10:30 p.m. April 21 and 22, Tacoma Comedy Club, $17 to $29; www.tacomacomedyclub.com. • The Weeknd: 7:30 p.m. April 26, KeyArena, Seattle, $35.50 to $121.

ERS! HUGE WASH

Save Time!

• Heart’s Ann Wilson: 8 p.m. March 8, Moore Theatre, Seattle, $47 to $67.

26th & N. Pearl • Westgate S. Shopping Center Free Wi-Fi www.LightHouseLaundry.biz

AUTO DETAILING

$30 OFF

COMPLETE DETAIL BOTH LOCATIONS

Must present coupon at time of purchase to receive discount. Limit one coupon per customer per visit. TW061915

NEW LOCATION NOW OPEN IN FIFE! 2592 Pacific Hwy E Fife, WA 98424 253.922.1555 13813 Meridian E Puyallup, WA 98373 253.848.6331

Join Us for Prime Rib! Easy, Free Parking

RESTAURANT & MARINA

ROASTED DAILY Across from The Museum of Glass Across from The Museum of Glass 1900 EAST D ST., TACOMA (253)D627-3186 1900 EAST ST., TACOMA (253) 627-3186 PRIME RIB FOR LUNCH!

• Tree Removal • Pruning • View Trimming

Dale L. VanDerschelden, DDS and Associates

$

• Emergency Service & Storm Cleanup

FREE IN OFFICE WHITENING OR

200

OFF DENTAL TREATMENT

• Tree Health Assessment Licensed • Insured • Bonded

253-234-GROW

(4769)

www.familytree253.com

TACOMA

SUMNER

PUYALLUP

BONNEY LAKE

253-759-3366

253-891-9100

253-846-5588

253-820-8800

WWW.RAINIERDENTAL.COM

LIC. FAMILTRC874M6

$

100 off

Jay Brock

Any Tree Service

Certified Arborist PN-7500A

$500 job minimum

Johnny Marth

Not valid with other offers or specials. Expires 1-13-17.

AFTER NEW PATIENT EXAM, X-RAYS AND HYGIENE TREATMENT. ONE OFFER PER FAMILY.

FOUR CONVENIENT LOCATIONS:

FREE ESTIMATES!

Certified Arborist PN-7495A


Make a Scene

9OUR,OCAL'UIDE4O3OUTH3OUND-USIC

GET THE PARTY STARTED, SHE WILL: SAUCY YODA RETURNS NEXT WEEK

Friday, January 13, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Nightlife TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

MOTOWN LEGEND SMOKEY ROBINSON – AKA THE POET LAUREATE OF SOUL – WILL BRING “QUIET STORM,� “TEARS OF A CLOWN� AND OTHER CLASSICS TO THE EMERALD QUEEN CASINO I-5 SHOWROOM ON FRIDAY, JAN. 13. THE SHOW STARTS AT 8:30 P.M., AND TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW WITH PRICES RANGING FROM $70 TO $160; WWW.EMERALDQUEEN.COM.

PHOTO BY BILL BUNGARD

FRIDAY, JAN. 13

MONDAY, JAN. 16 THE VALLEY: Old Foals, Nocturnal Habits, Blanco Bronco (rock, alternative) 8 p.m., NC

PHOTO COURTESY OF SAUCY YODA

POP FORCE. Saucy Yoda is set to bring her blend of rap, pop and garage to the stage at The Valley Pub Jan. 18. "Y%RNEST!*ASMIN ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Saucy Yoda has turned to the dark side (sort of), which may come as some surprise to local fans that have followed her since she first surfaced in Tacoma at Maltoberfest, an Oktoberfest-spoofing event held at Bob’s Java Jive in 2011. Saucy Yoda being the stage name of Alaska’s Melodie Langer, who will headline The Valley Pub on Wednesday, Jan. 18. To this point, she has specialized in irreverent party jams about turning up (“Party Every Day,� “Mothership�), turning back down (“Melatonin�) and Chinese takeout (or possibly something else on the innuendo-heavy “Wonton�). Her sound is an infectious blend of rap, pop and garage-rock that the Alaska Dispatch News recently called “Punky Brewster meets the Beastie Boys.� But from her first album, “Dysfunctional Dingus,� to 2015’s “It’s Not a Mystery,� there has been a pronounced movement away from programmed rhythm tracks to guitardriven rock, a transition that came partly out of necessity after her computer died a few years back. “I didn’t have a way to make beats, and my old producer quit music and sold all of his equipment,� Langer recalled last week. So she picked up her first guitar and quickly realized she preferred strumming to staring at an LED screen for hours on end. “That’s just such a tedious practice,� she said. “I’d rather just hold a guitar in my hand and make (songs) like that. My first album, I spent an entire year recording, working almost every single day in

the studio; and it was all done on a computer.� Langer may have rapped to digital backing tracks during her earliest performances, but fans should expect a full rock show on Wednesday. Her band includes drummer Jackson Eli McQuown and Bremerton-based bassist Dante Manalo, who will also open the show with solo ukulele material, as Ukululu Brown. Singer and backup dancer Nessa Marie will also open the show under her own alias, Sasshole. Fans can also expect to hear some new material, which is where Saucy Yoda’s flirtation with “the dark side� comes in. Langer said she has been drawing on weirder influences – the likes of Mr. Bungle and Jay Reatard – as she has prepared a “darker� new album that she hopes to release over the summer. “This album is different,� Langer said. “I kind of consider my band to be like Ween or Beck or the Beastie Boys where it’s just all over the place and people generally tend to like it. Most of my fans are pretty open minded.� Among new cuts that may show up during next week’s set are “Park Song,� which she said features spooky whistling; a 1960s-style garage-rock cut called “No Fun;� and a number called “Sun Slime.� “That one is more ominous and surreal sounding,� she said, “as if the twins from ‘The Shining’ were to write a song and sing it.� Also joining Saucy Yoda on the bill Wednesday will be weirdo electro-clash duo Garlic Man and Chikn, which recently switched monikers to Creature Hole. (Do yourselves a favor and check out their video

for “Shavin’ My Leg� on YouTube; but maybe do it at home since it’s mildly NSFW.) The fun will start at 8 p.m. Wednesday, and there will be a $5 cover charge. The Valley is located at 1206 Puyallup Ave; www. thevalleytacoma.com for further details. Saucy Yoda and company may also appear Thursday night at Real Art Tacoma, though details had not yet solidified as the deadline for this story approached. Visit www. realarttacoma.com for possible updates.

&IND3AUCY 9ODASMUSIC ONLINEAT SAUCYYODA BANDCAMPCOM

ROCKY HORROR

WOODARDS

TRANSYLVANIA

DRUNKEN DRIVING

DEFIANT GOLDFISH

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR

WRITERS RESIST

VAPE

SAUCY YODA

TIME WARP

CHARLES WRIGHT

B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: “Guitar Going Monday,� 7 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Michael Langdon (acoustic jam) 8 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, JAN. 17

DAWSON’S: Leanne Trevalyan and Billy Stoops (open mic) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, JAN. 14

TACOMA COMEDY: Steve-O (comedy) 10:30 p.m., $22-$30

B SHARP COFFEE: Redshift (jazz) 8 p.m., $7, AA G. DONNALSON’S: Nancy Erickson (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Mashtown Bluegrass Band (bluegrass) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Spazmatics (‘80s covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 UNCLE SAM’S: Law Dogg show, 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Squeak and Squawk fundraiser with Mr. Motorcycle, Widowspeak, The Cutwinkles, Kilcic Band (indie-rock, punk, psychedelic rock) 9 p.m., $7

SUNDAY, JAN. 15

IMMANUEL PRESBYTERIAN: Blues Vespers with Kim Archer and Jay Mabin (blues, rock, soul) 5 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA ROCK THE DOCK: Dustin Lefferty (open mic) 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC

G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m. THE VALLEY: Saucy Yoda, Garlic Man and Chicken (rap, pop, punk, garage-rock) 8 p.m., NC

THURSDAY, JAN. 19

TACOMA COMEDY: Rocky LaPorte (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

DOCTOR STRANGE

Nightly at 7:00 pm Sat & Sun Matinee at 3:45 pm Saturday @ 11:30 pm

2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500

LA LA LAND (128 MIN, PG-13) Fri 1/13-Thu 1/19: 11:30 AM, 2:35, 5:40, 8:30

LION (118 MIN, PG-13) Fri 1/13-Thu 1/19: 1:00, 3:40, 6:15, 8:50

JACKIE (99 MIN, R) Fri 1/13-Mon 1/16: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 Tue 1/17-Wed 1/18: 11:40 AM, 4:30, 9:10 Thu 1/19: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (137 MIN, R) Fri 1/13-Thu 1/19: 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00

OLYMPIC PRIDE, AMERICAN PREJUDICE (82 MIN, NR) CITY COUNCIL

G. DONNALSON’S: Johnaye Kendrick (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Sonic Funk (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Stoned Evergreen Travelers, Cottonwood Cutups, Danny Cash (bluegrass, country, Americana) 8 p.m., $5-$8 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC PACIFIC BREWING: Ethan Tucker (rock, blues, acoustic) 8 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Mungfest 2017 featuring American Wrecking Co., Fallen Kings, Massacre at the Opera, Chamber 6 (metal, hard rock) 8 p.m., AA STONEGATE: Led Zeppmen (Led Zeppelin tribute) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: ‘90s Underground (alternative, Brit pop) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Steve-O (comedy) 10:30 p.m., $22-$30 UNCLE SAM’S: The Remedy (rock covers) 8 p.m.

THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC

Tue 1/17: 2:00, 6:45

CASABLANCA (102 MIN, PG) Wed 1/18: 1:45, 6:45

&AWCETT 4ACOMA 7!

sGRANDCINEMACOM

B SHARP COFFEE: Samsara Blues Band with Lafleur (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA G. DONNALSON’S: “Soulful Sundays� (blues, gospel) 6:30 p.m., NC, AA REAL ART TACOMA: The Cardboard Swords, Panoramic, Quieter, Item Finder (rock) 5 p.m., $7-$10, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: Keith Henson Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA G. DONNALSON’S: John Maxwell (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Power Rock Jam (jam night) 8 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

Seeking Freelance Writer Pierce County Community Newspaper Group (PCCNG) is the premier producer of community newspapers in the Tacoma and Pierce County area. Along with our flagship publication, the Tacoma Weekly, we publish the University Place Press, Fife Free Press, Milton-Edgewood Signal and Puyallup Tribal News. PCCNG is seeking experienced, dependable, community-minded writers. All areas are needed – news, sports and entertainment. Must be a self-starter capable of following up on assignments and also developing in-depth stories independently in a deadline-driven environment. Photography skills are a big plus, as are copyediting/proofreading skills (AP style). Will include some evening work and occasional weekend hours. Send cover letter, resume and at least three examples of published work to matt@tacomaweekly.com or via regular mail to PCCNG, 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife, WA 98424. Please, no phone calls or walk-ins.


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY *ANUARY 

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: COUNTER-INAUGURAL BAWL BALL Sat., Jan. 21, 7 p.m. Asian Pacific Cultural Center, 4851 South Tacoma Way For those concerned about the Donald Trump presidency, an evening of being with like-minded folks on the weekend of his inauguration. There will be people there with a wide variety of concerns and issues, from peace to the environment to race matters to labor to immigration reform to LGBTQ to health policy to election reform, etc. We gather together, because we will need each other in our resistance to the Trump agenda and because we honor the words and spirit of Emma Goldman: “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.â€? Music by Smokey Wonder, DJ (think Smokey Robinson and Stevie Wonder), The Derivatives: A rock-solid cover-band. Come, have a good time, and find strength in community. If you don’t like to dance, there will be plenty else going on! Co-sponsors include (in reverse alphabetical order): Tacoma Chapter Veterans for Peace 134, United for Peace of Pierce County, Radio Tacoma, People for Peace Justice & Healing and Jewish Voice for Peace (Tacoma). Price: $10 (includes memorable party favors); proceeds go to the NW Detention Cetner Resistance and Radio Tacoma. No host bar, all attire welcome. RSVP appreciated but not required (it would help make sure there is enough alcohol and food). Write to Tacoma@JewishVoiceForPeace.org with the number of people attending in the subject line. Info: www.facebook.com/events/1780453032194283 DISTINGUISHED WRITER SERIES WITH TOD MARSHALL Fri., Jan. 13, 7-9 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. This monthly event features a distinguished writer followed by an open mic for all poets. Sign-up is at 6:45 p.m. This month features poet Tod Marshall. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 2728801; www.kingsbookstore. com TACOMA WEAVERS’ GUILD MONTHLY PROGRAM Fri., Jan. 13, 10-11 a.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7410 S 12th St. Sewing purses, bags and totes with Patti Schmidt, expert sewer, who will discuss sewing bags using handwoven and commercial fabric. Ages: Adults. Price: Free. Info: (253) 564-4402; www. saintandrewstacoma.org OPEN MIC NIGHT AT FORREY’S FORZA Fri., Jan. 13, 7-9:30 p.m. Forza Coffee Company, 2209 N. Pearl St. Open mic night is perfect for those looking to share their talent and passion for music. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 301-3925; forzacoffeecompany.com THE ART OF TRAVEL: TRAVEL POSTERS OF THE 1920S, 30S AND BEYOND Fri., Jan. 13, 9 a.m. Tacoma Public Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. From 1910 through 1959, modern cruise ships, railroads and commercial airlines made travel both simpler and more economical. Before the 20th century, few but the wealthy could afford to travel for pleasure. Ages: All Ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001; www.tacomapubliclibrary.org A YEAR WITH FROG AND TOAD Sat., Jan. 14, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 2-3:30 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. Based on Arnold Lobel’s well-loved books, featuring a hummable score by Robert and Willie Reale, this whimsical show is part vaudeville, part make believe‌all charm. Ages: All. Price: $10 - $15. Info: (253) 565-6867; www.tmp.org FOOD ADDICTS IN RECOVERY ANONYMOUS Sat., Jan. 14, 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. An international fellowship of men and women who have experienced difficulties in life as a result of the way we used to eat. Price: Free. Info: (253) 310-8177; trinitylutheranparkland.org

REDSHIFT AT B SHARP COFFEE HOUSE Sat., Jan. 14, 8-10 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C Jazz trio Redshift will be performing. Ages: All ages. Price: $7 cover. Info: (253) 292-9969; www.bsharpcoffeehouse.com ‘30 AMERICANS’ Sat., Jan. 14, 10 a.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. This critically acclaimed, nationally traveling exhibition showcases paintings, photographs, installations, videos, and sculptures by prominent African American artists who have emerged since the 1970s as trailblazers in the contemporary art scene. Ages: All ages. Price: $15 adult, $13 student/military/ senior (65+), $40 family (two adults and up to four children under 18), children 5 and under free. Members always free. Info: (253) 272-4258; www.tacomaartmuseum.org ‘SOUNDS OF BRASS’ Sun., Jan 15, 3-4 p.m. Tacoma Community College, 6501 S. 19th St. 19th annual concert with clarinetist soloist Cindy Renander and music selections of Beethoven, Prokofiev, Mahler, and Ravel. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 759-9511; www.tacoma.ctc. edu FILM FOCUS: SPENCER TRACY – ‘GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER?’ Sun., Jan. 15, 3 p.m. Theatre on the Square, 915 Broadway A couple’s prejudices and views on race are challenged when their daughter introduces her fiancĂŠe. Price: $12. Info: (253) 591-5894; www. broadwaycenter.org NEW SPANISH WORSHIP SERVICE Sun., Jan. 15, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 101 E. 38th St. We are offering a new Spanish worship service for the community. All are welcome to this new outreach which will use the same format as our English service. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 474-0525; blctacoma.com PBS KIDS ‘SPLASH AND BUBBLES’ SPECIAL SCREENING Sun., Jan. 15, 1-3 p.m. Foss Waterway Seaport, 705 Dock St. Come and enjoy a special screening of the new PBS KIDS show “Splash and Bubbles.â€? Admission will be free, and there will be an exciting presentation of “One Big Oceanâ€? with lots of hands on activities and fun give-aways. Ages: All ages. Price: Admission free with registration. Info: (253) 272-2750

2017 MLK JR. UNITY BREAKFAST: LET’S TALK ABOUT ACTION Mon., Jan. 16, 8-10:30 a.m. University of WashingtonTacoma, 1918 Pacific Ave. The 11th Annual MLK Unity Breakfast recognizes and celebrates the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his historic civic leadership that inspired a nation to strive for equality. Price: Free. Info: (253) 692-4501; www.tacoma.uw.edu/mlkregister CREATIVE COLLOQUY MONTHLY READING & OPEN MIC Mon., Jan. 16, 7-10 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C Don’t let January’s winter chill keep you from bundling up and heading to downtown Tacoma for Creative Colloquy’s monthly reading and open mic. Price: Free. Info: (915) 471-5028; www. bsharpcoffeehouse.com SUDSPOP WITH PACIFIC BREWING & MALTING CO. Mon., Jan. 16, 6-10 p.m. Peaks and Pints, 3816 N. 26th St. We’re calling the series SudsPop, asking breweries to supply music playlists and craft beer, as well as host activities such as trivia and games of skill. Ages: 21 and older. Price: No cover. Info: (253) 3285621; peaksandpints.com COAST TO CASCADES: C. C. MCKIM’S IMPRESSIONIST VISIONS Mon., Jan. 16, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. McKim’s light-filled, evocative images of Oregon landscapes capture the unique beauty and character of the Northwest. Ages: All ages. Price: $15 adults, $13 student/military/ seniors (65+), $40 family (two adults and up to four children under 18), children 5 and under free. Members always free. Info: (253) 272-4258; www.tacomaartmuseum.org

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TRIVIA NIGHT Tues., Jan. 17, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Treos, 2312 N. 30th St. Trivia every Tuesday night, free to play, great prizes. Bring a team or join one of ours. Price: Free. Info: (253) 212-2287; www.treoslife.com

evening of short films, featuring backcountry winter recreation. Price: Suggested donation $5 to benefit Mountaineers Youth Programs. Info: (253) 566-6965; www.brownpapertickets.com ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Wed., Jan. 18, 7-9:30 p.m. Cultura Event Center, 5602 S. Washington St. Learn to dance Tango in the style of Argentina, where tango was created. Learn the art of connection and moving with another person in this incredible and versatile dance. Ages: 18+ Price: $10, $15 couple. Info: (253) 2220105; tangointacoma.com

PEELED BANANAS OPEN MIC Tues., Jan. 17, 7:30 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 745 St. Helens Peeled Bananas Comedy Night presents a brand new comedy open mic to the downtown scene. Every Tuesday starting at 7:30 p.m., come on out and enjoy hilarious performances from some of the Pacific Northwest’s most promising comedians. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-9969; www.bsharpcoffeehouse.com

PROTECT THE SACRED: NATIVE ARTISTS FOR STANDING ROCK Thurs., Jan. 19, 6-9 p.m. Spaceworks Gallery, 950 Pacific Ave. “Protect the Sacred� gives voice to the diverse Urban Indian community of this region. Proceeds go to water protectors at Standing Rock. Exhibition curated by Asia Tail (Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma). Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 682-1735; spaceworkstacoma.com/gallery

OPEN-MIC NIGHT Wed., Jan. 18, 8 p.m. Tacoma Comedy Club, 933 Market St. This is where dreams are made, and nightmares come true. This night has everything from professional comedians working out new material, to comics getting on stage for the very first time. Price: Free. Info: (253) 282-7203 LAKEWOOD COMMUNITY BLOOD DRIVE AT BIG LOTS Wed., Jan. 18, 1:30-5 p.m. Big Lots, 5401 100th St. SW, Lakewood Give Blood, Save Lives. For 70 years, Cascade Regional Blood Services has provided blood for patients at hospitals in Pierce and South King Counties. Before you donate, be sure to eat well and drink plenty of non-caffeinated beverages. Bring photo ID. Price: Free. Info: (877) 24-BLOOD

WESTERN READING CLUB Thurs., Jan. 19, 7 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 Pacific Ave. Join fellow enthusiasts of the American West in roundtable discussions and hear from guest facilitators. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-4258 34TH ANNUAL TACOMA RV SHOW Thurs., Jan 19-22, Thur-Sat 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tacoma Dome, 2727 E. D St. The Tacoma RV Show kicks off the region’s RV “show season� with a big inventory of the latest campers, travel trailers, fifth-wheels, motor homes and park models. Price: $12 general admission, $6 with Military ID, free for children (12 & under). Info: (253) 756-2121

BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL Wed., Jan. 18, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Tacoma Mountaineers, 2302 N. 30th St. Join in at the Mountaineer’s Tacoma Clubhouse for a fun

B D U R P K J J O O T O T P Q B I Q L U

N H U S B R R O R X D X Q R J H S Q L L L T T B D H O E WW X E F R N U T I C H

T A P C O H M U P Y S C Z T O Q M M M A

R U V K B L T I N Y I C B X O A J O E R

A C N Y M X R S R K S O K F D V W U W L

N Y W H Y V R Q I D E M L Q A F T R A E

S Y J O X O L G E B R N U E R S O V R S

Y O I R Y A G U W C S V D S D T L C P W

L D Y R X E N R E I R I Q R S F W B N R

V A N I A P A P Z O B W D Q K F L D O R Z N O E C U N E Q F P A V Z A I J K N X U A H B D H M N X WWW X T Y L U K WG E T I R WO C B A I J L F J U H V D W C Y O E F I H I S C I E V T B A S L S I A C H T M C N S G A X V P G O I G H T H D

E B O O P G R Q X S D O K D I X C E G Y

L W K G A R N J C G H N E I A K P R S E F H W T T U T L K N L I B T B R D A Z M

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

RCIA PRESENTS: THE LAST SEVEN COMMANDMENTS Tues., Jan. 17, 7-8:30 p.m. St. Patrick Catholic Church, 1001 N. J St. Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults: Grow in your Catholic faith, deepen your prayer life, and help build the Church that Christ is calling us to be. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 383-2783; parish.saintpats.org BOOKTALK AND SIGNING WITH REBECCA HUYCKE ELLISON (COMPILER) Tues., Jan. 17, 7 p.m. Tacoma Public Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Booktalk and signing with Rebecca Huycke Ellison (compiler) “Forty Years Master: A Life in Sail and Steam.� Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 292-2001; www. tacomapubliclibrary.org

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar� link.

N G L X F C I T Y C O U N C I L O B N O

ROCKY HORROR How many words can you make out of this phrase?


Friday, January 13, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Classifieds

CALL 253.922.5317

253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

SERVICES CONTRACTOR

SERVICES

CONTRACTOR

CONTRACTOR

CONTRACTOR

JT GENERAL CONTRACTOR FRAMING

/FXt3FQBJST

ROOFING

/FXt3FQBJST 5FBS0GG3F3PPG

FENCING

8PPE $IBJO-JOL 3FQBJST5PP

253-222-1136

3FUBJOJOH8BMMTt4PE $MFBO6Q.BJOUFOBODF 4QSJOLMFS4ZTUFNT

Low Prices Free Estimates

-JDFOTF#POEFEt+5-"/-4.&

HAULING

LANDSCAPING

HAULING

HAULING

HAULING

Father AND Son Hauling Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time. Excavation and Demolition Now Available CELL

OFFICE

253-222-9181

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com LIMO

LIMO

LIMO

LIMO

PATRIOT LIMOUSINE SERVICE

24 Hour Service Weddings • Anniversaries • Birthdays • Proms • Graduations Funerals • Round Trip Airport Service • Corporate Holiday Parties • All Other Special Occasions

253-848-7378

SERVICES ELECTRICAL

CASH FOR CARS

Allied Electric Service

CASH FOR CARS PAY TOP $! $100 & UP. WE WILL BUY YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES & RVS. FREE TOWING. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE. 253-341-9548 RITA

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 www.alliedmarinecorp.com ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

HAULING

ALEX’S FALL MAINTENANCE SERVICES GUTTER CLEANING

AND

HAULING

  

EMPLOYMENT

LAWN CARE

LAWN CARE

Big John’s Lawn Care º Storm Clean-up º Handyman

(253) 397-7013

FREE Hauling for Metal

CLEANING

CLEANING

Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you. Squeaky Clean 253.473.7621 Licensed & Insured

CAT CARE

APPRENTICESHIP OPPORTUNITIES International Union of Elevator Constructors Local 19 Seattle / Western Washington Applications must be completed online by visiting www.neiep.org/careers.aspx

CAT CARE

AFFORDABLE CAT CARE FOR MULIT-CAT OR SINGLE CAT HOUSEHOLD. A TRUSTED RESOURCE WHILE YOU’RE AWAY. KATHY’S CAT CARE 253-952-7075

EMPLOYMENT

Completed applications must be received between Jan. 2, 2017 & Jan. 21, 2017 Applicants must be at least 18-years of age and possess a high school diploma or GED. Equal Opportunity for all applicants. Women and Minorities are encouraged to apply. More information can be found on the IUEC Local 19 website: http://iuec19.org/

www.patriotlimowa.com

EMPLOYMENT

SERVICES

EXPERIENCED TREE CLIMBER

Full Time/Year Round Up to $250.00 Per Day + Potential pay increase after 90 days. $1,000 Incentive can be earned within 60 days Medical after 60 days Voluntary Dental 3-5 years of tree climbing experience Email work experience to Recruiting@treeservicesnw.com

1-800-684-8733 ext. 3321

EMPLOYMENT

DISCRIMINATION Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator and City of Destiny Award Winner will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services. Tower Lanes Now Hiring Line Cook, Front Desk Help and Weekend Bar Server Apply at Tower Lanes 6323 6th Avenue Tacoma

CONTACT US Phone: Mail:

253-922-5317 Fax: 253-922-5305 2588 Pacific Highway E., Fife, WA 98424

Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@ fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.tacomaweekly.com

Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com • Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com • Andrea Jay, andrea@tacomaweekly.com


3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY *ANUARY13 

NOTICES

NOTICES

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT ./    .OTICEAND3UMMONSBY0UBLICATION $EPENDENCY 3-0" $EPENDENCY OF */% 0%26! *2 $/"  4O+2)34).!"*/2.% -OTHER ! $EPENDENCY 0ETITION WAS lLED ON *ULY   A &ACT &INDING HEARING WILL BE HELD ON THIS MATTER ON *ANUARY   AT  PM AT 4HURSTON #OUNTY &AMILY AND *UVENILE #OURT  ND !VENUE 37 4UMWATER 7ASHINGTON 9OUSHOULDBEPRESENTATTHISHEARING

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 1/17/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 08:00-09:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

4HE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENTASDElNEDIN2#7 4HIS BEGINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENTLOSSOFYOURPARENTALRIGHTS)FYOUDO NOTAPPEARATTHEHEARING THECOURTMAYENTERA DEPENDENCYORDERINYOURABSENCE 4OREQUESTACOPYOFTHE.OTICE SUMMONS AND $EPENDENCY0ETITION CALL$3(3 !T    OR     4O 6IEW INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS INCLUDING RIGHT TO A LAWYER GO TO (90%2,).+ hHTTPWWWATG WAGOV$09ASPXvWWWATGWAGOV$09ASPX $ATED    BY ,INDA -YTHRE %NLOW 4HURSDAY#OUNTY#LERK

4/!NTHONY3AKELLIS #ASE.AME$ 3 $ #ASE.UMBER059 #7 #7   .ATURE OF #ASE #HILD&AMILY 0ROTECTION 0ETITION !$*5$)#!4/29(%!2).' 35--/.3!.$./4)#%/&(%!2).' ! #HILD&AMILY 0ROTECTION 0ETITION HAS BEEN lLEDREGARDINGTHEABOVE NAMEDCHILD 9/5!2%(%2%"935--/.%$TOPERSONALLY APPEAR BEFORE THE #HILDRENS #OURT OF THE 0UYALLUP 4RIBE OF )NDIANS FOR A &/2-!, !$*5$)#!4/29(%!2).'ANDDATE TIMEAND LOCATIONBELOW $!4%&EBRUARY 4)-%AM ,/#!4)/.  %!34 34 34 4!#/-! 7! !TTHEFORMALADJUDICATORYHEARINGTHEPETITIONER MUST PROVE THAT THE ALLEGATIONS RAISED IN THE CHILDFAMILYPROTECTIONAREMORELIKELYTRUETHAN NOTANDTHATTHEBESTINTERESTSOFTHECHILDWILL BESERVEDBYCONTINUED#OURTINTERVENTION 4HE#OURTWILLEITHERlNDTHEALLEGATIONSOFTHE CHILDFAMILY PROTECTION PETITION TO BE TRUE OR DISMISS THE CHILDFAMILY PROTECTION PETITION UNLESS CONTINUED TO ALLOW THE PRESENTATION OF FURTHEREVIDENCE )F YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THE PETITION WITH IN $AYSORAPPEARFORTHEFORMALADJUDICATORY HEARING THE #OURT MAY lND YOU DEFAULT AND ENTERADEFAULTORDEROFCHILDFAMILYPROTECTION AND ORDER NECESSARY INTERVENTION AND APPROPRIATE STEPS YOU MUST FOLLOW TO CORRECT THEUNDERLYINGPROBLEMS  ./4)#% 05235!.4 4/ 42)"!, #/$% 3%#4)/.  4(% #/524 -!9 &).$ 4(% 0!2%.4 '5!2$)!. /2 #534/$)!. ).$%&!5,4&/2&!),52%4/2%30/.$/2 !00%!2 !4 ! #/524 (%!2).' 4()3-!9 2%35,4 ). 9/52 #(),$2%. "%).' 0,!#%$ ). !./4(%2 (/-% !.$ 4(% 0!2%.4 /2$%2%$ 4/ #/22%#4 #%24!). 02/",%-3 ! COPY OF THE 0ETITION AND AN !DVISEMENT OF 2IGHTSISAVAILABLEATTHE#OURT#LERKSOFlCE 9OU MAY CALL 0UYALLUP 4RIBE #HILDRENS 3ERVICESFORMOREINFORMATIONABOUTYOURCHILD 4HECASEWORKERSNAMEIS+ATIE2IEBELANDTHE TELEPHONENUMBERIS   $ATEDTHISTHDAYOF*ANUARY &ORMORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL THE 0UYALLUP 4RIBAL #OURT#LERKAT  

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 1/17/2017. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 2:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 1:00-2:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

WANTED WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

(253) 752-8105

VOLUNTEERS NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: VOLUNTEER MORE, TWEET LESS CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative Care has some great ways for you to serve the community and make meaningful connections. Those near the end of life need help with living. If you have 1-4 hours a week to read to someone, listen to their stories, run errands, make phone calls, or welcome people to our hospice facility, then we have several opportunities for you. Join us in the new year for trainings scheduled in January and March. Log onto www.chifranciscan.org and click “hospice and palliative care� in the “our services� tab to learn more. Or call James Bentley at 253-538-4649

#PROJECTFEEDTACOMA There are about 2,000 homeless in Tacoma and about 1.000 beds. Many are families with children. Please help #PROJ E C T F E E D TA C O M A to provide some basic necessities. All items donated will go directly to people on the street. PROJECT FEED TACOMA is 100% volunteer. This is a true grass roots organization and they really need your help. For more information and to find more go to www. projectfeedtacoma.org. Can you help with some urgent needs as winter approaches? Here are some suggestions and a huge THANK YOU! Needed: Warm Socks for Men, Women and Children; Warm Hats; Gloves; Peanut Butter and Jam/Jelly; Crackers, Chips and non-perish-

VOLUNTEERS able snacks; Individually wrapped granola bars or protein bars; cookies; lotion; lip balm; tampons and sanitary napkins; wipes; soap, shampoo and conditioner; gallon sized freezer bags. A BIG THANKS TO THE COPPER DOOR FOR ALLOWING PROJECT FEED TACOMA TO COLLECT DONATIONS THERE. Wear a 100 years of Fashion! Like to play dress-up? The Golden Oldies Guild (a volunteer arm of Goodwill) is looking for women to model in our vintage fashion shows. We do shows at lifestyle retirement communities, museums, assisted living facilities, churches, and a wide variety of fundraisers. The collection, from the late 1890’s to l980’s, is women’s garments in about size 12 and smaller. You don’t need to be elegant—you need to like to have fun. We also need piano and keyboard accompanists. Come join us! Contact Christine Oliver-Hammond (253) 5736765 (corrected phone number) or goldenoldiesguild@goodwill.com for information or to apply. Help hard-working families by volunteering with VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)! Provide free income tax preparation to low and moderate income households. Locations throughout Pierce County. Day, evening and weekend hours available (February to April 2017). Volunteers can serve as tax preparers, quality reviewers, greeters, or interpreters (for non-English speaking or hearing-impaired tax payers). Free training provided. Learn more and apply online at www.VolunteerTaxHelp.org. Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433 AmeriCorps Opportunity: Employment Case Manager/Job Developer Tacoma Community House is seek an outgoing, enthusiastic, and motivated professional that is passionate about assisting low-income community members on their journey to self-sufficiency. This professional position is responsible for assisting people in need of employment. The case manager/ job developer will provide career counseling, employment & training information, job search skills, workshop facilitation, job placement/follow-up, and

VOLUNTEERS

referral to other community resources. The case manager/job develop will assist in facilitation of our Employer Advisory Board and will also develop and implement 3 financial fitness events. Contact Arrie Dunlap at (253) 383-3951 or adunlap@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. AmeriCorps Opportunity: Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/student reading program for struggling first, second, and third grade readers. Duties include recruiting volunteers, producing a monthly tutor newsletter, facilitating bimonthly tutor workshops, tracking attendance for both students and volunteer tutors, researching best practicing best practices for tutoring strategies and tutor training and tutoring a student in each of the four schools. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2016-Jul 15, 2017). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686. Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and we’ll get you started. Please

join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253212-2778.

Coordinator, royf@ tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025.

Join us in changing lives!

Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.� Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868.

Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, a nonprofit, offers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org.

South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www.southsoundoutreach.org.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253-536-4494

Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/ nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports

Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www.bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060.

PETS Pet of the Week

FEZZIWIG Would you look at those ears? Word at the shelter is that it Bull Terrier mi e iwig fits his namesake to a tee. Just like Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol character, this pooch could be explained as happy, kind, and affectionate. Eightyears-young e iwig would fit est with a teenage or adult home — #A513029

www.thehumanesociety.org

Call us today to place your classified ad! 253-922-5317 or fill out this form and mail with payment to:

Name: _______________________________ Address: _____________________________

Tacoma Weekly 2588 Pacific Hwy Fife WA 98424

Category: Ad Copy Here:

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________

______________________________________ Phone:_______________________________

Deadline: Tuesday by 12 noon for Thursday publication

.

30 Words and Under: _____________________ Extra words @ .05: ________________________ Sub Total: _______________________________ x Number of Weeks = _____________________ Total Amount: __________________________

Cash Check Money Order Visa/Mastercard

Exp.

Card #

Cost: $15 for 30 words for one week. 5¢ per each additional word. Deadline: Tuesday, 12 noon for Thursday publications. Payment: Required on all classified ads at time of placement. We accept cash, check, money order or Visa/Mastercard. Bring payment to Tacoma Weekly at 2588 Pacific Hwy, Fife. Email: advertising@tacomaweekly.com

2 5 8 8 P a c i f i c H w y, F i f e • 2 5 3 - 9 2 2 - 5 3 1 7 TA C O M A W E E K LY

FIFE FREE PRESS

M I LTO N - E D G E W O O D S I G N A L

w w w. t a c o m a w e e k l y. c o m

UNIVERSITY PLACE PRESS


Friday, January 13, 2017 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Classifieds REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

CALL 253.922.5317

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

SERGIO HERNANDEZ

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES

Serving the Community Since 1991

WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs

Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNT‰ BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF t (FUUJOHRVBMJmFEBOEBQQSPWFEGPSBMPBO t $IPPTJOHUIFSJHIUMPBOUZQFGPSZPV t 6OEFSTUBOEJOHDSFEJUTDPSFTBOEIPXUPVTF DSFEJUJOXBZTUPJNQSPWFZPVSTDPSF t -FBSOUIF)PXBOE8IZPGXPSLJOHXJUIB SFBMUPS UIFIPNFQVSDIBTJOHQSPDFTTBOE IPXUPNBLFBOPGGFS

LEARN ABOUT THE...

CLASSES ARE FREE!

Home Advantage Loan

CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION

(Loan Specific Criteria applies)

Down Payment Assistance

Call Amy for information:

0% INTEREST/%.035("(& NO MONTHLY PAYMENT!

206-715-1847

(Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

61500'5)&45.035("(&".06/5 64&'03%08/1":.&/503$-04*/($0454

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

Top Producing Broker 2008-2015 Voted “Five Star Professional� by Clients

HOMES

HOMES

www.stephanielynch.com HOMES

his MUS SEE newly updated home boasts new hardwood floors, carpets and a large deck that will be finished in a couple weeks. Located in a beautifully quiet part of orth acoma with a partial view of the sound is just a stones throw from an amazing park and walking distance to a shopping area! ith 3 bedrooms on the main level and another in the lower, this home is large yet cozy! ot to mention the huge rec room downstairs! Come and check it out! You wont regret it! 3 5,000

REALTORS

$625 $625

s"UYERS s3ELLERS sST4IMERS .O-ONEY$OWN

$1450 $1095

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WEL1BED 1 BATH 450CLEAN, SF. 1BED 1 BATH 450 SF. 2 COME BD 1BATO845 SF.3COZY SETHIS BED 2AND BATH CLEAN, COZY APARTCOZY APARTMENT IN TACOMA, CLUDED 1BD 1BA HOME W/ OPEN U.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD MENT IN TACOMA, WITH WITH EASY ACCESSTOTOWA-16. WA-16. LOFT SPACE THE FIN.LEVEL. ATTIC. FLOORS ON IN THE MAIN EASY ACCESS

GIG HARBOR HOME DUPONT

BONNEY LAKE CONDO PUYALLUP

$1795 $1850

$1075 $1150

TACOMA TACOMA APT.

SPANAWAY SPANAWAY HOME

9007 115THAVE ST.E E#L1 1122 FOSDICK DR LN NW 8403 LOCUST 2205 PT. BOBS HOLLOW

Keller Williams Realty www.NeverWalkAlone.co With Keith G. Walker by your side, you’ll never walk alone

22BED BATH 1157 33 BED BED2.52BATH BATH 1822SF. WONBED2.5 2 BATH 1100SF.SF.REMODBEAU2274 SF. 2 STORY W/ ELED & TOWNHOUSE W/ 2 LOWER BEDS TIFUL SPACIOUS 2BD 3DERFUL SPACIOUSSECLUDED BEDROOMS, SETTING UPSTAIRS 1.5 BATH. NEWER FLOORING, AND AREA FOROPEN THISLOFT, 3 BD 2 LANDING BA HOME WITH & UNIT AT WEST LAKE TAPPS APPLIANCES, NEWER PAINT. PERFECT FOR A WORK STATION. LOFT AREA OVER THE KITCHEN. CONDOMINIUMS

14406 6601PACIFIC S TYLERAVE #6 S

$695 $795

Advertise Your Real Estate Listing in the Pierce County Community Classifieds CALL 253-922-5317

5121 203RD ST.ST. CT.E E 2118 198TH

$1425 $1750

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 1 BED, 1 BATH 575COMFORTABLE SF. GREAT 2 BED, 1 BATH 880 SF. 4 BD 2.5 BA 2450 SF. BEAUTIFUL MUST FANTASTIC 2 VALUE IN THIS NICE 1 BEDLOWER LEVEL 2 BEDROOM / 1 BATH- HOME HAS SEE!! FORMAL ROOM, STORY HOME, 3SITTING BEDROOM ROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE ROOM UNIT.PACIFIC SECTIONOAKS 8 ACCEPTED OPEN KITCHEN AMPLE STORAGE 2.5 BATH ONW/ A CORNER LOT. IN THE APTS.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

TREE SERVICE

• Tree Removal • Pruning • View Trimming • Emergency Service & Storm Cleanup • Tree Health Assessment Licensed • Insured • Bonded

253-234-GROW

(4769)

www.familytree253.com

LIC. FAMILTRC874M6

FREE ESTIMATES! $

100 off

Jay Brock

Any Tree Service

Certified Arborist PN-7500A

$500 job minimum

Johnny Marth

Not valid with other offers or specials. Expires 1-13-17.

Certified Arborist PN-7495A

HOMES

3008 S. 12TH ST., TACOMA

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

UNIVERSITY PLACE-COMMERCIAL ZONED, 27th & Bridgeport Way, Former CPA Office - Real Estate Included, $225,000, Now Vacant. temporary off the market

Specialize in Assisting:

22084515 GRANDVIEW N 11TH DR. ST W

HOMES

COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE

745020

3228 AVE. 3228SSUNION UNION AVE.

HOMES

$595,000

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES

Real Estate Consultant

PLACE N.UNIV. TACOMA HOME

Good Investment Property, FULLY LEASED , completely remodeled commercial office building, 3350 sq ft, .25 acre commercial lot, owner occupied, 10 offices, 3 bathrooms, Spacious conference room, 2 full Kitchen reception area, 2 parking lots front and rear. Centrally located to all services.

COMMERCIAL

REALTORS

253-653-1168 TACOMA TACOMA APT.

GREAT LOCATION! Brand new construction in Old Town. Great views of Commencement Bay. Large covered trex decks on water side to enjoy the views. Main floor Master with deck access. Gas fireplaces up and down. Gas furnace with heat pump, Huge Rec/ Family room downstairs. Maple raised panel Cabinets, Granite counters ,Engineered flooring on the entire main floor. Vaulted ceilings. Roughed in Vac system. Deluxe painted millwork.Quiet dead end street. Beautifully staged & ready! A Rare find!

$749,000

Carmen Neal, Blue Emerald Real Estate 253-632-2920

Keith G. Walker CONDOSCONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, & HOMES

Beautiful turn of the century home, located central to all services. Remodeled 2 stories w/ basement detached oversized 2 car garage, fully fenced, hot tub, nicely landscaped. Interior Floor plan features open concept living w/ spacious formal living & dining, enticing Kitchen w/Quartz counter tops, Shaker cabinets, Farm sink, Stainless Steel appliances, Pantry & Island. Evening brings 4 bedrooms 2 tastefully tiled bathrooms one adjoining. Partially finished laundry area in basement for games & hobbies.

3 Beds, 1 Bath, 1250 SF. Wonderful Victorian home that has easy commute to UPS & is close to Franklin elementary!!! Large covered front porch. Main floor bedroom. oth a living room & family room Large bedrooms. reakfast bar & loads of storage in kitchen. ewer roof, storm windows, newer hot water tank & furnace.Great Value Fully fenced backyard and paved driveway. Fresh paint inside and out, new flooring, updated plumbing & electrical, and fully insulated! Plenty of room for your own touches! Super close to 6th Ave! MLS# 832899 $150,000

Rachel Lieder-Simeon, Redfin Real Estate (253) 780-6068 FOR RENT

FOR SALE!! 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

HOMES

HOMES

1326 N. HEATHERWOOD W, TACOMA, WA 98406-1433

FOR RENT

FOR SALE 2307 N 27th St., Tacoma

$289,000

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4

CLASSES HELD REGULARLY

FOR SALE 1660 S 55th ST, Tacoma

EATING ESTABLISHMENT WITH BEER & WINE - Same Owners last 9 years, great location, Business price $285,000, terms avail. OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $519,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease.

price reduction

LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $149,000 $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. for $4,000 Month. SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY *ANUARY13 

Smokey Robinson Battle at the Boat 109

Lunar New Year Nguyen Hung

January 13, 8:30pm

January 20, 8pm

January 28, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $70, $95, $160, $170

I-5 Showroom $30, $50, $75, $100

I-5 Showroom -VDLZ&OWFMPQF(JWFBXBZ

Air Supply

CageSport MMA Blue Öyster Cult

February 14, 8pm

February 25, 7pm

March 11, 8pm

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $70, $75

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $25, $35, $55, $60

MORE Winners, MORE Often! twww.emeraldqueen.com &2$* *&YJU &UI4U 5BDPNB 8"t&2$)PUFM$BTJOP *&YJU 1BD)XZ& 'JGF 8" :PVNVTUCFUPFOUFSUIFDBTJOP.BOBHFNFOUSFTFSWFTUIFSJHIUUPDIBOHFBOZFWFOUPSQSPNPUJPO5JDLFUTBWBJMBCMFBUUIF&2$#PY0GGJDFT&2$JTOPUSFTQPOTJCMFGPSBOZUIJSEQBSUZUJDLFUTBMFT

Twa 01 13 17 p01  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you