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PLAN 1 ENTRY POND/CISTERN 2 GARAGE 3 LAUNDRY 4 MECHANICAL 5 WC 6 MUDROOM 7 KITCHEN 8 DINING 9 LIVING 10 ENTRY 11 BATHROOM 12 BEDROOM 13 PLAYROOM 14 EXTERIOR COURTYARD 15 MASTER BATHROOM 16 MASTER BEDROOM 17 MASTER CLOSET 18 OUTDOOR FIREPLACE 19 POOL

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The approach used here is an interesting foil to Bjarke Ingels’ concept of hedonistic sustainability. The philosophy posits that sustainable actions can increase quality of life and overturns the medicinal assumption that going green needs to hurt for it to be properly effective. The recent built work of

It is clear that the reasons for such impressive features originate from technical fascination, not an overriding concern for sustainability. Bjarke Ingels Group makes good on this approach, but the idea is still recreationally didactic and therefore intrusive in the context of a private residence. What is most powerfully captured in the Cascading Creek House is the sleek concealment of mechanics, literally under the hood of a gorgeous space. Any hint of systems intrigue is either mysteriously decadent — as in the case of the initial giant scupper — or suppressed entirely, a kind of stealth green that innovates while maintaining the desired level of comfort. Over 90 years ago, Le Corbusier wrote, “A house is a machine for living in.” What kind of machine do you want? Jack Murphy, Assoc. AIA, lives in Austin and practices architecture at Baldridge Architects.

5/6 2014

Texas Architect 59

Texas Architect May/June 2014: Water  

Exceptional craft and a relationship with water characterize all of the projects in this issue. Water is a scarce commodity in Texas, and wi...

Texas Architect May/June 2014: Water  

Exceptional craft and a relationship with water characterize all of the projects in this issue. Water is a scarce commodity in Texas, and wi...