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Studio Awards An elaborate swimming pool with an ecological filter, a minimalist house in the desert, a modular mirco-house, and a wall of coat hangers — this year’s Texas Society of Architects Studio Awards recognized four creative concepts. The jury

2013 Studio Awards

consisted of New York-based Paul Lewis, AIA, of LTL Architects, Amale Andraos of WORKac, Lyn Rice, AIA, of Rice+Lipka Architects, and Gordon Kipping of G TECTS. They convened at the Center for Architecture in Manhattan on July 18 and selected the winners from a pool of 59 entries. Presented here are all four winners from this year’s program, which recognizes excellence in unbuilt, often strictly conceptual, architectural design as well as studio projects by professors and students.

Austin Aquatic Center Runa Workshop, Austin

The Austin Aquatic Center integrates landscape and architecture to create a water management system with real ecological benefits. With its proposed location along the shores of Austin’s Lady Bird Lake, Runa Workshop’s design rethinks an existing seven-acre park at the intersection of Cesar Chavez Street and North Lamar Boulevard. The plan integrates water capturing and cleaning systems (bioswales, biofiltration, water storage, and water harvesting) to help supply the

“This [pool] goes beyond leisurely recreation and is responsible.” pool. The 40,000-sf building manages the water and seamlessly works within layers of green space and pedestrian paths. Early site analysis of both water runoff and pedestrian traffic informed the building’s form, the orientation of the pool, circulation nodes, and view corridors. The proposal provides a diversity of experiences on the site with little hint of the complicated system below. Juror Gordon Kipping appreciated the sustainable elements of the project. “Pools are great, but they use a lot of resources,” he said. “This proposal goes beyond leisurely recreation and is responsible. It is also a nice layering of the architecture and landscape.” Lyn Rice noted the success of the form. “They are slicing the ground plane and pulling it up as a strategy,” he said. “It works.”

40 Texas Architect

11/12 2013


Texas Architect November/December 2013: Campus Architecture