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TEXAS SOCIET Y OF ARCHITECTS | AIA ANNUAL reporT


3 2 0 0 9 PRE SIDE N T 4 ME MB E RSH IP 5 FIN A N CIA L S 6 L E A DE RSH IP 7 COM MI T T E E S & TA Sk FO RCE S 8 AWA RDS 10 T ExAS AR CH IT E CT S CO MMIT T E E 11 A DVO CA CY 12 MEMB E R RE SO URCE S 14 T ExAS ARCH IT E CT URA L FO UN DAT IO N 17 E xE CUT I VE VICE PRE SIDE N T & STA FF

Mission Statement: The Texas Society of Architects|AIA is the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sustainable environments.


T HE T SA VISIO N By 2012, TSA will be: » the principle resource for creative legislative initiatives that advance the profession, the industry and sustainability; » among the top 35 trade association or professional society PACs in Texas; » leading the collaboration of Texas’ 17 AIA chapters to grow membership; » sustaining its annual convention and trade show; » financially strong by growing designated reserves; » an established resource for members; » leading the collaboration of all stakeholders in creating safe, beautiful, sustainable, built environments; » and a place where lifelong friendships are made and strengthened.


The poWer oF The Texas Society of Architects|AIA began 2009 celebrating its 70th anniversary. We faced unprecedented economic times, and yet we also saw leadership opportunity as we moved into a new year and decade. Financially, a decision made over 10 years ago to provide for a designated reserve fund proved to be sound and invaluable. Given the economic downturn, the Finance Committee established more frequent meetings and priorities in budget reductions—reducing expenses without reducing member services. The 81st Texas Legislative Session provided unique challenges and opportunities. With an increased focus on government affairs, we provided workshops for our chapter leadership to better understand the importance of becoming active at the grassroots level with local representatives. The Government Affairs Steering Committee also focused on educating the Board and membership on the issues facing our Society, as well as promoting legislation on sustainable and livable communities. Defensively, TSA faced practice overlap and the repeal of “Qualifications-Based Selection” on publicly funded professional services contracts. In 2009, a significant focus for the Board was a new Strategic Plan. A three-year action plan was initiated, developed, and reviewed at each Board meeting, with final adoption occurring at the October meeting in Houston. A new Mission Statement was developed to better reflect our Society and its purpose: “The Texas Society of Architects|AIA is the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sustainable environments.” The Strategic Plan will serve as a roadmap for our committees and leadership. An initiative of the Texas Architectural Foundation, the Texas Consortium for Sustainability made great strides in 2009. By year’s end its leaders had developed TAF’s first grant application, Texas 8: Pilot Affordable Housing Delivery System, and immediately began raising funds. As president, it has been a privilege to serve with the volunteers and leaders of our organization this past year, especially during such uncertain times. The strength of our Society is in its members and our profession.

biLL reeveS, AiA 2009 TSA preSiDeNT

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“The strength of our Society is in its members and our profession.” -bill reeves, AiA


Membership* in TSA grew .07 percent in 2009. TSA represents 7.7 percent of the AIA’s total membership of 83,500.

TS A M eMberShip by cAT egor y 20 0 7

20 0 8

2009

Architects

4275

4464

4534

Associates

1398

1468

1384

475

476

496

6148

6408

6414

Students

163

147

145

Allieds

176

175

179

Emeritus Total

TS A M eMberShip* 20 0 4-20 0 9 2004 5,298 2005 5,523 2006 5,768 2007 6,148 2008 6,408 2009 6,414 *architect, associate, and emeritus


The poWer oF Philip Johnson once declared Texas his favorite country. Judging by TSA’s financials in 2009, especially when compared with the extreme challenges faced by other AIA components, Texas was indeed distinct. While significant numbers of our members faced difficult economic circumstances, our aggregate membership grew slightly (by 0.7 percent). The TSA Board, Executive Committee, Finance Committee, and staff monitored income and expenses carefully throughout the year. With approximately $55,000 in expense reductions instituted early in the year, TSA finished 2009 with net revenue. In October 2009, the Board approved the proposed 2010 budget of just over $2.5 million, approximately $126,000 smaller than the 2009 budget. Based on available research, economic trend data from the AIA office, data from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, anecdotal reports from our own members and those in the AIA’s other single-state regions, the Board approved a budget that assumes, most notably, a four percent net loss of membership in 2010. These continue to be challenging times, but if recent data are at all indicative of the coming business climate, Texas will remain comparatively strong and among the best places for architects to be.

AS S eTS 2 00 9 Operating Checking

25,349.97

Restricted Reserves

840,294.72

Unrestricted Reserves

735,246.79

Total Checking/Savings

4,240.87 1,605,132.35

Total Accounts Receivable

17,710.96

Total Other Current Assets

38,116.93

Total Current Assets Total Fixed Assets Total Other Assets Total Assets

1,660,960.24 25,321.79 1,840.61 1,688,122.64

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L i Ab i L i Ti eS & eQ UiT y Total Accounts Payable

0

Total Other Current Liabilities

0

Total Current Liabilities

388,345.30

Total Liabilities

388,345.30

Fund Balance

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1,133,385.20

Net Income

166,392.14

Total Equity

1,299,777.34

Total Liabilities & Equity

1,688,122.64

Source: TSA Statement of Financial Position for Year 2009 (unaudited).

While many AiA state components struggled during 2009, TSA membership grew, and the Society finished the year with net revenue.


William Reeves, President; Heather McKinney, FAIA, President-elect; Craig Reynolds, FAIA, Vice President-Advocacy Commission; Sandra Dennehy, Vice President-Member Services Commission; Adán Alvarez, Jr., Vice President-Practice Commission; Val Glitsch, FAIA, Vice President-Outreach Commission; Lonnie Hoogeboom, Secretary; Daniel S. Hart, Treasurer; Jeffery Potter, AIA Senior Regional Director; Gabriel Durand-Hollis, FAIA, AIA Regional Director; Dr. Ikhlas Sabouni, Assoc. AIA, Educator Member Director; Gail Thomas, Ph.D., Hon. TSA, Public Member Director; Brian Griggs, Regional Associates Director; Arthur Calcaterra, Assoc. AIA, Associate Member Director CHAPTER DIRECTORS Steven Ellinger, Abilene; H. Dan Patterson, Amarillo; Jacqueline Dodson, Austin; Timothy Donathen, Brazos; Jay Porterfield, Corpus Christi; Jennifer Workman, Dallas; Hector De Santiago, El Paso; Tommy Stewart, Fort Worth; Andy MacPhillimy, Houston; Frank Key, Lower Rio Grande Valley; Stacey Mincey, Lubbock; Dewayne Manning, Northeast Texas; Charles John, San Antonio; David Goodell, Southeast Texas; David Wright, Waco; Barbara Hughes, Assoc. AIA, West Texas; Ralph Perkins, Wichita Falls; David Lancaster, Hon. AIA, TSA Executive Vice President (ex-officio) The 81st Texas Legislative Session and the challenging economic environment were primary focal points for 2009. In addition to quarterly Board meetings, both the finance and executive committees conducted monthly conference calls to closely monitor the economic environment.

Wi N T er boAr D M eeTiNg J A N. 2 3 - 2 4 , A u S T I N

The Board engaged in a discussion with two state-level elected officials about key issues facing the Texas Legislature during the 81st session. The Board approved legislative issues to be carried forward during this session as presented by the Government Affairs Steering Committee. Discussion also focused on the Strategic Planning Steering Group’s efforts, with the goal to have a new TSA three-year Strategic Plan ready for approval in October.

S p r iNg boA r D M eeTi Ng A P R I L 1 7 - 1 8 , DA L L A S

AIA Dallas’ Center for Architecture was the site for the April Board meeting. The Society’s leadership heard from Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts Susan Combs, who discussed economic stability in Texas. Leaders held a lively discussion on the proposed AIA resolutions and Bylaws amendments. The Board approved motions revising its Surplus Revenue Policy; beta testing of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and a TSA blog; and elected the Board representative to the 2009 Nominating Committee.

S U MM er boA rD M eeTiNg

J u Ly 2 4 - 2 5 , C H I C A G O, I L L . Board members met with leaders from AIA Illinois and AIA Chicago, which underscored the commonality of issues many components face and the different approaches to solutions. Board discussion focused on elements of the AIA Component Performance Criteria, advocacy efforts, the 2010 budget development, and the proposed TSA mission and vision statements.

F AL L boA rD M eeTiNg O C T. 2 2 , H O u S T O N

The October meeting was held in conjunction with TSA’s 70th Annual Convention. The Board approved the 2010 Budget, elected three directors to the Texas Architectural Foundation, and adopted a new TSA 2010-2012 Strategic Plan, with its revised mission statement. Members engaged in a dynamic discussion regarding sustainable building code standards in relation to the development of an international green construction code. The preliminary TSA position statement was returned to the committees for reevaluation and subsequent submission to the Board for approval.


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Driven by the Society’s Mission Statement and Strategic Plan, the TSA Board of Directors oversees and directs the work of committees and task forces throughout the year. Dedicated volunteers engage in moving the organization forward and provide time, talent, and leadership necessary to support a relevant and thriving professional community of Texas architects. Committee chairs and Board members are listed on the TSA Web site, texasarchitect.org.

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hi gh L i ghT S The Society is organized into five commissions: Advocacy, Member Services, Practice, Operations, and Outreach. Within the commissions, 19 committees and task forces worked on your behalf in 2009 to achieve TSA’s mission. Below are a few highlights from 2009. Please note other sections of this report where programs and activities of other committees are emphasized. Three committees, Continuing Education, Convention, and Convention Futures, collaborated to bring members and related professionals together in Houston for the Society’s 70th Annual Convention and Design Products & Ideas Expo. The Fellowship Committee celebrated a record 17 new AIA Fellows from Texas. The Radio and New Media Committee closed in on 500 episodes of The Shape of Texas (the number of episodes is currently 494). The Building Information Modeling Task Force raised awareness regarding the use of BIM by Texas architectural firms. The Strategic Plan Steering Group and Board of Directors wrapped up 16-months’ work with the launch of a new Strategic Plan in October. The Plan is a three-year guidance tool for the Society designed around five Critical Success Factors: » Enhance the potential for members’ professional development and maximize learning and fellowship opportunities. » Be a champion of research; serve as a facilitator between practice and the academy to create applied research that advances the profession. » Influence the passage of laws and regulations that impact the profession. » Increase member involvement in TSA. » Raise awareness that “Good Design Makes a Difference” and how architects add value to the built environment and their communities.

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The Strategic Plan Steering Group identified the following core values during its deliberations and discussions: » Integrity, Competence, Collaboration/Consensus Building, Innovation, and Education/Knowledge Sharing. View the entire Strategic Plan online at texasarchitect.org (click on Publications).

With a focus on the future, TSA launched a new Strategic Plan and redefined its mission as “the voice for Texas architecture.”


T S A M E DA L F O R L I F E T I M E AC H I E V E M E N T I N H O N O R O F L L E W E L Ly N W. P I T T S FA I A Carolyn S. Peterson, FAIA, Ford, Powell & Carson Architects and Planners, San Antonio T S A A R C H I T E C T u R E F I R M AWA R D Page Southerland Page, Austin/Houston/Dallas T S A AWA R D F O R y O u N G P R O F E S S I O N A L A C H I E V E M E N T I N H O N O R O F W I L L I A M W. C A u D I L L FA I A Paul A. Bielamowicz, AIA, Page Southerland Page, Austin T S A AWA R D F O R C O M M u N I T y S E R V I C E I N H O N O R O F J A M E S D. P F L u G E R FA I A Craig Reynolds, FAIA, Brown Reynolds Watford Architects, Dallas T S A AWA R D F O R O u T S TA N D I N G E D u C AT I O N A L C O N T R I B u T I O N S I N H O N O R O F E D WA R D R O M I E N I E C FA I A Sue Ann Pemberton-Haugh, FAIA, University of Texas at San Antonio T S A AWA R D F O R E x C E L L E N C E I N T H E P R O M O T I O N O F A R C H I T E C T u R E T H R O u G H T H E M E D I A I N H O N O R O F J O H N G. F L O W E R S H O N O R A R y A I A Marcel Quimby, FAIA; Dennis Stacy, FAIA; Willis Winters, FAIA (TRANSFORMATIONS:The Architects, Buildings & Events That Shaped Dallas Architecture); Lawrence Holdren Connolly, AIA, Austin T S A A S S O C I AT E M E M B E R O F T H E y E A R Tiffany Robinson Long, AIA, Marmon Mok, San Antonio T S A A S S O C I AT E M E N T O R S H I P AWA R D Gary Dunn, AIA, Houston T S A C I TAT I O N S O F H O N O R Dallas Parks and Recreation Department and the National Audubon Society, Dallas; San Antonio Botanical Society and San Antonio Botanical Garden; Artisans: Legge Lewis Legge, Austin (Murray Legge, Deborah Lewis, Andrea Legge); Havel Ruck Projects, Houston (Dan Havel, Dean Ruck) T S A H O N O R A Ry M E M B E R S H I P S Paul B. Barwick, ASLA, Boerne; Bill Lively, Dallas; Juan R. Lopez, AICP, Edinburg; Stephen Sharpe, Austin T S A D E S I G N AWA R D S DFW International Terminal D by Corgan Associates, HKS, and HNTB; Elements by Buchanan Architecture; 1400 South Congress by Dick Clark Architecture; House in the Garden by Cunningham Architects; ImageNet Houston by Elliott + Associates Architects; Light & Sie Art Gallery by Laguarda Low Architects; Linda Pace Foundation by Poteet Architects; Long Gallery Carport & Parking Plaza by Dillon Kyle Architecture; Museo Alameda by Jackson & Ryan Architects; SAMA Brown Asian Art Wing by Overland Partners Architects; uT Center for Brainhealth by HKS; and Wolfe Den by MJ Neal Architects T S A S T u D I O AWA R D S Extreme Birding by Morris Architects; Flow City/Valencia by Hernan Molina; Kurdistan Transformational School by SHW Group; Lift: Home by Bart Shaw, AIA; Light Modulation by Nicholas Richardson; Museo Nacional de Textiles del Peru by Jeremy Olbrys; Sorensen Bridge by Brave/Architecture; and yarauvi: A Necropolis in the Dead Sea by Mir贸 Rivera Architects T S A 2 5 - y E A R AWA R D Margarite B. Parker Chapel, 1966, designed by Ford Powell & Carson


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For the ďŹ rst time, the Medal for Lifetime Achievement was awarded to a woman, carolyn peterson, FAiA, the fortythird recipient of the Society’s highest honor.


The economy took a toll on the Texas Architects Committee (TAC) fund-raising, but TAC still led the nation’s AIA components in dollars raised and percentage of members participating. TAC received $129,319 in contributions in 2009. While all the personal contributions that TAC receives are appreciated and used to promote and protect the business of architecture, a special acknowledgement is due to the 241 Century Club members who contributed at least $100 during the year and to the 182 Silver Century ($250-$499), 52 Gold Century ($500-$999), and 18 Platinum Century ($1000+) donors. TSA also recognized the extra effort of the Abilene, Amarillo, Brazos, Corpus Christi, Fort Worth, Lubbock, and Wichita Falls chapters who met or exceeded their goal.

p L ATiNUM A ND goLD c eNTU r y cL U b Me Mb e r S P L AT I N u M C E N T u R y C L u B M E M B E R S ( $ 1 , 0 0 0 A N D M O R E ) AuSTIN Thomas Oehler BRAZOS Timothy Donathen; John Greer, FAIA DALLAS Nunzio DeSantis, FAIA; Ralph Hawkins, FAIA; Todd Howard; Gary Keep; David Lind; Mark Watford, FAIA FORT WORTH Bruce Carlson; Randy Gideon, FAIA; Eric Hahnfeld; Chris Huckabee; Alan Magee; Tommy Stewart HOuSTON Gary Blanton; Lonnie Hoogeboom NORTHEAST TExAS Alan Roberts SAN ANTOINO Bill Reeves WEST TExAS Dan Hart G O L D C E N T u Ry C L u B M E M B E R S ( $ 5 0 0 - $ 9 9 9 ) ABILENE Rick Weatherl AMARILLO Thomas Lavin AuSTIN Richard Burnright; Tommy Cowan, FAIA; Randy Fromberg; Heather McKinney, FAIA BRAZOS Elton Abbott; Charlie Burris; Andrew Hawkins CORPuS CHRISTI Charles Anastos; Jack Turner; Bill Wilson, FAIA DALLAS Wayne Barger; Jim Cober; Duncan Fulton, FAIA; Ron Harwick; Kerry Hogue; Stephen Hulsey; Rick Myers; Dan Noble, FAIA; Craig Reynolds, FAIA; Marjorie Simmons; John Swope; Mark Wolf EL PASO Mervin Moore FORT WORTH Charles Nixon HOuSTON Daniel Barnum, FAIA; David Calkins; Jeffrey Choyce; Jim Furr, FAIA; Mark Lam; Michael Morton; Richard Munson; Calvin Powitzky; Perry Seeberger; Allen Swift LRGV Rudy Gomez LuBBOCK Mary Crites; Elizabeth Lonngren; Mike Moss NORTHEAST TExAS Mike Butler; Brice Davis SAN ANTONIO Michael Conrad; Debra Dockery; Ted Flato, FAIA; Kent Niemann SOuTHEAST TExAS Philip Long WICHITA FALLS Dick Bundy; Jackie Lebow; Troy Secord

TA c T rUST eeS 2009 ExECuTIVE TRuSTEES Mike Butler; Mary Crites, Chair; Eric Hahnfeld; Roy Lowey-Ball; Brian McFarlane; Martha Seng, FAIA 2 0 0 9 A DV I S O Ry T Ru S T E E S Mary Bartlett; Alan Bell; Paul Bonnette; Diana Bravo-Gonzalez; Charlie Burris; Mike Butler; Bruce Carlson; Robert Colburn; David Collins; Tommy Cowan, FAIA; Fred Dalbin; Betsy del Monte; Jim Doche, FAIA; Brian Eason; Elizabeth Feldman; Barry Hand; Robert Hanley; Chris Hudson; Barbara Hughes; Kurt Hull; Willie Jordan; Gary Keep; Ted Kollaja; Donald Kubala; Dohn LaBiche; David Lind; Alan Magee; Tim McClarty; Stacey Mincey; Mike Moran; Glenda Ramsey; Charles Reagan; Perry Seeberger; Albert Soto; Tommy Stewart; Darrell Vickers; James Walker; Mark Wolf


The poWer oF “Keep Austin Weird” was more than just a bumper sticker phrase in 2009, at least as far as the Texas Legislature was concerned. Flipflopping from sessions past, the Senate was cantankerous while the House unusually genteel. There was more fighting between the two chambers than between the two parties. There were both wins and losses, but overall, TSA took care of the things that needed protecting while advancing a reputation for being a leading voice for sustainability.

Th e S o c i eT y’S M A J or 20 0 9 LegiSL AT iv e Ac c o Mp L i ShM eNT S iNcLUD eD : » Confirming that the Statute of Repose is not trumped by the (legal) Doctrine of Proportionate Responsibility…that “’10 years means 10 years”—and a design professional’s liability can’t be extended; » Amending the Certificate of Merit statute to broaden the number of actions that require a Certificate of Merit to be filed in a lawsuit against an architect; » Helping highlight the need of increased funding for Courthouse Preservation; » Turning back another attempted amendment to the Engineering Practice Act that would have increased scope of practice to allow engineers to design any building without the involvement of an architect; » Defeating an attempt to license construction managers that was overly broad, and could have created market confusion as to when architects are required, much less the relative competence or desirability of using an architect compared with a construction manager.

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in 2009, the Texas Architects committee led the nation’s AiA components in dollars raised and percentage of members participating.


c oNveNT ioN The Society’s 70th Annual Convention in Houston drew nearly 3,000 people from across the state, region, and nation to explore the theme of POWER. With contributions from keynote speakers Drs. Lowell Catlett (amazing humor with a nod to statistics) and Scott Tinker (myth-busting information about the global energy scene), more than 100 presenters involved in 57 professional development sessions, a wonderfully selected and managed group of 13 tours, and numerous opportunities to connect, network, share, and be inspired, the 2009 Convention met all of its goals.

c oM M UNicAT ioNS The power of online media continues to enhance the Texas Society of Architects’ ability to communicate with members, bringing timely information more rapidly to people across the state. While the use of new media communications is likely to expand even further in the future, the Society remains committed to its premier print publication, Texas Architect. Texas archiTecT Through improvements in pre-press technology and efficient operations, Texas Architect finished 2009 in good financial health despite the looming economic downturn. At the request of the TSA Board, staff cut some operating expenses at mid-year, but without any negative impact to TA’s high standards for graphic qualities and editorial content. The readership of Texas Architect was slightly above 12,000 at year-end, according to circulation figures reported to the U.S. Postal Service. The online version of Texas Architect changed formats in September 2009 and allows members full access to the editorial content exactly as it appears in print. The number of unique online readers ranged between 3,200 (Nov/Dec edition) and 6,000 (Sept/Oct edition), according to figures compiled via a site meter. The same meter indicated that most readers accessed the online editions through search engines, referrals from other viewers, and the direct link from TSA’s Web site. The shape of Texas In 2009, The Shape of Texas radio series released Volume 19 of episodes, including features on historic houses in Bastrop, the Bosque County Courthouse in Meridian, San Elizario Church near El Paso, and the TeePee Motel in Wharton. The award-winning TSOT is produced through an arrangement between TSA and the South Texas Public Broadcasting System. For a list of public radio stations that broadcast The Shape of Texas, go to the TSA Web site (texasarchitect.org). Each twominute episode is written for a general audience to raise public awareness of the value of good design and the benefits of a thoughtfully designed built environment. In addition, TSOT podcasts are available for download on the TSA Web site, and others are syndicated in iTunes.


The poWer oF checKseT Since its conversion from a print publication to an e-newsletter in 2008, interest in TSA’s bimonthly CheckSet continues to grow. In June 2009, CheckSet had 18,135 views, its highest number for the year, compared with 8,900 in 2008. Throughout 2009, CheckSet was accessed more than 80,000 times, with each issue averaging more than 13,800 “hits” via the Web site. T s a B roa D c a s T Each month, staff compiles time-sensitive news briefs in an electronic format that is broadcast to members via e-mail. Through this timely communication platform, the membership is alerted to impending deadlines, issues and activities. The items include embedded links that take readers directly to online sources for more information. T e x a s a r c h i T e c T. o r G The Web site continues to be the hub of the Society’s online presence, serving as a source of information for members and the general public alike. Popular pages include The Shape of Texas episodes, the Texas Architect online edition, and JobLink, an online repository for resumes and job postings. In 2009, there were nearly 17 million visitors to the TSA Web site, which averaged more than 45,800 hits per day. SOCIAL MEDIA In 2009, the organization expanded its efforts to communicate with members through emerging forms of social media and has achieved much success with these interactive tools. Efforts include: » Facebook: TSA’s Facebook page has more than 400 members and has become a place to share ideas and news. » Twitter: Last year the Society launched its Twitter feed, which has grown to more than 850 followers. Daily “tweets” cover the latest activity updates, as well as news and commentary about the profession. » TSA Blog: April 2009 marked the official launch of TSA’s blog, which had 1,246 page views in September. The blog has become another avenue for communication on a variety of topics and gives readers an opportunity to respond with thoughts and opinions.

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The power of online media continues to enhance TSA’s ability to communicate with members, bringing timely information more rapidly to people across the state.


2009 was a period of growth and transition for the Texas Architectural Foundation (TAF), the charitable organization founded by TSA in 1952. TAF’s first full-time staff member, Administrative Director Emily Speight, was hired to maintain and grow TAF’s 57-year-old scholarship program and to assist the Board in fulfilling TAF’s expanded goals to support sustainability and community initiatives for good planning and design. The Texas Consortium for Sustainability, a committee of TAF and a collaboration among TAF, TSA, and Texas’ eight accredited schools of architecture, also took off with efforts culminating in the Texas 8: Pilot Affordable Housing Delivery System proposal. Once funded, this project will design, build, and monitor affordable, sustainable housing in multiple regions across the state. TAF’s power to make a difference in the lives of tomorrow’s architecture leaders was evident again as TAF awarded $52,000 in scholarships for the 2009-2010 academic year, despite the investment losses everyone suffered at the end of 2008 and early in 2009. These scholarships are made possible with endowments and donations from local AIA chapters, related organizations, and individuals who are dedicated to supporting future architects. TAF’s total funds for fiscal year-end (June 30, 2009) were $1,370,238. TAF received $83,330 in total contributions. The Foundation’s investments have done well this year, keeping pace with market indices, while TAF pursues a conservative strategy with diversified assets. Thank you to the sponsors of the 2009 TAF Tour des Monuments in Houston, the participants of the 2009 TAF Firm Match Program, scholarship donors, and individuals and firms who support TAF’s programs through the TAF Tomorrow fund. As my term as President comes to an end, I look forward to continuing to serve on the Board and know that TAF will continue to strengthen and grow under the leadership of President David Watkins, FAIA, and the 2010 Board of Directors.

DAviD richTer, FAiA 2009 TAF preSiDeNT 2 009 T A F boArD oF D irecTor S David Watkins, FAIA, Vice President; Richard Bundy, Treasurer; Jan Blackmon, FAIA, Secretary; Julius Gribou; Joe Mashburn; John Nyfeler, FAIA; Elaine Petrus, Hon. TSA; Ron Skaggs, FAIA; Bill Reeves; Heather McKinney, FAIA; David Lancaster, Hon. AIA

2 009 SchoLA rShip r ecipieN T S Prairie View A&M university: Gary Fondel, Deborah Hernandez Rice university: School of Architecture Texas A&M university: Tina Chanady, Francisco Farias, Kaushik Ganesh, Matthew Marshall, Kimberly Nordhoff Texas Tech university: Richard Greyson Geer, Brandon Hartley, Bradley Stephen Latson, Gibran Villalobos university of Houston: Athena Kali Patira university of Texas at Arlington: James Brandon Burris, Irving Gatica, Michael Robert Smoldt university of Texas at Austin: Adam Word Gates, Jason Paul Haskins, Alexis Aaron Kurland, Matthew Z. Leach, Kayla Michele Lyssy, Tahinee M. Felix Marin, Melynn Mayfield, Constance Claire Rosado, Li Tong, Katherine Ann Tucker, Julie Williams university of Texas at San Antonio: George Anthony Barrera, Jeffery Olivares, Anderson Prize team

“Receiving the AIA Brazos Scholarship was a huge blessing in my life. It is a great honor to be recognized by such a respected institution, and I am very grateful for the support that the AIA gives to students. It is this type of generosity that I hope to embody throughout my professional career.”

Matt Marshall Graduate Student Texas A&M University College of Architecture

Kayla Lyssy Senior University of Texas, Austin School of Architecture

“Architecture school at UT has created more opportunities for me than I ever imagined possible when I began as a freshman four years ago. I have been able to enjoy these experiences and make the most of my education thanks largely to support from people back home, including AIA Abilene.”


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TAF’s power to make a difference was evident as the foundation awarded $52,000 in scholarships in 2009.


Texas Society of Architects | AIA 816 Congress • Ste. 970 • Austin, TX 78701 texasarchitect.org • 512.478.7386


The poWer oF Despite a horrific economy in 2009, TSA increased its total membership… defying the national trend; had a well-attended, highly lauded Annual Convention & Expo in Houston; increased advertising circulation and advertising revenues, while cutting expenses significantly throughout the year; finished on the positive side of the financial ledger; and enjoyed overall success in dealing with the 81st Texas Legislature. I’m not aware of another AIA state component making a similar claim. These accomplishments were only possible because of our membership, volunteer leaders, and dedicated staff.

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community progress (shown clockwise from top left: Kraig Becker, Gayle Pickering, Suzette Lipford, Jeanette Allison, Julie Pizzo, Noelle Heinze, Leslie Williams, Joe McGuire, Stephen Sharpe, Tammie Baumann, Coti Bullard, Yvonne Castillo, and David Lancaster. Not pictured: Andrea Exter) We are facing what will almost certainly be another extremely challenging year in 2010, but we will not only survive, we will flourish and continue being a national leader in working to make things better for architects and architecture. Please let us know how we can be of service and benefit to you.

DAviD LANcASTer, hoN. AiA TSA execUTive vice preSiDeNT

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2009 was a powerful year for the Society, which celebrated its 70th Anniversary, increased its membership, and launched a new Strategic plan.


T he T exA S ecoN oM y While Texas fared better than the national economy in 2008, the state could not avoid the impact of global decline in 2009. Between October 2008 and November 2009 the state lost a total of 279,000 jobs. In November of 2009, the state’s unemployment rate stood at 8%, significantly less the national average of 10%, but far above the rate of 5.3% of twelve months earlier. One of the hardest hit sectors was construction. Construction unemployment shot up over 16% by the end of 2009. Private sector construction was hit hard by the recession, along with continued declines in housing and weakness in institutional construction. Public works could not offset the declines in other sectors. The latest signs are that the Texas economy is bottoming out. Further, the Texas recovery is expected to come sooner and stronger than national expectations. The Texas Leading Index created by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas has risen since March of 2009; the Texas Business Cycle index has stabilized; and job growth has shown signs of returning. Personal income and retail sales suggest a recovery. While Texas has not completely escaped the worst recession since World War II, it has weathered the storm better than the rest of the country. Texas was one of the last states to enter the downturn, and it will be one of the first to recover. Construction activity will follow suit. In 2010, housing will most certainly start its recovery. Public works construction will be bolstered by Stimulus funds. Institutional construction will post conservatively positive. Private construction activity is the only sector that will not participate in the recovery in 2010. The private sector will wait another year, primarily to absorb excess space and address financial complications, before it fully participates in a recovery.


Texas Society of Architects 2009 Annual Report  

Mission Statement: The Texas Society of Architects|AIA is the voice for Texas architecture, supporting the creation of safe, beautiful, sust...

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