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Previous spread Price, Hightower, Gamble, and Lantz are pictured at St. Edward’s University. Right Hightower is shown in his HiWorks office. He likes that the flexibility of running his own firm allows him to seek out creative and strategic partnerships.

Brantley Hightower, AIA, spent much of his early career asking the question, How is architecture relevant? The founder of HiWorks in San Antonio, Hightower knew in the second grade that

“Every day a business grows, it becomes less flexible, so I am enjoying this phase and trying to take advantage of as many opportunities as possible.” he wanted to be an architect, and his career followed a charted course: After earning his undergraduate degree, he worked at established firms like Perkins+Will in Chicago and Lake|Flato Architects before heading to Princeton University to earn his master’s degree. But the day came when that early question demanded his full attention, and he took the plunge, opening his own firm in late 2012. “Making architecture more accessible became part of the business plan,” he said. “How can we serve larger portions of the population and be understood to be more than just the designers of expensive, pretty things?” Part of that effort is not only to take on a diversity of projects for a wide range of clients but also to continually explore how the public relates to the built environment. As an adjunct professor at Trinity University in San Antonio, Hightower

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has developed a course to help non-architecture students learn about the design of the places in which they live, work, and play. He also explores the impact of architecture through writing; Hightower’s byline can be seen in Texas Architect as well as online at the Rivard Report, an independent journal in San Antonio. His first book, “The Courthouses of Central Texas” (University of Texas Press), will arrive in 2015. Hightower noted that planning for his professional future is like trying to predict what his children will be like when they grow up. He can guide and prepare, but essentially it’s unknowable where the work will take him. “Every day a business grows, it becomes less flexible, so I am enjoying this phase and trying to take advantage of as many opportunities as possible,” he said. For Sarah Gamble, partner at Austin’s GO collaborative, being in control of her time and focus is definitely liberating. But starting her own business was more than just the appealing idea of a flexible schedule. “I wanted to learn how to start a business,” she said. “I’ve found that entrepreneurship is challenging and that it has a huge learning curve.” Gamble’s passion is rooted in a commitment to service and volunteerism. After an internship in Guatemala, she earned her masters’ degree at

Texas Architect November/December 2013: Campus Architecture  

This issue explores the value of architectural diversity and creative responses to context. The discussion begins with a series on the three...

Texas Architect November/December 2013: Campus Architecture  

This issue explores the value of architectural diversity and creative responses to context. The discussion begins with a series on the three...