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TAMARA CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

1

ULI HINES COMPETITION 2 Week Design Competition RHINO, PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR

HOP TOWN

BREWING A NEW COMMUNITY THAT EDUCATES, HEALS AND ACTIVATES “Wabi-Sabi” is best defined as the beauty of everything imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. The scheme, therefore, embraces the current scenario of decay within Chicago’s industrial corridor. It explores the aesthetic value of the structures and materials surrounding the site, paying homage to its manufacturing identity in order to maintain a sense of familiarity with the site while providing the users with ample flexibility to use and reinvent new infill spaces.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

Millions  

The proposal’s central design element is “Nature’s Brew”; a complex that draws residents and visitors alike to a one-of-a-kind recreational park. This refreshing interactive space functions as a new addition in the exiting warehouse skeleton. It provides supporting amenities like: Boost Startup Incubator which accelerates regional startups, Makers’ Place which prototypes and test new industrial interventions, and Nature’s Brewery which hosts craft brewing. These amenities will support the booming redevelopment on Goose Island and the new residential infill in Hop Town. In addition, Hop Town will be home to a unique urban wetland that has been selectively designed with plants that can re-mediate heavy metal pollutants that may be found on or near the site. The marsh will attract native insects and birds that will complement the neighboring Great Lake Observatory. Based on surrounding development plans and phasing, a market for high end housing is formed. The Hop Town Hotel will serve as an attraction and a revenue generator for the project. The hotel and the housing have both been designed as staggered masses to create various levels of interaction for a healthy community. The staggered form is also in sync the riverfront steps that allow people to access the water during both high and low tides. To better serve the residents, street improvements have been made. In addition there is a green loop trail that connects the “natural” soft paths near the marsh to the rest of Hop Town, Goose Island and the 606. $150

$110

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$69

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Cash Flow (Million $)

$133

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Phase 1: Acquire all land to begin Bioremediation, convert Fleet Management warehouse to Nature’s Brew in site A

Development Costs

Net Revenue Generated

($250)

UNLEVERAGED IRR 16%

($286) ($300)

0

Net Leveraged Cash flow (Profits)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Development Project Years

Complete Streets Shared Streets Bus Route Biking/ Pedestrian Trail Existing Commuter Route Bioswale

On Street Surface Lot Parking Garage

Phase 2: Develop residential, commercial & mixed use units to add economic value Multimodal Transportation

Varying parking strategies encourage a more walkable community IAL

606 TRAIL

RE S

ENTE

ID

& IAL ENT

C MER COM

MENT RTAIN TIO OVA NN HI

TEC EVE ND NT ME LOP

Phase 3: Complete Hop Town by developing high end residential units & Great Lake Bird Observatory

Responsive and interactive design with surrounding context

Key attractor points: people planet profit


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

27%

OF TOTAL UNITS ARE AFFORDABLE

1,500+

NEW JOB OPPORTUNITIES

1,400+ NEW RESIDENTS

In sum, Nature’s Brew re-envisions the use of the old industrial corridors that are now becoming an endangered architectural language. What was once underused and vacant real estate, is now an active, mixed use district that celebrates its manufacturing heritage. It has achieved the “Triple Bottom Line”, providing a space for the people that generates revenue and gives back to the planet.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

2

FALL 2016 GROUP PROJECT RHINO, ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP

SUPERBLOCK

POROSITY

DIVERSITY

RESILIENT POROSITY The ideal urban city is one that allows us to gain experiences in many different places, and with many different people. It is one that blurs the edges, rethinks the boundaries and easily allows us to go in and out of spaces. Resilient Porosity enhances the existing structure of a neighbourhood in Pittsburgh by providing a network of public spaces where people of different classes, races and interests can regularly mix. It provides the pattern for transitioning and dispersing the large scale commercial identity of East Liberty to its existing neighbourly community with decentralized functions.


DIVERSE TYPOLOGIES

TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

Micro Unit: Adaptable, Community Structured, Compact. Multi-functional options for lower income residents, college students, artists, and maker spaces.

Single Family Unit: Increases homeownership. Provides stability for the neighborhood. Allows renters to grow within the neighborhood through rent-to-own home options.

Adaptable Single Family Unit: Increases diversity by attracting wealthier residents. Adaptable functionality- Large Family to extended family, Micro Unit Social Space, Neighborhood Cafe/ Market. Anchors corners of clusters and micro unit social spaces.

Typical unit size: 593 sqft Total building floor area: 1,010 sqft Scheme infill:6%

Typical unit size: 715 sqft Total building floor area: 1,430 sqft Scheme infill: 9%

Row Houses: Affordable. Compact. Brings a cohesive design to the neighborhood that relates to Pittsburgh’s architectural identity.

Double-Entry Apartment: Centers activity in cluster. Shared common spaces on first floor can act as community gathering space.

Bar Apartment: Mixed used, Diverse options in apartment sizes to appeal to all renters. Provides good edge for clusters and larger social spaces.

Typical unit size: 2,400 sqft Total building floor area: 7,200 sqft Scheme infill: 6%

Typical unit size: 2,300 sqft Total building floor area: 4,600 sqft Scheme Infill: 3%

Typical unit size: 4,600 sqft Total building floor area: 23,000 sqft Scheme infill: 33 %

Corner Apartment: Anchor to super blocks and larger micro clusters, Bottom floor can be used as commercial or spacial spaces. Naturally forms an open plaza under pilotis.

Small Scale Commercial: A space for start-ups and smaller offices and retail.

Large Mixed Use Commercial: Diverse layout options structured around a shared parking lot. Rethinks the ‘Big Box’ typology and mall strips.

Typical unit size: 5,207 sqft Total building floor area: 20,828 sqft Scheme infill: 29%

Calculated with Large Mixed Use Commercial

Typical unit size: 14,913 Total building floor area: 50,076 sqft Scheme infill: 13%

Typical unit size: 1,315 sqft Total building floor area: 2,315 sqft Scheme infill: 1%


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

Urban Garden: Smaller outdoor areas foster community and sense of ownership. Some units should front the space to increase safety, awareness, and upkeep, while other units may back up to it to give a sense of intimacy and privacy. This typology works best with smaller building scales.

Informal Gathering: Cities and neighborhoods need flexibility to thrive. The medium scale green spaces allow community members to define the program within the space: tailgating, BBQ picnic, outdoor study room. This typology works best with smaller buildings fronting it.

Ball Courts & Plazas: A porous city can not support heavy masses without varying scales of open spaces. Larger open spaces must be programmed to support the culture and lifestyles of the neighborhood while also being programmed to attract regional visitors for economic vitality.

1.Zig zag minor roads within the clusters.

2 .Green spaces vary in sizes to form the porosity and support diverse building scale.

3.Public plaza at the corner of small blocks.

4. Shared parking along streets.

5.Single family homes located along streets for demand of parking.

6.Buildings vary in scale and use within the cluster.

7.Micro units cluster together to form a shared open space and cooperative community.

ORGANIZATIONAL RULES

8. Big box is broken down into small cluster of buildings.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

Ball court and community gathering space within microcluster.

Urban gardens within clusters provides community building experience and sense of ownership.

Plaza at the corner of the block provides a destination and anchors activity in the porous city design.

Location Section of Pen Avenue and Negley Plaza

Spatial Definition

Section through new medium scaled green space at New Pennley Place.

Ecology

Rethinking the “Big Box� typology and huge vacant parking lots: The new typology of Whole Foods is not just a grocery store but an urban plaza in itself which gradually merges with the rest of the neighbourhood. The various sections of Whole Foods are now individual stores connected by the street pattern and open spaces of the micro-cluster city design, thus reducing the overall footprint of the Whole Foods. The roof now is used for parking and a vegetable garden, hence providing more usable open space and removing the large on street parking that disrupts the porous city.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

3

Blurring Prison Boundaries

RANKED

WORST IN THE CARIBBEAN

9TH IN THE WORLD MOST POPULATED

379 INMATES/ CAPITA

Thesis Exploration

HOW CAN THE PRISON BEGIN TO INTERACT WITH THE OUTSIDE COMMUNITY? Existing in The Bahamas Future

HOW CAN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IMPACT SOCIETAL VIEWS ON THE PRISON SYSTEM? Architectural design reflects the identity of the user. If the project is to change societal views and attitudes towards prisoners then it must be open to changing the traditional typology of the prison.

WHAT ARE ALTERNATIVE WAYS TO FORMING BARRIERS?

RETHINKING PRISON TYPOLOGIES

Nassau, Bahamas. Blurring Prison Boundaries is a thesis exploration formed to challenge our views of contemporary prison designs and their purpose. Using Scandinavian prisons as a precedent and the research conducted by Jane Jacobs on boundaries, this thesis explores the impacts of an urban prison that integrates itself within a community rather than simply carving at its landscape. The more opportunities of physical or visual connections a prisoner is given, the lower his chances of recidivism. Is it possible to have a prison complex that also acts as a community space- allowing both to benefit? Can prisoners and community members interact daily and begin to form the necessary connections to gain acceptance and set them up for success upon being released? Programs that promote such interaction and success rates exist, but the isolated, designs of prisons do little to facilitate them.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

7’-0” 3’-6”

7’-0”

20’-0”

34’-6”

8’-6”

6’-0”

4’-0”

7’-0” 8’-6” 102’-0”


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

4

FALL 2014 GROUP PROJECT SKETCHUP & LUMION

PATTERNS OF MOVEMENT

Shenzhen, China. Preliminary design proposal for the Global Schindler Award Competition in collaboration with ETH Zurich. This project is an interactive urban design in which the central theme is the interface between different modes of horizontal and vertical mobility and their interplay with the built environment.

STUDY OF DELAYS

PROGRAM STUDY

POTENTIAL INTERVENTIONS

ANALYSIS OF COMFORTABLE WALKING AND BIKING DISTANCES

Urban planners today, focus on creating mixed used buildings that are stacked; what if we look at the design of city blocks and twist them up to form a layered city that is mixed both horizontally and vertically?


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

PROTOTYPE SCENARIO The city of Shenzhen is one of the world’s fastest growing cities. Over a 40 year span it has transformed from a small fishing village of 300,000 into a mega city of 10-15 million. As a result, it has experienced extreme levels of gentrification. The purpose of the competition was to form an urban design for one of the few remaining sites for development within the city. Project entries were to focus on the creation of interactive urban ensembles in which the central theme is the interface between different modes of horizontal and vertical mobility and their interplay with the built environment. Our response to the competition goals was to form a prototype that could be adapted throughout the city to solve the needs of the surrounding area. Currently, Sungang Quingshuihe (the site) is made up of dense urban villages that reflect the characteristics of the migrant workers of Shenzhen. In order to prevent an urban design that would result in further gentrification, we decided to rethink the city block and develop the users as well as the site. The prototype to be implemented reflects on the surrounding city blocks, twisting them and stacking them to create a mixed use building with interlocking programs. The migrant workers are able to enter the building, engage in spaces for learning and leisure, all while continuing their journey to work. This reflects the Chinese shops and game rooms that line the base of urban villages. Each prototype will be a reflection of the surrounding area, merging and diversifying the city block.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

5

FALL 2014 GROUP PROJECT SKETCHUP, RHINO& LUMION

THE RINGS OF SPRINGFIELD 2014 Symbiotic Cities International Design Ideas Competition Entry. An urban design prototype that seeks to transform cities into more resilient, climate adaptive, regenerative, symbiotic cities.

Which route would you take? The Rings of Springfield aim to regenerate abandoned industrial areas by introducing a modular structure that can be easily adapted to create occupiable spaces. Strategic placement of these sustainable cells will revive post-industrial areas throughout Springfield, while providing a green route for easy access of suburban areas into the city center. The cells: collect water from rain and humidity, harvest wind, solar, and kinetic energy, grow plants and crops, house and provide for several species of animals, provide human scale spaces, and provide technology for the site to be smart and self-operating. Unique percentages of these cells generate distinct characteristics of each site while optimizing adaptation throughout the rings.

The cells, inspired by beehives, are modular hexagons that can multiply and build upon each other to create different scales of spaces. The cells have various functions which create a mutualistic, symbiotic relationship with the ecosystem, such as harvesting clean energy. Like a beehive, these cells can attach to structures and begin to grow from them, providing life to desolate areas of the city. The cells will spread throughout the urban fabric to form the rings of Springfield.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


COMMUNITY CENTER. RIPLEY, TN.

LINK INDEPENDENCE: ENVISIONING CONNECTIONS 2040

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SPRING 2013

The Community Studio project of spring 2013 worked with the city of Independence Missouri to explore design ideas for the physical connection between the Courthouse Square and The National Frontier Trails Museum. Our goal was to create a pedestrian oriented city center that will promote an increase in the resident population. We worked alongside the city council, citizens and various landscape, engineer, planning and sustainability consultants to create a 25 year visionary plan for the City of Independence.

1ST PLACE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

The community members of Ripley Tennessee, along with a representative of Marvin Windows and Doors selected this project for a scholarship award based on its conceptual strength.

6

FALL 2011

This project provides a space of the younger community of Ripley Tennessee. After interviewing the needs of the community and conducting site and context analysis, I learned that Ripley lacked a space dedicated to their younger community. In response, I designed a center that caters to the needs of troubled adolescents. Space is dedicated to a live-in mentor, and after school program. The bottom floor has spaces that are open to the public, with a lounge, study area, and community space. Whilst the upper floor has a mentor suite and four dorm rooms with reading nooks for young adults needing temporary housing situations as they reevaluate and establish better lifestyles.

TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

The comprehensive plan is divided into four main sections: • Parks • Complete Streets • Transit and Parking • Housing

The complete visionary book can be found: http://issuu.com/t.maraariel/docs/link_ independence

COMMUNITY STUDIO- LIBRARIUM NOMINATION

As the liaison for the class I kept in close contact with Jennifer Clark, the Community Development Director, and Ann Smith-Tate, Economic Development Manager for the City of Independence, in order to ensure we met the needs and goals of the city.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

8

FALL 2013

A.

A. The Open Air Pistachio Museum & Cultural Park complements the historical site of Kolona and frames the waterfront. B. B. Pathways mimic those of the urban streets.

D. As proximity towards the town increases, so does density of the transitional green spaces, integrating the pull and merge of the countryside with Aegina. E. Roads continue onto the site to influence design by forming pathways and division of spaces.

D. E.

STUDY ABROAD IN GREECE

B.

C.

OPEN-AIR PISTACHIO MUSEUM & CULTURAL PARK OF AEGINA Aegina, home to the finest pistachios in the world and typical of the slow Mediterranean lifestyle acts as a permanent home to some and vacation site for many. When you arrive at the dock and step off of the ferry, one of the first things you notice is Kolona to the left of you and a large church to the right. But along the entire waterfront, connecting these two points there are no green spaces. In fact, if we look at the context of Aegina there are little to no organized green spaces that serve the community. For now there is only the large soccer field in front of the orphanage that acts as a barrier between the active waterfront and countryside. Inspired by the Mediterranean Museums of Olive that highlights the culture and technology of Greek olive production, I hope to create an outdoor green space for the town of Aegina that facilitates the future Cultural Center at the Kapodistrian Orphanage. An Open-air Pistachio Museum reflects on the lifestyles of many of the farmers of Aegina and provides a leisurely walk through pistachio fields that inform the viewer of harvesting techniques and the history of the tree. The design was influenced by looking at the urban landscape of the pistachio fields and the fabric of the town. It merges those together and blends it with the natural landscape of the country sides in order to provide a connection between the town and countryside. It will serve as the social gathering space of the town, becoming an iconic symbol for Aegina, embodying leisure, education, and sports on one site for the community. Cafes and local farmers markets located towards the northern and central parts of the site draw people in from the waterfront. The Pistachio Museum and fields of medium and dense trees also provide a space for leisure and relaxation, with quiet benches and beautiful views that look out to the fields, sea, and jogging paths defined by flora. The open field, basketball courts, sand pits, soccer field, playground, and yoga area all provide activity spaces for the Cultural Park. Natural vegetation will be used so that little to no maintenance will be required, while the materials reflect the natural landscape of Aegina and were chosen to accept the graffiti culture of Greece. This site provides a connection and blends the town of Aegina with the countryside. It is where tourists, locals from the core of the town, and from the outer town meet to gather for events, surrounding leisure, education and sports. It will also become the perfect site to host the Pistachio festival. Booths can be set up along the paths of the site and into the fields of the Museum, and tourists will be drawn from the waterfront, onto the site and up to the Cultural Center where they can learn more about Aegina and what it has to offer as an island focused on agriculture and healthy lifestyles.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

9

FOURTH YEAR REVIT & PHOTOSHOP

STRUCTURAL AXON GLUE LAMINATED WOODEN ARCH

LOAD BEARING WALLS

HVAC SUPPLY & RETURN DUCTS

JOURNEY TEMPLE

The concept of the journey knot is derived from the Buddhist infinity knot. It symbolizes the eternal cycle of life, and the infinite journey towards enlightenment, The circulation directs the user on an ascent towards the temple where enlightenment occurs. The user is then directed outside from the temple space to the mediation garden, where they exit without retracing their steps. The path and overall form was derived from existing site lines and its context within the community. Particular attention was given to the building systems & materiality.


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

DRURY UNIVERSITY DESIGN BUILD CLUB Led a design charrette for the new outdoor classroom at Boyd Elementary, and art panel installations for the annual Beaux Arts Ball fundraiser. Volunteers gained hands-on experience framing, pouring and stamping concrete while transforming the dark, unused space into a needed area for the local Title I elementary school.

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Marketing Coordinator

10


TAMARA A. CARTWRIGHT

DRURY UNIVERSITY & ABC EXTREME MAKEOVER

DRURY UNIVERSITY ART OF SPACE CLUB Transforming and activating existing spaces in the city of Springfield by utilizing common materials and simple construction methods.

Helped to construct a volunteer memorial in Cunningham Park following the 2011 Joplin tornado.

The tape web successfully engaged the local community and fully transformed one of the abandoned spaces on the downtown square, demonstrating the strength of art.

Constructed benches, laid concrete, and worked on the landscaping of the site.

THANK YOU!


Design Portfolio