Page 33

Open House

The Hodge Orr Residence by Michael Malone, AIA Project Hodge Orr Residence, Dallas Client Douglas Orr and Nancy Hodge Architect David W George, FAIA Design team David George, FAIA; James Wheeler, AIA; Jessica Stewart Lendvay; Beth Steinbauer; Jack Cook III; John Lendvay Contractor Richard N. Smith Consultants David Keller Construction (manager); Wheeler International (project architect); Jessica Lendvay Architect (interiors/lighting); Hooper Group Consultants (georechnical); Cook Structural Engineers (structural); Frymire Services (mechanical); M A Landscape Specialists (landscape); John Lendvay Landscape (landscape); Armor Security (security/alarm) Photographer Thomas McConnell

T

he Dallas neighborhood of Preston Hollow is home to a number of well-designed and often very significant houses by nationally recognized architects — Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Meier, Steven Holl, and Edward Larrabee Barnes, to name a few. The neighborhood also has a considerable representation of local talent (including Max Levy, Russell Buchanan, Mark Wellen, Svend Fruit, Frank Welch, and Howard Meyer). The larger, rambling lots — often skirted by creeks and sheltered by mature trees — seem appropriate for truly purposeful architectural design, perhaps more so than the sites in more typical suburban neighborhoods close by. The majority of Preston Hollow residents still opt for large, more traditional houses. But with the varied topography, even they seem to fit in better on the larger lots. It is a pattern for houses in this area to overwhelm their sites, dominating them and distracting attention from the beautiful trees and landforms (and the neighbors) with a sense of monumentality. But not all of them. The Hodge Orr House, designed by David Webster George, FAIA, in collaboration with Jim Wheeler, AIA, is a reminder that a well-planned house can be both gracious and architecturally arresting, while still embodying principles of restraint and blending into the features of the site. These two architects — in tandem with a totally involved client who valued and insisted on simplicity — were able to follow their ideas to completion, fully integrating with the site. The house is so carefully tucked in under the canopy of existing oak trees, you can drive by and almost miss the house, unless you are looking for it. But close observation demands your consideration and rewards it with thoughtful lessons on how to make a beautiful thing using a restrained basket of tricks. It begins with the great

7/8 2012

Texas Architect 31

Texas Architect July/Aug 2012: Healthcare & Wellness  

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public heal...

Texas Architect July/Aug 2012: Healthcare & Wellness  

In this edition about design for healthcare and wellness, we look at good buildings of both types. But the role of architects in public heal...