Page 1

Internships

New RAs

Learn about students’ experiences learning outside the classroom.

Find out which students will be resident assistants next year.

Features, pg 4

Campus Life, pg 8

jareddjanzen@tabor.edu

Ministry Spotlight WUMP offers fun to young kids in Wichita. Features, pg 5

Issue 5

March 12, 2014

Extension cords lead to concerns with fire safety Lauren Wall

All three performers take the stage as Krista Neifert accompanies Sara Sagner and Trevor Morris during the recital’s finale, a rendition of “Anything You Can Do.” Photo by Courtney Reed

Three music students perform junior recital Jessica Vix

Sports Editor

Three music majors joined to present their junior recitals in voice and piano Thursday, March 6 in the chapel. Sara Sagner, a mezzo soprano from Cheney, Kan., is a vocal music education major with an endorsement in secondary special education. “Although it was hard to mesh three people’s schedules for practice times, I loved putting this recital together,” said Sagner. Sagner began the recital with an alto solo from Handel’s “Messiah” and also performed pieces by Franz Schubert, August Holmes

and others, as well as a lively aria from Mozart’s famous opera “The Marriage of Figaro.” She was accompanied on piano by senior Cora Ruhl. “The biggest challenge for me is conveying the emotion, message and meaning in each song to the audience,” said Sagner. Trevor Morris, a tenor from Murdock, Kan., is majoring in music and pre-physical therapy. Morris, accompanied by sophomore Zach Neumann, performed pieces by Franz Schubert, Stefano Donaudy and Gabriel See RECITAL, page 2

Reporter

Tabor will begin to maintain campus-wide records and make room inspections to comply with fire codes after spring break. In November the fire marshal came and inspected the residence halls that resulted in Tabor having about 50 write-ups for the rooms because of a situation with the standard extension cords. The extension cords are not allowed in any of the rooms because it’s against fire code. “This has been talked about for years now, but it wasn’t until the fire marshal came that we really wanted to start doing something about it,” said VP for Student Life Jim Paulus. Extension cords can cause a fire or shock and is an electrical danger. According to The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), an estimated 3,300 residential fires originate from extension

cords each year, killing and injuring over 300 people. Tabor came up with a plan to respond to these reports and decided to do room inspections to comply with the state fire code. Students will be told when these inspections are and the RAs will simply go around and check the rooms for safety with the power outlet. “We’re not going through students things and we’re not looking for anything other than the power outlets,” said Paulus. Students will be offered to check out a power strip from Student Life if they are using an extension cord and don’t have any other option. “We have to document everything based on the fire code,” said Paulus. “Next year it’ll be in the handbook so students will know that in the middle of the fall and spring semester each year we’ll have to do an inspection.”

Bible department welcomes guest speaker

Jared Janzen

Editor-in-Chief

Tabor’s Bible department will be hosting a guest speaker March 24 and 25 who will speak during chapel, an evening event and several classes. The speaker, Dr. Terry Brensinger, is the dean and vice president of Fresno Pacific Biblical Seminary in California. He also serves as professor of pastoral ministry at FPBS. During the evening session, he will give a lecture called “Rethinking the Smelly Fish in Our Lives” at 7 p.m., Monday, March 24 in the Chapel. The subject is based off the second chapter of Jonah. Chapel credit will be given for this event. Also on Monday, Brensinger will speak in Dr. David Faber’s Ethics class and Dr.

Doug Miller’s Poets and Sages classes. During Chapel on Tuesday, he will share a message titled “Converting Prejudice into Compassion” about the fourth chapter of Jonah. Brensinger has a Ph.D. in the Old Testament from Drew University. He has published two books and is working on a third, not to mention the numerous scholarly articles he has written. Some of the other roles he’s held are professor at Messiah College in Pennsylvania and pastor at churches in Kentucky, New York City and Pennsylvania. His position as dean and vice president at FPBS began just a few months ago in August 2013. This will be Brensinger’s first time at Tabor. He first developed connections here when he spoke at the USMB Study Confer-

Things to remember: Dormitories will close at 5 p.m. Saturday, March 15 for spring break. They reopen at noon on Sunday, March 23.

ence in Phoenix January 2013. Professors Del Gray and David Faber were in attendance at that conference, got to know him and invited him to come speak at Tabor. “He is an energetic and engaging speaker who can challenge us to think hard about how to be loyal followers of Jesus in culture that itself demands our loyalty,” Faber said. According to Doug Miller, who helped coordinate this event, it’s been five or six years since the Tabor Bible department has hosted a speaker. However, the Bible departments at Bethel and Hesston Colleges have opened their doors to Tabor when they’ve hosted speakers in recent years. Tabor will be returning the favor to the other two colleges with Brensinger. Bible department faculty from Bethel and Hess-

ton will be invited to share a dinner in honor of Brensinger. Miller said he hopes the student body will make Brensinger welcome during his time at Tabor and will show support by attending the events he is speaking at.

Terry Brensinger will visit Tabor March 24-25.

Room sign ups for next year take place Monday evening, March 31 for men and Tuesday evening, April 1 for women. To sign up, students must pay a $50 deposit by 4:30 on March 27 in the business office.


NEWS 2

March 12, 2014

Choirs to travel north this year for spring break tours Jared Janzen

Editor-in-Chief

Rather than spending spring break on vacation or at home relaxing, the members of Tabor’s Concert Choir and Concerto Bella Voce will be touring out-of-state, spending their break with a busy schedule of performances. “The goal is to enrich people through the beauty of music,” said Brad Vogel, director of the Concert Choir. The 46 members of Concert Choir will have performances in Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Minnesota this year. This year’s theme of “I Lift My Voice” focuses on the areas of praise, prayer and proclamation. Concert Choir’s tour will get a headstart, leaving at 1 p.m. Friday, March 14. Their first concert is that evening in Henderson, Neb. Sunday and Monday have two performances scheduled for each day while the choir is in South Dakota. On Tuesday they sing in Wisconsin before continuing to Minnesota for concerts on Wednesday and Thursday. They’ll begin heading back on Friday, pausing in Omaha, Neb., for an evening concert. Concert Choir’s final two performances will be Sunday at churches in Olathe and Topeka, Kan.

Concert Choir’s busy performance schedule won’t leave much time for other activities, but Vogel does have a visit to the Cheesecake Factory planned for the Saturday before they return. Concerto Bella Voce will be singing at venues in Kansas, Colorado, South Dakota and Nebraska. They will leave Sunday, March 16 and kick things off right away with two morning performances at a church in Hays, Kan. They will spend the next two days performing in Colorado, after which they will travel to South Dakota. Wednesday will be their day to relax, with opportunities for sightseeing instead of singing. They plan to visit Wind Cave National Park, Mt. Rushmore and Hot Springs. On Thursday they’ll be back to singing with a morning performance in Rapid City, S.D. and an evening one in Grand Island, Neb. The last two performances of Concerto Bella Voce’s tour will be special because they will be singing at the home churches of two choir members. On Friday they sing at Evangelical Free Church in Hastings, Neb., the home church of freshman Jenna Thayer. Their final performance of the tour in Topeka, Kan., will be at freshman Jessica Beasterfield’s home church of Cornerstone Community Church.

Science dept. hatches new life Chelsea McWhirt

Reporter

Spring is just around the corner and with it comes new life. Tabor’s science department is performing an experiment to hatch chicken and duck eggs for Zoology and Animal Behavior. In charge of the experiment is Biology professor Andrew Sensenig. It began Feb. 27, and after 21 to 28 days, the chicken and duck eggs will hatch here on Tabor campus. “We are incubating six domestic mallard duck eggs and six assorted breed chicken eggs,” said Sensenig. Sensenig intends for his to students to understand the physiological development of chickens and ducks in a closed environment. To begin the process for incubation, the eggs were brought from Sensenig’s farm. During the incubation the eggs are kept at 100 degrees after being at room temperature.

News in brief Ukraine PM: We Won’t Budge Ukraine PM Arseniy Yatsenyuk will head to Washington this week for talks on the Crimea situation. Yatsenyuk said his U.S. visit will seek a "resolution of the situation in Ukraine," after a government meeting. Meanwhile, Yatsenyuk was talking tough, adds the AP, vowing at a Kiev celebration of the country's great nationalist poet that "This is our land. Our fathers and grandfathers have spilled their blood for this land. And we won't

The eggs will begin to develop once they’re kept at this temperature. Then they’re turned three times a day automatically. This simulates what actual birds do in the wild. After three days a heartbeat will begin to develop. At one-week-old, eyes develop. Feathers will develop after two weeks. Finally after three weeks the chicks and ducklings will hatch. During the incubation process half of the eggs will be sacrificed in order to examine the developing embryo. Once the birds have hatched they will be kept in tanks until they’re old enough to be outside. How warm the weather is also determines when they will be placed outside. Sensenig will release the birds at his farm once they are old enough to stay warm and be outside at night. They will then join Sensenig’s other flocks. This project is done every year by the science department.

budge a single centimeter from Ukrainian land. Let Russia and its president know this." Crimea was throwing a party of its own, with 4,000-plus people gathering in the capital of Simferopol to throw their support behind unification with Russia. "Russians are our brothers," Crimea's parliament speaker told the crowd. "We are going back home to the motherland." A smaller gathering of 500 or so turned out to voice opposition to the referendum. "We will not allow a foreign boot that wants to stand on the heads of our children," said one protester. Source: newser.com

Gettysburg Rapid City

Minneapolis

Omaha Denver

Hillsboro This map shows the approximate routes where Concert Choir (gray) and Concerto Bella Voce (black) will be traveling over spring break. Graphic by Jared Janzen

“We love to try to perform at home churches of the (choir) members if possible,” said Janie Brokenicky, director of Concerto Bella Voce. “It’s an enjoyment for the girls as well as the community.” They are scheduled to return Sunday, March 23. This will be Concerto Bella Voce’s second tour experience, as the group was just formed at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year. Brokenicky hopes that having a better understanding of the organization

and the timing of the concerts will make this experience go a bit smoother than its first tour. Last year Concerto Bella Voce experienced a few setbacks, including a bus breakdown and a trip to the hospital. Brokenicky said she expects the tour to be a fun way to build cohesion within the group while they use their talents for the enjoyment of others. “It’s a great way to provide music ministry to schools and parishes away from our own,” said Brokenicky.

RECITAL

1946 Broadway musical “Annie Get Your Gun.” In this final song, Morris and Sagner donned toy guns and showed off their acting skills in addition to their voices, taking on the roles of Annie Oakley and Frank Butler, two competing sharpshooters in the musical. Neifert added some humor of her own when in the middle of the song, she suddenly launched back into a section from “Rhapsody in Blue” before Sagner stomped over to the piano to correct her. “This song was a great way to end the recital because it was a time for us to go crazy,” said Sagner. “Also, we kept the part where Krista breaks into her Rhapsody a secret from our professors so it was a surprise for everybody.”

Continued from page 1 Faure. He also sang two pieces by popular American composer John Jacob Niles, including “Black is the Color of my True Love’s Hair.” Krista Neifert of Pratt, Kan., is a triple major in music education, piano pedagogy and Biblical and religious studies. Neifert performed two pieces: “Notturno, Op. 6, No. 2” by Charles Griffes, and the famous “Rhapsody in Blue” by prominent American composer George Gershwin. With this piece she was joined by Dr. Sheila Litke, professor of piano and piano pedagogy, who played the orchestra reduction on piano. All three performers then teamed up to perform Irving Berlin’s “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better” from the

Junior Trevor Morris sings one of his seven solos during the recital as sophomore Zach Neumann accompanies him on piano. Photo by Courtney Reed


March 12, 2014

OPINIONS 3

Where’s the best place to live on campus?

Townhouses offer freedom, convenience Quad provides spiritual, social growth

Janelle Rust

Lauren Wall

Reporter

Longer visitation hours. Not having to go out in the cold to get your laundry. Bigger rooms. These are just a few reasons why living in a townhouse is the best place to live on campus. I transferred to Tabor at the start of my junior year and was fortunate enough to get into a townhouse right away so I never had to experience the “quad life.” Although I’m sure there are some perks about residing in the quad or a house, there is a large list of things that make living in a townhouse special. One big factor that puts the townhouse above other living areas is the newness of it. The townhouses are some of the most recent dorms built on campus, which means the furniture, kitchen area and rooms are in very good condition. Another benefit of living in a townhouse is the longer visitation hours. Unlike the quads, visitation hours are every day, not just a couple of nights a week. This allows for more freedom and ability to have people over. If going out in the cold and switching your laundry doesn’t sound appealing, living in a townhouse is the place for you.

Each townhouse has its own washer and dryer, which makes doing laundry very simple. It’s also nice because usually you have some type of relationship with everyone in the house so you don’t have to worry about your clothes being stolen or messed with. Finally, living in a townhouse is a great place to spend your college days because of the sense of closeness you develop with the people you live with. Whether they’re teammates, best friends or people you never met before that year, living in such close quarters fosters late-night conversations and close friendships. These are just a handful of the many reasons why choosing a townhouse is the best decision.

Reporter

Students arrive at Tabor from all over the country and are provided with a diverse and essential life-changing experience. Where they live on campus has a lot to do with this experience. Each student is challenged daily to balance their personal lives and stories, experiences, and beliefs with other individuals who are living with them. The quad is the best place to live because students get the opportunity to engage and live in a place that cultivates a Christian community while promoting academic, spiritual and social growth among other students. All freshman are first placed in the quads and in exchange they receive an experience they’ll never forget. The mod atmosphere and layout is what really brings a floor together because you are living closer together than in a townhouse or house. “Students often tell me that when they live elsewhere on campus, they miss the community in the quad. They feel less connected because they have to be more intentional to connect with a large group of people when they live outside the quad,” said Sara Sigley, RD of the women’s quad.

“When they live in the quad, there are small connections all of the time simply because they are in close proximity with their peers.” Living in the quad is a great experience because of the weekly event “Tuesday at 10,” which provides a time to eat and have fellowship with your mod mates. You get to have an RA that is committed to investing personally with every student on his or her floor, and the women’s quad has a great location on campus because it’s closest to the caf and my classes. “My favorite thing about the quad is the growth I see happen all the time because people are in close connection with one another,” said Sigley. “It's a sacred experience when students are able to share life together, figuring out who they are and how they fit into God's plan for the world.”

Movie Review: “Son of God” depicts life of Jesus Lauren Wall Reporter “Son of God” is an interesting and theatrical version of the series “The Bible” that aired on the History Channel last year. Husband and wife Roma Downey and Mark Burnett produced both the show and the movie. “Son of God” is the Jesus portion of that series which came out in theaters Feb. 28. From what I noticed there wasn’t much advertising for this movie and I didn’t know much about it beforehand, but it is explicitly aimed for Christian audiences.

The movie opens with Apostle John describing God’s promise with His people. Thirty years after his birth, Jesus calls Peter to join His mission to transform and the world. It's a theatrical, openly sentimental and extremely intense movie about Jesus’ life from His birth through his ministries, crucifixion and resurrection. The movie is a captivating presentation of God’s greatest act of love and His unending grace when he gave His one and only Son, Jesus. The acting and visual effects are excellent throughout the movie, especially with the powerful crucifixion and resurrection scene. The movie serves as a great medium for delivering a message that is life-changing.

Mary Magdalene’s role in the movie is somewhat surprising. She is involved in nearly every scene with Jesus’ ministry. This isn’t the common thought of her role in Jesus’ life and work. There is no doubt that she is considered to have had a significant role at Jesus’ crucifixion and at his burial site, but the movie gives the feeling that she more or less had the same role as the 12 disciples. All in all, “Son of God” gives a good visual of the ministry that Jesus led, as well as the social quarrels that arose due to his work. It gives a sense of exactly how His coming to earth made others feel and react at the present time.

What are your plans for spring break?

“Travel home to Colorado.” Senior Hannah Holmes

“Go back to Texas and visit friends.”

“Go on the Spring Serve Mission Trip.”

Freshman Simba Ijeoma

Senior Esther Schmidt

“Partying.” Freshman Marshall McShan

The View Staff Editor-in-Chief, Opinions Editor: Jared Janzen

The Tabor View is the official

Campus Life, Features Editor: Elizabeth Janssen

newspaper of Tabor College in

Sports Editor: Jessica Vix

by Print Source Direct, LLC,

Reporters: Jessica Vix, Janelle Rust, Becky Bryan,

Hillsboro, Kan. It is published 116 S. Main, Hillsboro, Kan., 67063. The opinions expressed

Jared Janzen, Lauren Wall, Chelsea McWhirt

in The Tabor View are not

Photographer: Courtney Reed

View staff.

Adviser: Sara Jo Waldron

necessarily those of The Tabor

Letters The View welcomes all comments, opinions, questions and suggestions from students, faculty and employees. We want to hear what you have to say. Let your voice be heard! Send all letters to the editor, Jared Janzen, at jareddjanzen@tabor.edu.


Open Mic Night

SAB hosts annual event with a great turn out Features, pg 4-5

FEATURES 4

theview@tabor.edu

‘Cafe’ Changes

See what is new and improved about the Tabor Cafetieria News, pg 2

Sports Editor For many students, the thought of entering the job field after college can be intimidating at the very least, but three communications majors are getting a head start this semester by participating in internships. “I am hoping to learn about working in a real work environment and all that it entails, like working with and under other people and learning basic skills,” said senior Sydney Coughlin. Coughlin is focusing on organizational communications and plans to work in publics relations, event planning or human resources. She hopes to one day be involved with a missions-oriented nonprofit organization. She interns 18 hours a week at MB Foundation in Hillsboro, doing mostly secretarial work. “I’m trying to really broaden my knowledge of the financial world since that is what MB Foundation deals with,” she said. “It’s way out of my comfort zone. Also, I’m learning about how a Christian organization and a nonprofit functions.” Previously, an internship was required for communications majors, but the major underwent recent changes that negated the requirement. However, Communications Professor Aleen Ratzlaff encourages students to take the opportunity to gain experience and learn more about potential career paths. “I think we (Tabor) see the value of internships,” said Ratzlaff. “They give

Photos by Zach Bissell

Welcome Back

Left: Jake Schenk sits at his desk thinking about several different things that are happening around campus as well as what God is doing. Right: Erica Haude takes a break from helping students to enjoy some company. Both Schenk and Haude are Tabor Grads that have come back to give back to the Tabor community.

Two major positions have recently been filled this year including Student Success Counselor and Director of Campus Ministries. Both positions were filled with Tabor College graduates. Erica Haude There is a new face in the Student Success & Career Services Office. Erica Haude is Tabor’s new Student Success Counselor. She is the supervisor of Andrea Batista, oversees students on academic probation and works on accommodations for students with disabilities. She also does counseling on a referral basis. She has ample experience for her position. After graduating from Tabor in 2006 she went to Denver Seminary to get her Masters in counseling, which she received in 2010. She has worked

as a youth pastor for First Mennonite Brethren in Wichita and for the last two years at a residential treatment center. While praying for God’s guidance she received an e-mail from Directo of Admissions Lee Waldron and Vice President of Athletics and Enrollment Management Rusty Allen. She felt like God was telling her not to say no and accepted the job. She feels called to work with people who are, as she says, “on the fringes.” She loves being at Tabor and getting to counsel. Riding her bike in the snow and chasing a possum out of a mod are among the memories Haude has of her time at Tabor. She also remembers being undefeated in conference while she played during basketball season. You could most likely find her and her husband at sporting events at Tabor. Haude’s office is in the Student Success & Career Services

Office in the library. As she says, “I want to get to know people. I want to hear their story.” So go and visit her in her office or find her at a football game, she’d love to get to know you.

Jake Schenk You may have seen Jake Schenk around campus and wondered what he does. Schenk is our new Director of Campus Ministries. In this position it is his job to organize the chapels, oversee small group, and get to know and minister to students. Schenk graduated from Tabor with a dual degree in Physical Education and Bible in 2006. After graduating he coached football. Two years at Tabor and Two at Greenville College Illinois, but he always felt called to sports and ministry. As he says, “God gave me football as something to enjoy while He prepared

Interns enhance chapel experience Reporter During chapel students usually pay attention to what happens on stage. They take for granted the little things, such as lighting and sound. Without freshman Marcina Root and junior Trenton Wilker, chapel wouldn’t be the same.

Issue 1

March 12, 2014

New Women’s Choral group on campus

Business students to visit Dominican Republic

Kelsey Unruh

Reporter

One of the new additions to the Tabor College curriculum this year is Concerto Bella Voche, the women’s chorale that is directed by new coming professor Janie Brokenicky. “It’s Italian for ‘a collection of beautiful voices,’” said Brokenicky. “Women’s chorale before was a very universal name and you’d hear it and think it could be anyone’s choir. Concerto Bella Voche will, after a while, become a familiar name for Tabor and help give the group identity.” Brokenicky joined the Tabor music department after applying for Assistant Professor of Choral Music at the request of Dr. Brad Vogel. “I’m thrilled to have Janie here,” said Vogel. “When the position opened, I ran into her at the National Association of Teachers of Singing and I talked to her and asked her to ap-

ply. There were 30 applicants.” One of the reasons Brokenicky was picked for the position was because of her previous work records with other chorale groups. “Getting the group re-established was the primary goal,” said Vogel. “The goal over 3 years is to have 40 voices in women’s choral. Janie is very good, and has a track record of building good chorale programs. She’s the perfect person for the position.” Brokenicky is looking forward to what the school year will bring. “I’m excited for the girls to have such a strong variety in musical performances,” said Brokenicky. “We will get to perform on our own at the Thanksgiving concert and we are touring, but we also get to sing The Messiah with the concert choir. I never got these opportunities in college, so I’m excited for all of these opportunities for the girls.”

Becky Bryan businesses and will have Reporter the chance to ask businesspeople the opportunity to “It is really exciting getFor students who play owners how they are able see what it’s really like. ting to experience the fasta winter sport or are busy to be successful in the DoIt’s helped some people paced news environment,” during interterm, there is a minican. decide, ‘Yes, this is what I said Bryan. “I am hoping new trip being offered this “We will also be visitwant to do’.” to learn more about the difstudents return to key staff roles year that will not interfere ing two universities down She added thatFormer internferent jobs available in the Ben Schmidt with either of these. there, as well as the presiships provide students withReporter broadcast industry, and get Members of the Interna- dent’s palace,” said Schumopportunities to network a better feel for what job tional Business class are acher. “We will even have a and connect with profesStudent Senate sets up traveling to the Dominican chance to meet Congress.” sionals, which often helps suits me best.” For each credit hour newspring campaign over break as a part Schumacher lived in the them in their future job Zach Bissell taken, 40 hours at the inofEditor-in-chief their class. They can also Dominican for six years as search. get their cultural awareness a child. He returned there in Senior Janelle Rust is in- ternship site are required. credit for taking the trip ac- 2001 and lived in the counterning for Anthony Mon- Students keep a log of how See SENATE, pg 2 cording to Jesse Schumach- try for two more years. son, sports information many hours they spend at er, business professor who The students will have the director for Tabor, writing the site. The site superviis leading the trip. chance to visit a variety of articles that sor fills out a See STAFF, pg 2 “Dave Loewen, Tristian different museums as well appear on the “I think we midterm and Long, Rafael Marins, Chris as having the opportunity to Tabor Bluejays (Tabor) see the final report and Schafers and I are the men work with local kids. website. c oon lFacebook l a b oasrwella taseextra s materialwho Each editionof of theinternTabor View will be put and contests value will be going on the Schumacher said they Rust usually Keep an eye on the pagewith for photothe contests throughout the stutrip,” said Schumacher. will be visiting a business ships. They give rest of this year. writes two ardent’s adviser The college has approved incubator, which is a facilticles a week. people the opto determine the the students leaving a day ity that helps people to start She focuses on portunity to see before spring break, mak- their own business. incorporating what it’s really student’s final grade. statistics from ing their trip 10 days long. They will have a chance “I would say the games and like. It’s helped The students will have the to visit this city and interworks to finish some people to do somechance to spend time at the act with Americans living stories before decide, ‘Yes, beach as well as going to there, as well Americans thing you have the next morn- this is what I markets, but they will spend living in other parts of the a passion for ing. a lot of their time meeting country. and something “It is deadline want to do.’’’ people and learning about Schumacher said they will Aleen Ratzlaff you are excited writing, so I the ways to do business in embrace the Dominican culabout,” said have learned to a foreign country. ture while on their trip. get stories done in a timely Bryan. “Interning is a great While in the Domini“We will eat the food, go time of learning while manner,” said Rust. can, they will visit both to the restaurants and interAnother challenge is find- you’re still in the classAmerican and Dominican act with the people.” ing new and creative ways room setting.” Internships can be a great to write stories, said Rust. opportunity for expanding Students considering an internship in any field should one’s horizons as well. “It’s good to find an consider the time commitment and possible expense internship within your of driving if the internship is range of knowledge,” said Coughlin, “but by going not in Hillsboro. Junior Becky Bryan is out of your comfort zone looking toward a career in you will learn more about broadcast and is interning your own capabilities and at KAKE news in Wichita. interests and learn new Three days a week she skills you can take into travels to the studio where your future workplace.” she not only observes, but Ratzlaff encourages stualso helps produce broad- dents in any major to talk casts. Bryan helps run the to their adviser about the Photo by Courtney Reed prompter, create graphics possibility of doing an in- Junior Trenton Wilker makes an adjustment to the sound system during chapel. and write stories. ternship.

Behind the scenes: Chelsea McWhirt

Campus Life, pg 8

September 19, 2012

Communications students explore careers through internships Jessica Vix

Arts and Crafts Fair Photos

See some photos from last weeks craft fair

Wilker and Root are in charge of the sound and lighting during both chapels. Root is in control of lighting while Wilker focuses on sound and projection. Root has had prior experience working as a lighting and sound technician in high school. Wilker also has prior high school experience.

Wilker and Root are also in charge of sound and lighting during SP&D, as well as setting up and tearing down for concerts and guest speakers. Wilker has been an intern since Spring 2012 when he was hired by former campus pastor Mike Broulliette. Root joined Wilker as a technician last semester.

Student Senate is planning to help students even more this year than in previous years. They are looking to start a “Tabor Proud Campaign.”

“Tabor Proud is a fundraising effort to raise money for students who experience a family crisis during the year” said Senate President Mike Klaassen. Mission statement for the new

When asked what their favorite part of being an intern was, both replied being in control and being involved. They also like to change the sound and fix problems as they come up. Wilker will be graduating in 2015. Root will then be in charge of sound and lighting. “Realistically it would be better to have three people: one on projection, one on lighting, one on sound,” said Wilker. Due to budget restrictions, however, only two people are on staff.

Root and Wilker believe that this internship experience will benefit them later on. “I’m not fit for pastor position because that’s not where my skill set is and it’s not where my passion is,” said Wilker. “So if I were to work in a church and do something in ministry it would probably either in tech or some type of music.” Both are interns out of enjoyment rather than academic major requirements. They work for minimum wage five hours a week.


Open Mic Night

SAB hosts annual event with a great turn out

‘Cafe’ Changes

See what is new and improved about the Tabor Cafetieria

Features, pg 4-5

March 12, 2014

theview@tabor.edu

News, pg 2

Arts and Crafts Fair Photos

See some photos from last weeks craft fair

Campus Life, pg 8

September 19, 2012

FEATURES 5

Issue 1

Theater professor develops historical drama New Women’s Choral group on campus Kelsey Unruh

Jared Janzen Editor-in-Chief Laurel Koerner, assistant professor of theater, has been creating a historical play inspired by the Salvadoran Civil War in the 1980s. She is working on the project with a colleague, Juan Parada. Although the project began in 2012, it recently received a push forward when Koerner received money from a Hope Scholar’s Grant to aid the research and development process, which will include a trip to El Salvador this summer. The play revolves around Radio Venceremos, a radio station that emerged during the war. This station became a way for people to

Reporter

One of the new additions to the Tabor College curriculum this year is Concerto Bella Voche, the women’s chorale that is directed by new coming professor Janie Brokenicky. “It’s Italian for ‘a collection of beautiful voices,’” said Brokenicky. “Women’s chorale before was a very universal name and you’d hear it and think it could be anyone’s choir. Concerto Bella Voche will, after a while, become a familiar name for Tabor and help give the group identity.” Brokenicky joined the Tabor music department after applying for Assistant Professor of Choral Music at the request of Dr. Brad Vogel. “I’m thrilled to have Janie here,” said Vogel. “When the position opened, I ran into her at the National Association of Teachers of Singing and I talked to her and asked her to ap-

ply. There were 30 applicants.” One of the reasons Brokenicky was picked for the position was because of her previous work records with other chorale groups. “Getting the group re-established was the primary goal,” said Vogel. “The goal over 3 years is to have 40 voices in women’s choral. Janie is very good, and has a track record of building good chorale programs. She’s the perfect person for the position.” Brokenicky is looking forward to what the school year will bring. “I’m excited for the girls to have such a strong variety in musical performances,” said Brokenicky. “We will get to perform on our own at the Thanksgiving concert and we are touring, but we also get to sing The Messiah with the concert choir. I never got these opportunities in college, so I’m excited for all of these opportunities for the girls.”

learn about things that the erner and Parada have been laborative approach, using government and military referring to it as the Radio what is known as “ensemwere trying to hide. Venceremos Project. ble-based work.” This means that all the “What we’re interested For Parada, the project people who will be inin is the radio as the voice has personal significance of the people and how this because the violence of volved with the production group of guerrilla radio the Salvadoran Civil War get together during the writFormer students returnforced to key staff producers could radically him roles to immigrate to ing process to offer input Ben Schmidt Reporter of the change the course the United States when he on what the script should say. Actors and designers war through the power of was young. get equal opportunity as the information,” said Koerner. Their trip to ElStudent SalvadorSenate sets up playwright and director in The project originated this summer will be tonew con-campaign determining the language of when Parada began telling tinue researching,Zach Bissell conduct Editor-in-chief Koerner of the station’s his- interviews and take video the play. “These roles are much tory on the day the two of footage that will later be See SENATE, pg 2 them graduated from the made into a film component. more fluid,” said Koerner. “It stems from the belief California Institute of the The Radio Venceremos Arts with Master’s degrees. Project is not being written that breaking down that See STAFF, pg 2 typical hierarchy can create Koerner said she was fasci- in the traditional manner a more interesting, a more nated by the idea, and they of an author or playwright nuanced creative product.” immediately began develtoandtype Each edition of the Tabor View will be working put on Facebook by as wellhimself as extra material contests Koerner and Parada plan Keep an eye on the pageout for photo contests throughout the oping the play. a complete script. Inrest of this year. to go through this workshop At this point, the play stead, Koerner and Parada process in Los Angeles, Cadoes not have a title. Ko- are taking a much more colPhotos by Zach Bissell

Welcome Back

Left: Jake Schenk sits at his desk thinking about several different things that are happening around campus as well as what God is doing. Right: Erica Haude takes a break from helping students to enjoy some company. Both Schenk and Haude are Tabor Grads that have come back to give back to the Tabor community.

Two major positions have recently been filled this year including Student Success Counselor and Director of Campus Ministries. Both positions were filled with Tabor College graduates. Erica Haude There is a new face in the Student Success & Career Services Office. Erica Haude is Tabor’s new Student Success Counselor. She is the supervisor of Andrea Batista, oversees students on academic probation and works on accommodations for students with disabilities. She also does counseling on a referral basis. She has ample experience for her position. After graduating from Tabor in 2006 she went to Denver Seminary to get her Masters in counseling, which she received in 2010. She has worked

as a youth pastor for First Mennonite Brethren in Wichita and for the last two years at a residential treatment center. While praying for God’s guidance she received an e-mail from Directo of Admissions Lee Waldron and Vice President of Athletics and Enrollment Management Rusty Allen. She felt like God was telling her not to say no and accepted the job. She feels called to work with people who are, as she says, “on the fringes.” She loves being at Tabor and getting to counsel. Riding her bike in the snow and chasing a possum out of a mod are among the memories Haude has of her time at Tabor. She also remembers being undefeated in conference while she played during basketball season. You could most likely find her and her husband at sporting events at Tabor. Haude’s office is in the Student Success & Career Services

Office in the library. As she says, “I want to get to know people. I want to hear their story.” So go and visit her in her office or find her at a football game, she’d love to get to know you.

Jake Schenk You may have seen Jake Schenk around campus and wondered what he does. Schenk is our new Director of Campus Ministries. In this position it is his job to organize the chapels, oversee small group, and get to know and minister to students. Schenk graduated from Tabor with a dual degree in Physical Education and Bible in 2006. After graduating he coached football. Two years at Tabor and Two at Greenville College Illinois, but he always felt called to sports and ministry. As he says, “God gave me football as something to enjoy while He prepared

Student Senate is planning to help students even more this year than in previous years. They are looking to start a “Tabor Proud Campaign.”

“Tabor Proud is a fundraising effort to raise money for students who experience a family crisis during the year” said Senate President Mike Klaassen. Mission statement for the new

lif., and El Salvador over the summer. Koerner said she has done a number of smaller theater projects using the collaborative writing approach. They’ve had to work on the Radio Venceremos project a little bit at a time because of busy schedules and searching for funding. This makes it hard to know when the final project will be complete, but Koerner would like to have a version of it done by the end of the summer. “That’s really ambitious, but I would hope… that we could have something to show an audience and then know where we’re at with it and take it another step farther,” said Koerner.

Ministry Spotlight:

WUMP provides activities to Wichita kids in mass chaos in the gym with the leaders simSports Editor ply trying to break up fights,” said Holmes. Senior Ben Wiens has participated in Friday nights are a prime time for social acWUMP since his freshman year and has wittivities, but for about 30 Tabor students it is nessed these positive changes. also a time to minister. “It’s mostly due to the current leadership reWichita Urban Ministries Plunge (WUMP) is a Friday night kid’s club hosted by Grace alizing that how WUMP was being run before wasn’t working,” said Wiens. “We then did a Baptist Church in Wichita. Each week, an average of 50-70 area kids complete overhaul of how each night looked.” ages 5 to 12 enjoy a meal, crafts, games and Now that the kids are divided into separate Bible lessons all facilitated by Tabor students. groups, their time is much more productive. The students travel to Wichita each Friday, leaving campus at 5 p.m. Several students then drive vans from the church to four nearby neighborhoods to pick up the kids. They start each evening as a large group in the church’s gymnasium before dividing into four groups, classified by age and gender. Most of the kids come from rough family backgrounds, explained junior Carly Wilhelm, a member of the leadership team. Many are exposed to violence regularly or have parents in prison. For junior Crystal Holmes, giving up her Friday nights is anything but a chore. “We are able to love these children out of the grace God has given us,” said Holmes. “It is so awesome to know that God is teaching these kids.” Above: This is the third year Holmes has partici- Sophomore Joe Cannon is swarmed by a group of pated in WUMP and she is currently on the young girls during WUMP. leadership team. The team meets once a week to discuss any issues and consider changes or improvements. The program has undergone some significant alteration in the past few years. Right: Sophomore Katie Pritchard (left) “On my first ever night of WUMP, we had reads a story to two kids at WUMP. 60 children running and throwing basketballs

Jessica Vix

“This helps them learn more in the lesson and we as leaders also get to build more meaningful relationships with each student,” said Holmes. “Sometimes it’s hard to tell if what we’re doing is worthwhile, but there’s nothing better than seeing the kids show they understand what we are teaching and live differently because of it,” said Wiens. Wilhelm stated the purpose of WUMP simply: “Our goal is to love them with the love of Christ.”

Photos courtesy of Becky Spahr.


March 12, 2014

SPORTS 6

Tabor basketball sweeps KCAC Lauren Wall

Reporter It was a great day to be a Bluejay after both the women’s and men’s basketball teams defeated their opponents and won the KCAC Championship games March 3 in Park City, Kan. Hartman Arena was full of energy, excitement and anticipation during both of the basketball games. The student section on both sides of the arena was filled with students full of paint and spirit as they were cheering on their Bluejays. “When I walked into the arena I immediately was impressed by all the blue and was excited by the energy that was coming from our crowds,” said Student Success Counselor Erica Haude. “I know that it helps energize the players to have such an involved, loud and supportive crowd.” The Lady Jays defeated Southwestern College 85-51. “I think our game against Southwestern was just a culmination of all the hard work and time we have put into this season. To see it all come together like that was really special,” said senior Janelle Rust. “We took care of business in the conference tournament and

Photo by Vance Frick

Above:

Tabor’s men’s and women’s basketball teams pose with their championship banners after winning the KCAC tournament.

the team is so excited to be headed to nationals. The Lady Jays received the number eight seed and will play number one seed Northwestern College from Orange City, Iowa in the first round of the NAIA Division II Women’s Basket-

ball National Championship in Sioux City, Iowa Thursday, March 13 at 1:45 p.m. The men’s basketball team defeated the Sterling College Warriors 97-90 in overtime. Tabor was led by Freshman Lance Carter who com-

pleted the game with 42 points, 17 rebounds and four assists. The Bluejays started out with a 9-3 lead but fell behind for most of the first half. The score at the end of the first half was 46-39 with Sterling in the lead.

The game began to make a change after senior Marc Hopkinson shot a three with less than eight minutes left. The nerve-racking intensity was felt by everyone in the arena when Sterling increased their lead to three with only 25 seconds remaining in the game. Senior Nick Sauer then tied the score with a threepoint shot, sending fans into an uproar of excitement and the game into overtime. “After such a hardfought second half, that game-tying shot to force overtime brought me back to my Tabor student days,” said Director of Admissions Lee Waldron. “The energy and emotion in the arena were palpable.” Tabor took an early lead in overtime and maintained it for a win. The Tabor College men’s basketball team (20-12 overall record) will play Indiana University Southeast (25-4 overall record) on Thursday March 13 in the NAIA Division II Men’s National Championship Tournament in Point Lookout, Mo. at 5:45 p.m.

New coaches hired in soccer, swimming, cross-country Becky Bryan

Reporter

In the recent months Tabor has announced three new coaches. These coaches are Ian Thompson, women’s soccer; Nathan Duell, men’s and women’s swimming and Eric Schwab, men’s and women’s cross-country. Previously, the women’s soccer team shared their coach with the men. “This will be great because we will have a coach who will have more time for us,” said junior Jessica Renzelman, soccer player. Thompson, who graduated from Tabor in 2006, made a significant mark during his time on campus. He earned All-Conference honors for his play in goal, was a two-time AllAcademic selection and was also named his team’s most inspirational and most improved player. “I think his personality fits in with our team,” said Renzelman. “He takes our program seriously but he also has a pretty good sense of humor.”

Duell, men’s and women’s swimming coach, came from Goshen, Ind., where he heard of Tabor through a Mennonite connection. Duell swam at Wheaton College, where he started his now 20-year coaching career after graduating. He is currently working on scheduling next year’s meets and recruiting. There have been two signees already, and 30 questionnaires have been filled out online, which Duell said is encouraging for him. Tabor men’s swimming is the only option for athletes who want to attend college in Kansas and Kansas University offers the only other women’s program in the state. Duell said he is communicating to students the unique benefits that Tabor has to offer. At the end of February, Tabor also announced a new cross-country coach. Eric Schwab, a native of Nowata, Okla., graduated from Austin College where he finished 12th in the marathon at the 1989 NAIA

Photos by Courtney Reed

Above:

Ian Thompson (left), a Tabor graduate, returns to coach women’s soccer. Nathan Duell (right) brings 20 years of coaching experience to Tabor’s premier swimming team.

Outdoor Track and Field National Championships. Schwab spent the past 20 years as head cross-country and track and field coach at Fresno Pacific University in Fresno, Calif.

“Schwab is a high caliber coach and he brings a degree of experience and excellence that is exactly what the program needs,” said junior Joel Allen, track and field athlete. “He knows

how to recruit to a private Christian MB college, and his track record with his athletes is more than excellent at Fresno Pacific University.”


SPORTS 7

March 12, 2014

Softball looks to continue early success

Tabor baseball improves record to 11-5 Janelle Rust

Reporter

said Massey. “We’ve really Janelle Rust The Tabor baseball team pulled together and finished has been on the road for the Reporter strong against some good majority of their season thus The Tabor College softball teams.” far, posting some big wins “We’ll need that team against ranked opponents. team has had a strong start Twice this season the Jays to their 2014 season as they chemistry and effort to be in the top of the conference.” have traveled to 5th-ranked have posted a record of 8-3. As conference season is Oklahoma City University, Due to the long and harsh approaching quickly, the walking away with a 2-1 rewinter that the Midwest has Lady Jays have set the bar cord. In the first game, Tabeen experiencing, they bor crushed OKCU 11-1. high for their season. have had a number of games Another strong team Ta“Our team goals for this canceled or postponed due bor has faced is 6th-ranked season are to ultimately win to snow. York College, with whom conference, which is very The Lady Jays started out they split the two games. doable,” said Massey. “But their season going undefeated Tabor will get some more overall we’d like to beat the in the month of February, getshots at them coming up, ting wins against Langston top three teams in the con- with some of the games beUniversity, Central Christian ference, KW (Kansas Wes- ing played in Hillsboro. leyan), Friends and Bethany, College and York College. Other wins for the Jays So far in March the com- at least once, if not sweep have been Morningside Colpetition has been tough, but them.” Dallas Christian ColTabor will continue their lege, the Lady Jays have continlege and St. Edward’s. ued to improve and com- busy spring schedule as they Competing against good pete with some top teams. travel to Tucson, Ariz. to opponents this early in the Earlier this month, they compete in the Tucson Invisplit with NCAA Division tational March 17-19. There II Newman University, as they will face some new freshman Marilee Burge competition as they play two Jared Janzen pitched a great game to re- teams from North Dakota, Editor-in-Chief main unbeaten this year at one from Canada and three After the first three tenothers. the mound. nis meets of the season, Before the softball seaTabor’s preseason schedboth Tabor’s men’s and son began, the KCAC softule has not been easy, but women’s teams stand at a ball coaches voted on the senior outfielder Sarah record of 1-2. All-KCAC preseason team. Massey knows it will pre“The athletes on both pare the team for conference Four Tabor players were teams are working hard and named to the team: Burge, play. it shows in their continual freshman first baseman Ara“(Preseason) has defiimprovement,” said coach selly Vargas, Massey and senitely been helpful so far in John Ruder. nior catcher Katie Henning. preparing for conference,” Several challenges have faced the tennis team this seaTrack athletes compete at nationals son. Due to inclement weathSeveral athletes from Daugherty who finished 7th er, they have had only four Tabor competed at the in the finals of the men’s practices outdoors so far. Another obstacle is that NAIA Indoor Track and 1000 meter run and was recthis year’s team is very Field National Champi- ognized as an All-American. young. Five of the nine onships in Geneva, Ohio, “Being All-American was players on the men’s team March 6-8. my goal from the beginning are freshmen. The men’s 4x800 meter of the year,” said Daugherty. “There is a big jump relay team finished 17th “But it doesn’t change what between high school and and Alex Grier finished my goal is in running, which collegiate tennis, and there 20th in the 200 meter dash. is to run my best for God are technical and tactical The best performance whether it’s first or last or adjustments necessary to came from junior Garrett anywhere in between.” be successful,” said Ruder.

year will serve the Jays well as they head into conference play later in March. “Playing tough competition early really shows us where we’re at as a team early on,” said senior outfielder Grant Silva. “We all know if we want to accomplish our goal of going to the World Series we’re going to have to beat some tough teams.” The Bluejays have had players get individual honors from the KCAC. The first Bluejay to earn an honor was sophomore pitcher Jacob Webb, who pitched the 11-1 Oklahoma City win. Junior Mustain was also named pitcher of the week recently, after leading Tabor to their second win over OKCU. For the year Mustain has compiled a 2-1 record while opponents are hitting just .145 off him.

Even though the season is just getting into full swing, there have already been a number of highlights for the team. One big highlight was beating Oklahoma City, a team that is one of the powerhouses of NAIA baseball, said Silva. In addition, there have been some great individual performances and overall strong offense that the team is excited about. “Some of the highlights have been some of the great pitching performances from Webb and Mustain against some really good teams,” said senior pitcher Alex Mann. “When our offense is rolling, that’s a whole highlight reel in itself.” “However, I think our best highlights are still to come,” said Mann.

Tennis teams look to improve throughout season “This will be a year of development.” Despite their inexperience, Ruder believes the teams will still be competitive. In recent practices they have been focusing on serves, doubles play and attacking groundstrokes. Their first meet was Feb. 15 against Newman University. The men’s team swept the competition with a score of 9-0. Meanwhile, the women’s team struggled and ended with a loss of 0-9. The teams traveled to Nebraska for their next two match-ups Feb. 28 and March 1. The men fell to Doane College with a score of 1-8. They fared better the next day against Concordia University but still came away with a loss of 4-5. Doane also defeated the Tabor women’s team, 4-5. However, the Lady Jays

came back the next day and secured a win against Concordia, 6-3. Tabor had two home meets scheduled last week but both were canceled. They faced Central Christian College on Tuesday, March 11. Results from this meet were unavailable at press time. Ruder is optimistic about the teams’ performance for the rest of the season. “We have a chance to finish in the top four and qualify for the tournament,” said Ruder. “However, we must continue to improve and play well to make that happen.” The tennis teams will have their next meet at 3 p.m. March 26 against Oklahoma Baptist University here in Hillsboro.

Intramurals popular with athletes and non-athletes alike Becky Bryan Reporter

Tabor has a high percentage of students who participate in athletics, and people who aren’t involved in sports can often feel left out. The school does have an alternative that gives students who aren’t involved in sports on campus the opportunity to stay active. Tabor offers five intramural sports and is trying is trying to add dodgeball, said Joe Wuest, men’s resident director and intramural coordinator. “Intramurals have been growing in numbers the last several years,” said Wuest. “We had a record 26 teams sign up for three-on-three basketball during interterm.”

Wuest said the most popular sports are flag football and five-on-five basketball. “Intramurals have been a great opportunity for me since I no longer play basketball at Tabor,” said Kendra Flaming, junior. “It’s been really fun to still be able to play some sports and get to enjoy playing with a team again.” Indoor soccer is taking place currently. “It is the only sport that allows the participation of Tabor athletes who play the same sport,” said Wuest. Another incentive for competing in intramurals is the prize awarded to the winning team. “Winners of each sport get t-shirts as a prize, and they get to submit their own designs,” said Wuest.

Flaming said she has won all three of the sports that have been played so far this year and is currently playing indoor soccer and looking forward to five-on-five basketball. “I would love to have more female teams sign up as we just barely have enough for each sport,” said Wuest. He encourages feedback and says he is always looking for ways to improve intramurals. The final sport of the year is five-on-five basketball. Sign-ups for this will begin after spring break. “Intramurals provides another avenue for students to build lasting relationships,” said Wuest. “It is also a way for non-athletes to participate in competitive sports.”

Above:

Photo by Courtney Reed

Michel Herszenhaut dribbles past a defender while Taylor Janzen chases after him during an intramural soccer game.


Open Mic Night

SAB hosts annual event with a great turn out Features, pg 4-5

CAMPUS LIFE 8

theview@tabor.edu

‘Cafe’ Changes

See what is new and improved about the Tabor Cafetieria News, pg 2

Reporter Have you ever wished you had a butler? Someone to take care of all those menial tasks? Multicultural Student Union offered a solution to that by hosting Butler for Hire Thursday, March 6 at Java Jays. MSU auctioned off about 35 Tabor men to offer their time to serve their “master.” Jonathan Guiterrez, Emery Schroeder, Drew Pankratz, Ben Schmidt, Zach Trostel and Josh Wiebe were a handful of the butlers sold during the event. About a dozen football players were also auctioned off to fulfill their community service requirement for football. “Helping others is something I always grew up with,” said Michael Wager, president of MSU. “Where I’m from we always volunteered our time to anyone that needed our services.” MSU put on a similar fundraiser five or six years ago. This year MSU brought it back due to requests from the community. If you needed help with any kind of task, MSU provided a way so that you wouldn’t need to lift a finger. MSU hired Clint Siebel to oversee the event with his 40 years of auctioneer-

Campus Life, pg 8

Issue 1

Kelsey Unruh

Photos by Zach Bissell

Welcome Back

Left: Jake Schenk sits at his desk thinking about several different things that are happening around campus as well as what God is doing. Right: Erica Haude takes a break from helping students to enjoy some company. Both Schenk and Haude are Tabor Grads that have come back to give back to the Tabor community.

Two major positions have recently been filled this year including Student Success Counselor and Director of Campus Ministries. Both positions were filled with Tabor College graduates. Erica Haude There is a new face in the Student Success & Career Services Office. Erica Haude is Tabor’s new Student Success Counselor. She is the supervisor of Andrea Batista, oversees students on academic probation and works on accommodations for students with disabilities. She also does counseling on a referral basis. She has ample experience for her position. After graduating from Tabor in 2006 she went to Denver Seminary to get her Masters in counseling, which she received in 2010. She has worked

March 12, 2014

New Women’s Choral group on campus Reporter

One of the new additions to the Tabor College curriculum this year is Concerto Bella Voche, the women’s chorale that is directed by new coming professor Janie Brokenicky. “It’s Italian for ‘a collection of beautiful voices,’” said Brokenicky. “Women’s chorale before was a very universal name and you’d hear it and think it could be anyone’s choir. Concerto Bella Voche will, after a while, become a familiar name for Tabor and help give the group identity.” Brokenicky joined the Tabor music department after applying for Assistant Professor of Choral Music at the request of Dr. Brad Vogel. “I’m thrilled to have Janie here,” said Vogel. “When the position opened, I ran into her at the National Association of Teachers of Singing and I talked to her and asked her to ap-

ply. There were 30 applicants.” One of the reasons Brokenicky was picked for the position was because of her previous work records with other chorale groups. “Getting the group re-established was the primary goal,” said Vogel. “The goal over 3 years is to have 40 voices in women’s choral. Janie is very good, and has a track record of building good chorale programs. She’s the perfect person for the position.” Brokenicky is looking forward to what the school year will bring. “I’m excited for the girls to have such a strong variety in musical performances,” said Brokenicky. “We will get to perform on our own at the Thanksgiving concert and we are touring, but we also get to sing The Messiah with the concert choir. I never got these opportunities in college, so I’m excited for all of these opportunities for the girls.”

ing experience. Siebel has been and auctioneer since 1972. He is also Executive Director at the Hillsboro Development Corp and students return to key staff roles has served onFormer the college’s Ben Schmidt Reporter11 advancement staff for years. Bids began at $1 for one Student Senate sets up hour of service, $3 for two new campaign Zach Bissell hours and $5 for three hours. Editor-in-chief Butler for Hire was a huge success. Michael WaSee SENATE, pg 2 ger said that the fundraiser raised more than $350. Proceeds went to MSU to help Freshman Michael Beye wonders who will purchase him as Clint Siebel prepares See STAFF, pgto 2 start the bidding. sponsor later events. Some of the 35 butlers were bought byEach their feledition of the Tabor View will be put on Facebook as well as extra material and contests Keep others an eye on the page for photo contests throughout the low students, and rest of this year. were sold to faculty members. Marlene Fast, alumni director, hired nine butlers, Aleen Ratzlaff, communications professor, hired five and Norman Schmidt, science professor, bought two. “Once you get started and your hand goes up you just have to keep going up,” said Fast. The gentlemen Freshman Josh Wiebe watches with amusement she hired will be painting while Clint Siebel auctions him off to the student body. fences, sweeping her garage and cleaning her car. “It was a fun atmosphere,” said Fast. She thought more faculty should have attended to support the cause and get cheap labor. Since the event was such a success, MSU plans to host the event again next year. as a youth pastor for First Mennonite Brethren in Wichita and for the last two years at a residential treatment center. While praying for God’s guidance she received an e-mail from Directo of Admissions Lee Waldron and Vice President of Athletics and Enrollment Management Rusty Allen. She felt like God was telling her not to say no and accepted the job. She feels called to work with people who are, as she says, “on the fringes.” She loves being at Tabor and getting to counsel. Riding her bike in the snow and chasing a possum out of a mod are among the memories Haude has of her time at Tabor. She also remembers being undefeated in conference while she played during basketball season. You could most likely find her and her husband at sporting events at Tabor. Haude’s office is in the Student Success & Career Services

Office in the library. As she says, “I want to get to know people. I want to hear their story.” So go and visit her in her office or find her at a football game, she’d love to get to know you.

Jake Schenk You may have seen Jake Schenk around campus and wondered what he does. Schenk is our new Director of Campus Ministries. In this position it is his job to organize the chapels, oversee small group, and get to know and minister to students. Schenk graduated from Tabor with a dual degree in Physical Education and Bible in 2006. After graduating he coached football. Two years at Tabor and Two at Greenville College Illinois, but he always felt called to sports and ministry. As he says, “God gave me football as something to enjoy while He prepared

Student Senate is planning to help students even more this year than in previous years. They are looking to start a “Tabor Proud Campaign.”

“Tabor Proud is a fundraising effort to raise money for students who experience a family crisis during the year” said Senate President Mike Klaassen. Mission statement for the new

Photos by Courtney Reed

Senior Elizabeth Janssen makes a bid for a butler.

Brave New Works festival

2014-2015 resident assistants announced

Next year’s list of RAs was announced March 3. The Student Life office is still in the process of assigning them to floors. Women’s RAs Beth Nesser Mallory Zuercher Lauren Wall Catherine Christie Courtney Reed Kat Wells Laurie Daniel Brooke Vandever Celeste Worthy Allie Jost

See some photos from last weeks craft fair

September 19, 2012

MSU auctions students into service Chelsea McWhirt

Arts and Crafts Fair Photos

Men’s RAs Ben Nafe Brandon Johnson Trevor Morris David Friesen Garrett Nickkel Tyler Guerrero Logan Whitney Emery Schroeder Edgar Trejo Pat Reilly David Nelson Keith Francis Jesse Allen

Junior Rachel Wedel, freshman Heather Loewen, and sophomore Olivia Kliewer discuss plans for their play during Tabor’s first-annual Brave New Works festival. The event began Friday night, Feb. 28 and lasted through Saturday night, March 1.

Junior Cheyenne Derksen makes a dramatic gesture as she and her team plot out their play.

Exhaustion begins to set in for sophomore Michael Wager, junior Katie Bair, and junior Andrea Acker. Participants had only 24 hours to create an original play from scratch, which meant that some students pulled all-nighters. Photos by Courtney Reed.

March 12, 2014  

Read about upcoming spring break trips, student interns, last week's KCAC basketball championships and much more in this this month's issue...

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