Page 1

TACOMA LITTLE THEATRE ‘SOPHIE’ 11

-2 1987 01 8

because

tters ma

WEEDLY – SYNTHETIC CANNABIS 3

com

RAINIERS PICKING UP STEAM 9

muni ty

Because Community Matters.

TACOMAWEEKLY NEWS FREE • SUNDAY, MAY 12, 2019

WWW.TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

ENGAGING LANDLORDS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN HOMELESSNESS

LLP

Landlord Liaison Program staff thank those who make a difference with a Community Pillar Award, here being received by Shonna Randle of Rainier Rentals (holding frame). From left to right are: Tony Lewis, Landlord Liaison Program; Debra Grant, Clara Le and Terra Island, Metropolitan Development Council; Kiesha Triplett, Landlord Liaison Program; Michael Yoder, Associated Ministries; Alexis Eykel, Landlord Liaison Program; Bruce Dammeier, Pierce County Executive; Jeff Rodgers and Anne Marie Edmunds, Pierce County Human Services.

BY MATT NAGLE matt@tacomaweekly.com

A new partnership between Pierce County and Associated Ministries has resulted in a novel program for helping house those experiencing homelessness countywide. Called the Landlord Liaison Program (LLP), it strives to successfully house homeless individuals and families who cannot otherwise access housing due to rental barriers (such as past evictions, bad credit, or low income), with the ultimate goal to provide safe and affordable housing in every part of Pierce County. Under the leadership of Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier, last year the Pierce County Council established a county landlord mitigation fund and the county Human Services Department wrapped a new

program around the administration of that fund, the Landlord Liaison Program (LLP), which works with property owners/managers and participating service agencies. The program is an incentive through which private market landlords have access to funds and tools to rent to those with less than perfect rental histories – the hope is to create a way to get landlords to be more willing than they have been in the past to rent to those that they might normally shy away from. Associated Ministries has been awarded the contract to run the program for Pierce County. “It fits with what we do because our organization has a variety of public and private funded-housing programs so this is a natural fit with our work,” said Associated Ministries Executive Director Michael Yoder. “There is only one solution to homelessness: to get someone into a permanent

home, and this is a new effort to do that.” LLP is not a brand-new concept, but a newly energized effort in Pierce County to take the best practices of how similar programs have worked well in other communities and try to foster something like it in Pierce County. “There are some outstanding examples of communities that have really embraced and advanced this idea of working directly with private-market landlords to help them with incentives and mitigations so that they can more easily step into the system and do their part in the homelessness continuum,” Yoder said. “We can’t just build public housing to build out way out of our homelessness crisis. We have to have private-market forces as the main solution in the short term.” u See LANDLORDS / page 7

CROATIANS SIGN SISTER CITY AGREEMENT BY JOHN LARSON jlarson@tacomaweekly.com

Two visitors from Croatia were in town last week to formalize the latest sister city agreement. Tacoma now has its 15th sister city, Stari Grad, which is located on the island of Hvar. Representing that city was Branka Bezic-Filipovic, head of the Croatia Heritage Foundation, and Petroslav Sapunar, an educator and elected official who serves on what would be the equivalent of a county council.

Several local residents of Croatian descent showed the guests around town. They included Bill Connolly and Clare Petrich, a member of the Port of Tacoma Commission. Both have Croatian and Irish heritage; Connolly said he is more Croatian than Irish, while Petrich is 75 percent Irish and 25 percent Croatian. Bezic-Filipovic noted she is part Italian, but feels more tuned into her Croatian heritage. She and her associate spent several days in Los Angeles, then flew up here on April 29 to spend five days in Tacoma, a u See SISTER CITY / page 2

CITY OF TACOMA

Branka Bezic-Filipovic, left, Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards and Petroslav Sapunar had a meeting at Tacoma Municipal Building last week.

BIG SALE!

This Weekend Only

Friday May 10 thru Sunday May 12 at

LeMay - America’s Car Museum

3410 PACIFIC HWY E FIFE, WA | 877-598-7422 | 253-358-8870

W W W. F I F E R V C E N T E R . C O M


2 | NEWS

Sunday, May 12, 2019 • www.tacomaweekly.com • TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS

COUNTY COUNCIL APPROVES CHAMBERS BAY LEASE AGREEMENT

t Sister City From page 1

After months of public testimony, discussion and negotiation, the Pierce County Council voted 6-1 to approve Ordinance 2019-10s, the Chambers Bay Resort Ground Lease Agreement, as amended. This action was taken on May 7. The ordinance will now be sent to County Executive Bruce Dammeier for signature and implementation. Any future modification or amendment to the lease must receive authorization of the County Council. “The Council was provided the proposed ground lease agreement in late December for consideration,” said Council Chair Doug Richardson. “Over the course of the past four months, the Council has listened to the public, sought legal advice, and thoroughly questioned the developer to gain clarity on the specifics of the ground lease agreement. This project will enhance and continue to reinforce Chambers Creek Properties as a premier park, trail, golf course and County jewel.” The ground lease agreement includes the approval of the following features as part of the Chambers Bay Resort project: no more than 190 hotel or golf villa units; event and meeting space; new clubhouse and pro shop; a spa; a restaurant and bar operated by noted Seattle chef and restauranteur Tom Douglas; improved parking necessary to serve the improvements under University Place Municipal Code for the proposed project; and not more than 239,000 square feet of total building space. Pierce County continues to manage the Chambers Creek Properties in accordance with the Chambers Creek Regional Park Master Site Plan, as a condition of the City of University Place giving approval of the Conditional Use Permit for the Chambers Creek Waste Water Treatment Plant expansion. The development of a resort complex within the Central Meadow area of the Chambers Creek Properties is consistent with the 2017 Chambers Creek Regional Master Site Plan. Pierce County continues to be the property owner for all 930-acres of Chambers Creek Regional Park, including the Chambers Bay Resort project land. The City of University Place is the permitting agency for the resort project. The Council also passed Resolution 2019-52, as amended, which is the Council’s intent to conduct a market and budget analysis on future capital projects within the Chambers Creek Properties and Ground Lease Agreement.

city which attracted many Croatian immigrants. They met with several members of the new sister city committee, including Patti Mullan and Tonya Stack, who is originally from Zagreb, Croatia. She teaches Croatian language classes two Saturdays a month at Slavonian Hall in Old Town. Among the places they visited were Point Defiance Park, Tacoma Historical Society, Skansi Park in Gig Harbor and city hall in Tacoma, where the signing ceremony was held with Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards and city staff. They also had dinner at the new McMenamins complex in downtown. At the downtown branch of Tacoma Public Library, they donated a book written by Bezic-Filipovic. Bezic-Filipovic discussed her foundation’s mission to connect with Croatian people who have left their homeland and settled around the world. As a result, she has visited the United States numerous times, although this was her first time in Washington. “We hope it will be the first of many,” said Petrich. In August, an exhibit based on her research will open in the Civic Museum in Stari Grad. It will examine the lives of Croatian immigrants who settled in Tacoma, Gig Harbor and Bellingham. Text for the exhibit will be in English and Croatian. Bezic-Filipovic hopes to someday bring the exhibit to this area. “I hope this will be the first step toward greater cooperation between us,” she remarked. Sapunar has a background in education, having worked as a teacher of vocational and technical studies in a high school. He is pleased to see how Croatian immigrants prospered here. “I am happy we adapted well

and built a decent life,” he observed. “Many have supported each other as one Croatian community. Our experience is that history is a teacher. If you do not know your history, you cannot build a better future.” Bezic-Filipovic said prior to World War I, her country was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Young males were subject to a military draft, some as young as 12. Some chose to leave rather than serve in that military. Actions taken by the empire had a devastating effect on the wine industry in Croatia, taking a heavy toll on the economy. “They were looking for a better life,” she said. “The toughest always survive.” Bezic-Filipovic would like to see student exchanges between her city and Tacoma. People of Croatian descent from around the world go there to learn more about their cultural heritage. One was an 80-year-old woman living in Chile. The visitors noted a few notable differences between their city and Tacoma. Coastal areas of Croatia draw many tourists during the warm weather months, creating work in hotels, restaurants, museums and other attractions. Many of these employees are out of work during the off-season. Overall, the unemployment rate there is about 25 percent. “When I went there I saw no evidence of that,” Connolly remarked. Bezic-Filipovic was saddened by the sight of a young man in downtown Tacoma, who appeared to be homeless and was panhandling. She said in her city, people in need can often turn to their family for help. One American export that Sapunar connected with is basketball, a sport he began playing in his youth. He said Croatians are very proud of players who have gone on to play in the National Basketball Association. These include Dino Radja, who played for the Boston Celtics, and Toni Kukoc, who played for several teams including the Chicago Bulls during their dynasty years of the 1990s.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF TACOMA

The Croatian visitors and their new American friends posed for a picture on the deck outside Mayor Victoria Woodards’ office.

253.274.0443

jonzcatering.com

Your Corporate

BBQ Made Easy

FRAME-MAKERS.COM

BRING THIS AD AND GET

25% OFF YOUR CUSTOM FRAMING!

(253) 564-2320 3011 6th Avenue Tacoma, WA 98406

Start the Year off Right

WITH OUR NEW 2019’S! Fife RV Center carries Coachmen, Forest River, Gulf Stream, Newmar, Prime Time and Pacific Coachworks models including Mirada, Pursuit, Forester, Gulf Breeze, Tracer, Vintage Cruiser and Blaze’n. We offer hundreds of recreational vehicles from the top selling manufacturers of Diesel, Class A, Class C, Fifth Wheels, Travel Trailer and Toy Hauler units. Our Service Center is staffed with experienced and courteous technicians who are qualified to handle all of your recreational vehicle service, repair, parts, accessories and maintenance needs.

3410 PACIFIC HWY E FIFE, WA | 877-598-7422 | 253-358-8870

W W W. F I F E R V C E N T E R . C O M


NEWS | 3

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

BULLETIN BOARD

JINKINS’ MEDICAL DEBT BILL ONE OF SEVERAL VICTORIES CARING AT HOME IS THE KEY

which makes clear that the 10-year statute of limitations on debt cannot be unexpectedly revived through unscrupulous debt collection practices. Known as “zombie debt,” restarting the clock on the statute of limitations often leaves people in an endless cycle of debt.

The governor has signed a pair of consumer protection bills related to debt, and two more are on the way to his desk. Rep. Laurie Jinkins (D-Tacoma) is the sponsor of HB 1531, which reduces the chances of medical debt spiraling out of control for patients and their families. “You wouldn’t hand over your credit card to be swiped by a retailer without first knowing what you actually owe. But that’s often what we’re required to do to get medical treatment,” Jinkins said. “This bill will help reduce medical bankruptcies and protect people’s finances.” Medical debt is the number one cause of bankruptcy in the United States. HB 1531 lowers the interest rate that often accrues before a patient ever sees a bill, prohibits health care providers from selling medical debt to collections agencies for at least 120 days after the first billing, and requires that patients are informed about opportunities to apply for charity care. “The 2019 session had a lot of big wins for consumers, and I’m thrilled that four of them were bills the House Civil Rights & Judiciary committee championed,” said Jinkins, who chairs the committee. Other debt-related consumer wins include: • HB 1066, sponsored by Christine Kilduff (D-University Place), increases fairness and transparency for consumers by putting an end to the practice of “pocket service” by debt collectors. With pocket service, a person can receive a debt-related summons that is difficult or impossible to verify. The consequences of ignoring a valid summons can be extremely damaging, including liens, wage garnishment, negative credit reports – even bench warrants. This bill has been signed into law.

• HB 1730, sponsored by Amy Walen (D-Kirkland),

STAFF John Weymer publisher@tacomaweekly.com Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com Harald Hohendorf harald@tacomaweekly.com John Larson jlarson@tacomaweekly.com Ashlyn Allen ashlyn@tacomaweekly.com ADVERTISING sales@tacomaweekly.com Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us.

Stay Connected with us on

Keep yourself informed on

s s s

• HB 1602, sponsored by Kristine Reeves (D-Federal Way), which will help ensure working families are not left destitute or homeless by wage garnishment. It brings down the interest rate on the consumer debt owed, and lets people retain more of their wages so they can pay for necessities, like rent.

About 80 percent of us will need some form of long-term care in our lifetime. The reality is that most of that care will be provided at home, not a health care facility. Oftentimes the care provided is not medical, but rather assistance with basic tasks. Today more families are relying on in-home support of a loved one for both short and long-term care. “Keys to Caring @ Home” is an opportunity to learn about caring at home and the services available in your community. The presentation will discuss how to effectively work with providers, pay for care while avoiding expensive services and the difference between home care and home health. Knowing the right questions to ask can save families hundreds and thousands of dollars over time. The conversations will be held on May 13, 12 p.m. at the Pierce County Annex, 2401 S. 35th St., Tacoma . While many families pay for care out-of-pocket or through health insurance, there are also several publicly-funded resources that may help them pay for care. With some programs the eligibility for receiving assistance is very generous. This may save families on the cost of care but might also enable care to be extended over additional weeks or months. “There is no cookie-cutter solution when it comes to needing care at home,” said Pierce County Aging and Disability Resources Manager Aaron Van Valkenburg. “The needs of each care recipient and the situation of each family often dictate the mix of care that needs to be provided. Quite often the most important part of planning for care is knowing the right questions to ask when the need arises.” “Keys to Caring @ Home” is an informational event sponsored by Pierce County Aging and Disability Resources. Each session is free and open to the public. Anyone of any age can attend. No RSVP is required. For more information about the presentations, call the Pierce County Aging and Disability Resource Center at (253) 798-4600 or 1 (800) 562-0332.

Tacoma Weekly News LLC P.O. Box 7185, Tacoma, WA 98417 PH: (253) 922-5317 FAX: (253) 922-5305

Weekly news Contests Local events

fb.com/tacomaweekly

Great assortment of Dinner Entrees Come and Get It!

29 Tacoma Ave. Tacoma • 253.272.1193

• Country Style Breakfasts FULL BAR • Specialty Burgers AND • Salads & Sandwiches BANQUET • Choice Steaks ROOM • Homemade Soups • Daily Food & Drink Specials 1402 E. Main. Puyallup • 253.848.4571

Dry Cleaning Services Friendly, knowledgeable garment experts! Once your clothes are left in our care, you can trust that they’ll be carefully inspected & handled from start to finish. Your clothes will be returned packaged, clean & ready to wear.

Pickup and Delivery Free service to your front door. 618 N 1st St, Tacoma, WA 98403 www.stadiumthriftway.com

608 North 1st Street, Tacoma

(253) 572-7121


4 | NEWS

Sunday, May 12, 2019 • www.tacomaweekly.com • TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS

GAIN REAL-WORLD EXPERIENCE WITH PIERCE COUNTY LIBRARY’S TEEN VOLUNTEER LEAGUE

PIERCE COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Teens can gain work experience by volunteering. Teens: Want to learn hands-on job skills, gain leadership experience, earn community service, and spruce up job or college applications? Apply to join the Pierce County Library System’s Teen Volunteer League now through June 10. The Teen Volunteer League is open to teens, ages 14-18, and is offered at all Pierce County Library locations. Students will volunteer at their library June-August. Through volunteering, students gain valuable experience and hands-on job skills training by assisting with library activities and special projects. “The Teen Volunteer League is a super opportunity for teens, benefiting them as well as benefitting the Library System and the communities where the teens live,” said Pierce County Library Executive Director Georgia Lomax.

“The teens will learn valuable real-world skills and see first-hand their impact in giving back to their community.” Participating in the Teen Volunteer League requires teenagers to commit at least eight hours of volunteer time during the summer months. The Library System encourages interested teens to apply as soon as they can, because available volunteer opportunities are limited based on location and positions. The Library will fill positions as it receives applications, keeping the limited opportunities open until filled. The Pierce County Library Foundation sponsors the Teen Volunteer League. For more information about volunteer opportunities at the library, visit volunteer.pcls.us.

Annual

&

Health Wellness Fair Saturday, May 18 • 1:00pm th

Become a happier, healthier you! You’re invited to join us as we host a health fair featuring local resources such as Dispatch Health, Home Doctor USA, the Pierce County Aging and Disability Resource Center, massage therapist Dana Quade, PS Salon and more. Healthy snacks and refreshments will be served. To RSVP, please call 253.256.1543. I n de p e n de n t & A s s i s t e d L i v i ng • M e mor y C a r e

8201 6th Avenue • Tacoma • NarrowsGlen.com LICENSE# 2385

253.256.1543

LARCHMONT ELEMENTARY NUTRITION MANAGER RECEIVES REGIONAL RECOGNITION The national, non-profit School Nutrition Association (SNA) has named Regina Coleman from Larchmont Elementary School the Northwest regional Manager of the Year. Considered the highest honor a school nutrition manager can earn, the award recognizes a cafeteria manager who has demonstrated dedication and ingenuity to improve his or her school meal program. One of Coleman’s primary duties as child nutrition manager is to create a welcoming environment for her students, greeting each one with a smile and calling them by name. Her patience and passion for her students make her a role model in Larchmont Elementary.  Working with a group of special education students in her kitchen part-time, Coleman teaches how to work safely and efficiently and build practical skills so that they will be able to maintain a job after school. She encourages parents and students to get involved with school nutrition and she manages her school’s social media platforms to stay in contact with parents and answer questions. Through YouTube videos, she recruits new employees, educates parents on food-related concerns and enhances the community within and outside of the school district.  As a professional who appreciates continued education,  Coleman encourages staff members to take advantage of available nutrition and skills classes. For the past 10 years, she has helped secure stipends needed to pay for these classes for staff.  Coleman is there to offer advice and answer staff questions on everything from nutrition guidelines and time management to union contracts. She encourages staff to join SNA and attend Washington School Nutrition Association events and trainings. Last year, she brought three members from her staff to their first-ever Annual National Conference (ANC).  While attending ANC last year, she participated in as many education sessions as she could, taking in the latest in school nu-

SCHOOL NUTRITION ASSOCIATION

On July 14, Regina Coleman will be honored during the Red Carpet Awards Ceremony at the School Nutrition Association’s 73rd annual National Conference in St. Louis. trition and food service news to share with her staff.  “Regina Coleman has shown a strong work ethic and unmatched passion for school nutrition and food service over the years,” said SNA President  Gay Anderson, SNS. “Her commitment to SNA’s mission to provide healthy, nutritious meals to children is only strengthened by her advocacy for members in her local chapter and in SNA national.” The  Manager of the Year Award  is given in honor of Louise Sublette, a leader in school nutrition in her state and in the national School Nutrition Association. During her 43 years in the profession, Sublette worked in many areas of foodservice – public schools, colleges, hospitals and elderly feeding programs. Sublette dedicated her career to honoring school nutrition professionals and ensuring those who work in school cafeterias have access to professional development opportunities, empowering them to help their school meal programs flourish. On July 14, Coleman  will be honored during the Red Carpet Awards Ceremony at the School Nutrition Association’s 73rd  annual National Conference in St. Louis, MO.

ADVERTISE WITH US TODAY:

CALL JOHN AT

(253) 405.4893

Blessed are the sorrowful; they shall be comforted. Pre-arrangements Available

Our Lady of Guadalupe & St. Anthony the Great • Columbariums

READY • FOR SALE

CALVARY CEMETERY

ASSOCIATION & MAUSOLEUM 5212 70th St. W • Tacoma, WA 98467 253-472-8875 • www.calvarytacoma.com


NEWS | 5

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

. . . Stop the show! No, wait, let’s not. Please donate to save the fireworks. Tacoma Freedom Fair needs your help: While the city of Tacoma provides $30,000 for the fireworks, the overall cost is closer to $60,000. Due to a lack of sponsors, we are asking the public to donate money so we can continue to provide a fireworks spectacular on Independence Day. Any amount is appreciated. Tacoma Events Commission, producer of this event, is a 501 C(3) non-profit organization. Any donations are tax deductible.

Send checks to: Tacoma Freedom Fair 4109 E7 Bridgeport Way West University Place, WA 98466

Or visit: www.freedomfair.com to make a donation

Fireworks

Music

Pole Vault

Food Booths

Sports Park

Arts & Crafts Vendors

Camp Patriot Kids Fun Zone

Military Jets are Back for 2019!

and more!

Major Sponsors

WWW.FREEDOMFAIR.COM


6 | NEWS

Sunday, May 12, 2019 • www.tacomaweekly.com • TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS

‘YOU’RE KIDDING ME. THEY NAMED A MOVIE THEATER AFTER A MOUSE?’ Yes, they sure did... a Blue Mouse!

BY BILL EVANS On Tuesday evening, Nov. 13, 1923, a gentleman named John Hamrick did just that. It was on that date that Hamrick’s Blue  Mouse  Theater had its grand opening on Proctor Street and other than for restoration or repairs, the Blue Mouse has remained open every single evening since 1923. By the end of 2019, that will add up to more than 35,000 evenings! It is no wonder that the Proctor District Blue Mouse Theater is one of the very oldest continuously operating movie theaters in the United States. Another interesting fact is that the theater may have been named after a theater in Paris that Hamrick attended in 1919. Hamrick also had the good fortune to meetup with an architect from London by the most unique and memorable name of Fitzherbert Leather. It was he who designed the “garden style arts and crafts” building that was constructed at a cost of $20,000. Thirty-three years after having dedicated the Proctor District Blue Mouse,

Hamrick died on Nov. 30, 1956. Since then, over the years various owners have come and gone. In 1988, a woman named Shirley Mayo purchased the theater and ran it successfully until failing health forced her to sell the theater in 1993. Understandably, Mayo, a native of Arkansas, wanted to return home to be with family. One local developer approached Mayo at the time. He wanted to purchase the building, add a third floor and convert the building into office spaces. To her great credit, Mayo refused. A plan of action was devised by 17 people from Tacoma, many of them friends, and they raised $170,000 to purchase the theater and then refurbished it to its original 1923 charm. The Proctor Theater, which it had been called for many years, then received its name back and was once again the Blue  Mouse. It was then that Dale Chihuly, one of the owners of the theater, designed the blue mice that you see scurrying across the marquee. Such lucky little mice. See you at the theater!

Chalet Bowl celebrates 35th anniversary Please join us in congratulating the Fredericks on celebrating Chalet Bowl’s 35th anniversary and many years of family fun in Proctor. Thank you Frederick family for your countless contributions and being true stewards of our community – we wish you many more!

T-Town Trading Co. is all about shopping local When longtime Tacoma natives Pat and Gail Ringrose were looking for the right location to expand their retail business apart from their printing business, they decided on Proctor. Come by and check out T-Town Trading Co., where they are all about local. They feature local artists monthly and carry familiar Tacoma brands that you might have seen around but not have known where to buy, until now. Do you recognize any of their brands?

OPENS 7 DAY

The sun is out and warmer days are ahead of us. For 27 years Julie’s Hair Care has been a staple of the community. Just in time for the change of the seasons, new customers receive $5 off their first visit. Stop by and see their new lineup of @amikapro products. Are you looking for a new look this season?

An Old-School American Eatery & Cocktail Lounge Come in and experience our famous food

WE FEATURE THE LARGEST SELECTION OF “MADE IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST” MERCHANDISE IN THE REGION We ship for you!

Julie’s Hair Care, a longtime Proctor staple business

Complimentary Gift Wrap

2702 N. Proctor • 253.752.2242

Our Hours Sun-Thurs: 6:30AM-9:00PM Fri-Sat: 6:30AM-10:00PM Lounge Open Daily 8AM – 2AM

In Tacoma’s Historic Proctor District www.pacificnorthwestshop.com

2707 N Proctor Street • 253-759-9009


NEWS | 7

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

t Landlords From page 1 BEST OF BOTH WORLDS LLP is under the quite capable hands of Program Manager Alexis Eykel. Eykel brings with her more than 10 years experience developing relationships with landlords within the homeless system in King County and she is also a licensed real estate agent, so she has an inside knowledge of how landlords operate and what their concerns are. “What you’ve got in Alexis is a very unique individual who is key to making this work,” Yoder said. “She understands the homeless system and people experiencing homelessness. And as a trained real estate agent working in that field and being a landlord herself, there probably isn’t another human in this county who is so qualified. This is what is needed – to think differently about a solution that spans two worlds and brings them together. This can happen when you have someone who understands both worlds and that’s one of the reasons why this program is making some progress now – we have innovative people that have innovative background experience.” As Eykel stated it, LLP is there to represent the landlord so that they have somebody on their side. Eykel said that Associated Ministries is a pioneer in encouraging shelters and other housing programs to rethink their rules for housing, which often included “no felonies,” “no prior evictions,” “no drug use,” etc. “You had to be the ‘perfect’ homeless person that maybe just lost their job,” she said. “We’re allowed to be innovative here and do what needs to be done to help everyone.” Eykel explained that program staff works directly with landlords and provides protections to them if they’re renting to tenants with high barriers and whom the landlord is willing to take a risk on. “Historically, landlords haven’t had someone to make sure that they’re heard and that their property is being taken care of. We are here to pro-

tect their assets with our risk mitigation funding. Landlords can call us 24/7 through a number that rings straight to my cellphone if they have a concern or issue with a tenant.” “The landlords we work with, and most landlords, don’t want to evict,” said LLP Property Partner Specialist Kiesha Triplett. “They don’t want to see people homeless. Yet landlords are human and their rental property may be their investment for retirement or something that they want to hold for their children one day, so it’s really important for them to guard that.” LLP offers two different types of mitigation funds to help landlords, also called “property partners,” when they sign on with the program – a state fund and a county fund. “We want to be that catch-all, so if landlords list their units through us, we can protect them with risk mitigation funds and make sure they are taken care of. That’s what we want to be seen as in the community,” Eykel said. Triplett described LLP as “supplemental insurance,” like Aflac – extra protection that’s no cost to property partners. “We have case managers who can come in and respond quickly to help diffuse things and help their tenants get their lives together,” she said. “Property partners give us a call with anything they need.” The program offers much to renters as well. Case managers walk with tenants through the whole process – from the application process to the rental or lease agreement signing. In addition, Associated Ministries’ Renters Readiness program provides renters with basic tools to be good renters, helping them learn how to build healthy relationships and trust with landlords. In the event that there is a conflict to be settled, LLP steps in to mediate. “We shine when stuff goes downhill with tenants,” Eykel explained. “With us being the middleman, people can take their frustrations out on us – clear their minds before they talk to the landlord. We diffuse situations first and then they can talk. We have the opportunity to be

a sponge to soak up all the bad energy and then they can talk to each other with positive energy. It feels good, fostering those relationships.” A WIN-WIN SITUATION Yoder provided this scenario that encapsulates LLP benefits for all parties involved: Let’s say you own a little apartment building and you have a unit that’s open. How would you normally look for a tenant? You’d put an ad on Craigslist or something and let people apply. Then you can pay to have them screened, interview them and try to guess if they’d be a good tenant, look at their background and make a choice. If anything goes wrong – they trash the place and leave in the middle of the night – you’re on your own. This is where LLP comes in: By signing up with LLP, property partners make units available as one of the inventory through LLP and then the rapid re-housing agencies that are working to house homeless clients will know that they have a unit available and recommend a client to take the unit. It’s still a tenant/landlord relationship – tenants still have to apply and be approved by the property partner – but landlords agree to use LLP’s screening criteria. By taking a client that comes through LLP, the mitigation funds and advocates come with that tenant; so your willingness to accept a person through LLP, rather than picking your own, can be a benefit to you because they come with extra protections. If that tenant isn’t the right fit, LLP will help that person move on without landlords having to go through the pain and bring in a new person – a graceful exit. When all is said and done, it’s the

right thing to do, says Yoder. “It’s the right thing to give a second chance to somebody with an eviction, but it is inherently riskier to rent to somebody who’s had to be evicted in the past so we’re going to help you do the right thing. We have a program now to cover landlords to do the right thing and take a second look at people and let their compassion come forward toward being a solution to house those in need. There’s a new option for landlords now to be more expansive in their screening criteria and lower the barriers.” COMMUNITY PILLAR AWARDS Saying thank you to landlords and rental companies that have signed on with LLP is an important aspect of the program. “Landlords rarely ever get told thank you,” as Eykel stated it, so every quarter, LLP gifts a Community Pillar Award to those who have gone above and beyond to help end homelessness. Dammeier presents the awards to the recipients, as he has invested so much into making LLP a reality. To date, awards have been presented to Rental Housing Association of Washington, Rainier Rentals and Spinnaker Property Management. To learn more about LLP, visit www. LandlordLiaisonProgram.com, call (253) 426-1518 or email info@landlordliaisonprogram.com. Please note that LLP works directly with landlords and case managers of Pierce County-funded housing programs. If you are experiencing homelessness yourself and need housing please contact Coordinated Entry at (253) 682-3401. LLP does not work directly with clients or tenants in housing programs.

NO FUSS NO MUSS NO POP-UPS

www.tacomasubaru.com www.olympiajeep.com www.olympianissan.com

Volunteer opportunities July 2–5, 2019

www.olympiajeep.com www.portorchardford.com www.vwofpalmsprings.com

w w w. b r u c e t i t u s . c o m

Or Call our Office, 253-507-9357


8 | OPINION

Sunday, May 12, 2019 • www.tacomaweekly.com • TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS

STAFF EDITORIAL

HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL ON THE SANDLOT

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Aahhh, springtime. When a young man’s mind turns to thoughts of baseball. Our national pastime was on full display on every level on May 4 in our fine city. The University of Puget Sound team finished their season. While they lost both of their games, they recognized the seven seniors who finished their collegiate playing careers, as well as their senior student assistant and assistant head coach Bob Walz, who completed his 25th season on the staff. Over at the Heidelberg complex and Foss High School, high school squads competed in the West Central District playoffs. Some younger boys competed in little league action, while even younger kids played t-ball. Later that evening next door at Cheney Stadium, the Tacoma Rainiers faced off against the Albuquerque Isotopes in the Pacific Coast League, one step below Major League Baseball. Our April 28 issue had a front-page article about Lakeview Hope Academy, an elementary school in Lakewood. Three surprise visitors made an appearance: Rainiers players Austin Nola and Matt Tenuta and team mascot Rhubarb. The children had an opportunity to pose questions to the players. They both began playing the sport at a younger age than the fifth-graders they were speaking to. Part of the appeal of the sport was that, while a team sport, baseball requires specialized skills that can be practiced without the need for coaches and teammates present. They discussed hitting the batting cage. One mentioned taping up a strike zone on the side of his childhood home and practicing placing a pitch within the box. The school shares its campus with the Gary and Carol Milgard Family Hope Center, a facility of the Boys & Girls Clubs of South Puget Sound. One of our reporters in attendance, a 61-year-old white male sports writer, was very impressed with the

Dear editor,

school complex. The Lakeview Elementary School he attended as a child was torn down and replaced in 2008 with the Lakeview Hope Academy. Hats off to the Clover Park School District for placing a few historical artifacts at the front lobby of the school. Among the old black and white photographs was a team picture of his little league team from 1965, with him sporting a Tacoma Giants ball cap. He noted the neighborhood in his youth had many families with a military connection, generally households with a father retired from active-duty status. It was a working-class neighborhood, full of adults with blue-collar jobs striving to provide for their families. The kids had various ethnic backgrounds – white, black, Hispanic, Asian, etc…... Think of the movie “The Sandlot” and the kids playing baseball in that fictional, 1960s neighborhood. Today, the children in the neighborhood can play in the gym at the club; some play basketball on the new courts outside or play tetherball. Some things have changed, such as the school; a few older homes have been demolished and replaced with new houses. One thing that has not is the baseball field in the corner of the campus. It gets little use, to no surprise. Of the millions of dollars spent on that campus, it does not appear the ball field received a penny. Perhaps some person or organization may take that on as a community service project. Could that forlorn, abandoned diamond in the rough become a future field of dreams? Could one of those boys at Lakeview be playing for the L.A. Dodgers in 15 years, just like Benny “the Jet” Rodriguez? Many adults wring their hands about our society being so deeply divided along lines of race, class and political ideology. We prefer to watch the children play, too busy living the American dream to even notice.

GUEST EDITORIAL

ACTIVISTS TO HONOR MOTHERS’ DAY WITH PROTEST AT PUGET SOUND U.S. NAVY NUCLEAR WEAPONS BASE BY LEONARD EIGER Puget Sound-area activists will hold a nonviolent protest against nuclear weapons at the U.S. Navy’s West Coast Trident submarine base at Silverdale on May 11. Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action will host its annual Mothers’ Day weekend day of education and action honoring the original intention of Mothers’ Day. The day will be highlighted by a speech by Kathy Kelly of Voices for Creative Nonviolence and a vigil and nonviolent direct action at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor. In 1870, Julia Ward Howe envisioned a Mothers’ Day for Peace in response to the carnage of the Civil War and other wars of her time. In that continued spirit Ground Zero Center believes that the world’s children deserve better than to live under the threat of a renewed nuclear arms race and the catastrophic effects of any nuclear war. Increasing militarization and wars steal resources desperately needed to mitigate climate change and improve people’s lives, while increasing the risk of nuclear annihilation. Today, the U.S. government is accelerating nuclear weapons modernization, developing new nuclear weapons (including the new “low-yield” Trident W76-2 nuclear warhead that will be deployed on Trident submarines based at Bangor), and threatening to use nuclear weapons in potential conflicts with Russia and other nations. This is not only threaten-

ing humanity with the devastating effects of a potential nuclear war, but also diverting money and human resources from desperately needed efforts to deal with the existential threats posed by climate change. The nurturing efforts of mothers around the world would be destroyed in the brief timeframe of a nuclear war. Kelly will give the keynote address: “Deploying Love in a Permanent Warfare State.” Kelly has traveled to war zones and lived alongside the people of Afghanistan, Iraq, Gaza, Lebanon, Bosnia and Nicaragua. She and her colleagues in Voices for Creative Nonviolence believe the U.S. should end all U.S. military and economic warfare and pay reparations for suffering already caused by U.S. wars. For two years, Voices has organized vigils and forums about conflict-driven, near-famine conditions in Yemen and northern Africa. Kelly was sentenced to one year in federal prison for planting corn on nuclear missile silo sites (1988-89) at Whiteman Air Force Base and spent three months in prison, in 2004, for crossing the line at Fort Benning’s military training school. As a war tax refuser, she has refused payment of all forms of federal income tax since 1980. The events will include a legal rights workshop with Tacoma attorney Blake Kremer, and Seattle Peace Chorus will conduct a sing along and be present at the vigil and action. Participants will hold a vigil and nonviolent direct action at

I have heard from neighbors in the Central Tacoma neighborhood about their opposition to a new proposed storage facility that is projected to be located along South 19th and South Lawrence streets. As the Council member for this district, I understand the neighborhood’s concerns. Although the City of Tacoma cannot take action in this case, which is in private litigation, I have asked that staff conduct a thorough review of loopholes and weaknesses in our code and explore options to mitigate the impact on the neighborhood, depending on how this case is decided. I have also asked that staff utilize strengthened design review to ensure all projects in strategically vital transitional areas between neighborhoods are designed with proper beautification and improvements. The vision the Tacoma City Council had for this neighborhood and zoning area was a mixed-use development that would support small business and residential populations along a main arterial where the Tacoma Link light rail will eventually run. Although the proposed storage facility abides by the rules currently detailed in our code, and staff has proceeded with notifications as the code directed, this project is not consistent with the vision of the Council or the neighborhood.  I will work with my colleagues on the City Council and the mayor, who has already given me her support in this matter, to find ways of ensuring our neighborhoods grow and develop in a way that makes the best use of our important corridors while respecting the residential character of surrounding neighborhoods. We will also work to increase notification, strengthen public participation, and educate residents on how to be involved in planning decisions early on. Keith Blocker Tacoma City Council Dear editor,

the Bangor Trident base. Eight of the U.S. Navy’s 14 Trident ballistic missile submarines are based at Bangor, 20 miles west of Seattle. It has the largest concentration of deployed nuclear weapons in the U.S. The W76-1 and W88 warheads at Bangor are equal respectively to 100 kilotons and 455 kilotons of TNT in destructive force (the bomb dropped on Hiroshima was between 13 and 18 kilotons). One submarine deployed at Bangor is equal to more than 1,400 Hiroshima-sized nuclear bombs. Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action, founded in 1977, is on 3.8 acres adjoining the base at Bangor. We offer the opportunity to explore the roots of violence and injustice and to experience the transforming power of love. Leonard Eiger is communications chair for Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action in Poulsbo.

On World Press Freedom Day (which was May 3), the National Society of Newspaper Columnists stands in solidarity with journalists across the globe, particularly those who risk their safety to tell the stories the public needs to know. Targeting of journalists happens here in the United States as well. The Committee to Protect Journalists report that 11 journalists have been killed in this country since 1992; four were killed in 2018 alone. Eight were outright targeted because of their work. On World Press Freedom Day, in addition to freedom of speech and expression, we reaffirm our commitment to two more freedoms: Freedom from fear: no journalist should fear for their safety or worry about reprisals for reporting the truth or expressing an evidence-based opinion. Being contrarian is a hallmark of opinion journalism and we stand with those columnists who dare to test new propositions in their writing. Freedom from want: journalists should be paid fairly for their labor and for the risks they take. We particularly support columnists and opinion writers whose craft is undervalued while news outlets jettison entire opinion departments or lay off so many columnists that the department’s future is uncertain. We understand that some of the public has grown skeptical of journalism and we will continue to work to maintain public trust in our profession, laboring under the belief that a free press is more about the public’s right to know the truth than it is about our right to tell it. Chandra Bozelko Vice president, National Society of Newspaper Columnists Nationally syndicate columnist at Creator’s Syndicate


SPORTS | 9

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

RAINIERS PICKING UP STEAM IN NORTHERN DIVISION RACE BY STEVE MULLEN news@tacomaweekly.com

The Rainiers, after getting off to a slow start in April, have righted the ship in early May by winning five of their past eight games with the latest being a 12-8 slugfest against the Albuquerque Isotopes on May 6 at Cheney Stadium in front of 2,697 fans on a warm 70-degree night. Top prospect Justus Sheffield rebounded from a rough start last week in Salt Lake City with a 5.1-inning outing that saw his vaunted fastball touching 95-96 miles per hour for most of his outing. “I had good footwork on the mound tonight. I have been working on that for the better part of season,” said the rangy left hander, who picked up his first win of the season and lowered his earned run average to 3.76. Sheffield also credited his outing to his internal focus throughout the game. “I have to maintain it constantly every fifth day. It’s a reward to toe the rubber every fifth day and staying focused is a huge factor.” The difference in the game offensively for Tacoma was shortstop J.P Crawford, who drove in six runs and went four for five at the plate. “When I first got called up in 2017 in Philadelphia, I learned one thing right off the bat. If you do not produce on a regular basis, a lot of people will let you know about it, especially in a sports city like Philly.”

JEFF HALSTEAD

Justus Sheffield Crawford also stressed the importance of another thing that we all adhere to in our daily lives - being on time every day at the ballpark and getting all of your practice work done. “It’s paid off for me to this point in my career,” he said. When all was said and done after

the three-hour and 38 minute, nine-inning marathon, manager Darren Browne reflected on both Sheffield and Crawford. “Sheffield was really on his game tonight, with the exception of his 23-pitch second inning, and he’ll only get better from here,” said the veteran

Tacoma skipper. Browne also reserved some praise for Crawford’s work of late. “J.P. has put in a lot of work to this point of the season and it is showing on a daily basis.” Crawford is hitting .321 on the season. The Rainiers received some more good news earlier when left-handed pitcher Tommy Milone was awarded the Pacific Coast League’s pitcher of the week award. His week was capped off by his stellar seven-inning shutout of Albuquerque on May 5. “It’s a great award and I thank all my teammates playing behind me,” said Milone, who has been the steadiest pitcher on the staff to this point of the season. The crafty lefthander, who has pitched in the major leagues for the better part of eight years, credits his success with Tacoma to a couple of different factors. “You have to be able to improve game to game and stay consistent with your delivery until you are real satisfied with it,” he said. With his season to this point, Milone points to some other factors that have contributed to his success. “My confidence level has been sky high so far this year and I am hoping that at some point I get another shot to finish my career at the big league level. With that being said, I would like to thank my teammates here in Tacoma for playing real well behind me. And every time I put on this uniform here in Tacoma, I will compete on each pitch.”

~ Serving the greater Pierce County community since 1971 ~ “We serve our customers with integrity, flexibility, vision, creativity and common sense. These are the qualities we use in presenting a successful optical company.”

We Help the greater Pierce County community See in the World of Style! 6720 Regents Blvd, University Place

CONTACT US TODAY (253) 565-2500 WWW.SUBURBANOPTICIANS.COM


“BACK TO BASTICKS” MAY 18, 2019

THE ARMORY 1001 SOUTH YAKIMA STREET, TACOMA, WA

Doors Open at 10:00 AM Program at 1:00 - 3:30 PM

Drummers: $15 Spectators : Donation Only For more information,

Call Ted Brown Music at 253-272-3211 or CK Financial at 253-722-7526 This year's largest gathering of Seattle/Tacoma area drummers! On May 18 join hundreds of your fellow drummers to play drums, make noise, have fun, and raise money to help homeless families. Meet and greet Alan White from the super-group Yes, and Tony Coleman, B.B. King's longtime drummer, who will both be on hand to sign autographs! That's right; after a two-year hiatus Woodstick is back! Bring your drum kit and play as you've always wanted to! Socialize with other Pacic Northwest drummers, check out all the amazing drum kits, and experience the phenomena of being one of the hundreds of drummers playing with a live band. It's like nothing you've ever seen (or heard) before!

Drummers are encouraged to raise pledges for the cause, and there will be prizes for the participants who raise the most in pledges. Ask your friends, co-workers or employers to sponsor you to help Tacoma-area homeless families! All net proceeds go to Network Tacoma, a 501(c)3 non-prot organization helping homeless families with children. http://www.networktacoma.org/ Join us on May 18 and beat the drums to beat homelessness! Drummers should bring at least a bass drum, snare drum, hi-hat or cymbal, sticks, and a rug to protect the oor. If you don't have a rug, there may be some available onsite. Earplugs will be provided!

2019


City Life

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

tacomaweekly.com/city-life

TACOMA LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTS ‘SOPHIE’

Night Life TW PICK OF THE WEEK

COCO MONTOYA

Blues musician Coco Montoya brings his passionate vocals and melodic guitar playing to Jazzbones on May 11. The show starts at 8 p.m. with a $25 cover. PHOTO COURTESY OF COCO MONTOYA

UPCOMING SHOWS:

Friday, May 10

AIRPORT TAVERN: Forgotten 45s, Biblioteca, Hail The Pilot, 8:30 p.m. ALMA MATER: The Cave Singers, Some Surprises, 8 p.m., $18-20 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ruler, Ryan Rebo and the London Werewolves, Season of Strangers, Black Smoker, 7 p.m., $7 O’MALLEY’S: Summer & Rye, Outlaw Gruntry Band, 8:30 p.m. REAL ART TACOMA: Sam Bogle, Modern Daze, Big Sky Mind, 8 p.m., $10, AA SWISS: Boogie Boys, Stingshark, 9 p.m., $8 UNCLE SAM’S: Daze Pazt (Classic rock) 8 p.m. VALLEY: Vaginal Vomit, Beyond Theory, Metaphoria, Born Terrible, 8 p.m.

Saturday, May 11

ALMA MATER: Jake Miller, Logan Henderson, Just Seconds Apart, 8 p.m., $20-25 DAWSON’S: Joe Blue & the Fabulous Roof Shakers 9 p.m. GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Harmonious Funk (Top 40) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Coco Montoya, 8 p.m., $25 MCMENAMINS: Malo Castro, 7 p.m., NC, AA O’MALLEY’S: Purusa, The Beacon Hillbillies, Death Fetish, 8:30 p.m.

Lighthouse Laundry

Free Wi-Fi

Get Ready for Camping! Wash your sleeping bags in our HUGE HUG E WA washers! SHER Open pm 8am - 9

26th & N. Pearl Westgate S. Shopping Center

S!

LightHouseLaundry.biz

11

SWISS: Spazmatics (80s covers) 9 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Rif Raf, 8 p.m. VALLEY: Watch Rome Burn, Primary Pulse, Of The Heavy Sun, Petey Normal, 8 p.m.

Sunday, May 12

UNCLE SAM’S: Final Notice w/Bob Evans (Country/rock) 7 p.m., NC

Monday, May 13

AIRPORT TAVERN: Intimate Existence, Flub, Aethereus, Blackwater Burial, 8 p.m. JAZZBONES: Rockaraoke, 9 p.m., NC SWISS: Chuck Gay (Open mic) 7 p.m., NC

Tuesday, May 14

PLAID PIG: Vile Effigy, Guttural Stutter, URDR, Divine Era, 8 p.m., $6 UNCLE SAM’S: SOB ( Jam) 7 p.m.

Wednesday, May 15

JAZZBONES: Live It Out Loud (Open mic) 6:30 p.m., NC, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (Rock jam) 7 p.m.

Thursday, May 16

ALMA MATER: Nyoka (Open mic), 7 p.m. PLAID PIG: Deschamp, Mr. Clit and the Pink Cigarettes, Shark Legs, Tremor Cats, 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (Guitarist) 7 p.m.

Tacoma Little Theatre presents a special added program to its season, “Sophie,” a play by Bryan Willis and directed by Nyree Martinez. From her earliest childhood, Sophie Large would write about things and events and people that interested her. As she became older, she often wrote as well about her own thoughts and feelings. This one-act show takes place at an outdoor railway station, where a young Sophie (age 13) talks with her older self (age 19). At age 19, the talented Sophie was due to direct and produce a play at the Edinburgh Fringe (Scotland) but died before this ambition could be realized. In the ensuing weeks her family decided to found a charity in Sophie’s name to give financial support to needy students of acting and of singing – Sophie’s Silver Lining Fund. The charity published a book of Sophie’s own writings entitled “Sophie’s Log –Thoughts and Feelings in Poetry and Prose.” A few years later, the trustees commissioned a playwright to write a short play based on “Sophie’s Log.” Tacoma Little Theatre’s production of “Sophie” features a strong cast of talented young actresses sharing roles. Young Sophie is played by Alexandria Bray and Olivia Burns, with Older Sophie being played by Kate Anders and Ayla Carda. Sophie will run Friday, May 17, through Sunday, May 19. Friday and Saturday evening showings are at 7:30 p.m. with Saturday and Sunday matinees

FILE PHOTO

Soon after Sophie Long’s death, the charity Sophie’s Silver Lining Fund published a book of Sophie’s own writings entitled “Sophie’s Log –Thoughts and Feelings in Poetry and Prose.”

at 2 p.m. “Sophie” is recommended for all ages, Tickets are $10 general admission and may be purchased online at www. tacomalittletheatre.com, or by calling the box office at (253) 272-2281. “Sophie” will be available for bookings throughout the 2019-2020 school year. For more information contact Nena Curley, education director, at education@ tacomalittletheatre.com.

OPENING DOORS TO ART EXPERIENCES TAM adds free admission in celebration of national and international Museum Day to its access opportunities

In celebration of the 10th annual Art Museum Day and in partnership with the International Council of Museums (ICOM)’s International Museum Day, Tacoma Art Museum will offer free admission to everyone on Saturday, May 18. “When we welcome the community on May 18, we also welcome new artworks in multiple places throughout the Museum,” noted Executive Director David F. Setford,. Among the refreshed pieces include artwork by Michael Brophy, James Carpenter, Dale Chihuly, Ka’ila FarrellSmith, Joe Feddersen, Dan Friday,

Josiah McElheny, Dominick Lambino, Charlie Parriott, Ginny Ruffner, Laura de Santillana, Dana Vachtova, and Toots Zynsky. “As Tacoma’s art museum, we aim to connect all areas of our community through art and continually explore ways to break down financial barriers to the museum experience,” added Setford. In addition to free admission on Saturdays May 18, TAM is also free to mothers on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 12; free for children 17 and under every Saturday; and provides completely free admission on Neighborhood Nights every Thursday night from 5-8 p.m.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTIST

Charles Parriott (born Norwolk, Connecticut, 1952), Tin Man, 1998. Cast glass, 19 x 7 x 6 inches. Tacoma Art Museum, Museum purchase with funds from Anne Gould Hauberg, 2004.24.3.

Follow us on Facebook!

Follow us on Twitter!

Follow us on Instagram!

facebook.com/tacomaweekly

twitter.com/tacomaweekly

instagram.com/tacomaweekly


12 | CITY LIFE

Sunday, May 12, 2019 • www.tacomaweekly.com • TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS

Coming Events

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

Bre Johnson and Tara Newton of the Rainbow Center: Rainbows & Unicorns: LGBTQ inclusion in the workplace; Kristy Fassio, Redhead Bopo Inspiration: Body Liberation. Price: $40. Register: www. allisonbishins.com/services/ modern-womxn-at-work-may-19honey

‘MOBBED UP FOR MURDER’

Thurs.-Sat., May 16-18, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., May 19, 3 p.m. The Social Bar & Grill, 1715 Dock St., Tacoma Tacoma Little Theatre makes you a part of the mob with “Mobbed Up for Murder.” This murder mystery dinner experience will have you feeling like you’re in a Francis Ford Coppola movie. Don Provolone orchestrates a meeting at his favorite restaurant with Don Spumoni and Don Cannoli. They’ve been to the mattresses for a while, and quite frankly, his back is killing him! He thinks it’s time to let bygones be bygones and has come up with a deal they cannot refuse. Or can they? Don’t miss out – you’ll want to meet these three colorful Don’s along with Toni “Two Times” Tortano, Marisa Macaroon, and Olivia Ascolane. Who will come heavy? Who’s on the lam? Who’s in the wind? And what does that all mean?. Price: $55 (includes dinner with gratuity and show), reservations required. Info: www.tacomalittletheatre.com, (253) 272-2281.

‘THE FULL MONTY’ Now through June 2: Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 2 p.m.; Sat., May 25 and June 1, 2 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 6th Ave., Tacoma Based on the 1997 hit Academy Award-winning British film, “The Full Monty” musical is about six unemployed Buffalo steelworkers who are out of work and need to find a quick way to make cash in order to save their families, homes and self-respect. Seeing how much their wives enjoy watching male strippers during their “Girls Night Out,” they come up with a bold way to make some quick cash. The former steelworkers decide to become male strippers determined to succeed by “taking it all off,” or as the British say revealing “the full monty.”As the guys work through their fears, self-consciousness, feelings of worthlessness and anxieties, they come to discover that not only are they stronger as a group, but that the strength they find in each other gives them the individual courage to face their demons and overcome them. Content Advisory: Contains some strong language and male nudity. Discretion is advised. Price: Adults $31; senior (60+), military, students $29; children 12 and under $22; groups of 10 or more $27. Reserved seating. Info: boxoffice@tmp.org; www.tmp.org; (253) 565-6867 ‘ART’ Fri., May 17, 7:30 p.m.; Sat., May 18, 3 p.m.; Sat., May 18, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., May 19, 3 p.m. Theater on the Square, 915 Broadway, Tacoma Imagine making a purchase that brings 20 years of friendship to a comical boiling point and fist fight. Art, by Yasmina Reza, was a sensational hit in London and New York when it premiered, running more than 600 performances on Broadway and winning the Tony for Best Play. A breathtakingly funny, brilliantly satiric look at status, power, and the dynamics of friendship, including the difficulty of being truly honest, even between people who love each other. All is well in the lifelong friendship until one of the trio buys an

expensive painting setting everything out of balance! This is a local, professional theater production. Price: $19, $29, $42. Info: www.TacomaArtsLive.org ‘SOPHIE’ Fri., May 17, 7:30 p.m.; Sat., May 18, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Sun., May 19, 2 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St., Tacoma From her earliest childhood, Sophie Large would write about things, events and people that interested her. As she became older, she often wrote as well about her own thoughts and feelings. This one-act show takes place at an outdoor railway station, where a young Sophie (age 13) talks with her older self (age 19). At age 19, the talented Sophie was due to direct and produce a play at the Edinburgh Fringe (Scotland) but died before this ambition could be realized. In the ensuing weeks her family decided to found a charity in Sophie’s name to give financial support to needy students of acting and of singing – Sophie’s Silver Lining Fund. The charity published a book of Sophie’s own writings entitled “Sophie’s Log –Thoughts and Feelings in Poetry and Prose.” A few years later, the trustees commissioned a playwright to write a short play based on “Sophie’s Log.” Recommended for all ages. Price: $10 general admission. Info: (253) 272-2281; www.tacomalittletheatre.com DAY OF REMEMBRANCE Thurs., May 16, 3-8 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma Learn about the forced incarceration of people of Japanese ancestry during WWII after President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. Learn to make origami folded paper cranes, a symbol of peace, to carry during the commemorative walk to Union Station later in the evening. Experience history through the Living Voices performance “Within the Silence,” the story of a teenage girl sent to a US concentration camp. Participate in a Town Hall discussion about an upcoming permanent

exhibition focused on Japanese American history across Washington related to Executive Order 9066.To close the Day of Remembrance, Tamiko Nimura and Tacoma historian Michael Sullivan will lead a community procession to Union Station. Remarks will be made in front of the former railway station to remember the families who reported there on their way to being forcibly incarcerated in federal camps during World War II. Price: Free, all ages welcome. Info: www.WashingtonHistory.org. SCHOLARLY SELECTIONS Thurs., May 16, 6:30 p.m. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma “From Emily Dickinson to Lucinda Williams: Women Speaking Truth to Power through Poetry and Music” – Join UW Tacoma senior lecturer Nicole Blair for a discussion of the roots of Americana music by women, focusing on two examples: Emily Dickinson and Lucinda Williams. Blair will argue that poets like Anne Bradstreet, Phillis Wheatley, and Emily Dickinson, paved the way for songwriters like Brandi Carlile, Rhiannon Giddens, and Lucinda Williams. She will discuss how Americana music provides female singer-songwriters with a way to express their lived experiences, which not only empowers women, but uplifts society as a whole. Price: Free, all ages welcome. Info: www.WashingtonHistory.org SHORELINE BEACH CLEANUP Sat., May 18, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jack Hyde Park, 2000 Ruston Way, Ruston Join Citizens for a Healthy Bay for a shoreline beach cleanup at Tahoma Salt Marsh, a fun opportunity to help keep Commencement Bay clean. Bring gloves and a bucket; we’ll provide anything else you might need. Park at Jack Hyde Park; we’ll be cleaning up their beach too. Info: www.facebook.com/ events/2363865357205700. Sign up: email Kenny Coble, kcoble@healthybay.org MODERN WOMXN ART EXHIBITION & WOMEN IN BUSINESS WORKSHOP

Sun., May 19, 6-8 p.m. Alma Mater, 1322 S. Fawcett Ave., Tacoma Please join Handmade PNW for a unique art show that tackles the modern experience of being a womxn. Featuring 17 local womxn artists, the Modern Womxn Exhibition will be viewable to the public for free during opening hours at Alma Mater. Along with the show, Handmade PNW and Allison Bishins Consulting will be leading a workshop, “Modern Womxn: @ Work.” Speakers include T’wina Nobels, Tacoma Urban League and Ladies First: Boundaries Lead to Better Outcomes; Krista Perez, Tacoma Women of Color Collective: Imposter Syndrome and Self Care in the Workplace; Renee Simms, Associate Professor, African American Studies, UPS: “Me, Too” at Work;

‘THE ABSTRACTION HAIKU’ Now to June 28: Tuesday– Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., free Thursdays 5-8 p.m. Tacoma Art Museum, Gottfried and Mary Fuchs Foundation Education Wing (3rd floor), 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma “The Abstraction Haiku” brings together seven abstract painters from the Tacoma and Seattle area whose works signify important dichotomies inherent to abstraction. The artists’ intention for this exhibit is “to open the door to a fresh look at abstraction and to invite a dynamic discovery of form, shape, and relationship that can lead museum viewers to greater access to the subtleties and rich layers inherent in each painting on view.” The participating artists of the Northwest Abstractionists include: Deanne Belinoff, Dede Falcone, Teresa Getty, Karey Kessler, Anna Macrae, Angela Wales, and Audrey Tulimiero Welch. Info: TacomaArtMuseum.org; (253) 272-4258 SEE MORE COMING EVENTS AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM


13

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

LEGAL NEWS Tacoma The Prescription Pricing for the People Act of 2019 Cantwell, Grassley introduce bipartisan legislation requiring FTC get to the bottom of prescription drug middlemen much patients and the government pay for drugs, much of their business model is cloaked in secrecy, and the industry has experienced significant consolidation in recent years. The Prescription Pricing for the People Act helps provide a better understanding of the PBM industry through a comprehensive FTC review designed to inform policymakers, protect patients and safeguard competition. This bill is just one of many steps I’m taking as Finance Committee chairman to improve access to affordable medications,” Grassley said. PBMs serve as middlemen in the prescription drug supply chain, but the industry has been under scrutiny for how it determines the prices of prescription drugs. Recent consolidations between PBMs and insurance providers have resulted in vertical integration whereby a small number of companies now manage the vast majority of prescription drug benefits. The Prescription Pricing for the People Act requires the FTC to study the industry, in light of recent consolidations, and report its findings to Congress. Specifically, the legislation

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA), a senior member of the Finance Committee, and Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA), the chairman of the committee, have introduced legislation requiring the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to study the role and recent merger activity of pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), as well as possible anti-competitive behaviors. The Prescription Pricing for the People Act of 2019 helps to shine a light on the PBM industry by examining the effects of consolidation on pricing and other potentially abusive behavior. It also requires the FTC to provide policy recommendations to Congress to improve competition and protect consumers. “People’s lives depend on getting affordable access to medicine. We need greater transparency and oversight to increase competition and make sure patients get a fair deal on the medications they need,” said Cantwell. “Competition and transparency are key ingredients to improving affordability of prescription medications. While PBMs play a significant role in determining how

Legislative, Executive, and Judicial advocacy

joan k. mell lawyer

joan@3brancheslaw.com

253.566.2510

1019 REGENTS BLVD., STE. 204 FIRCREST, WA 98466

FAMILY LAW | CRIMMINAL LAW PERSONAL INJURY Office Locations

1019 REGENTS BLVD., SUITE 204 FIRCREST, WA 98466 569 DIVISION STREET, SUITE 200 PORT ORCHARD, WA 98366

whalley-law.com | P: 253.565.3209 F: 253.238.0460

Accident & Injury Attorney Representing PEOPLE for 35 Years $6 million for E. Coli. hamburger injury $4 million for 80 injured tenants in apartment fire Y SEE M ITE $5 million for 700 people injured by toxic exposure S B E $1.5 million for deaths due to heater failures W $ Millions for brain injuries $ Millions for auto accidents, insurance claims, product failures, etc. Terry E. Lumsden

Every Claim is Different www.TELumsden.com I 253-537-4424

Bankruptcy Chapter 7, 11 and 13

DavidSmithLaw.com • 253.272.4777 • 201 St. Helens Ave, Tacoma

commissions the FTC to evaluate whether PBMs: • charge certain payers, including Medicare and Medicaid, a higher price than reimbursement rates for competing pharmacies while reimbursing pharmacies in which the PBMs have an ownership interest at the rate charged to payers; • steer patients to pharmacies in which the PBM has an ownership stake; and • use formulary designs to depress the market share of low-cost, lower-rebate prescription drugs. The legislation also directs the FTC to evaluate the current state of the industry, determine whether more information about the roles of intermediaries would benefit consumers and offer policy recommendations to improve transparency, prevent anticompetitive behavior and promote efficiencies for patients. The legislation will be referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over antitrust matters. Cantwell has long supported efforts to drive down prescription drug prices. She introduced the Basic Health Plan provision included in the Affordable Care Act, which has allowed New York and Minnesota to negotiate health care prices for large populations in bulk, driving down costs for hundreds of thousands of Americans. And in January, she joined Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) to introduce bills to empower Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices for seniors and allow Americans to import safe, low-cost prescription

FILE PHOTO

Senator Maria Cantwell

FILE PHOTO

Senator Chuck Grassley

drugs from Canada. Along with Cantwell and Grassley, the legislation is also cosponsored by Senators Steve Daines (R-MT), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), James Lankford (R-OK), and Joni Ernst (R-IA).

• Personal Injury • Auto Accidents NO RECOVERY / NO FEE FREE CONSULTATION:

253-573-1111 417 S. G Street, Tacoma, Washington 98405 • www.balerudlaw.com

REMAIN SILENT AND

DEMAND

Bryan G. Hershman Attorney at Law

Bryan@BryanHershman.com cell: 253-405-4360

YOUR LAWYER


14 | CLASSIFIEDS

Sunday, May 12, 2019 • www.tacomaweekly.com • TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS

CLASSIFIEDS REALTORS

CALL TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

253.922.5317 REALTORS

REALTORS

Imagine waking up to views of the Puget Sound! Minutes from

window. Kitchen with custom cabinetry, pantry & Stainless Steel

FOR SALE

appliances. Master bedroom with unbelievable views and a

333

walk-in closet!

MLS

the waterfront. Main floor living room with views from every

Second floor with 2 bedrooms, extra storage

SW

293RD

ST,

FEDERAL

WAY

#1436006

and full bath. Huge lot! RV parking, shop, patio & dog run.

REALTORS

TACOMA URBAN DIGS

REALTORS®

Heather Crittendon & Associates

mobile: 253-212-8468 office: 253-222-4549 hcrittendon@yahoo.com

www.facebook.com/TacomaUrbanDigs First Time Home Buyer Specialist

253-203-8985

www.stephanielynch.com

Tacoma Urban Digs has been a prominent fixture in the Tacoma real estate market since 2006. Eric and Heather are highly experienced and multi-functional in all aspects of purchasing and selling. Operating with the highest level of integrity and honesty.

WWW .T ACOMA U RBAN D IGS . COM

ADVERTISE HERE!

CONDOS & HOMES APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA TACOMA CONDO

UNIV.LAKE PLACE BONNEY CONDO

3228TACOMA S UNION 1501 AVE SAVE. #404

2208 GRANDVIEW DR. EW 8403 LOCUST AVE

1BED 450SFSF. 2 BED1 1BATH BATH 1140 CLEAN, COZY APARTSTUNNING ANDTACOMA, EFFICIENT CONDO MENT IN WITHIN THE DESIRABLE REVERIE AT MARCATO. EASY ACCESS TO WA-16.

3 BED 2 BATH 1742 SF. WELBEDTHIS 2 BATH 1000SF COME2 TO 3 BED 2 BATH BEAUTIFUL & SPACIOUS UPPER UNIT AT U.P. HOME, W/HARDWOOD WEST LAKEON TAPPS FLOORS THECONDOMINIUMS MAIN LEVEL.

$625 $2095

DUPONT TACOMA APARTMENT 2205 BOBS HOLLOW 12718 A ST #1 LN

$1850 $775

3 BED 2.5 BATH1 2274 2 STORY 1 BED BATHSF.250 SF W/ 3 SPACIOUS BEDROOMS, COZY 1 BEDROOM 1 UPSTAIRS STORY OPEN LOFT,HOME AND LANDING APARTMENT LOCATEDAREA IN THE PERFECT FOR A WORK STATION. WOODSHIRE APARTMENTS.

$1450 $1295

PUYALLUP LAKEWOOD DUPLEX 9007SPRUCE 115TH ST. E 8314 ST SW

$1150 $1495

2 BED22.5 1157 1500 SF. REMODBEDBATH 1.5 BATH SF ELED TOWNHOUSE W/ 2MIDBEDS BEAUTIFUL SPACIOUS & 1.5 BATH. NEWER FLOORING, CENTURY HOMENEWER WITH HUGE YARD APPLIANCES, PAINT.

AND LARGE DECK

UNIV.TACOMA PL. APARTMENTS

SPANAWAY TACOMA APARTMENT 1440641ST PACIFIC S 5121 203RD 7514 ST CTAVE W #B 2106 FIFEST. STCT. #1E

$695 $1120

1 BED, 1 BATH 575 SF. GREAT 2 BED, 1 BATHNICE 800SF. VALUE IN THIS 1 BEDAVAILABLE NOW! UPPER AND LOWER ROOM UPPER UNIT AVAILABLE APARTMENTS LOCATED THE IN THE PACIFIC OAKSINAPTS.

BEAUTIFUL FIR PARK APARTMENTS.

$1425 $1395

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1680 SF. 2 BED 2 BATH 1123 SF 2 MUST SEE!! FANTASTIC ROOMY 2BA LOWER UNIT IN STORY2BD HOME, 3 BEDROOM THE NORTH-END AT THELOT. 2.5 BATH ON A CORNER

CONQUISTADOR APARTMENTS.

Park52.com ·· 253-473-5200 Park52.com 253-473-5200

Viewpictures, pictures, discounts discounts && more more properties properties online. View online.

ProfessionalManagement Management Services Professional Services Follow us on Facebook! facebook.com/tacomaweekly

Follow us on Twitter! twitter.com/tacomaweekly

Follow us on Instagram! instagram.com/tacomaweekly

For rates contact John Weymer sales@tacomaweekly.com

253.405.4893

NO FUSS NO MUSS NO POP-UPS

Frustration-free News


CLASSIFIEDS | 15

TACOMA WEEKLY NEWS • www.tacomaweekly.com • Sunday, May 12, 2019

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

253.922.5317

Wanted

Services

Notices

Notices

REMODELING

For Rent ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE

WANTED: Cruzin To You Remodeling

253-882-4780

cnc.remodeling72@gmail.com Free Estimates If my work isn’t awesome, then I’m not done yet.

Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

(253) 752-8105

Licensed and Bonded

Services

SELL YOUR STUFF HERE!

HAULING

HAULING

ALEX’S LANDSCAPING SERVICES

Services

Gutter Cleaning and Hauling

SENIOR DISCOUNTS

253-651-0083

HAULING

Father AND AND Son Hauling

Serving all your hauling needs. We will haul anything at any time.

Garage Clean Out Yard Clean Up CELL

253-222-9181

Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 05/16/2019. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00am. Viewing of cars from 10:00am-11:00am. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Apartment for Rent!

1bd/1bath. $800 rent.  Full Kitchen, living room, W/D, beside parking lot ... At Tacoma 8324 S. Park Ave. Contact 206-214-8538     

OFFICE OF ARTS AND CULTURAL VITALITY IS HIRING The City of Tacoma’s Office of Arts and Cultural Vitality has announced the opening of three positions, as follows:

Position 1: Tacoma Creates Specialist, Lead; Application deadline: May 15, 5 p.m. This position develops, implements, coordinates, and manages the Tacoma Creates program in alignment with City's strategic initiatives and responsive to community needs to support equitable access to arts, culture, science, and heritage programming. Duties include providing technical assistance concerning programs and funding to organizations and community groups; leading the public school access program; directing the work of Tacoma Creates staff and contractors; coordinating and collaborating with partner programs; acting as lead and liaison with city departments, officials, and citizens on issues related to Tacoma Creates; and providing training and outreach to community. Visit https://tinyurl.com/y2eo6jnp. Position 2: Community Programs Specialist (COMING SOON!) This position supports the cultural growth and vitality of the city by planning, developing, coordinating and implementing comprehensive arts and cultural programs, events, and special projects in the visual, literary, performing, public art, and other art forms. Position provides administrative assistance and support in the coordination, implementation, and promotion of arts and culture programming; coordinates and collaborates with partner programs and acts as a liaison to city departments, officials and citizens on issues related to arts and culture programming; and coordinates public programs that support Tacoma Creates as necessary. Position 3: Tacoma Creates Coordinator (COMING SOON!) This position assists in the implementation, coordination, and promotion of the Tacoma Creates program to support equitable access to arts, culture, science, and heritage programming. Duties include data entry and management, correspondence, assisting in the planning and production of Tacoma Creates public events, basic research, marketing and promotion across multiple communication channels, and assisting with funding applications and panels. Apply: Find out more, including full job description, qualifications, salary, and apply at www. governmentjobs.com/careers/tacoma. Benefits: The City of Tacoma provides excellent medical, dental and vision benefits for the whole family; paid holidays and personal time off; participation in Tacoma's Public Employees' Retirement System and a growing variety of City-sponsored health and wellness opportunities. For more information on the City of Tacoma's benefit package, feel free to explore City of Tacoma Benefits at http://newhiretacoma. wpengine.com/?page_id=26. City of Tacoma Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion Tacoma's diversity is its greatest asset. Tacoma embraces its multi-cultural and multi-ethnic character. Communities of color and immigrant communities are fundamental to Tacoma's entrepreneurial spirit, workforce, and long-term success. In Tacoma, equity and empowerment are top priorities, meaning that all Tacoma residents must have equitable opportunities to reach their full potential and share in the benefits of community progress. The City of Tacoma's workforce goal is to reflect our community. We actively work to eliminate racial and other disparities and welcome candidates with diverse backgrounds and/or multicultural skill sets and experiences. Our goal is for Tacoma to be an inclusive and equitable place to live, work, and play. No direct inquiries, please.

OFFICE

253-671-9951

fatherandsonhauling@hotmail.com

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF THURSTON

Big John’s Lawn Care

FAMILY AND JUVENILE COURT In re the Welfare of: AMINAH WALLACE

D.O.B.: 01/26/2005 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ No: 19-7-00292-34

»Storm Clean-up »Handyman

FREE Hauling for Metal (253) 397-7013

NO FUSS NO MUSS NO POP-UPS

Notice and Summons by Publication (Termination) (SMPB) (Optional Use) To: JOSEPH SIMONS, Legal Father: A Petition to Terminate Parental Rights was filed on March 22, 2019; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: June 12, 2019, at 1:30 p.m. at Thurston County Family and Juvenile Court, 2801 32nd Avenue SW, Tumwater, Washington 98501. You should be present at this hearing. The hearing will determine if your parental rights to your child are terminated. If you do not appear at the hearing, the court may enter an order in your absence terminating your parental rights. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, call DCYF at 360-725-6700 or 1-888-822-3541. To view information about your rights, including right to a lawyer, go to www.atg.wa.gov/TRM.aspx. Dated:

04/26/2019

Follow us on Facebook! facebook.com/tacomaweekly

, by Linda Myhre Enlow, Thurston County Clerk.

Follow us on Twitter! twitter.com/tacomaweekly

Follow us on Instagram! instagram.com/tacomaweekly

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD Call 253.922.5317


.

25¢ DOWN

THEN JUST

A MONTH $I0 no hassle sign up

Visit a club today! PUYALLUP, WA

625 River Road Puyallup, WA 98371

TACOMA EASTSIDE, WA

BONNEY LAKE, WA

Phone: 253-845-5357

817 East 72 Street Tacoma, WA 98404

Phone: 253-475-5689

19561 State Route 410 East Bonney Lake, WA 98391

UNIVERSITY PLACE, WA

TACOMA (FERN HILL), WA

TACOMA WEST END, WA

Phone: 253-533-2510

Phone: 253-321-5940

6704 19 Street West University Place, WA 98466 th

Phone: 253-353-7008

nd

9820 Pacific Avenue Tacoma, WA 98444

Phone: 253-321-5939

2217 North Pearl Street Tacoma, WA 98406

BRING THIS CUPON TO ANY CLUB LISTED ABOVE TO REDEEM OFFER .

25¢ DOWN

THEN JUST

$I0 A MONTH no hassle sign up

offer expires : 5/12/19

ONLINE SIGN-UP PROMO CODE: JOINPF we ’ re not a gym . we ’ re planet fitness .

planetfitness.com Must be at least I8 years old, or 13 with parent/guardian. Planet Fitness facilities are independently owned and operated. Membership payments are billed to a checking account, $39 annual fee. ©Planet Fitness

Profile for Tacoma Weekly News

Tacoma Weekly 05.12.12  

Tacoma Pierce County News

Tacoma Weekly 05.12.12  

Tacoma Pierce County News

Advertisement