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Front & Center Building Together by Catherine Gavin, Editor

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orking closely with Larry Paul Fuller over the course of the last six weeks, I have come to appreciate the satisfying collaboration that goes into building the project that is Texas Architect. Expanding upon Stephen Sharpe’s legacy, Larry has guided this magazine in a new direction that embraces a larger design dialogue. With this transformation has come a new focus on the impact of architecture in shaping communities and influencing people’s daily lives. A successful effort was made to broaden the discussion and illustrate the importance of the public impact of projects such as the Lubbock Arts District, while also consistently featuring more conventionally spectacular design such as the Asia House in Houston. As an illuminating record of architecture in Texas, the content has evolved and will continue to present architecture within the context of allied fields and considerations such as urban design, landscape architecture, historic preservation, planning, and sustainability. This richer dialogue hinges upon critical analysis of the role of design in the built environment and its ability to connect people to places and to one another. The effort to build Texas Architect requires not only the contribution of the committees, writers, and staff dedicated to this publication, but also that of architects throughout the state. As Larry Paul Fuller departs to refocus on his prior

commitments, I thank him for his help with my transition, his gracious guidance, his sense of humor, and his fundamental contribution to this issue. Larry has been a welcome presence and influence at 500 Chicon over the last ten months,

With this transformation has come a new focus on the impact of architecture in shaping communities and influencing people’s daily lives. and the Society is deeply grateful for his valuable and generous contribution. We look forward to continuing his good work. we have included a collection of houses that illustrates the extensive collaboration necessary for an effective relationship between architect and client. This dialogue results in homes that are true to the ideas and desires of the people who inhabit them. Distinct lifestyles and budgets are fully expressed in the house that grew around a kitchen; in a modest, transportable home; a playful pool house; a house that embraces a tree; and in a collection of homes that resolved an important need for urban housing. In this edition,

New housing in the Jubilee Park neighborhood of Dallas was developed with community input during six collaborative design meetings.

1/2 2013

Texas Architect 5


Texas Architect - Jan/Feb 2013: Residential Design