Issuu on Google+


Soap Box Derby Saturday, June 19 2010 Fa r

ibault, MN

Noon Next to McKinley Center

Grand Parad e

June 1 6:30 p 9 .m.

Central Park in Faribault: Food • Craft Show • Rides • Large Beer Garden • Teen Night Sponsored by Grampa Al’s

Music on Thursday-Saturday Nights in the Central Park bandshell: Thursday: Big John Dickerson

Friday: Smokescreen

Saturday: The Pearl

Raffle tickets are $5!

Prizes – 1st: $500, 2nd: $250, 3rd: $100

Drawing will be held Sat., June 19 at Central Park at 9:30 p.m. after the parade. Raffle tickets available at Central Park during the Celebration.

Visit our website to find: Schedule of events/Entertainment • Box Car Derby Information • Photos of the Event • Parade Information and Entry Applications • Sponsor and Donation Information

Pillar Sponsors: State Bank of Faribault City of Faribault Ameriprise Financial Faribault Web

Photo: © Lisa F. Young | dreamstime.com

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Contents Vol. 6, Issue 6

June 2010 17 Bridge Square Northfield, MN 55057

507/663-7937 neg@northfieldguide.com Publisher: Rob Schanilec By All Means Graphics Advertising: Kevin Krein Kevin@northfieldguide.com or 507/663-7937 Contributors: Susan Hvistendahl Locallygrownnorthfield.org Breanna Zarbinski Online: at northfieldguide.com! A flippin’ cool digital edition, downloadable PDF, archives and content submission form.

JUNE 2010

Happenings – Up Close ........ 3-13, 30-35 Sports ..........................................3 Theater .......................................3 Galleries......................................4 A Month at a Glance.... 26-29 Music Matters ........................36 June Gigs .......................................37 Clubs, Classes & More ........ 37 Historic Happenings ..... 40-44 Dining ......................................45 Advertisers’ Index ................45 Just Curious: Dean Kjerland .................46-48 On the Cover:

This is our Third Annual Music Issue and we’re just tickled to profile several locally appreciated musicians inside these pages including those on the cover (clockwise from top): Sweet North, The Night Crawlers (photo: courtesy David Gray), Gospel Gossip (photo: Joshua Lerman) and Your Friends and Family.

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

Paid Advertisement

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The official VBF lapel pin is your admission to all but the limited-seating VBF events in August. To receive yours, make a donation through our website, or by visiting these Northfield establishments: By All Means Graphics, Northfield Historical Society, Northfield Arts Guild, Northfield News, Graphic Mailbox, or the Northfield Chamber of Commerce.

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Theater

This enchanted edition is based on the 1997 teleplay. Tickets: $14 adults, $8 children 14 and under. The Phantom Tollbooth

Best of Broadway

June 12, 7:30pm and June 13, 2pm Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault A show filled with fun, frivolity and music. Join some of the best local talent as they sing the best of the Broadway tunes you know and love. Director Julianna Skluzacek, music director Barb Piper (see profile page 20) and pianist Doug Madow. Cinderella

June 18-20, 24-27; Th-Sa 7:30pm, Su 2pm Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault The timeless enchantment of a magical fairy tale is reborn with the Rodgers & Hammerstein hallmarks of originality, charm and elegance. With great warmth and more than a touch of hilarity, the hearts of children and adults alike still soar when the slipper fits.

S P O R T S Here are the home games

June 18-20, 25-27; F/Sa 7:30pm, Su 2pm Northfield Arts Guild Theater Based on a long-popular children’s book, The Phantom Tollbooth follows Milo on a journey into an imaginative land. Milo must fight foes like The Doldrums and the Demons of Ignorance to save Dictionopolis and Digitopolis. Aided by his Photo: Patsy Dew companions Tock and The Humbug, Milo strives to rescue the Princesses Rhyme and Reason from the Castle in the Air. An engaging retelling of this very popular story, this play is a wonderful option for the entire family.

Wednesday, June 2

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. St. Paul Sport and Spine, 7:30pm Northfield Knights vs. Austin Blue Sox, 7:30pm Friday, June 4

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Highland Park, 7pm Northfield Knights vs. Richtown Bombers, 7:30pm Saturday, June 5

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. St. Louis Park, 7pm Sunday, June 6

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. TBD Championship, 3pm Northfield Knights vs. Miesville Mudhens, 2pm Wednesday, June 9

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Richtown Bombers, 7:30pm Northfield Knights vs. Prescott Pirates, 7:30pm Friday, June 11

BASEBALL – Northfield Knights vs. Lakeville Athletics, 7:30pm Sunday, June 13

BASEBALL – Northfield Knights vs. Red Wing Aces, 2pm Monday, June 14

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Eastside Merchants, 7:30pm Wednesday, June 16

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Austin Blue Sox, 7:30pm Northfield Knights vs. Rosemount Black Sox, 7:30pm Friday, June 18

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Rosemount Black Sox, 7:30pm Monday, June 21

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Austin Greyhounds, 7:30pm Wednesday, June 23

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Lyon’s Pub Warriors, 7:30pm

Northfield Arts Guild’s Jessie Jane’s Jamboree 4: Merry Mary

June 2, 7-10pm and June 6, 1-3pm at the Northfield Arts Guild Theater Jessie Jane will return to the stage for another episode of the trials and tribulations of Jessie Jane’s Jamboree. Life smells sweet in the little town of Northfield until the dark side of the new perfumery is discovered. Yes, something smells good in Northfield. Too good. Lighthearted melodrama, music and dancing. There are many roles for adults of all ages and experience levels. Those auditioning will be asked to prepare a one- to two-minute song, be prepared to read from the script, and be prepared to dance. To sign up for an audition, call 507/645-8877. Show dates: Sept. 9-11, 2010. Northfield Arts Guild’s Singer Sisters

June 6, 4-6pm and June 7, 7-9pm at the Northfield Arts Guild Theater The Singer Sisters, written by local playwright Marc Robinson, is a sweet comic drama about four sisters, a teenaged son, and the nice neighbor from down the road. The sisters have reunited after many years to celebrate their mother’s birthday, but circumstances force them to celebrate in a way that they hadn’t expected. The sisters are compelled to face memories of songs sung long ago, lost opportunities and choices gone wrong. Prepare a one- to two-minute song and be prepared to read from the script. There are four women’s parts, ages 50-70. There are parts for a boy about 16 and a man 60 to 70. All parts are singing parts with the exception of the adult man’s part. Sign up for an audition by calling 507/645-8877. Show dates: Nov. 5-21, 2010. Lockwood Theater Company’s Jesse

Friday, June 25

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Cannon Falls Bears, 7:30pm Northfield Knights vs. East Side Merchants, 7:30pm Sunday, June 27

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. Hampton Cardinals, 6:05pm Wednesday, June 30

BASEBALL – Dundas Dukes vs. St. Louis Park, 7:30pm Northfield Knights vs. Kasson Coyotes, 7:30pm

JUNE 2010

Auditions

June 10, 6-9pm and June 12, 2-4pm, callbacks 4-5pm at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church There will be 25-35 parts available for ages 10-80+. Some cast members may have multiple roles. Some roles may have understudies. To receive audition information, sign up for an LTC Audition Notification email list at http://lockwoodtheater.org/auditions/

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

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ArtOnWater

Grezzo Gallery

Paradise Center for the Arts

217 S. Water St. • 507/786-9700 artonwater.com

220 Division St., River Level 507/581-2161

321 Central Ave., Faribault 507/332-7372 paradisecenterforthearts.org Marsha Van Buskirk (collage boxes) and Milly Oudhoff (goddess dolls) – through June 12.

Northfield Arts Guild

“a favorite cup” – functional ceramics of Colleen Riley, Donovan Palmquist plus many other local and Minnesota-connected potters. Fine art from the potter’s hand – personal use – great gifts. “Fired Art – Glass, Clay” – fused stained glass by Northfield artists Tonya and Cayenne Kjerland, plus original oak-framed decorative American Opal(escent) Glass by Dean Kjerland.

Carleton College Art Gallery One N. College St. • 507/646-4469 carleton.edu/campus/gallery “Dimensional Vision,” the 2010 Senior Studio Art Majors Exhibition – through June 11.

Eclectic Goat 418 Division St. • 507/786-9595 More than 120 artists represented. “A shop where...ART RULES!” Open House: June 6, 2-4pm

304 Division St. • 507/645-8877 • M-F 105, Sa 11-3 • www.northfieldartsguild.org High School Honors Art Exhibit, through June 19. Northfield High School students from Katherine Norrie’s Honor’s Art Class will show their best work from their year of art study. Richard Rock: Picturing History – June 23-July 31. A series of Richard Rock’s paintings of artifacts and furnishings from the collections of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Painted from life at the MIA beginning in 2001, the paintings are “intimate portraits of the museum and captured remains of times past.” The Other Room in the gallery will show the work of Riki Kölbl Nelson in an exhibit titled Dress/Undress. Opening Reception: June 24, 7-9pm Art in Bloom – June 24-27. Every year, local gardeners from the Northfield Garden Club team up with the Northfield Arts Guild, creating various floral arrangements that have been inspired by pieces in the gallery. This year, the flowers will be displayed alongside the artwork of artists Richard Rock and Riki Kölbl Nelson. The event is a wonderful example of the splendor of both art and summer as the flowers give the gallery a beautiful and refreshing new look. Opening Reception: June 24, 7-9pm

Annual Members Show – June 25-July 30 – Brings together artists from all fields of study: batik, drawing, ceramics and more.

Studio Elements 16 Bridge Square • 507/786-9393 Th/F 10-8, Sa 10-6, Su 12-4 studioelements.net A monthly market of fine art, unique gifts and fun junk. Open June 3-6.

swag 423 Division St. • 507/663-887 Tu-Sa, 10-5 Hand-made art birds to welcome in spring. Wood-adorned birds – all one-ofa-kind.

“Windows on Paradise” Art Gallery 904 Division St. So. • 507/645-5563 Landscapes and inspirational art by Mark Daehlin. Viewings by appointment.

Also try our Herbal “Energy” Tea – stop in and get fused!

Come in and try one of our 39 flavors of smoothies under 300 calories.

200 Division St. • 507-786-9696 4 NEG@northfieldguide.com

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Marty Anderson and the Goods 8-11pm

HAPPE N I NG S

The Tavern Lounge Acoustic, electric, classic rock and country alternative with a song list that spans the decades: Dylan, Young, Springsteen, Wilco, Beatles, Hiatt, Ryan Adams and Steve Earle.

TUESDAY, JUNE 1 Chamber Recital III • 12-1pm

Concert Hall, Carleton African Drum Ensemble • 4-5pm

Sayles-Hill Great Space, Carleton Jay Johnson, director.

Dan Andreasen • 9pm

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale Smooth saxophone.

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam.

Goodsell Observatory Open House 10pm-12am

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2

Marty Anderson

Violin/Viola Recital II • 3-4:30pm

Concert Hall, Carleton THURSDAY, JUNE 3 Northfield Area Chamber’s 5th Annual “Golf-A-Palooza” 1pm

Northfield Golf Club Wild West Shot Gun Shootout! 11am lunch and registration. Dinner, silent auction, program to follow. Western attire encouraged. Mark Mraz • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge Forget about life for awhile with the piano man. From Billy Joel to Kermit the Frog – Mraz tickles the ivories and entertains requests from the audience.

SATURDAY, JUNE 5 Birds on River Bend • 8-10am

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Spot birds nesting, hunting and fishing along the Straight River. Herons, swallows and kingfishers are waiting so bring your binoculars. A spotting scope will be available for close-ups! The program begins and ends with a beautiful mile-long hike through the riparian woodland. Wear sturdy shoes; this exhilarating hike may be difficult for strollers. Free for all ages. Riverwalk Market Fair Grand Opening • 9am-1pm

Bridge Square and the Riverwalk See ad on back cover.

FRIDAY, JUNE 4 Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

Butler’s Steak and Ale Burning Chrome • 8pm

Tim Freeland

Carleton These open houses are always the first Friday evening of each month for two hours. Open houses are canceled if it is cloudy.

The Contented Cow Rock at heart with excursions into everything with a guarantee that each song will be a minimum of six minutes and a maximum of, well, somewhere around 18. All original material because the best things are still hand made.

Dave Hudson • 6pm

Willinger’s Golf Club After cutting his teeth with various college bands and acoustic duos, Dave Hudson made his way through the Minneapolis music scene by writing and singing his own blend of melodic acousticrock music. His style has been compared to the likes of the Gin Blossoms, U2 and the Counting Crows. His self-styled mix of cover songs blended with his own recorded and nationally released music is what has kept crowds coming back for more.

Aquatic Pets “A Unique Pet Shop” Tropical & Marine Fish Aquariums & Supplies For All Pets

414 Division St. S. Northfield, MN 55057 (507) 663-1096

Fish make great pets!

15% OFF total purchase with this coupon

Steve & Liz Messner, Owners

JUNE 2010

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

Exp. 6/30/10

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HAPPENINGS Saturday, June 5, continued Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale Sweet Jazz • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge The name says it all! Christina Schwietz (vocals); Peter Webb (keyboard); David Miller (drums, flugelhorn, melodica) and Muriel Carpenter (bass). See profile on page 20.

Sweet Jazz

Area 51 • 8pm

The Contented Cow Voted Northfield’s No. 1 Band of 2009 by readers of the Northfield Entertainment Guide! Take eight from the fields of education, architecture, communications and medicine; mix in guitars, drums, saxophones, harmonicas, voices and cowbells and you’ve got “music from the heavens.” SUNDAY, JUNE 6 Artists Open House • 2-4pm

Featuring: Local Fine Artist Joel Hurlbutt Artist’s Reception June 9, 6-8 p.m.

Eclectic Goat Politics and a Pint • 6pm

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com.

Comfortable shoes and clothing for men and women Store Hours: M-F 9:30-8, Sat 9:30-5:30, Sun 12-4 401 Division Street, Northfield•645-4257•rarepair.com

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Northern Roots Session • 7pm

THURSDAY, JUNE 10

The Contented Cow Acoustic music with roots particularly from Nordic countries.

Alexy

Ian Alexy • 8-11pm

The Contented Cow Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug.” $5/four-person team.

The Tavern Lounge Singer/songwriter/guitarist Ian Alexy offers deft finger-picking, jazzy melodies and heartwarming tales of a well-traveled 20-something-year-old.

MONDAY, JUNE 7

Study Hall • 9pm

Quiz Night • 8pm

The Contented Cow This includes Peter Lynn and Terry VanDeWalker and these guys really rock the house – digging deep into obscure covers and original tunes.

Multe • 7:30pm

The Contented Cow Great traditional Nordic music for your listening pleasure! Profiled on page 21.

FRIDAY, JUNE 11

Fourth Annual Northfield Retirement Community Golf Classic

Twin City Naturals • 5pm

The Contented Cow

Northfield Golf Club Call 507/645-9511 for information.

Multe

New Moon Trio • 8pm

TUESDAY, JUNE 8 Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9 Artist Reception • 6-8pm

Shanti Tattoo Local fine artist Joel Hurlbutt.

JUNE 2010

Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm • Butler’s Steak and Ale

The Contented Cow Here’s a taste of 100 years of popular tunes, random requests and spontaneous harmonies featuring Ross Currier on bass, Lance Heisler on drums and Kase Justin London on guitar. Lonesome Dan Kase • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge Think music from O Brother, Where Art Thou? and mix in a little more ragtime and a hint of bluegrass.

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

7


SATURDAY, JUNE 12 Carleton Commencement • 9:30-11:30am

Lawn west of Hulings Hall, Carleton Northfield Dance Academy’s Spring Recital: “Feel the Heat” 2pm

Northfield Middle School Auditorium Tickets: $10.

concert series. Cake and coffee will be served at 7pm. See profile on page 14. Kevin Stanke • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge Lyrically focused acoustic grooves inspired in part by the artists often covered, G. Love, Jack Johnson, Belle and Sebastian and Magnetic Fields. The Bohemian Duo • 9pm

Linda James • 5pm

Rueb ‘n’ Stein Chad Johnson and Russel Franek, former front men of “Communication Breakdown,” playing originals and covers including the likes of Lynard Skynyrd, Van Morrison, CCR and Johnny Cash.

The Contented Cow Robin Fodor • 6pm

Willinger’s Golf Club Acoustic/classic rock/folk. Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm Fodor

Butler’s Steak & Ale

Theater: Best of Broadway • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Meredith Fierke with Steven McKinstry • 7:30pm

Northfield Public Library Well-heeled in the Minneapolis music scene, this Northfield-grown wonder practices original illusive lyrics, raw emotion and deft guitar playing. Voted Northfield’s No. 1 musician 2009. This is part of the Carnegie Centennial

2 of Hearts • 9pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale SUNDAY, JUNE 13 Theater: Best of Broadway • 2pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

• Embroidery • Screen Printing • Cad Cut • Logo Design • Quality Clothing • Photo Transfers

Personalized gifts for weddings, baby showers, etc. 427 Division St., Northfield MN 55057 (507) 645-6576 Toll Free: (800) 343-9715 Fax: (507) 645-0414

www.rockytopmn.com linda@rockytopnorthfield.com

Quality Compassionate Care Without the Wait! Better Service • Lower Costs • More Convenience Sick? Injured? Pain? Come see us at Northfield Urgent Care. We are here for you!

We offer: On-site Lab Services & X-ray Equipment, Casting, Stitches, On-site Pharmaceuticals, Occupational Medicine, Physicals, Drug Screens, Breathalyzers All health insurances accepted. Walk-in. No appointment needed!

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Politics and a Pint • 6pm

Books and Stars: Sons of the Beach • 7pm

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com. Northern Roots Session • 7pm

The Contented Cow Northern Roots

Quiz Night • 8pm

The Contented Cow Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug.” $5/four-person team. MONDAY, JUNE 14 Multe • 7:30pm

The Contented Cow Great traditional Nordic music for your listening pleasure! See profile on page 21.

Outdoor Pool Rock out fun with 1950’s rock and roll! THURSDAY, JUNE 17 Faribault Heritage Celebration

Central Park, Faribault This is the second of a four-day event. Food, craft show, rides, beer garden. Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault This is the first of a four-day event. The Paradise and the Mural Society join forces to present a recycled art sale! Search your attic and basement, get rid of those art pieces you can’t stand to look at anymore. Donate to the Paradise...then come back for new-to-you art for your home! Carleton’s “Lighten Up” Garage Sale • 8am-7pm

TUESDAY, JUNE 15

West Gym, Carleton This is the first of a two-day event. The tenth annual “Lighten Up” garage sale. Proceeds benefit the Northfield Union of Youth, Project Friendship and the Northfield Area Special Olympics.

Wine Tasting • 6-8pm

The HideAway Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians of all levels gather to jam. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16 Faribault Heritage Celebration

Central Park, Faribault This is the first of a four-day event. Food, craft show, rides, beer garden.

Taste of Northfield • 4-10pm

Downtown Northfield This is the first of a two-day event. Bring your taste buds to this feast. Whether you’re an epicure or just know a good burger when you bite into one, this event is sure to meet your cravings. There’s also a beer and wine tent, silent and live auction and a James Gang bank raid re-enactment – fun for all ages! Live music and dancing fill the downtown streets into the night.

You Ad Here!

Summer is on the way!

JUNE 2010

Call Today! 507-663-7937!

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

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HAPPENINGS Thursday, June 17, continued Northfield Community Band Concert • 7pm

Bridge Square Featuring local performers and music of many genres, the Northfield Community Band has been a part of summers in town for more than 100 years! All the concerts are free to the public. It’s the perfect evening out for families and friends. Joe Carey • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge

Toaster Fork!

The Contented Cow The music may be vaguely familiar, but it’s all original rock and roll. FRIDAY, JUNE 18 Faribault Heritage Celebration

Central Park, Faribault This is the third of a four-day event. Food, craft show, rides, large beer garden, musical performance by Smokescreen. Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault This is the second of a four-day event. See June 17 description. Carleton’s “Lighten Up” Garage Sale • 8am-7pm

West Gym, Carleton This is the second of a two-day event. See June 17 description. Taste of Northfield • 4-10pm

Downtown Northfield This is the second of a two-day event. See June 17 description.

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

SATURDAY, JUNE 19

Butler’s Steak and Ale

Faribault Heritage Celebration

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Central Park, Faribault This is the fourth of a four-day event. Food, craft show, rides, large beer garden. Soap box derby at noon, grand parade at 6:30. Musical performance by The Pearl.

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3. Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth 7:30pm Tim Freeland

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 3.

Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault This is the third of a four-day event. See June 17 description.

Alison Rae • 8-11pm

The Pleasure Invasion • 5pm

The Tavern Lounge St. Paul-based musician “whose voice and songs come at you with all the power and hype of a falling snowflake…her talent has instantly hushed a room.” – Jim Walsh, MinnPost.

The Contented Cow Rock.

Sir Isaac Newton’s Royal Funk Orchestra • 8pm

Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm

The Contented Cow

Willinger’s Golf Club Butler’s Steak & Ale

Contra Dancing Under the Stars • 8pm

Bridge Square Music by Over and Back. Mixed tradition contra dancing from 8-10pm, freestyle dancing 10-11pm

Guitarist Rich Prenier • 6pm The Pleasure Invasion

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3. Phantom Tollbooth

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 7:30pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 3. Jeff Ray • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge Mighty fine guitar and harp.

Sports Bar & Grill

Bringing the “Best Burger in Town” down to Bridge Square for The Taste of Northfield June 17-18 from 4-10 pm 503 Division St. • Northfield • 645-6691

www.ruebnstein.com JUNE 2010

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

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HAPPENINGS Saturday, June 19, continued Dime-Store Watch • 8pm

The Contented Cow Jerry Johnson, Inga Johnson and Joel Cooper. SUNDAY, JUNE 20

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 2pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 3. Quiz Night • 8pm

The Contented Cow Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug.” $5/four-person team.

Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault This is the fourth of a four-day event. See June 17 description. Scandinavian Midsommer • 5pm

Way Park Informal picnicking, wreath making and other family friendly activities. A midsommar professional, raising of the maistang (maypole), songs and dances, games and more. Live Nordic music will be provided by Hütenänny and Friends. In case of rain, the celebration will be held at St. John’s Lutheran Church. Politics and a Pint • 6pm

MONDAY, JUNE 21 Multe • 7:30pm

The Contented Cow Great traditional Nordic music for your listening pleasure! See profile on page 21. Summer Solstice Evening Stroll • 8-9:15pm

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Take a leisurely stroll up to the overlook (the highest point at River Bend) and watch the sun go down at its latest time. You’ll discover how people through the ages and around the world mark this important natural event. The trail to the overlook is hilly and has a flight of stairs at the end. The trail will not be suitable for strollers. Free for all ages.

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com.

TUESDAY, JUNE 22

Northern Roots Session • 7pm

Acoustic musicians gather to jam.

The Contented Cow

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23

Theater: Cinderella • 2pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3.

Join us for fun, free, family friendly entertainment at a variety of Northfield parks Wednesday evenings in June and July! Booker open 6:30-8:15 pm. The show begins at 7 pm. June 16 – SONS OF THE BEACH Rock out fun with ’50s rock and roll! At the outdoor pool. June 23 – MU DAIKO Amazing drumming! Their sound is immense, building in intensity, filling the air with wave upon wave of pulsating rhythm. At Way Park.

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm • The Contented Cow

June 30 – JUSTIN ROBERTS Four-time Parents’ Choice Gold Award winner Justin Roberts has emerged as a key player in the world of hip kids’ music! At Ames Park.

Junebug Music Festival

The Contented Cow Carey Langer, 5pm Solo artist covering six decades and seven styles of music. From The Everly Brothers and Frank Sinatra, to Rick Springfield, Dave Matthews and Jimmy Eats World, plus original music. See profile on page 18. New Moon Trio, 8pm Here’s a taste of 100 years of popular tunes, random requests and spontaneous harmonies featuring Ross Currier on bass, Lance Heisler on drums and Justin London on guitar. Peter Ricke Trio, 11pm Blues/rock/pop from Rosemount. Everything good rolled up into a night of awesome sounds. The Rueb ‘n’ Stein The Bratlanders, 8-11pm As many as six members and eight instruments, with a set list of almost four hours of rootsy Americana rock and roll.

Inclement weather site: NCRC Room 103, Jefferson Parkway (by the high school stadium)

Books and stars is made possible by a grant from the Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council. Sponsored by the City of Northfield-Library and Northfield Schools-Community Services Division.

For information, call 507-645-6606 or www.northfieldmn.info.

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Books and Stars: Mu Daiko • 7pm

Way Park Amazing drumming! Their sound is immense, building in intensity, filling the air with wave upon wave of pulsating rhythm.

FRIDAY, JUNE 25 Celebrate Dundas Baseball Game Kickoff • 7:30 pm.

Memorial Field, Dundas This match up between the Dundas Dukes and the Cannon Falls Bears starts the ball rolling right into the next day’s pull-out-allthe-stops celebration!

THURSDAY, JUNE 24 Junebug Music Festival

The Contented Cow Small Town Anthem, 5pm Love was found when Blues introduced a soul named Rock and a soul named Reggae. They had two children: one named Folk and the other Funk. That family became known as “Small Town Anthem.” Fish Frye, 8pm Mankato-based duo featuring a Neil Young-sounding Joe Tougas and the gorgeous-voiced Ann Fee. Eclectic pop from Etta James to KISS – five decades of music delivered so you can hear the band and the person next to you. Marty Anderson & the Goods, 11pm The “Goods” music is a blend of Americana and country alternative sound with lots of Bob Dylan. They do some glam-era adaptations that really rock, as well as new music like Wilco and Ryan Adams. The Rueb ‘n’ Stein Bonnie and the Clydes, 8-11pm Take a step back and resurrect songs of love, peace and flower power from the late ’60s and early ’70s. The Bonnie is Bonnie Jean Flom. The Clydes are Bill McGrath and Scott McMillan. Northfield Community Band Concert • 7pm

Bridge Square Featuring local performers and music of many genres, the Northfield Community Band has been a part of summers in town for more than 100 years! All the concerts are free to the public. It’s the perfect evening out for families and friends. Art Opening Reception • 7-9pm

Northfield Arts Guild See page 4.

Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

Butler’s Steak and Ale Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3. Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 7:30pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 3. Junebug Music Festival

The Contented Cow Occasional Jazz, 5pm Mainstream classic jazz of Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Dave Brubeck and others in the same style. Beguine Brothers, 7pm Area 51, 9pm Voted Northfield’s No. 1 Band of 2009 by readers of the Northfield Entertainment Guide! Take eight from the fields of education, architecture, communications and medicine; mix in guitars, drums, saxophones, harmonicas, voices and cowbells and you’ve got “music from the heavens.” HAPPENINGS (and Junebug) continued on page 30

OPEN DURING CONSTRUCTION Bring in this coupon for one free egg roll or a free 4-piece cream cheese wonton, with the purchase of an entree. Voted Best Take-Out 2009

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Northfield Entertainment Guide

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3. Area 51 • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge Voted Northfield’s No. 1 Band 2009 by readers of the Northfield Entertainment Guide! Take eight from the fields of education, architecture, communications and medicine; mix in guitars, drums, saxophones, harmonicas, voices and cowbells and you’ve got “music from the heavens.”

Bringing a touch of the Orient to downtown Northfield since 1981

Enjoy Eat-In or call ahead for convenient Take-Outs.

107 East 4th St. • Northfield • 645-7101 Hours: Lunch Wed.-Fri. 11:30-2:00 Dinner Tues.-Thurs. 4:30-9:00 Fri. & Sat. 4:30-10:00

JUNE 2010

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

13


n i a tr

g n o s Soaring vocal melodies “dirty-pretty” original lyrics of honesty and raw emotion

2007, 2008, 2009 – Best Musician (Northfield Entertainment Guide) 2009 – Red Gorilla Festival at South by Southwest in Austin, Tx “Train’s Song” recorded on CITIES 97 SAMPLER Volume 21 Fierke falls somewhere in the space between songwriters such as Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell and Cat Power…the chills that tracks like “Train’s Song” and “Stellar” induce are authentic; the material here remains on high ground, safely removed from the tides of melodrama. -Will McClain, City Pages Up next: June 12, 7:30pm, Northfield Library

Photo: Joshua lermon

more at meridithfierke.com

Shoegaze, thrash, pop Shoegaze – late-’80s/early-’90s UK heydey predecessor to grunge where musicians performed standing relatively still, gazing, for the most part, at their shoes. If Gospel Gossip stands still – their audiences certainly don’t. Max Clark (Unicorn Basement/UF Records):“GG expounds their post-punk influences through throbbing bass lines and danceable drums that make you move like Ian Curtis.” Northfield-based trio spawned at Carleton College. Sarah Nienaber guitar and vocals Ollie Moltaji drums Justin Plank bass at times Deanna Steege synth-keyboard. A sound reminiscent of The Cure, New Order, Echo & The Bunnymen, and the Smiths – with tastes of the Raveonettes and the Jesus & Mary Chain. 2006 – released the Milkshake EP, which was recorded in the basement of Carleton College’s Concert Hall. Spring 2007 – won Carleton College’s Battle of the Bands. Voted one of the “Best New Bands of 2007” by First Avenue.

Up next: (catch ‘em while you can - they won���t be warming the curbs in front of Oolala and GBM forever): June 1, 8pm • The Mill • Iowa City, Iowa June 2, 8pm • The Strutt • Kalamazoo, Michigan June 3, 8pm • Darkroom • Chicago, Illinois June 4, 8 pm • Whammy Bar • Peoria, Illinois June 5, 10pm • Cactus Club • Milwaukee, Wisconsin June 11, 10pm • 501 Club • Minneapolis June 26, 9pm • The Contented Cow • Northfield

Label: Guilt Ridden Pop

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


“Music consumes me.” Northfield’s No. 1 Male Musician 2008 – Northfield Entertainment Guide.

“I export my songs to buddies out-of-state or across town. They load my project into their setup, add parts, then send it back. Very cool! When will it be done? Who knows? I’m happiest in the midst of a project, so why rush it?”

Day job: Custom Framing Studio on 5th Street off Division in Northfield.“If the weather’s nice, sometimes I’ll be out front on the sidewalk with a guitar or sax...”

His previous band, Sticky Wickets, opened for Lovin’ Spoonful. Makes his own guitars.

Songwriter. Recorder: Roland 24-channel digital workstation.“Digital sound has come a long way – from hard and brittle, to luscious and creamy. Suddenly there are no limitations as to what I can do.”

For more: http://www.jonmanners.com and find him on Facebook

Up next: June 26, 8pm, The Rueb ‘n’ Stein downstairs bar.

Celtic Folk and American Civil War tunes left: John Hanson (guitar, banjo, resonator guitar) right: Brad Easterson (fiddle, mandolin, recorder) Regularly play Bittersweet Eatery, downtown Northfield, for the lunchtime crowd. A Wake-Robin is the first trillium of the spring, and according to legend, thus “wakes the robins.” More at: www.wake-robinofnorthfield.com

JUNE 2010

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15


Songwriter, vocalist, multi instrumentalist.

Alto sax, piano, bluesy vocals At 16 she was stealing away from home and working her guitar and vocals on the stages of Chicago’s “Somebody Else’s Trouble” and the “Kingston Mines.” Graduated from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, with a major in piano and a minor in alto sax.

Worked in a variety of theater and musical groups and toured nationally as an actress and musician. Along with Lore and Friends, sits in with various local bands including her own, The Zillionaires. She’s skinned a bear.

Moved to L.A. and played with the Lost Angels, whose original pop/country/rock sound was voted no. 1 on the central coast of California. Recorded with Helen Reddy (sax and background vocals) Toured with Hoyt Axton on the original “Honeysuckle Rose” bus Recorded with Jackson Browne (vocals) She’s been a few places since then and moved from Northfield. But the individuals on these pages drew her back and inspired her newest band, Lore.

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Loves all things bass clef

Lively electric guitar Available for gigs, recordings, lessons, light electronic repairs, vocals, songwriting/arranging/ producing. Northfielder, family man, nice guy, long hair, short fingernails. Has played/sung/written or recorded for Freeflite, Zakarian, Alien Citizen, Peter Z, Patriot, Chameleon, Sizzling Eggheads, Hanover Fist, CBS, A+M, MCA/IRS, Kiss, Prairie Creek Band, Jellystone Yogi, Lore, Study Hall and Sister. “A reformed attic/basement dweller, explosive showboater and space ambassador/illuminator, Peter is quite pastel and smooth, if not supremely normal or a communist sympathizer gone native.” - Thus spake Sundog Rainboa, happily looking away. more at: flyingpanproductions.com and myspace.com/peterdiggins

A townie. Married to a townie (Tania). Father to a townie (Kai, 7). Son and brother to townies. Bachelor’s and Master’s in music from St. Olaf and the U of M. Middle school band director and teacher. Inspired to learn bass after watching concert footage of The Who, Cream and Tower of Power. Has played with various rock/blues groups such as As You Like It, Velvet Kilt, Big Top, Tim Casey and the Martyrs, The Staff Infection and now Lore and Friends. Plays regularly at United Methodist Church. Formally trained as a tuba player by Paul Niemisto (St. Olaf ) and Ross Tolbert (MN Orchestra). A member of the Up North Brass Quintet for more than 20 years. Plays regularly with the Lake Wobegon Brass Band and the Cannon Valley Regional Orchestra. Occasionally spotted playing with the Northfield Trombones, local brass quintets, pit orchestras, dixieland groups and the Northfield Community Band.

First big break: when as a child he was asked to play drums with Marv Grundhoefer for the Northfield Lion’s Club Pancake breakfast, an annual gig which he proudly continues to play to this day. Late 1970s: played with Northfield’s first reggae band, Kwasa, then moved to the Twin Cities to work as a drummer and sound engineer. Currently plays with several local bands including Lore and Friends, The Bratlanders and The Zillionaires.

JUNE 2010

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17


A self-taught musician, he began his musical pursuits at the age of 12. First with guitar, then branching far and wide into vocals, piano, drums, clarinet, saxophone and tuba. At 14, Carey toured with contemporary Christian band,“Morning Star” out of Omaha, Nebraska, as their drummer. He spent his remaining high school years playing with a 28-piece big band, pursuing theater, participating in vocal music ensembles, and playing solo shows for festivals, clubs and private gatherings. On tour he’s opened for Brad Paisley, The Great Divide, Little River Band, Wade Hayes, Three Dog Night and Kansas. Now he performs solo with the ’80’s band DV8, out of Nebraska, that recently celebrated 20 years of performing together. And he’s writing songs for a new album that should be released this summer. Up next: June 23, 5pm, The Contented Cow For more: www.myspace.com/clangermusic

Voted one of Northfield’s best by readers of this publication. Contemporary pop of Missy Higgins and the Avett Brothers to classic rock by bands like Fleetwood Mac and John Mellencamp to such varied artists as the Indigo Girls, Damien Rice and Sarah McLachlan. Power harmonizing by twin sisters Linda Wilson and Sandy Jensen Bluesy vocals and guitar by Toby Jenson Mandolin, harmonica and percussion by Sandy Jensen Up next: June 26, 6pm, Willinger’s Golf Club More at relativitytheband.com

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Folk pop: Just some handsome guys and some beautiful women playing music together. (l to r): Monica Haynes (piano) Travis Kath (vocals, guitar) Kevin Stanke (bass, harmonica) Allie Savella (ukulele) - not pict. Travis and Kevin met working in Northfield and bonded over a passion for obscure songwriters. They became “Slowsound.” Allie and Monica added more life and instruments to the band and they became Your Friends & Family. Upcoming gig: June 12, Tavern Lounge more at: www.facebook.com/yfandf Crazy stories: in the making…

“A sound too loud for Northfield.” Their music: You’re either really going to love it, or you’re going to despise it. Det Vent, founded as a two-man project in the winter of 2009 by Dan Zenner and Kevin Krein. “laptop rock” “abrasive electronic music” electronica/shoegaze/punk rock/funk one guitar two keyboards a laptop ten effects pedals and the most recent addition: drummer Adam Casper For more: detvent.blogspot.com. There you can also download their free digital EP ”the Anhedonia EP.” You may not be ready for it, but your kids are going to love it.

JUNE 2010

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19


Modern folk vocals/guitar Influences: From Hoagy Carmichael, The Beatles and Bonnie Raitt to Susan Tedeschi, Brandi Carlile and Indigo Girls. She also writes and performs her own music. Been going solo and in groups since the 1980s. Regular southern Minnesota venues include The Contented Cow, The Tavern Lounge, Froggy Bottoms and the Northfield Arts Guild Theater. Currently contributes her talents to the Entertainment Guide’s No. 1 Band Pick 2009, Area 51; fronts the blues/rock band,“Top Shelf”; and performs with a Faribault musical theater group at Paradise Center for the Arts. A music teacher for 27 years.“To help young people develop their musicianship and contribute creatively to our culture is a privilege with a sense of urgency. The future of the arts is in these young people’s hands.” For more: www.barbarapiper.com

The name says it all! The first course in 2006 with Christina Schwietz doing vocals and Peter Webb on piano exploring jazz vocal standards. Add drums, flugelhorn and melodica to taste (David Miller) and a dash of bass (Muriel Carpenter) and you’ve got the full course. jazz Brazilian swing ballads blues When not creating sweet jazz, David teaches band in Apple Valley (and plays with the Bend in the River Big Band), Peter is a mathematician at the U of M, Murial is a sophomore at Northfield High School and Christina teaches KidsArt, acts, dances and sings. Next up: June 5 at the Tavern Lounge, and as part of the Northfield Carnegie Library Centennial Concert Series – date to be determined. More at: www.math.umn.edu/~webb/SweetJazz/

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Seven years ago, Northfielders with a penchant for Nordic music gathered to jam as Nordic Jam. Over the years it spawned several musical groups, including Multe – a band that focuses on playing the traditional music the way it’s meant to be played. Influences: Top Norwegian folk bands including Hallingdal Kraftlag, KVARTS and Nordafjells, and artists like Sven Nyhus and Rannveig Djønne. Musicians steeped in the traditions of Denmark, Finland and Sweden including Haugaard & Høirup, JPP, Maria Kalaniemi and Ale Möller. Strongly committed to the dance element of the music: waltzes, polkas, schottische, maszurka, pols, polskas, etc. Several members have attended regional and national music competitions/festivals in Nordic countries – seeing, hearing – and meeting – the best of the best. Upcoming gigs: A regular “working session” almost every Monday night at The Contented Cow, around 7:30pm to try out tunes in public. For more: http://multe.org http://facebook.com/MulteBand http://myspace.com/MulteMusic

JUNE 2010

Everyone in the group has direct heritage from at least one of the Nordic countries: Photo (l to r): Jon Thore Bjork (5-row chromatic button accordion, guitar) Bruce Jensen (bass) Andrea Een (fiddle, Hardanger fiddle) Drew Dixon (guitar) Doug Wornson (piano accordion, piano) Oftentimes Ruth Marie Sylte - not pictured (piano accordion, vocals, dance leader)

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21


Four out of five played a private party together in the summer of 2009 and have been jamming weekly every since. These acoustic musicians hail from Cannon Falls, Northfield and Red Wing. John Reed joined in on violin later that year. Individually they represent rock, country, jazz, blues, folk and classical. As a group – mostly bluegrass with unexpected twists. Sandy Jensen (vocals and octave mandolin) Doug Duncan (vocals and guitar) Tom Erickson (vocals and upright bass) Tom Sampson (mandolin) John Reed (vocals, violin, viola) For more: www.SweetNorthBand.com

Once upon a time Neil Rowley needed a guitar player. Having heard of a John Hiscox, he gave him a call.“Would you be interested in playing a song or two at a cabaret at the PAC?”“Sure, sounds like fun.” Musicians: 5. Rehearsal: 45 minutes. Songs: 3. The performance went well and the audience wanted to know how long the band had been together. Neil looked at his watch and said,“Well, about 45 minutes.” That was the first and the last performance of the 45-Minute Band. Fast forward to 2009: Hiscox, Rowley, Chris Moen and Scotty Friedow were pickin’ at the Contented Cow’s Tuesday Night Acoustic Jam. Batting about the idea of brewing up a band, they called 45-Minute Band singer, Gail Moll, and set the date for the first rehearsal and gig. Guitar, mandolin, stand-up bass, banjo, acoustic bass guitar, bouzouki, resonator guitar plus original songs, old rock, older rock, old country, blues and bluegrass. Music done well, not overwhelmingly loud and fun for the audience. Out of one of those audiences came Steve Shroyer, who joined the band and brought with him a tin whistle.

(l to r): Neal Rowley (vocals, guitar, bass), Scott Friedow (vocals guitar), Gail Moll (vocals), Chris Moen (vocals, guitar, mandolin, bass), and John Hiscox (vocals, mandolin, resonator mandolin, guitar, resonator guitar, bass and bouzouki.

Since the group all met “by Chance” so to speak, the name “Chance Meetings” was adopted. Up next: June 26, 3pm, Contented Cow

Fresh from a gig last month at Froggy Bottoms, they’ve still got it! See article on page 40. The Crawlers circa 1966.

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Photo courtesy David Gray

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


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Summer Activities...So many choices, so little time by Wendy Russell, Kindermusik Adventures A growing number of children’s activities require families to decide what’s important and make choices. When I was a first-time mom, I was overwhelmed by all the things I ‘should’ do as a parent, for my child. Looking back, our activity priorities centered mostly on health and safety. Living in ‘The Land of 10,000 Lakes’, learning how to swim was basic safety. Then came organized sports because physical fitness is for life. Beyond that I just encouraged my children to explore a variety of interests. I used to think music was just one of many interests a person might have. Now I know differently. I used to think parents who took infants and preschoolers to music classes were trying to create “Mozart” prodigies. Now I know differently. As I taught piano lessons, parents asked me to teach younger children who weren’t ready for the 30-minute sit-down lesson. So, in order to offer an age appropriate option, I became a Kindermusik educator. I also attended YAMAHA music classes with my then 3 year-old daughter. What I have since learned and witnessed about the impact of early childhood music on brain development is astounding. Research on brain development tells us that the newborn brain continues to grow after birth. This research confirms that musical experiences create and strengthen neural pathways in EVERY area of a child’s brain.

Not only is early childhood music education beneficial for a child’s musical development, but it also enhances physical, emotional, cognitive, language, and social development. PHYSICAL – Music stimulates physical responses that develop the rhythm center of the brain and impacts physical coordination. EMOTIONAL – Music not only creates emotional responses but it also offers a healthy outlet for expressing feelings. It is important for children to learn socially acceptable ways of venting emotional energy. Whether mad or sad, expressing feelings through music helps to move through and transform those feelings into something more pleasant. COGNITIVE – Music not only stimulates a child’s creative thought process, it helps them recognize patterns, sequence and develop problem-solving skills, which later leads to success in reading and math. It is easiest for the brain to recall words learned through music and song. That’s why children learn the letters of the alphabet or the names of the fifty states in song or rhythmic chants.

Summer Camp Sessions For ages: 4-7 yrs. Old June 21–25, 12:30-2pm July 26-30, 10-11:30am For Information and Registration contact: Wendy Russell, Kindermusik Educator (507) 663-8989 • w.russell@att.net JUNE 2010

LANGUAGE – Like reading, songs teach children language, and singing helps them learn to pronounce words and speak in sentences. Also, singing to your children fosters emotional closeness and bonding even more than reading does. SOCIAL – Most children hear, but listening is a learned skill. Kindermusik activities have children listening and responding to specific things in the music. This not only helps children practice focused listening but they also practice impulse control as they learn to wait and play their part in a group. Mastering these skills prepares them for successful experiences in school and in a community. The best part of gaining all these benefits of early childhood music is that it is easy, rewarding and guaranteed to be fun.

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23


CUISINE of INDIA

GOOD BEER GOOD FOOD GOOD COMPANY

Open for lunch & dinner Lunch Buffet ~ A La Carte Catering Take-out Parties Welcome

Northfield 507-645-2462 • 214 Division St. S. Wed. June 23 Thurs. June 24

Proud Sponsor

Fr. June 25

Sat. June 26

Congratulations to all Graduates of 2010 Carleton, St. Olaf and Northfield High School. Well Done! From all of us at Chapati.

www.chapati.us 24 NEG@northfieldguide.com

5pm 8pm 11 pm 5pm 8pm 11pm 5pm 7pm 9pm 11pm 3pm 5pm 7pm 9pm 11pm

Carey Langer New Moon Trio Peter Ricke Trio Small Town Anthem Fish Frye Marty Anderson & The Goods Occasional Jazz Beguine Brothers Area 51 RCAs Chance Meeting Taylor Baggott Zoo Animal Son of a Gun Gospel Gossip

Check out the calendar for regular jam sessions, live music, quiz night, etc. Coming Soon: Bocce Ball on the lawn.

Open 7 days 3 pm www.contentedcow.com 302 Division St. • Northfield © NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


Enjoy a

Knickerbocker Glory on our new deck overlooking the new bike path overlooking the old Cannon River.

Hours: Lunch: 11:30am-2pm Dinner: 4-9pm (10pm Fri, Midnight Sat) Closed Mondays

A kitchen for canning, jams, pickles and more! Inspected. Approved. Now good to go and ready for YOU!

The Kitchen @ 1001 Contact Diane Burry

diane@1001solutionsllc.com 1001 Division Street • NorthďŹ eld

507-645-1622 JUNE 2010

Tuesday-Sunday 7am-7pm Open Late Friday & Saturday Closed Monday 303 Division St.

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

25


e n Ju SUNDAY

MONDAY

For details on these and more events, check out the Happenings listings with descriptions elsewhere in this guide.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1

2

Chamber Recital III 12-1pm

Violin/Viola Recital II 3-4:30pm

Concert Hall, Carleton

Concert Hall, Carleton

African Drum Ensemble 4-5pm, Sayles-Hill Great

Space, Carleton Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

The Contented Cow

6

7

8

9

Politics and a Pint • 6pm

Multe • 7:30pm

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

Artist Reception • 6-8pm

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow

Shanti Tattoo

Northern Roots Session 7pm • The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8pm

Fourth Annual Northfield Retirement Community Golf Classic

The Contented Cow

Northfield Golf Club

13

14

15

16

Theater: Best of Broadway 2pm, Paradise Center for the

Multe • 7:30pm

Wine Tasting • 6-8pm

The Contented Cow

HideAway

Faribault Heritage Celebration

Arts, Faribault

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

Central Park, Faribault

Politics and a Pint • 6pm

The Contented Cow

Books and Stars: Sons of the Beach • 7pm

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7pm • The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8pm

Outdoor Pool

The Contented Cow

I will be demonstrating how to make homemade flour and corn tortillas, fresh salsas, fool-proof Mexican recipes and some basic cooking techniques. Learn how to make your own vinaigrettes and “aguas frescas” (fresh fruit drinks). Limit 10 people per session, 3 sessions a day. Call or email to reserve a place.

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© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

3

4

5

Northfield Area Chamber’s 5th Annual “Golf-A-Palooza” • 1pm

Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

Riverwalk Market Fair Grand Opening 9am-1pm • Bridge Square/Riverwalk Birds on River Bend • 8-10am

Butler’s Steak and Ale

Northfield Golf Club

Burning Chrome • 8pm

Mark Mraz • 8-11pm, Tavern Lounge

The Contented Cow Marty Anderson & the Goods 8-11pm, Tavern Lounge Dan Andreasen • 9pm • Butler’s Goodsell Observatory Open House 10pm-12am, Carleton

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault Dave Hudson • 6pm • Willinger’s Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm • Butler’s Sweet Jazz • 8-11pm, Tavern Lounge Area 51 • 8pm, The Contented Cow

10

11

12

Ian Alexy • 8-11pm, Tavern Lounge

Twin City Naturals • 5pm

The Contented Cow

Carleton Commencement 9:30-11:30am

Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

Lawn west of Hulings Hall, Carleton

Butler’s Steak and Ale

Northfield Dance Academy’s Spring Recital: “Feel the Heat” • 2pm

Study Hall • 9pm, The Contented Cow

New Moon Trio • 8pm

Bar Games

The Contented Cow Lonesome Dan Kase • 8-11pm

Jingo Mondays, Castle Rock N Roll Euchre Wednesdays, Castle Rock N Roll

The Tavern Lounge

Northfield Middle School Auditorium Linda James • 5pm, Contented Cow Robin Fodor • 6pm, Willinger’s Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale Theater: Best of Broadway • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Karaoke

Meredith Fierke with Steven McKinstry • 7:30pm, Northfield Library

Fridays Jesse James Lanes (national competition!) Castle Rock and Roll, Castle Rock

DJ Music Fridays & Saturdays Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Kevin Stanke • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge The Bohemian Duo • 9pm, The Rueb 2 of Hearts • 9pm, Butler’s

17

18

19

Faribault Heritage Celebration

Faribault Heritage Celebration

Faribault Heritage Celebration

Central Park, Faribault

Central Park, Faribault

Central Park, Faribault

Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Mural Society Recycled Art Sale

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Carleton’s “Lighten Up” Garage Sale 8am-7pm, West Gym, Carleton Taste of Northfield • 4-10pm

Carleton’s “Lighten Up” Garage Sale 8am-7pm, West Gym, Carleton Taste of Northfield • 4-10pm

The Pleasure Invasion • 5pm

Downtown Northfield

Downtown Northfield

Willinger’s Golf Club

Northfield Community Band Concert 7pm, Bridge Square Joe Carey • 8-11pm

Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm

Butler’s Steak and Ale

Butler’s Steak & Ale

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

The Tavern Lounge Toaster Fork!, The Contented Cow

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth 7:30pm, Northfield Arts Guild Theater Alison Rae • 8-11pm

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth 7:30pm, Northfield Arts Guild Theater Jeff Ray • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge

The Tavern Lounge

JUNE 2010

The Contented Cow Guitarist Rich Prenier • 6pm

Sir Isaac Newton’s Royal Funk Dime-Store Watch • 8pm The Contented Cow Orchestra • 8pm, The Contented Cow Contra Dancing Under the Stars Square Check 8pm, us outBridge online at www.northfieldguide.com

27


SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

20

21

22

23

Mural Society Recycled Art Sale, Paradise Center for the

Multe • 7:30pm

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

Junebug Music Festival

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow

Arts, Faribault

Summer Solstice Evening Stroll • 8-9:15pm

The Contented Cow Carey Langer, 5pm New Moon Trio, 8pm Peter Ricke Trio, 11pm The Rueb ‘n’ Stein The Bratlanders, 8-11pm

Theater: Cinderella • 2pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

River Bend, Faribault

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 2pm

Books and Stars: Mu Daiko 7pm, Way Park

Northfield Arts Guild Theater Scandinavian Midsommer 5pm, Way Park Politics and a Pint • 6pm

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7pm • The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8pm

The Contented Cow

27

28

29

30

Theater: Cinderella • 2pm

Multe • 7:30pm

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

The Contented Cow

The Contented Cow

Books and Stars: Justin Roberts • 7pm, Ames Park

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 2pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater Politics and a Pint • 6pm

The Contented Cow Northern Roots Session 7pm • The Contented Cow Quiz Night • 8pm

The Contented Cow Garden Tours

28 NEG@northfieldguide.com

Bar Games Jingo Mondays Castle Rock N Roll Euchre Wednesdays Castle Rock N Roll

© NORTHFIELD ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

24

25

26

Junebug Music Festival

Piano Man Tim Freeland • 6-8:30pm

Celebrate Dundas • 8am-6pm

The Contented Cow Small Town Anthem, 5pm Fish Frye, 8pm Marty Anderson & the Goods, 11pm The Rueb ‘n’ Stein Bonnie and the Clydes, 8-11pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale

Dundas

Celebrate Dundas Baseball Game Kickoff • 7:30pm

Creatures of the Ponds • 2:30-4pm

Dundas

Norwegian Cowboy • 8-11pm

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

The Tavern Lounge

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

Northfield Community Band Concert 7pm, Bridge Square Art Opening Reception • 7-9pm

Junebug Music Festival

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth 7:30pm, Northfield Arts Guild Theater Junebug Music Festival

The Rueb ‘n’ Stein Jon Manners, 8-11pm The Bitter Roots, 9pm The Contented Cow Chance Meetings, 3pm Taylor Baggott, 5pm Zoo Animal, 7pm Son of a Gun, 9pm Gospel Gossip, 11pm Relativity • 6pm • Willinger’s

Northfield Arts Guild Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault Area 51 • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge

The Contented Cow Occasional Jazz, 5pm Beguine Brothers, 7pm Area 51, 9pm RCAs, 11pm The Rueb ‘n’ Stein Burning Chrome, 9pm

Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm • Butler’s Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Karaoke Fridays Jesse James Lanes (national competition!) Castle Rock and Roll, Castle Rock

JUNE 2010

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault

DJ Music Fridays & Saturdays Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth 7:30pm, Northfield Arts Guild Theater Ira’s Jazz Quintet • 9pm, Butler’s Garden Tours

Check us out online at www.northfieldguide.com

29


HAPPENINGS (and Junebug)

Creatures of the Ponds • 2:30-4pm

Friday, June 25, continued from page 15

River Bend Nature Center, Faribault The ponds are bustling with life! Explore the amazing variety of animals and plants found in this water world ecosystem. Search the ponds at River Bend using dipping nets and underwater pond viewers. Free for all ages.

RCAs, 11pm The Rice County All-Stars are Aaron Hagenson, Peter Lynn, Terry VanDeWalker and Aaron Anderson – that would be a dose of Last Known Whereabouts a dash of Deputies, a smidgen of Big Wu and Mr. Sticky to taste – the All-Stars. The Rueb ‘n’ Stein Burning Chrome, 9pm Rock at heart with excursions into everything with a guarantee that each song will be a minimum of six minutes and a maximum of, well, somewhere around 18. All original material because the best things are still hand made. SATURDAY, JUNE 26 Celebrate Dundas • 8am-6pm

Dundas This family friendly event celebrates Dundas’ history and offers engaging activites for people of all ages including a one-day museum complete with stories and artifacts, horse-and-buggy rides, a kid’s carnival, Dundas Dukes baseball clinic and game, art fair, pancake breakfast, car show, dog show, pie-eating contest, live music, food vendors and more.

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Norwegian Cowboy • 8-11pm

The Tavern Lounge Old-school country, ’80s rock, alt-country and alt-rock. Songs you don’t want to admit you like. Not really a cowboy, but voted Northfield’s best male musician 2007. Junebug Music Festival

The Bitter Roots, 9pm in the Upstairs Rueb. Soulful rock, guitar oriented and diverse, with vocal harmony and tight rhythms. The Contented Cow Chance Meetings, 3pm A group of Northfield musicians that met “by chance” at local jams and other events. They are Scotty Friedow, John Hiscox, Chris Moen, Gail Moll, Neil Rowley and occasionally Richard Brooks, making for a real mix of styles and genres. See profile on page 22. Taylor Baggott, 5pm Taylor Baggott’s golden voice is a beautiful instrument. Classically trained in opera and musical theater, he can adapt his voice to any style. Already releasing four solo albums, his most recent, Soul Searcher, has sold nearly 1,000 copies. “The best singer I know, with amazing songwriting” - Marcus Hanson, manager of In Pulse and professional singer/entertainer. HAPPENINGS (and Junebug) continued on page 32

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HAPPENINGS (and Junebug)

Saturday, June 26, continued from page 30 Zoo Animal Photo: Emily Utne

Zoo Animal, 7pm “Zoo Animal strikes a balance between clever lyrics and catchy guitar riffs” - Brandon Henry, Rift Magazine. Son of a Gun, 9pm Photo: Joshua Lerman Gospel Gossip, 11pm Voted Best Band by City Pages – “Drawing an old-soul pop awareness they must have accrued in their past lives, these wunderkinds have made a high-wattage debut that harkens to the finer, headier days when brainiacs like the Velvet Underground and New Order were called party music.” See profile on page 14.

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The Rueb ‘n’ Stein Jon Manners, 8-11pm on the main level. Voted Northfield’s best male musician 2008! Playing guitar since 1957, Manners has been in bands including: The Stingrays, The Fabulous Intruders, The Critters, The Sticky Wickets, Yellow Fish, The Glass Eye, The Windjammers, No Dice, Rockaday Jonny, Diesel Goose, Zebra, Berceuse, Shriek, Neoneon, The Kitty Younger Band, Flight Time, The Great? Imposters. In the early ’70s, he associated with Andrew Loog Oldham, one-time producer for The Rolling Stones. Now playing solo, he says “it’s easier to call a rehearsal and it gives me complete control over the songlist.” See profile on page 15. Relativity • 6pm

Willinger’s Golf Club Current and classic light rock as well as great original music. See profile on page 18.

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Pianist Wendy Russell • 6pm

Politics and a Pint • 6pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale

The Contented Cow Join discussions on local issues at this “lightly moderated” open forum. For topics, go to www.contentedcow.com.

Theater: Cinderella • 7:30pm

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3.

Wendy Russell

Northern Roots Session • 7pm

Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 7:30pm

The Contented Cow

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 3.

Quiz Night • 8pm

Butler’s Steak & Ale

The Contented Cow Foursomes compete for prizes and the chance to drink from the “Winner’s Mug.” $5/four-person team.

Garden Tours

Garden Tours

This is the first of a two-day event. Take a lovely tour of private gardens at a variety of homes including the Mayflower Hill section of town. You’ll find an artist in each garden creating a piece of art. A variety of mediums will be demonstrated. Art will also be on sale.

MONDAY, JUNE 28

Ira’s Jazz Quintet • 9pm

Multe • 7:30pm

The Contented Cow Great traditional Nordic music for your listening pleasure!

SUNDAY, JUNE 27 Theater: Cinderella • 2pm

TUESDAY, JUNE 29

Paradise Center for the Arts, Faribault See page 3. Phantom Tollbooth

This is the second of a two-day event. See June 26 description.

Acoustic Jam Session • 7pm Theater: The Phantom Tollbooth • 2pm

Northfield Arts Guild Theater See page 3.

The Contented Cow Acoustic musicians gather to jam. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30 Books and Stars: Justin Roberts • 7pm

Ames Park Four-time Parents’ Choice Gold Award winner Justin Roberts has emerged as a key player in the world of hip kids music! Justin Roberts

Advance ticket sales at Present Perfect, Northfield Arts Guild, Knecht’s Nursery and eco gardens (across from EconoFoods) or purchase a ticket at any garden during the tours. Tickets: $10 (under age 12 free, must be accompanied by an adult) Gardens located on Greenvale Ave. W., Highland Ave., Orchard St., and St. Olaf Ave. (note locations on posters or on your ticket)

For more information, contact Jerry Nord at 507-645-6191 or Richard Collman at 507-645-1357.

JUNE 2010

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Gospel Gossip Releases ‘Drift’ Gospel Gossip (profiled on page 14) continue their rise in the music scene with their third CD, “Drift.” This Northfield trio, these shoegaze mechanics of powerful sound, lyrics and a stunninging beautiful voice in Sarah Nienaber, will once again be playing Junebug the 26th of this month at 9pm. City Pages – “Economic in form and cinematic in scope, Drift enhances the Northfield trio’s shimmering dream-pop with tightened songcraft and ambitious experimentation. The results avoid the group’s previously erratic tendencies with a robust, assured sound that amounts to the local buzz band’s most accomplished effort to date.” Culture Bully – “With Drift, we hear resoundingly that Gospel Gossip is a group that is increasingly willing to take chances with their sound. They have played live shows incessantly since their inception and have become a powerful and tight band. Lucky for us they didn’t just buy the hype of being the next big thing and start to coast, because it would have been a shame to have missed watching them continue to evolve in such an exciting way.” Star Tribune – “Just five months since issuing its six-song “Dreamland” CD, fuzzy-guitar-wielding shoegazer frontwoman Sarah Nienaber and her Northfield-reared trio has another EP to tout, “Drift,” anchored by the short and bursting would-be radio hit “Sippy Cup” plus three longer, stormy jams that show a penchant for wigged-out psychedelia.”

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JUNE 2010

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that the inner life of this person, their experiences and outlook, were expressed through their music.

Guest Column

Recently, I saw a Hip Hop dance competition and was disturbed with how violent and dark the music sounded to me. Then I thought about who might enjoy playing this music. I thought of urban children and imagined what it was like for them growing up in a more violent place than I am used to. Now I hear Hip Hop differently. Now I hear the need to speak out and reclaim personal power.

By Wendy Russell

Music – A Cultural Window There is music, there is sound and there is what the harsher critic would call noise. If beauty lies in the eye of the beholder, then music lies in the ear of the beholder. In the movie “August Rush,” a boy hears music in all sounds including city noises. Music is not just something that is heard, but rather it is experienced. After the composer Beethoven became deaf, he could no longer hear music with his ears. Instead, the music he heard and wrote came from his heart and mind. It could be said that music is something that speaks either to or from our spirit. People tend to connect to songs that express ideas that they can relate to. I knew a young male musician who enjoyed many different music styles. He had a prejudice, though, against young female bands. He eventually came to realize that the reason he didn’t like female bands was because he couldn’t relate to pre-teen girls or their music. I then realized the reason I didn’t care for this man’s music was because I didn’t relate to young men. But, after I listened to his music in order to understand rather than enjoy, I discovered

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Karl Paulnack, director of music at Boston Conservatory, states: “Music has a way of finding the big, invisible moving pieces inside our hearts and souls and helping us figure out the position of things inside us. From one of the most horrific events in history, life in the concentration camps, the role and value of art is found. When there was barely enough energy on a good day to find food and water, to avoid a beating, to stay warm, to escape torture – why would anyone bother with music? And yet – from the camps, we have poetry, we have music, we have visual art; many, many people created art. Why? Well, in a place where people are only focused on survival, on the bare necessities, the obvious conclusion is that art must be, somehow, essential for life. The camps were without money, without hope, without commerce, without recreation, without basic respect, but they were not without art. Art is part of survival; art is part of the human spirit, an unquenchable expression of who we are. Art is one of the ways in which we say, “I am alive, and my life has meaning.” So, what is music? It is a way in which people express and celebrate who they are. Music appreciation, like art appreciation, attempts to expand one’s understanding of a culture. What’s Northfield’s culture? Listen – and you just might get a fresh glimpse of it. Russell is an independent music teacher and can be reached through www.wendyrussellpiano.com.

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Clubs, Classes and More… Cub Scout Pack 300 – 612/490-4048, www.cubs300.org Glass Garden Beads Beading Class – 507/645-0301

First and third Mondays Just Food Co-op – 507/650-0106

Northfield Buddhist Meditation Center – Children’s Circle

Class (ages 3-9) – Sundays, 3-4pm Children and their parents meditate, do yoga and learn about Buddhism in a fun, peaceful atmosphere of exploration. Everyone welcome.

Tuesdays: Knitting Night, 7-9pm, 507/645-6331 – knit, chat, share ideas and get help.

Northfield Public Library – 507/645-6606

The Key

Summer Schedule: June 15-July 29:

Mondays: Book Club, 5pm Tuesdays: Photo Club, 5:30pm – developing and learning. Family Game Night, 7pm Wednesdays: College Prep, 7-8:30pm – learn about the ACT, financial aid, how to write a college essay, etc. The Key will pay for college applications for those not able. Most who show up are paired with a caring and knowledgeable adult. Thursdays: Art Night, 7pm Saturdays: Cooking Class, 6pm, Emmaus basement Photo Club, 11am – shooting. Sundays: Writing Workshop, 3-5pm – for details, call 507/6630715. Northfield Arts Guild – 507/645-8877 – Find classes for kids

and adults at www.northfieldartsguild.org KidsARTS for ages 4-6 now offers two class time options: Tuesday 9:30-11:30am or Thursday 11am-noon. Two hours of fun and learning in the arts, especially designed for preschoolers, kindergartners and home-schoolers. $64 (nonmembers)/$58 (members)/four-week session. Start anytime.

First Steps Early Literacy Center: Monday, Friday and Saturdays, 10-11am No First Steps June 26. Infant Lapsit: Tuesdays, 10am Toddler Rhyme Time: Wednesdays, 10am Pre-School Stories and Craft: Thursdays, 10am Make a Splash Discovery time: Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1-3pm June 15-July 29 Books and Stars: Wednesdays, 7pm Reward Pizza: Thursdays, 12pm Make a Splash Game Time: Thursdays, 1-3pm Paradise Center for the Arts – 612/216-1206 Find art-related classes for kids and adults at www.paradisecenterforthearts.org. River Bend Nature Center – Time Travel – Join a naturalist for

a journey back in time to discover the fascinating history of the land before it was a nature center. Travel by golf cart to unlock the mysteries scattered all around the nature center. Tours last one-and-a-half hours and can accommodate up to five people. Call to schedule a day and time that will work for everyone. This program is available through mid-October. Donations welcome. Cannon River Woodcarving Club – 507/339-0336

Monthly meetings, 3rd monday of each month, 7pm, Ivan Whillock Studio, Faribault

June Gigs 2 of Hearts ................................... 12 – Butler’s Acoustic Jam Session ............Tuesdays – Cow African Drum Ensemble ........... 1 – Carleton Ian Alexy ........................................10 – Tavern All Jampt Up................................26 – Dundas Dan Andreasen ............................. 4 – Butler’s Area 51 .................... 5, 25 – Cow, 24 – Tavern Taylor Baggott .................................. 26 – Cow Beguine Brothers ............................. 25 – Cow Bitter Roots...................................... 26 – Rueb Bohemian Duo ............................... 12 – Rueb Bonnie & the Clydes....................... 24 – Rueb Bratlanders ...................................... 23 – Rueb Breakthrough ..............................26 – Dundas Burning Chrome ............ 4 – Cow, 25 – Rueb Joe Carey ........................................17 – Tavern Chance Meetings .......26 – Cow and Dundas Community Band .....17, 24 – Bridge Square John Dickerson .........................17 – Faribault Dime-Store Watch ........................... 19 – Cow

JUNE 2010

Meredith Fierke/ Steven McKinstry ...................... 12 – Library Fish Frye............................................ 24 – Cow Robin Fodor ...........................12 – Willinger’s Tim Freeland .......................Fridays – Butler’s Gospel Gossip .................................. 26 – Cow Dave Hudson ...........................5 – Willinger’s Hütenänny and Friends ..........20 – Way Park Ira’s Jazz Quintet ......................... 26 – Butler’s Linda James ...................................... 12 – Cow Carey Langer .................................... 23 – Cow Lonesome Dan Kase.....................11 – Tavern Jon Manners .................................... 26 – Rueb Mark Cameron Band .................26 – Dundas Marty Anderson & the Goods .....4 – Tavern, 24 – Cow, 26 – Dundas Mark Mraz.......................................3 – Tavern Mu Daiko..................................23 – Way Park Multe ..................................... Mondays – Cow New Moon Trio ........................ 11, 23 – Cow Northern Roots Session ........Sundays – Cow Norwegian Cowboy .....................26 – Tavern Occasional Jazz................................. 25 – Cow

Over and Back..................18 – Bridge Square The Pearl ....................................19 – Faribault Peter Ricke Trio ................................ 23 – Cow Pleasure Invasion ............................. 19 – Cow Rich Prenier ............................19 – Willinger’s Alison Rae......................................18 – Tavern Jeff Ray ...........................................19 – Tavern RCA’s ................................................. 25 – Cow Relativity .................................26 – Willinger’s Justin Roberts .........................30 – Ames Park Wendy Russell .................Saturdays – Butler’s Sir Isaac Newton’s Royal Funk Orchestra .................... 18 – Cow Small Town Anthem ....................... 24 – Cow Smokescreen..............................18 – Faribault Son of a Gun .................................... 26 – Cow Sons of the Beach............................. 16 – Pool Kevin Stanke..................................12 – Tavern Study Hall ......................................... 10 – Cow Sweet Jazz.........................................5 – Tavern Toaster Fork!..................................... 17 – Cow Twin City Naturals .......................... 11 – Cow Zoo Animal ...................................... 26 – Cow

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Celebrate Dundas! June 25-26 With a 153-year history and a vibrant and growing community, the City of Dundas has good reason to celebrate. In an effort to bring all past and present Dundas-area residents together for a city-wide festival, the Dundas Historical Society will host “Celebrate Dundas” on Friday, June 25 and Saturday, June 26. The family friendly event will celebrate Dundas’ history and offer engaging activities for people of all ages. Michelle Millenacker, president of the Dundas Historical Society and chair of the Celebrate Dundas event, says, “This is the third year we’ve hosted the event for the community and we couldn’t be more excited about what we have lined up. At its core the event is designed to celebrate Dundas’ storied history, while at the same time showcase the people and activities of interest in our community today.” Millenacker goes on to explain that some of the historical stories the group plans to highlight during the two-day event include the history of the Dundas Mill and the role of the Cannon River in the community’s beginnings, the long-standing role of baseball in Dundas and the success the team has seen on the field, and the K-8 schoolhouse, which was in operation from 1856 to 1971. She says, “There’s a really great story behind our community’s beginning… the flour produced in the Dundas Mill, for example, received international recognition for its extraordinarily smooth texture and white color. The product was highly desired and won international awards…And that’s really just the tip of the iceberg!” To showcase some of the key elements in Dundas’ history, the

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Live music and horse-and-buggy rides are but a couple of the Celebrate Dundas happenings in store for late June.

Historical Society will sponsor a one-day museum complete with stories and artifacts as well as horse-and-buggy rides through the historic districts. Though a significant portion of the event will be centered on the town’s history, the celebration will also include family friendly activities such as a kid’s carnival, Dundas Dukes baseball clinic, art fair, pancake breakfast, car show, dog show, pieeating contest, live music, food vendors, a Dundas Dukes baseball game and more. For a schedule of events go to www.cityofdundas.org or find the event on Facebook.

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HISTORIC

HAPPENINGS NORTHFIELD STYLE By Susan Hvistendahl

1966: The Night Crawlers play for a dance at the Northfield Armory (l to r): Bill Redeker, Mike Jines, Marc Reigel, Barry Gillespie, Mark Headington. Photo courtesy David Gray

The Night Crawlers: Carleton’s ‘60s Rock Favorites Way back in the historic mid-1960s, when I was attending St. Olaf, my friends and I would head down to Sayles-Hill Gym at Carleton to attend dances. St. Olaf had only allowed dancing on campus since 1961 (except for square dancing, called “square gaming” back then so no one would think Oles were actually engaged in dancing) and the early “officially approved” Ole dances were pretty lame. Carleton had allowed dancing since 1918 and you could count on the socially advanced Carls to put on great dances with great bands. And absolutely the best dance band at Carleton and in southern Minnesota during the 1960s was a group known as the Night Crawlers. Oles, Carls and townies alike flocked to their dances and bought the 45 rpm singles of their original song “You Say,” which we all played on old-fashioned contraptions called record players.

The Mark II’s were a popular addition to the campus dance scene but by the summer of 1965, only Marc and Mark remained of that group. Back home in Owatonna, Reigel heard a band called “The Checkmates” and swooped in on two Owatonna High School NIGHT CRAWLERS continued on page 42

The genesis for this band was Owatonna, long before Adam Young of “Owl City” fame. Jim Oldsberg, in his 1992 book, “The Flip Side: An Illustrated History of Southern Minnesota Rock & Roll Music from 1955-70,” traces a shifting evolution from three ninth grade schoolmates at Owatonna High School playing for mixers in the cafeteria to other combinations of members, with the focal point being Marc Reigel on piano. Reigel tells me that his father, Donald (a 1936 graduate of Carleton and publisher of the Owatonna Photo News from 1956-74), was an accomplished pianist. Reigel played trombone in band and orchestra, but taught himself piano by playing along with 45 rpms of Fats Domino, Ricky Nelson and Buddy Holly. By his senior year, he had formed the “OHS Combo,” playing at mixers after football and basketball games. When Reigel went to Carleton, in the fall of 1963, he would go to the third floor of Willis Hall where there was an “old, out-of-tune, upright piano” and just “pound away,” as he says, playing hits by such artists as Chuck Berry, Elvis, the Everly Brothers and the Shirelles. Often the “noise” attracted a few students who joined in the singing. By 1964-65, he had a five-piece group called the Mark II’s, so-named because his classmate Mark Headington of Minneapolis had joined in on bass. They got a “couple of paying gigs at Sayles-Hill Gym,” now the campus center, and were pictured in the 1965 Algol yearbook, juxtaposed with a photo of the well-known pianist, Van Cliburn, who had played at Carleton that year. Reigel says: “The irony was not lost on us, even as 20-year-olds!”

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2004: The Night Crawlers reunite at the Owatonna Sesquicentennial Celebration at the Steele County Free Fair (l-r): Mike Jines, Barry Gillespie, David Reigel (for Bill Redeker), Mark Headington and Marc Reigel.

NIGHT CRAWLERS continued from page 40

students, guitarist Mike Jines and drummer Bill Redeker. He asked them to form a new band with him. That summer the lore is that Headington had a dream about large worms, which inspired the name for the band: the Night Crawlers. The Night Crawlers debuted at a “Battle of the Bands” at the Steele County Free Fair in August of 1965 and won. Northfielder Tim Sellers recalls watching that performance and tells me he got “goose bumps” hearing them play Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.” Their winning song was “Silver Threads and Golden Needles.” The Night Crawlers were completed when Barry Gillespie, also of Owatonna, was recruited as the lead singer in February 1966. The group’s growing popularity led to their being represented by promoter Don Madison and to a recording session for MAAD Records in Mankato. Here they cut two original songs, “You Say,” by Barry Gillespie and his former bandmate Sid Gasner, and “Night Crawlin,’” an instrumental which Reigel says he and Headington “hurriedly composed” just ten minutes before it was recorded when they realized they “needed an original B-side.” Oldsberg writes that the recording session cost $300, “which entitled the group to the recording time and a record pressing of 1000 copies. Barry received four cents a copy for his composition and Reigel and Headington each received two cents per copy for their Night Crawlin’ contribution. They sold enough records at Carleton to basically break even. Other regional sales produced a small profit for them.” Reigel remembers selling the records at Carleton for a dollar in the basement of Willis Hall, four flights down from the “rickety piano” he had pounded on as a freshman. The Night Crawlers played on the southern Minnesota/Iowa “sockhop” circuit, with a couple forays to North Dakota. After a gig in Estherville, Iowa, they were traveling back to Minnesota in a big Oldsmobile sedan, towing a U-Haul loaded with their equipment. A 1957 Chevy filled with “greasers” pulled them over and tried to get them to play at a party that night. When this idea was rejected, one of the greasers told them he had a gun and asked for their money. Gillespie could only think to push in a cigarette lighter in the dashboard as a possible weapon, while Headington, who was at the wheel, floored the Olds. After an eight-mile chase and a bump from the Chevy, Headington signaled to make a left turn, then turned quickly to the right, thus faking out the pursuers, who flew by to the left. The band made it to a small town and, says Reigel,

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“found the local cop, waiting for speeders on the main street, and breathlessly reported the near-disaster.” Then, to the band’s chagrin, their promoter Madison booked them in Estherville again six weeks later because, he said, “They loved you down there!” An armed guard was promised to allay any fears. So, on the return engagement, Reigel took note of the greasers in the audience and couldn’t resist taunting them a bit. This led to a confrontation in the men’s bathroom later, broken up by the club’s owner – and, says Reigel, “a lot less taunting!” After the performance, the band was escorted to the Minnesota border by the police. Madison arranged another recording session for the band in 1966 at Columbia Records in Chicago. Acetates of a cover of Johnny Preston’s “Feel So Fine” and an original, fuzz-busting guitar/vocal called “Want Me” were made, though no records resulted at that time. But “Want Me” can now be found in two compilations: “Get Off My Back!: Unissued Sixties Garage Acetates” and “Back from the Grave,” a development that Reigel considers “serpentine,” wondering, “How did those acetates get there?” Their recording of “You Say” went on to have significant air play in Chicago, even after the band disbanded. Reigel was teaching in the Chicago area and his students rallied behind this Byrds-like classic, featuring strong vocals and Mike Jines on his 12-string guitar. Their support drove it up to number one on WEEF’s North Shore Top Ten, ahead of songs by the Rolling Stones, Neil Diamond, the Box Tops and the Young Rascals. As Oldsberg wrote, “Unfortunately the demand was not followed up by a supply of records to the area.” In 1996, Headington corresponded with Byrds’ leader Roger McGuinn and got his autograph on the band’s copies of “You Say.” The popularity of this band can be judged by their income from playing about eight shows a month during the senior year of Reigel and Headington – $10,000, or $70,000 in today’s money. Reigel says, “That’s a lot of buck-fifty gigs.” The band played a four-hour farewell dance at Carleton in June of 1967, as Reigel and Headington were graduating. The performance, which was transferred from tape to a 4 CD set, showcases their versatility, with more than 50 songs including the Beatles, of course, and Dave Van Ronk’s “Cocaine Blues,” Howling Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning,” Martha and the Vandellas’ “Heat Wave,” the Shirelles’ “Baby, It’s You,” Wilson Pickett’s “Midnight Hour,” the Turtles’ “Happy Together,” “The Girl from Ipanema” and their

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own originals, “Want Me” and “You Say.” There is even a medley of classics “Louie Louie” and “Hang On, Sloopy,” with “Jesus Loves Me” thrown in. The 1967 tape was called “Last Dance,” but Carleton was not ready to let them go: the Crawlers were hired for a dance at Sayles-Hill in January 1968. Reigel says they had to borrow all of the equipment from “the guys to whom we had sold it the past spring.” The reviewer in the Carletonian of Jan. 11 wrote, “The veteran ‘Night Crawler’ fans were ecstatic; the newer ones were overwhelmed.” The band (minus Redeker) then reunited for the 25th reunion of Carleton’s Class of 1967 in 1992. They also played at two reunions in Owatonna, with Reigel’s son David on drums – for the town’s sesquicentennial in 2004 and an all 60’s high school class reunion in 2006, both held at the Steele County Free Fairgrounds. Reigel and Headington were invited to entertain at yet another class reunion, this time the 35th reunion of Carleton’s class of 1969, held at the Grand Event Center in Northfield in June of 2004. Then, on May 1 of this year, Reigel, Headington and Gillespie (with the assistance of Reigel’s son-in-law, Tom Wadzinski) reunited at Froggy Bottoms River Pub, rocking the frog pond before a cheering, standing-room-only crowd. Redeker last played with the band in 1968. As he told me in a recent e-mail, “The breakup of the Crawlers drove me to the desert of Arizona, another band and a college education.” In his senior year, Redeker “convinced the general manager of a television station to hire me as a technical director. I quickly switched to reporting and eventually put in 35 years as a network news correspondent for ABC and CBS.” Redeker, who is a six-time Emmy-winner, jokes that his résumé reads like “holidays from Hell” with tours of every war zone from South East Asia to Africa, Central America and the Middle East. He was also posted in Tokyo, Los Angeles, New York, London, Washington, D.C., Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Denver. He says, “Sadly the grind kept me from participating in Night Crawler reunions.” He recently left the news business and now develops and sells mountain properties in Park City and Deer Valley, Utah, “where skiing has replaced the thrill of performing…sort of.” Yet, he writes, he still has his Rogers drums. “They look terrific and sound pretty good. I’ve sat in with bar bands in Mexico and Japan but that’s about all. Would love to play one last dance with the Crawlers someday.” When three of the Night Crawlers reunited on May 1, Redeker sent the drum head with their band logo to Northfield as a surprise. Band leader Marc Reigel taught high school English for five years in Highland Park, Illinois, and earned an M.A. in American

Literature at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. He then taught English at Edina East High School 1972-80. He was Dean of Students at Edina’s Valley View Junior High School 1980-81 and after two years teaching in Rochester, he again taught at Edina High School from 1983-88 and was staff development chair for the district. Since 1988, Reigel has lived in Columbus, Ohio. While at the Ohio Dept. of Education, his book, “Image to Impact: Toward Excellence in Teaching” was published in 1990. Reigel now works with school districts, “writing grants, conducting assessments, and running in-service programs for teachers and administrators.” He also volunteers as a blood courier for the American Red Cross, drives Meals on Wheels and writes program notes for Six String Concerts in Columbus. Reigel’s Carleton classmate, Mark Headington, headed to the University of Iowa for an M.S. in computer science. He then developed software and taught in universities in Minneapolis, East Africa, Washington, D.C., Illinois, and Wisconsin. After earning a Ph.D. from Iowa State, he had teaching positions in Iowa, California and again in Wisconsin, where he is a now a professor at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He is co-author of 12 university-level computer science textbooks. While at the University of Iowa, he engaged in some folk and Mississippi Delta blues solo work but then left music for 25 years. A 1992 reunion performance with the Crawlers “reawakened the need to make music,” he says. He has played in several rock and blues bands in LaCrosse: the Exchequers, LB and the Biscaynes and the Shufflin’ Duprees. He says he is “currently between bands” or “retired from music – I can never be sure!” Lead singer Barry Gillespie continued to sing after the Night Crawlers broke up but settled into the real estate business, as a third generation owner of ERA-Gillespie Real Estate in Owatonna (his sister, Pam Gillespie, works for Edina Realty in Northfield). Gillespie was named Minnesota Realtor of the Year in 2002 and served as president of the Minnesota Association of Realtors 2002-03. He tells me his father Lud still has the best voice in the family, at age 85. Mike Jines, a Northfield resident, says he mostly retired from the violin (his first love) and guitars after 1967; he then stopped completely after an unfortunate “incident with a power saw.” For 37 years, he has been a design engineer, mostly in new product development and has worked for Wenger Corporation of Owatonna for almost 24 years. Jines designs equipment used for music education and performance. He says, “I frequently visit rehearsal and concert spaces and hear the students performing. It helps me feel connected to music – if only indirectly.” NIGHT CRAWLERS continued next page

2010: The Night Crawlers play Froggy Bottoms. (left): Barry Gillespie, Marc Reigel and Mark Headington; (center): Reigel at the keyboard; (right): Gillespie, Reigel and Headington with drum head sent from Utah by Bill Redeker.

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NIGHT CRAWLERS continued from previous page

I asked all of the Night Crawlers for their favorite memories. Reigel recalls their winning performance in 1965 at the Steele County Free Fair “Battle of the Bands” in front of 3,000 kids (“much to the chagrin of the Emperors,” he notes), and the Iowa car chase story. Also, he remembers playing prom dances for kids in small towns all over southern Minnesota who “would always be dressed up, just love the music, and seem so archaically innocent” (no matter what might happen after the dance!). Jines’ favorite memories involve playing at Carleton, before the big, friendly and enthusiastic crowds of Carls, Oles and townies. He also remembers one “seriously impaired Ole” who did not like a medley which combined “Louie Louie” with “Jesus Loves Me.” Jines says, “Remembering the irony of his drunken scolding always makes me laugh.” Headington agrees with Jines about the Carleton dances. “With the crowds so fired up and supportive, it was just a thrill to be part of the rhythm and spirit. Also, I have such a strong memory of how satisfying it was to be part of a group of good musicians. Marc would decide we should play a new song, but we were living in different towns and couldn’t find time to practice together. So we’d all learn our parts separately, and at the next dance we would just play the song for that first time together. And it worked! I don’t think many bands at that time could get away with that.” Redeker says, “No doubt about it, Carleton is at the top of the list. The enthusiastic feedback of the crowd energized us and cranked up our performances. Bill’s Pizza, townies, Oles and road trips are all fond memories.” The best memory is “the energy created when the five of us somehow made it all work. It was infectious, exhilarating and loud!” Redeker also puts in a word of praise for their supportive parents and for Reigel: “The Crawlers had a lot of spirit, thanks to the energetic leadership of Marc.” Gillespie also recalls the “rush” when a crowd was big and supportive. “When things really got going it was a thrill.” The recent reunions of the band “have been amazing, with the crowd (aging by the minute) excited and appreciative from start to finish. People do like to recapture what they remember as the ‘good old days.’ And so do we.” Let’s let the band’s leader Reigel have the last word (of course). The Last Dance of 1967 is one of his favorite memories. But, “It was clear this part of our lives was coming to an end, and – truth be told – just about the right time.” The music was changing from the “melodic, danceable, infectious, sing-along-to-able” to the “psychedelic, metal, thrash kind of music,” which signaled the “death knell of sock-hops.” The Night Crawlers were a cover band, with a couple originals and, Reigel says, “To make a real ‘go’ of it in the music business, you have to be the Beatles, not copy the Beatles. Perhaps we had the talent to come up with some, but it sure didn’t feel like we had the time or inclination.”

New Day for Night Crawlers The Night Crawlers now have a whole new fan base, thanks to the Internet, in particular the social networking site called Facebook. About ten years ago, Erika Van Buren, a Netherlander who grew up in Japan, was an amateur teenage guitarist in Japan. She auditioned a female vocalist who brought along a cassette tape of her favorite songs. On this tape was “You Say” by the Night Crawlers of Owatonna, Minn. Van Buren e-mailed me, “As soon as I listened to it, I was totally blown away and attracted to this wonderful tune. The cool fill-in of the drums, endless jangling electric 12-string guitar, crisscrossing running bass and bitter-sweet melody, but still full of raw and powerful impetus. Everything was perfect to me!” So how did “You Say” end up in Japan? Van Buren thinks it came from a garage-punk compilation LP called “Pebbles, Vol. 17.” She ultimately obtained the same 45 rpm original from MAAD Records that I bought at a Carleton dance years ago. She told me, “U.S. garage punk or garage rock from the 60s has quite a large fan base all around the world.” Mike Jines’ guitar work on this piece “is prominent enough to attract 12-string lovers” and she believes “it still has some kind of potential to attract more people even today – 44 years after its first release.” Van Buren (who is in her late 20s and is engaged in the food trading business) creates and administers a number of pages and groups devoted to music. In April she established a Facebook fan page for the Night Crawlers. The site features photos, videos, links to songs and publications and a running commentary from fans. Reigel, who co-administers the site, reports there are fans from the United States, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Malaysia, Bulgaria, Canada, Germany, Taiwan, Spain and the United Kingdom. Alexandre Hussenet of France is a super-fan of the Night Crawlers, a member of what he calls a “little niche of people in Paris” who are “garage obsessives.” A musician from Glasgow tells Reigel, “I adore your music, man. You have been an influence on my own music and will continue to be.” As Reigel is fond of saying, “You can’t make this stuff up!” The link to the site is http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-NightCrawlers-60s-Minnesota-Garage-Band/114548891904744 My thanks to all the Night Crawlers for sharing their memories with me: Marc, Mark, Barry, Mike and Bill. Rock on, guys! Thanks also to Carleton archivist Eric Hillemann, Jim Oldsberg and Erika Van Buren.

Reigel still likes to strum guitar along with music (“still covering, after all these years!” ) and will sit down at a “stray piano and plunk.” He says that although the days of wine and roses are gone, “the days of still loving music, attending concerts, buying music, strumming along, are still with us!”

44 NEG@northfieldguide.com

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DINING

Support the restaurants that support the Northfield Entertainment Guide.

Butler’s Steak and Ale

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James Gang Coffeehouse & Eatery Page 34

620 Water St. • www.butlerssteakandale.com 786-9797 – Tues-Sat 11:30am-2pm and 4-9pm (open until 10pm Friday and midnight Saturdays) – Closed Mondays – Steaks, fish, chops and much more. Fine wines, signature cocktails, and Irish coffees. Happy hour 4-6pm Mon-Sat and after 9pm Fridays and Saturdays.

2018 Jefferson Rd. • 663-6060 • Mon-Fri 6am -8pm, Sat- Sun 7am-5pm – Voted Best Coffeehouse in southern Minnesota. Fresh daily roasted coffee. Wraps, soup, sandwiches, salads, desserts, ice cream and non-espresso drinks. Free wireless internet and business catering available.

Castle Rock N Roll Bar and Grill

503 Division St. • www.ruebnstein.com 645-6691 • 11am-close – Great burgers and famous Ruebens. Casual relaxing atmosphere. Huge selection of imported and domestic beers, fine spirits and wines. Game room, happy hour 3:30-6pm, Karaoke on Fridays at 9pm

27798 Chippendale Ave • 507/645-0676 – 111am (every day). Great burgers and pizza, with daily specials. Located at the corner of Hwy. 3 and Cty. Rd. 86. Private party room available. Chapati

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214 Division St. • 645-2462 (office 645-1665) www.chapati.us – Closed Mondays – Cuisine of India. Variety of curry and Tandoori entrees including a large selection of vegetarian items. Wine and beer. The Cheese Cave

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318 Central Ave., Suite 6, Faribault • 507-3343988 • www.cheesecave.net -Wed 10am5:30pm, Thu-Sat 10am-8pm – A light menu of fresh salads and sandwiches, a couple gourmet pizzas and cheese plates to compliment whatever you are drinking. Wines, spirits and Summit beer on tap. Contented Cow

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302 Division St. S. • www.contentedcow.com 3pm-close – British-style pub with authentic British specialties and a variety of soups, salads and sandwiches. Extensive patio overlooking the Cannon River. Great selection of imported and domestic draft beer and a full selection of wine and spirits. El Tequila

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1010 Hwy. 3 S. • 664-9139 • 11 a.m. -10 p.m. – Family restaurant offering authentic Mexican cuisine as well as wonderful margaritas and more. Froggy Bottoms River Pub

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305 S. Water St. • www.froggybottoms.com 664-0260 • Mon-Sat 11am-close – Steaks, salads, pasta and more. Wide selection of beers and wines. Non-smoking restaurant with cozy atmosphere, thousands of frogs and a beautiful outdoor patio overlooking the Cannon River. Fused

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200 Division St. • 786-9696 • 7-7 Mon-Fri, 8-5 Sat. – Delicious smoothies with 20 grams of protein, under 300 calories, and in 39 flavors. Fast food for smart people.

J. Grundy’s Rueb ‘N’ Stein

Mandarin Garden

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107 E. 4th St. • 645-7101 • Lunch: Wed-Fri 11:30am-2pm, Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9pm. Open until 10 Fri and Sat. OPEN DURING CONSTRUCTION! – Stop in and enjoy our authentic Peking and Szechuan dishes, or take it to go – voted Best Take Out by the readers of the Entertainment Guide. Quarterback Club

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116 3rd St. W. • 645-7886 • Mon-Sat • 6am9pm, Sun 10:30am-8pm – Family friendly dining in Northfield for 37 years. House specialties include broasted chicken, BBQ ribs and flamebroiled hamburgers. The Tavern of Northfield – 212 Division St.

663-0342 • www.tavernofnorthfield.com – Sun-Thu 6:30am-10pm, Fri-Sat 6:30am11pm, lounge open daily 3pm-midnight. – Located in the historic Archer House since 1984, The Tavern hosts casual dining with a wide variety of homemade menu items and specials daily featuring fresh fish on Fridays and prime rib on Saturdays. The Tavern Lounge sports a deck overlooking the Cannon River, appetizers and a full bar with live music Thur-Sat. Tiny’s Dogs All Day – 321 Division St. S. 645-6862 • Mon-Thu 9:30am-7pm, Fri 9:30am-5pm, Sat 8:30am-5pm, Sun 11am-2pm – Historic former pool hall, Tiny’s continues to delight patrons with great hot dogs, sandwiches, non-alcoholic beverages and snacks. Features include New York-style coneys, Chicago-style Vienna Beef, as well as Tiny’s own classic dog. Since 1947 Tiny’s has offered Northfield’s largest selection of specialty tobaccos and quality cigars. Willingers Bar & Restaurant

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6900 Canby Trail, Northfield • 952/652-2500, Sun-Thurs • 11am -9pm; Fri-Sat 11am-10pm The HideAway Page 21 – High above the course, with views of Willingers 421 Division St. • 645-0400 Mon-Fri • 6amGolf Club’s fairways, greens, lakes, wetlands, 10pm, Sat-Sun 7am-10pm – Cozy bistro atmosphere serving unique appetizers and sandwiches. ponds and trees, this venue offers dining with casual, upscale cuisine. Enjoy dinner or simply a Coffee drinks, wine and beer specialties. at the bar. Also available foreldguide.com wedding reCheck usbeverage out online at www.northfi JUNE 2010 ceptions, banquets, meetings or small gatherings.

Anna’s Closet ............................................. 28 Aescendant Accessories .........................10 Aquatic Pets .................................................. 5 Bierman’s .................................................... 29 Bridge Square Barbers ............................... 6 Budget Blinds ............................................ 38 Butler’s Steak & Ale ................................. 25 By All Means Graphics ........................... 36 Celebrate Dundas! ....................................16 Chapati ........................................................ 24 The Cheese Cave ..................................... 39 Community Resource Bank .................. 49 College City Beverage ........................... 39 The Contented Cow ................................ 24 Larry DeFries, Realtor® .............................. 8 Detjen Counseling ................................... 40 Eastman Music ...........................................18 Eclectic Goat .............................................. 33 Electric Fetus ...............................................21 El Tequila ..................................................... 46 Faribault Heritage Celebration ......................... inside front Froggy Bottoms River Pub ....................... 9 Fused ............................................................... 4 Graphic Mailbox ..........................................34 HideAway Coffeehouse/Wine Bar........20 James Gang Coffeehouse .................... 34 Jenkins Jewelers ....................... front cover Michael Jordon, Realtor®....................... 46 Just Food Co-op ........................................ 34 Kindermusik Adventure ......................... 23 Kitchen@1001 ........................................... 25 KYMN 1080 Radio....................................31 Dianne Kyte, Realtor®............................. 26 Left Field ......................................................... 1 LORE ..............................................................21 Marguerite’s Salon .........................................9 Mandarin Garden........................................ 13 Maria’s Catering...........................................26 Millstream Commons ............................. 39 Northfield Arts Guild .................................. 12 Northfield Art School ................................. 41 Northfield Dance Academy .......................7 Nfld Downtown Develop Corp............ 30 Northfield Garden Club .......................... 33 Northfield Lines, Inc. ............................... 28 Northfield Liquor Store............................18 Northfield Music Collective....................18 Northfield Public Library .........................12 Northfield Retirement Community.........35 Northfield Remodeling Tour........................ 4 Northfield Urgent Care .............................. 8 Pan Pan ....................................................... 25 Paper Petalum.............................................. 5 Pool & Spa Boy ..........................................11 Porchlight Painters....................................11 Present Perfect .......................................... 39 Quarterback Club ........................................ 7 Ragstock.......................................................10 Rare Pair ......................................................... 6 Re-doux ....................................................... 35 Riverwalk Market Fair ............ back cover Rocky Top Printing ..................................... 8 Rueb ‘N’ Stein .............................................11 Schmidt Homes......................................... 32 Shanti Tattoo ................................................ 6 Sisters Ugly .................................................... 6 Sketchy Artist ............................................. 29 Three Links ................................................. 48 Vintage Band Festival ................................ 2 Willinger’s Golf Club.................................15

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Just Curious…

And so a few quick questions and answers. By Breanna Zarbinski After meeting Dean Kjerland, owner of ArtOnWater Gallery, I reflected on his extremely diverse resume. When Kjerland is not busy planning Riverwalk Market Fair, he works in his own paleontology lab or collaborates with the Northfield Arts Guild on future projects. Originally from Iowa, Kjerland has traveled to many places in the Air Force and while working in business, but he eventually settled here in Northfield and built The Kjerland Building where he now lives and works.

BZ: You are involved in quite a few endeavors in town. Are you from Northfield originally? Kjerland: I was born in northern Iowa, and my family moved to Owatonna when I was in the eighth grade. I came to Northfield when I attended St. Olaf, but I was drafted and spent four years in the Air Force in New Mexico. I returned to Minneapolis for 18 years and ended up being the vice president of a trading company.

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I went on my own in international trade for another 18 years or so. When I retired I decided that I couldn’t afford to live on the Seine in Paris so thought that a live/work on the Cannon in Northfield was as close as I could get. I built The Kjerland Building (Riverwalk Condominiums) in 2003. Here I have my home, a paleontology lab and ArtOnWater Gallery. BZ: How did you become interested in paleontology? Kjerland: Near Mason City there was a great fossil site. In third grade my Cub Scout troop visited there, and I became fascinated by the fossils. I wanted to recreate that experience with my son, so 40 years later we decided to look for it and similar places near the Twin Cities. This eventually led to establishing a relationship with the University of Minnesota Department of Geology and Geophysics. BZ: What did you do with the U of M? Kjerland: I got involved in some research under a mentor and found it fascinating. It was also very challenging. However, the thing about paleontology is that there is a long tradition of amateur paleontologists. I was accepted by the department and had access to laboratories and expertise even though I had never had a formal education in the field. BZ: What do you enjoy most about paleontology? Kjerland: I’m a bit of an explorer. Most people pick up a fossil, put it in their pocket or on a shelf and then forget about it. The other method, the one I prefer, is to take the scientific approach and document what you have found and learn how it came to be there. This is my passion. I actually ended up teaching a class with the Elder Learning Institute at the University and led field trips to regional fossil sites. When I moved to Northfield, I got involved with the Cannon Valley Elder Collegium and taught some classes. I enjoyed

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sharing my hobby and found it incredibly exciting to be able to teach it to someone else. I have several fossil collections in my lab and some interesting research (at least interesting to me!) BZ: You said that you established ArtOnWater Gallery when you moved here. What made you decide to do that? Kjerland: I really built the building around my paleontology interest. I wanted a place to do my work in my retirement. The University was interesting, but I was working out of three labs and had to commute there. I was always in the wrong lab with the wrong stuff, and I found it easier to work in one place that was created just for me, so I decided to build it!

about the Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation, which funds asset-based community project ideas. We applied and received grant money to build a community-wide development team to determine how to best utilize Northfield’s artistic assets. BZ: So you received the grant money? Kjerland: Yes! We held a meeting to decide what the grant should be used for and invited 300 people to come to the Grand Event Center to give presentations. We ended up deciding that the grant money should go towards creating Riverwalk Arts Quarter, Inc., a non-profit organization that could get grant money to provide a regional market place with local artists and regional patrons. We felt that Riverwalk Arts Quarter was a service organization, and we reapplied for a separate events grant from the Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation, got that grant, so we will also be opening Riverwalk Market Fair on June 5.

BZ: What inspired the construction of the building? Kjerland: When I was at St. Olaf, I A third-grade Cub Scout excursion exposed Kjerland was on a work-study program and to the fascinating world of paleontology. His passion worked downtown in one of these nice for the subject led him to create his own paleontolBZ: How do you think these endeavors storefronts on Division Street. I had ogy lab in the back room of his Gallery on Water will help the Northfield community? also worked retail in an old storefront Kjerland: Among other needs, the visual in Owatonna, and I really liked this artists are entrepreneurs, have a “product” and need a “market’.” style of building, so I modeled my 1890’s style brick building after Riverwalk Arts Quarter, Inc. plans to provide artists with access to this fashion. I originally thought that I could open up a paleontology museum here, and I did a little bit of that, but there is really no business and marketing skills, but we also need to spend money to get a regional draw and get regional patrons face to face with these satisfactory revenue stream for that. local artists. My gallery is about using art patronage as an economic BZ: What made you decide to use the building as a gallery? development tool. Riverwalk Arts Quarter and Riverwalk Market Kjerland: I thought, “I have all of this wall space and a lovely locaFair are other ways to go about doing this. They will help the entire tion, why don’t I see if I can create an opportunity for artists,” so I community grow. created a gallery called “ArtOnWater,” punning on the river location and my Water Street address. For nearly two years, I just rented BZ: Can you describe Riverwalk Market Fair more? space to artists, but I found out that most of the artists needed help Kjerland: It is a unique regional, European-style market where the consuming public is present with the producer vendors. In this in marketing. What is needed is a full-service gallery in which we public, open-air setting, all people, without common connections, both marketed and actively participated in the sale of art. Local can mingle and see all of the products and meet the artists who people support our local artists, so I reorganized the whole place make these products. People want to meet farmers and artists, so and created a full-service fine art gallery and ran that for a couple we are aiming in this case to give them a chance to get their prodof years. Again, however, it became very clear that unless we had a uct directly from the producer and maybe begin some collaboraregional market, this was not sustainable. tions. But every town has a farmer’s market or a craft fair, and we BZ: What are the advantages of a regional market? wanted to make something a little “Northfield” different. And we Kjerland: There are not enough people in town for us to just buy will have music and activities. It will also draw people to our local from each other. We have to tell the world what we have and get restaurants, hotels and stores. them to come here. Certainly, most patrons are serious art buyers. BZ: So the Market Fair will have both food and art vendors? How Sometimes local patrons may decide that they want to think about did you find farmers to participate? it and assume that it will be here when they are ready. A visitor, Kjerland: We have a farmer’s market in Northfield already, and we however, may experience “departure anxiety” and feel the need to don’t want to disrupt anything that already exists. We wanted to purchase immediately. Either approach sells art, and we need to start fresh and regional. We actually engaged St. Olaf students to reach both markets. The cost of running a gallery is too high with approach the whole concept of locally grown. We have 100 growers simply a local market. and producers within 25 miles of town. We want to work with BZ: How did you move this idea forward? these farmers to improve our local food infrastructure. Twenty-two Kjerland: Some local artists as well as other gallery owners and I of these farmers came together for a founding meeting, and then a had an idea. We have several galleries on the river here as well as the smaller group helped us create market participation standards. Arts Guild and the art store. These, our local artists and an underutilized riverwalk are all strong assets that can be used as a regional BZ: Where will the market fair be located? Kjerland: We have used the underutilized assets of Northfield, draw. State Representative David Bly had forwarded me an email

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would be a great place as well. We will tie the two locations together with an information tent in Bridge Square.

Creating an art gallery (ArtOnWater Gallery) was not enough for Kjerland. He soon realized artists also needed an art market to sell their product. Kjerland has been the moving force behind Northfield’s Riverwalk Market Fair, an enterprise to supply just that.

such as the river which is currently only used for Jesse James Days. The farmers decided to have the Riverwalk Farmer’s Market in the new Sesquicentennial Legacy Plaza by the post office. The city had invested in a design suitable for a public market place, so the farmers felt this would be a perfect location. The artists have traditionally had an artists’ fair behind the Northfield Arts Guild, down on the lower riverwalk, during Jesse James Days, so we thought that

48 NEG@northfieldguide.com

BZ: With your diverse background, what made you decide to become interested in the arts in Northfield? Kjerland: My mother, before she raised six kids, had written some poetry, so perhaps “art being ok” was a part in the working class world we grew up in. I pursued a liberal arts education at St. Olaf College in the early ’60s. I also traveled the world in my business years. When I lived in Vienna, for example, I was exposed to one of the world’s great museum and art communities. My brother and sister-in-law established The Kjerland Stained Glass Studio in Northfield starting in the ’70s, so I got to personally know many of the artists here through their connections and my frequent visits to Northfield. I worked many years in manufacturing and ventures, and I lived with applied technology, technical products and processes, but art contributes differently to an otherwise replicable, commercial focused world in my opinion.

BZ: Have you made any art yourself? Kjerland: Because of my industrial and art interests, I got involved in stained glass art ideas. Specialized glass foundries produce beautiful art glass with multiple colors and patterns for the stained glass artist. I became fascinated with these sheets of raw material, purchased some, and had them cut into specific panel sizes. I explored different ways to frame and display them. I ended up creating seven large stained glass framed panels that are in City Hall now. And I continue to create and sell new versions. I would call them decorative art.

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HOME EQUI TY LINE OF CREDIT It’s a great time to get a jump on those spring fix-up projects. From home improvements to consolidating other loans, take advantage of low rates using your home’s equity. Ask for details! *Annual Percentage Rate (APR) effective as of 5/14/10 and subject to change. 5.00% variable rate based on Prime and is available on lines of $25,000 or more; 80% LTV. Payment example: $102.74 monthly based on interest only and an outstanding balance of $25,000. There may be a balance owing at maturity. Offer subject to credit approval. Maximum APR 18%. Other rates and terms are available. New lines only. Closing costs may apply ranging from $250 to $480. Automatic payment from a CRB checking account required. Consult a tax advisor regarding the deductibility of interest.

Northfield Main Office 1605 Heritage Drive • 507-645-4441 Northfield Downtown Office 25 Bridge Square • 507-645-3132 www.community-resourcebank.com Additional offices in Cannon Falls and Roseville

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Discover the Art of

a Summer

Saturday!

“Pears and a Bowl” by Kathy Miller, Northfield watercolor artist Original watercolor, 2009 • www.kmillerwatercolors.com

Make this summer your season to discover the hometown pleasures of an open-air Market Fair! Stroll Northfield’s incomparable Riverwalk any Saturday morning June through October, and you’ll find a sampling of our area’s best talents and tastes: Fine Art and Fine Craft

Fresh, Local Produce

Artisan Foods

Browse a changing weekly palette of various media: oil, watercolor, acrylics, pottery, glass, sculpture, fiber, jewelry, wood art, mixed media. Lower Riverwalk, east side of the Cannon.

Meet our region’s finest growers of local and organic fruits and vegetables, and producers of minimally processed meats and cheeses. Don’t forget the fresh cut flowers for your table! Adjacent to Bridge Square in Sesquicentennial Legacy Plaza.

Taste the quality difference... check out our handcrafted breads and pastries, fresh coffees, old family recipes and new creations. Eat here and take some home.

Bring the family...socialize and shop... rediscover the heart of Northfield! June 5th Grand Opening Visit Our Welcome Center in Bridge Square Saturdays, June through October 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. (Except September 11, Defeat of Jesse James Days)

www.RiverwalkMarketFair.org Many thanks to our generous donors and sponsors!

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Be a Riverwalk Market Fair Vendor! Great entrepreneurial opportunity for artists and growers. Complete event and marketing management provided for quality vendors. Join us for one Saturday, or for twenty! Minimal per-day fee. To apply, visit our website below, or call 507-786-9700 to speak with a Market Fair Manager.

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Northfield Entertainment Guide - June 2010