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Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  1


Just Getting Warmed Up!

Red Lon of Two M 13W & Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up 300Z Grand Champion Female

Cowboy Up Bull Calf Champion and Bull Jackpot Champion

Red Rock of Spittleburn 101Y Reserve Champion Bull

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e r fo n th dup h tc nt i oun a W me d R ign al Re ay 12 s n co nnu turd , 20 0 h A Sa er 2 t b 40 to c O


MJT Angus cows bred to

Connealy Concensus 7229, Belvin Tres Marias Patrón 205, Belvin Panic Switch 2’11, LLB 114P Bando 571S, Geis Kodiak 53’07, 20/20 Touchdown 20X, Bar-E-L Wisecrack 246W, MJT Abe 271X, Duralta 307R Upward 100Y, MJT Kodiak 214Y, Minburn Upwards 43Y and DFCC 176W Sizzler 52Y

Concensus

Patrón

Sale Management:

Ted & Mina Serhienko Chris Poley 3-3342 Millar Ave Saskatoon, SK S7K 7G9 P :: 306-933-4200 F :: 306-934-0744 info@tbarc.com :: www.tbarc.com Ted’s Cell :: 306-221-2711 Chris’ Cell :: 306-220-5006

Panic Switch

Real time bidding available

Contact Jill Mader :: 403-990-9187

Mick & Debbie Trefiak

Kurt, Shannon, Matthew, Ryan & Casey Trefiak, Mark & Kristi LaBoucane RR 1 Edgerton, Alberta T0B 1K0 P :: 780-755-2224 F :: 780-755-2223 :: Cell :: 780-842-8835 mick@mjt.ca :: kurt@mjt.ca :: www.mjt.ca Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  3

Ranch located 14 miles east of Wainright and 11 miles north on range road 4-3


Table of Contents

Feature

Summer 2012 - Early Sale Issue

26

On Track... The Story of SooLine

33

T Bar Invitational Wrap Up

Shows 24

Saskatchewan Gold Show

47

Canadian Junior Angus Show

As In Every Issue

26

31 A Breeder’s... Veterinary Perspective 40 Certified Angus Beef 55 The Real World 65 Rates & Subscriptions Cover Photography By Kim Harder

66 The Final Word

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Red Soo Line On Target 9308

S: Red CG On Target 18T D: Red Soo Line Penny 7079 BW: -0.3 WW: 45 YW: 72 M: 13 TM: 35

Cresent Creek Emblazon 109X

S: Bronyx Emblazon 58T D: Crescent Creek Pride 27M BW: 4.8 WW: 49 YW: 82 M: 14 TM: 39

Box 85, Simpson, SK S0G 4M0 Rob Garner: 306-836-2035 Cell: 306-946-7946 Fax: 306-836-4440 www.nordallimousin.com Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  5


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Also Watch for our consignment to the

Eastern Canadian Extravaganza September 29, 2012 Uxbridge, ON

Locust Grove

~ Featuring fancy heifer calves from the heart of our 2012 crop by: • Mytty In Focus • Old Post • Emblazon • Royal On Time DRCC • Sandy Bar Advantage • S A V 004 Predominant • Bred Heifer by Bismarck

Erica 8Z

Sitz Dash x Emblazon Sells with her dam

Find these Leading Ladies at the

Autumn Angus Classic September 1, 2012 Hanover, ON

Locust Grove

New Location

Z Blackbird 11 Right Time

ilmo vantage x W Sandy Bar Ad

New Sale

New Sale

New Sale

Black Angus Female Sale

For pictures contact us after August 2nd.

Sunday Septembe r 30, 2012 1 Held at M:00 PM aple Line Farm

Maple Line Farm & Friends 3320 Bradburn Road, Blackstock, ON Consignors: Maple Line Farm Ian & Joy Rudkin 905-986-4113 Southview Farms Terry & Monica Ormiston 905-439-4235 | Windswept Acres Todd & Janet Moore 905-986-5018 Full Circle Farm Greg & Sue Watson 705-927-1332 | Hillsview Farm Doug & Tricia Hill 416-677-6291

Sale Management... T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd. | Ted & Mina Serhienko | Chris Poley 4 3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, SK S7K 7G9 | P: 306.933.4200 | F: 306.934.0744 | info@tbarc.com | www.tbarc.com Ted: 306.221.2711 | Chris: 306.220.5006 Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  8


October 6, 2012 5:00 PM Olds Cow Palace In conjunction with Olds Fall Classic

Sire: LLB Free Wheeler 268S Major Service sire on bred heifers and sire of elite heifer calves on offer

Black Magic 2011 high selling female at $26,250 to Boss Cattle Premier Angus Genetics, Nebraska Dam of Remitall F Odyssey 67X

Also On Offer: • Donor material two year old females with elite heifer calves • Herd building bred heifers • Elite show heifer calves

Sire: Cudlobe Yellowstone 80M Service Sire on feature two year old females and sire of feature show heifer prospects Richard Latimer 403.507.1122 Gary Latimer 403.507.1123 RR 4 Site 3 Box 16, Olds, Alberta T4H 1T8 www.remitall.ca • cattle@remitall.ca office: 403.556.2742 • fax: 403.556.2761 Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  9


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S A V Heavy Hitter

Southland Full Throttle 15R

2nd annual eastern Canadian extravaganza Saturday, September 29, 2012 at 1 PM in Uxbridge, ON Consigning 1 Heavy Hitter daughter and 7 Full Throttle daughters

Sitz Dash

SCC Retail Product

Enright farms & Guests Investing in the Future iii Saturday, October 14, 2012 at 1 PM in Renfrew, ON Consigning 1 Sitz Dash daughter and 1 Full Throttle daughter

12201 Torbram Rd., Caledon, ON L7C 2T4 Ph: 905.843.1236 Email: tullamore.angus@gmail.com

bred s r e f i e h all sale duct o r p l i a t e to r

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WILGOR 1R NETWORTH 5X Service Sire to many of the females on offer at Enright Farms & Guests Investing in the Future III Sale

Selling at Enright Farms & Guests Production Sale October 14 ● Renfrew, Ontario

Owner: Gordon McGibbon Ph: 450-562-6313 - Cell: 514-984-2983 Fax: 450-562-2479

JJZ 1L WORLDWIDE 095 4W Reserve Grand Champion Bull as a calf at the 2009 Toronto Royal Winter Fair

Manager: Michael Wilson Ph: 450-562-5112 - Cell: 514-919-9125 E-mail: wil-dorrangus@live.ca

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WLL 12Z Sired by Bushs Coach 510

1:00 p.m. - October 6, 2012 - Lucknow, ON

Selling in the Eastern Extravaganza sale along with a feature yearling by New Attraction & select heifers

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Dennis & Donna Bridge 1273 South Line RR 4 Kincardine, ON N2Z 2X5 P: 519-395-5010 F: 519-395-5011 bridged@hurontel.on.ca


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SAV

SAV

These ladies were flushed this spring. Watch for their progeny at the Touch of Class Sale and Agribition this fall.

Introducing

Bear Tooth

Date of Birth: February 18, 2012 Registration #: 1665472 Birth Weight: 79 lbs. EPDs

Red EKW Bear

Tooth 22Z

Red SSS Boomer 803B

Red SSS Soapy 542Y

Red Wildman Crossfire 512R

Sire: Red SSS Boomtown 260D

Dam: Red EKW Double Fire 708T

Red Bar-E-L Dynofire 127R

BW

-0.3

WW

+26

YW

+56

Milk

+17

TM

+30

Stay

+13

Built on the strengths of 4 outstanding Cow lines: Dynofire Lakima Soapy Highlass

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  16

Bear Tooth is a calf with a huge upside. From the top of his crest to the bottom of his hoof he is sound and correct. His pedigree is packed with Breed Legends. He has hip and hair. Watch the future of this young prospect as it unfolds.

Elmer K. Wiebe Box 212, Hague, SK S0K 1X0 P: (306) 225-5720 C: (306) 381-3691 Fax: (306) 225-5863


The $65,000 phenomenon who is poised to make his mark. His first service sells. Owned with L83 Lodoen Cattle Co., ND

Embryos by Sakic’s dam and the rare Rambo 502 on offer! The powerhouse U.S. National Reserve Champion Bull. His first service sells. Owned with Sunberry Valley Farms, AB

The U.S. Grand Champion Female was sourced at Six Mile by Christy Collins and Safari Cattle Co. OK. Do not miss your opportunity to find the one this year!

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Introducing Our 2 New Herdsires:

Red U-2 Strike Force 24Y owned with Robb Farms

Red U-2 Mama’s Boy 167X

Judge Fall Heifer e h T e B Sale You 2nd Monday of December Nilsson Brothers, Vermilion, AB

•  150 Heifers bred Red Angus for February 1st calving •  400 Heifers bred Red Angus for March/April calving •  50 Heifers bred Red Angus for May calving Feel free to stop by and have a look at the heifers and this year’s bull calves

Press Release 2011 Canadian Angus Association Auction Market of the Year Award Presented to VJV Auction Co. Ltd. June 13, 2011 CALGARY, AB — VJV Auction Co. Ltd. of Ponoka, AB has been chosen as the Canadian Angus Association’s 2011 Auction Market of the Year in recognition of their work promoting Angus and Angus cross cattle. Brian Good, Director of Field Services for the Canadian Angus Association, presented the award at the Livestock Markets Association of Canada annual convention on June 1. VJV is an umbrella for Foothills Livestock Auction of Stavely, AB and Dawson Creek Auction of Dawson Creek, BC. With peak months in the fall, the mart can run 8,000 head of cattle per week. Along with their regular sales, VJV was proud to be the first livestock auction to offer cattle over the Online Ringmen Internet Auctions. Catalogued and videoed cattle allow buyers to make choices based on age verification, health and feed from miles away. Blair and Ralph Vold along with Blair’s son Nanson operate the auction and promote Angus cattle, the Canadian Angus Association and its members year round. In 2011, VJV held four designated Angus calf sales that consistently sold high quality red and black Angus cattle. Since the mart’s inception in 1957, the Vold name has stayed consistent along with the family’s desire to sell beef cattle in the cattle capital of Canada. In the community, Blair and Ralph serve on numerous boards to promote the cattle industry. Their service to agriculture has been persistent throughout their career. The Auction Market of the Year was introduced in 2006 to recognize and honour those auction markets that work hard to promote Angus cattle. The first award was presented to Mankota Stockmen’s Weigh Co. at Mankota, Saskatchewan. The 2007 award was presented to B.C. Livestock Producers Co-op Williams Lake at Williams Lake, BC, the 2008 award was presented to Saskatoon Livestock Sales Ltd., the 2009 award was presented to Provost Livestock Exchange of Alberta and the 2010 award was presented to Assiniboia Auction Mart in Assiniboia, SK. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef organization. The Association represents 3,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herd Book and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed. Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  18

From L-R CAA General Manager Michael Latimer, CAA Director of Field Services Brian Good, Sharon Bergevin (wife of Rob), Ralph Vold (owner of VJV, Ponoka), Rob Bergevin (owner at VJV Stavely), & CAA President David Bolduc


Complete

Red Angus Dispersal By Private treaty

• Home Raised Herd from ai Sires • Super 2012 Calves by ‘Detour’ • Cows and heifers bred back to ‘Detour’

On Offer 45 Head of Red Angus Females by Private Treaty Selling Cows, bred heifers & heifer calves Brian McCarthy & Family

Box 467, Moosomin, SK S0G 3N0 Ph: 306-435-3590 :: Cell: 306-435-7527 bmccarthy@rfnow.com :: www.springcreeksimmentals.com Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  19


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Press Release Red Coat Cattle Feeders Inc. Awarded Western Feedlot of the Year June 20, 2012: for immediate release Lethbridge AB- Canadian Angus breeders gathered in Lethbridge, Alberta for the 2012 Canadian Angus National Convention. At the Convention Red Coat Cattle Feeders Inc. of Hazenmore, Saskatchewan were honoured with the Western Feedlot of the Year Award presented by the Canadian Angus Association. The idea of Red Coat was first brought to light in 1998 at a community gathering, and they never looked back. One million dollars was raised by the first board of directors. Fall 2000 marked the first head coming in to the feedlot. At that time a majority of the cattle were black hided. They started off with 10,000 head and a half section land base. Only four years later the feedlot expanded to 13,500 head and increased their land base drastically. In the beginning Red Coat found themselves with a 14 man board. The first president was Garth Dorgan, second president was Bob Switzer and the third president was Miles Anderson. On site is a manager’s residence currently occupied by Barry Boghean, holding this position since 2003. Today, the feedlot has a capacity of 18,500 head. Murray Linthicum is the president and there is a nine man board that meets every two months. The board consists of Tyler Huber acting as vice president, Harvey Boland as treasurer and Deb Verbrugge as Corporate Secretary. Directors on the board are Don Blake, Tyler McCuaig, Al Mulhern, Miles Anderson, Alvin Olsin and John Williamson. Typically the feedlot hires one employee per every 1000 head of cattle. Red Coat grows a small percentage of the forage that is being fed, but the majority of it is purchased. Almost all of the grain fed is also out sourced, depending on the year. Like almost all feedlots in Saskatchewan, they provide custom feeding for the cattle brought to Red Coat. The customization is based upon customer needs. Plans are made to accommodate each case scenario. They find that this way of feeding works for them and keeps the customers satisfied. When asked about the success of this feedlot president Murray Linthicum said “Strong management, a great board and a great staff is what has kept it all together. You cannot have these places without these people.” Congratulations to Red Coat Cattle Feeders Inc. Your hard work and dedication over the years has definitely paid off and the Canadian Angus Association proudly awards you for your efforts last year and for years to come. The Canadian Angus Association introduced the Feedlot of the Year award last year to recognize feedlots that promote Angus to their customers and that feed Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed tagged cattle. The award for 2010, recognized in 2011, was presented to High Ridge Feeders and Shannondale Farm. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents 3,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herd Book and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

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There is a reason we are the number one choice for so many breed leading operations. From business cards to farm signs, posters and sale catalogues;

we go that extra mile to make it happen!

As life gets busier you want a team pulling in the same direction.

Call us anytime to discuss your next project.

Bryan Kostiuk 306.934.9696

bryan@tbarc.com todayspublishing.com

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  23


OPEN DIVISION FEMALES HEIFER CALF 1. Eric Yewsuk, Wynyard, SK with Red U6 Audrey 31Z by Black Wheel Odyssey 117U 2. Ty Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Schwan Mystical Density 2Z by Cajun Density 9W HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Eric Yewsuk, Wynyard, SK with Red U6 Audrey 31Z by Black Wheel Odyssey 117U RESERVE HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Ty Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Schwan Mystical Density 2Z by Cajun Density 9W

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Lon of Two M 13W by Red Northline Rev 341R with her bull calf, Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut

YEARLING HEIFER Split 1 1. Alexis DeCorby, Rocanville, SK with S7R 77W Fern 50Y by Bar-E-L Wolfman 77W 2. John Hogberg, Langenburg, SK with BH Tibbie 2Y by HF High Roller 79R

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Martina Tibble, Swan River, MB with MVF Tibbie 25X by Sitz Upward 307R with her heifer calf, Swan Hills Tibbie 12Z by S A V Camaro 9272

Split 2 1. Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Eula 36Y by S Chisum 6175 2. Kodie Doetzel, Lipton, SK with Nu-Horizon Tibbie 101Y by S A V Bismarck 5682

HEIFER CALF 1. Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Annie K 35Z by Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P 2. Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 72Z by Red Koru Chateau 53U

JUNIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Alexis DeCorby, Rocanville, SK with S7R 77W Fern 50Y by Bar-E-L Wolfman 77W RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE John Hogberg, Langenburg, SK with BH Tibbie 2Y by HF High Roller 79R TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR 1. Martina Tibble, Swan River, MB with MVF Tibbie 25X by Sitz Upward 307R with her heifer calf, Swan Hills Tibbie 12Z by S A V Camaro 9272 MATURE COW/CALF PAIR 1. Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Lon of Two M 13W by Red Northline Rev 341R with her bull calf, Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Katie Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Stumpie 9R by Crescent Creek Alliance 29N with her bull calf, Crescent Creek Einstein 68Z by KG Smart One 9116

OWNED DIVISION

HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Annie K 35Z by Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Eastondale Annie K 30’10 by S A V 004 Traveler 5658 with her heifer calf, Crescent Creek Annie K 35Z by Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P

RESERVE HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 72Z by Red Koru Chateau 53U

CROSSBRED YEARLING HEIFER CLASS 1. Shane Roger, Balgonie, SK with LPF Silver by Angus x Simmental

YEARLING HEIFER 1. Shane Roger, Balgonie, SK with NRA Rosebud 49Y by Sitz Upward 307R 2. Austen Anderson, Swan River, MB with Anderson’s Tibbie 4Y by F A R Krugerrand 410H

CROSSBRED CHAMPION FEMALE Shane Roger, Balgonie, SK with LPF Silver by Angus x Simmental

JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Shane Roger, Balgonie, SK with NRA Rosebud 49Y by Sitz Upward 307R RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Austen Anderson, Swan River, MB with Anderson’s Tibbie 4Y by F A R Krugerrand 410H TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR 1. Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Eastondale Annie K 30’10 by S A V 004 Traveler 5658 with her heifer calf, Crescent Creek Annie K 35Z by Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P MATURE COW/CALF PAIR 1. Katie Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Stumpie 9R by Crescent Creek Alliance 29N with her bull calf, Crescent Creek Einstein 68Z by KG Smart One 9116 2. Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 51T by Red Moose Creek Glycerine 33R with her heifer calf, Red Koru Thelma 72Z by Red Koru Chateau 53U Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  24

BEST PAIR OF FEMALES 1. Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK BULLS BULL CALF 1. Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up 300Z by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut 26U 2. Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Gladiator 69Z by Red Soo Line Gladiator 5297 BULL CALF AND GRAND CHAMPION BULL Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up 300Z by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut 26U RESERVE BULL CALF AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION BULL Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Gladiator 69Z by Red Soo Line Gladiator 5297


FEMALES HEIFER CALF 1. J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with J Square S Tibbie 18Z by MJ Escalade 2. Ty Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Schwan Mystical Density 2Z by Cajun Density 9W CHAMPION HEIFER CALF J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with J Square S Tibbie 18Z by MJ Escalade RESERVE CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Ty Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Schwan Mystical Density 2Z by Cajun Density 9W YEARLING HEIFER Split 1 1. Section 7 Ranch, Rocanville, SK with S7R 77W Fern 50Y by Bar-E-L Wolfman 77W 2. Bar H Land & Cattle Co., Langenburg, SK with BH Evening Tinge 87Y by HF Done Deal 64T Split 2 1. Justamere Farms, Lloydminster, SK with Justamere 10277 Tiffany 203Y by Sitz Dash 10277 2. Shane Roger, Balgonie, SK with NRA Rosebud 49Y by Sitz Upward 307R Split 3 1. Crescent Creek Angus, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Eula 36Y by S Chisum 6175 2. Crescent Creek Angus, Goodeve, SK with Crescent Creek Margaret 11Y by Lookout Huck 53T

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wright Livestock, Melfort, SK with Red Lon of Two M 13W by Red Northline Rev 341R with her bull calf, Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE CHAMPION BULL Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wraz Red Angus, Wawota, SK with Red Rock of Spittalburn 101Y by Red RMJ Redman 1T

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Bar H Land & Cattle Co., Langenburg, SK with BH Evening Tinge 4X by HF Done Deal 64T with her heifer calf, BH Hope 2Z by BH Balancer 14X

MATURE BULL 1. Bar H Land & Cattle Co., Langenburg, SK with BH Balancer 14X by HF Bruin 96T 2. Clay Enterprises, Wapella, SK with Red Ter-Ron X-Factor 011X by Red Ter-Ron Reload 703T

BULLS BULL CALF 1. Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wrights Livestock, Melfort, SK with Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up 300Z by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut 26U 2. J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with J Square S Escalade 24Z by MJ Escalade 2W BULL CALF CHAMPION Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wrights Livestock, Melfort, SK with Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up 300Z by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut 26U RESERVE BULL CALF CHAMPION J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with J Square S Escalade 24Z by MJ Escalade 2W

JUNIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE CHAMPION FEMALE Justamere Farms, Lloydminster, SK with Justamere 10277 Tiffany 203Y by Sitz Dash 10277

YEARLING BULL 1. Justamere Farms Ltd., Lloydminster, SK with Justamere 422 Impact 244Y by EXARPAF 422 2. Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wraz Red Angus, Wawota, SK with Red Rock of Spittalburn 101Y by Red RMJ Redman 1T

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Section 7 Ranch, Rocanville, SK with S7R 77W Fern 50Y by Bar-E-L Wolfman 77W TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR 1. Bar H Land & Cattle Co., Langenburg, SK with BH Evening Tinge 4X by HF Done Deal 64T with her heifer calf, BH Hope 2Z by BH Balancer 14X 2. Wade Olynyk, Goodeve, SK with Eastondale Annie K 30’10 by S A V 004 Traveler 5658 with her heifer calf, Crescent Creek Annie K 35Z by Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P MATURE COW/CALF PAIR 1. Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wright Livestock, Melfort, SK with Red Lon of Two M 13W by Red Northline Rev 341R with her bull calf, Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut 2. J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with Greenbush Georgina 18U by S A V 004 Density 4336 with her heifer calf, J Square S Georgina 90Z by MJ Escalade 2W

JUNIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION BULL Justamere Farms Ltd., Lloydminster, SK with Justamere 422 Impact 244Y by EXARPAF 422

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  25

SENIOR CHAMPION BULL Bar H Land & Cattle Co., Langenburg, SK with BH Balancer 14X by HF Bruin 96T RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION BULL Clay Enterprises, Wapella, SK with Red Ter-Ron X-Factor 011X by Red Ter-Ron Reload 703T CHAMPION BREEDERS HERD: Bar H Land & Cattle Co. PREMIER BREEDER: Bar H Land & Cattle Co. PREMIER EXHIBITOR: Bar H Land & Cattle Co. HEIFER CALF JACKPOT Judge: Rena Hordos, Melville, SK 1. J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with J Square S Tibbie 18Z by MJ Escalade 2W 2. Ty Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Schwan Mystical Density 2Z by Cajun Density 9W BRED HEIFER SHOW Judge: Rena Hordos, Melville, SK 1. Section 7 Ranch, Rocanville, SK with S7R 77W Fern 50Y by Car-E-L Wolfman 77W 2. Shane Roger, Balgonie, SK with NRA Rosebud 49Y by Sitz Upward 307R BULL CALF JACKPOT Judge: Rena Hordos, Melville, SK 1. Triple L Angus, Viscount, SK and Wrights Livestock, Melfort, SK with Red Triple L Wrights Cowboy Up 300Z by Red Lazy MC Cowboy Cut 26U 2. J Square S Angus, Grayson, SK with J Square S Escalade 24Z by MJ Escalade 2W


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  26


Situated along the Canadian Pacific Railway’s famous Soo-Line, in an area known as the Palliser Triangle, lays the town of Midale and to its southeast, a ranch owned by the Hardy family, known as Soo Line Cattle Company and operated by the fourth generation Hardy … Roger. Roger’s great grandfather David came up from South Dakota filled with hopes and dreams of a future and set up his homestead in the Midale area at the turn of the century where he had a mixed farm that included a cattle operation. David farmed here for a few years then went down to Oregon to try his luck at some other business ventures but returned within a couple of years. Roger`s grandfather, George, (born on the original homestead in 1900) continued on the homestead until the late 30’s and unfortunately lost it all to the disastrous whims of Mother Nature. George would have experienced the hottest day in Canadian history, that of July 5th, 1937, when both the towns of Midale and Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan had temperatures that soared to a record breaking 45 degrees Celsius or 114 degrees Fahrenheit. Living in the dust bowl of the 30’s hardened many farmers and Roger’s grandfather was no different. By the mid 40’s he purchased back some of the original homestead land at Midale and an additional ranch in the Radville area. His first purebred herd of horned Hereford cattle came from the Palmer’s EXL Ranch at Marsden, Saskatchewan around 1942. “Our family is etched in the history of the livestock industry. Everyone came out of the Hereford breed it seems, at one point or another… many people assume that we have only been in the business since the nineties, but our family has been involved in agriculture since the early 1900`s. I remember, as a 12 year old, putting weights on horned Hereford bulls, that was my job… boy, my knuckles were sore! As we got older my brother and I were the dehorning crew as well, I remember that my dad was always looking at the phases of the moon, as that would keep the cattle from bleeding, well sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn’t and when it didn’t we were not welcome in the house by my Mom as we weren`t real clean by the end of the day. One of my first ranch memories was of our first on farm bull

sale in 1972. I was only five but I can still remember the auction sights and sounds.” “My father, David Dale, named after my great grandfather, has been an integral part of the Soo Line operation from the beginning. He has been my mentor and sounding board for the 40 years I have been in Agriculture...Dale ranched all his life, but took some time out and became a geologist then continued on and got his degree in Agriculture. He worked off farm for a few years for a Texas oil firm looking for oil in Saskatchewan and Alberta, but was always home for seeding and harvest. Then in the 60’s he stayed home and ranched fulltime. He’s had the greatest time of his life in the last fifteen years and has enjoyed all of the shows and sales often saying, ‘ that’s what I wanted to do, but we never had the people or the time to do it … when we had the Herefords to be able to sell and show the cattle’. He’s coming 79 and is out at the farm every day … it keeps him young and active and he still loves it. My father met my mother Britta, while attending the University of Saskatchewan; she was training to be a registered nurse and came from Lamont, Alberta. Roger is the middle button of six siblings, an older brother and four sisters. He grew up and graduated grade 12 in Weyburn and furthered his education in the ‘schools of hard knocks’ working in the ‘oil patch’ for fourteen years. He has three children; Liam 15, Sean 14, and Bridget 9. “You folks put together an oil company during the Tommy Douglas, Alan Blakely, Roy Romanow eras when no one wanted to be around.” “Yes, everyone wanted to pull out and we invested in Saskatchewan! We employ over 50 people in the oil patch … now we’re the popular kids. You know, my Dad always told me that we never laid anyone off, we always kept our people even when times were slow and even when Alan Blakely was trying to put us out of business.” Roger is a partner in a small oil exploration company… Midale Petroleums Ltd., which they have owned and operated since 1972. His father and four partners started it. “They were all working for different oil companies and decided to form their own. Now they produce nearly 3000 barrels a day out of 150 wells. The best people seem to come from two of Canada’s greatest resources that being the oil industry and agriculture… The people in the oil patch and agriculture are the best… the cattle people have sure been a great bunch. I’ve made some great friends in the cattle business and I’ll continue to have them; I would consider the people I have met in the cattle business to be one of the greatest rewards.”

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They dispersed the Herefords in 1990 and with a larger land base of 8000 acres, cropping only 700 acres and the balance in pasture and hay; Roger took a more active role on the ranch. Running a commercial herd of Hereford/Red Angus/ Char Cross cows and then in 1996 purchased his first Red Angus purebreds out of the Superstar, Masterpiece & Red Roundup sales. By 1998 he had purchased the Lone Pine Creek LPC herd and by 2002 had purchased his first blacks out of the Geis Angus herd and has since purchased select females from various sales throughout North America. Just like his forefathers and with the goal of becoming an elite Angus seed stock source, Roger was on his way. While achieving his goals as a livestock producer, Roger still managed two terms on the Saskatchewan Angus board, with one term as President and also spent a term as director on the board of the Canadian Angus Association. He served on the local school board, the oilmen’s association, and on the Midale recreational board and helped to rebuild a new skating rink. “We have always been proud to support 4-H & Junior movements as we feel that they are the future of the breed… I just like to help where I can.” “Because you have been involved in various breeds of cattle… specialized in Angus during your day, what are your thoughts on the Angus Breed and why it’s so great?” “I think that part of the great thing about Angus, is the marketing that has been done in Canada, the US and throughout the world. As far as being the high profile breed, marketing has attracted the consumer into accepting that Angus is the best in an eating experience. Angus crosses with all breeds and makes them better. Angus cows make the ideal mother cow, I believe. I’m not a big fan of hybrid bulls because I think that your first cross is your best cross. But that’s for people to decide themselves.” Roger’s, Soo Line goal was to strive and raise cattle that were structurally correct, sound and had fleshing ability as well as able to compete in the show ring or in the pasture. With the proper use of sourced herd bulls and proud of the fact that they always A.I.’d with their own herd bulls, never following trends that various studs promoted, they feel confident in having built a herd of cattle backed by many great females in the breed. “ We always strived to produce the kind of cattle that would make money for us, but also for our customers, because you aren`t going to be doing this for very long if your bull customers don’t see an increase to their bottom lines sourced from your genetics.” While livestock shows were not the main goal, they have been fortunate in breeding a ‘few of the right kind’ who excelled in the show ring as well as in the pasture and sale ring. One of their earlier victories was with the purchase of

Red Geis Knighthawk 14’02 who along with his mom was Supreme Champion Female at Agribition and by CWA 2004 had Reserve Senior Champion Yearling Female with Red Soo Line Miss Emily 85P sired by Knighthawk. Red Soo Line Rhonda 5109 followed in 2006 and was named Agribition Senior Division Reserve Champion Yearling Female and became an integral part of the herd. 2007 through 2012 were banner years for all the folks at Soo Line, as well as being named 2008 Saskatchewan Purebred Breeder of the Year, their dedication and effort eclipsed in the show ring. Here are a few career highlights… In the year 2007, Soo Line Annie K 6271 became Farmfair Champion Intermediate Heifer and went on to become the First Lady Classic Grand Champion Female as well as Junior Division Champion Yearling Female at CWA. Red Soo Line Gypsy 7293 was Intermediate Reserve Heifer Calf Champion and Red Soo Line Momentum 7051 was Champion Red Angus Bull Calf while Soo Line Kodiak 7019 was Reserve Champion Black Angus Bull Calf. Red Soo Line Momentum 7051 started the 2008 year off by being pronounced Junior and Grand Champion bull at the Toronto Royal Winter Fair and Annie K 6271 again entered the show ring at Farmfair and won Two Year Old Heifer and Reserve Grand Champion Female. That followed with Agribition where she was declared Senior and Grand Champion Female and was in the top ten of the RBC Beef Supreme. Not to be outdone, Gypsy 7293 was Junior Division Yearling Heifer Champion and Soo Line Yellowstone 6344 was named Grand Champion Black Angus Bull.

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But the highlight of the year was winning the RBC Beef Challenge Supreme Champion Bull with Yellowstone 6344, a great honor and perfect year end for Soo Line Cattle Co. It had been 34 years since the same breeder achieved winning both female and bull categories in the Angus breed, let alone with siblings! The dream continued at the World Angus Forum in Calgary the summer of 2009 where Soo Line Annie K 6271 was Grand Champion Angus Female. Red Soo Line Annie 7249 was named Reserve Grand Champion Female and World Angus Forum Futurity Reserve Grand Female, while Red Soo Line Momentum 7051 was Reserve Grand Champion Bull. Soo Line Dana 8129 was Reserve Late Senior Yearling Heifer Champion and Red Soo Line Annie 8192 was Junior Champion Female at the Forum.

At the 2009 Canadian Western Agribition, Soo Line Cattle Co. won Reserve Senior Heifer Calf Champion with Soo Line Annie K 9165 and Junior Yearling Heifer Champion with Duff NE 664M Lassie 823; Junior Heifer Calf Champion with Red Soo Line Countess 9394 and Reserve Junior Yearling Heifer Champion with Red Soo Line Annie 8192; Senior Heifer Calf Champion with Red Soo

Line Julia 9136 and Reserve Senior Champion, Reserve Grand Champion Female and First Lady Futurity Reserve Champion Female with Red Soo Line Annie 7249 and her calf Red Soo Line Annie 9222.

An historic event for Soo Line was winning the Grand Champion Pen of three Bulls at the 2010 National Western Stock Show in Denver, CO.“It gave Soo Line more mileage in North America than anything else we ever did. Winning also opened the door for Canadians to go down and show the Americans what we have. They get looked at now! I appreciate the judges not letting politics get in the way that day.” For a Canadian outfit at the Stock Show they had a very successful event. Jason Scheetz, of Frederick OK. won Junior Heifer Calf Champion and Grand Champion Heifer with Red Soo Line Rainbow 9230. While Soo Line won Junior Bull Calf Champion with Red Soo Line Hawk 9288. The year 2010 was not over. At Agribition the winning continued with Intermediate Heifer calf Champion Soo Line Favorite 0260, Reserve Senior Bull Calf Champion with Soo Line Kodiak 0022 and Reserve Yearling Bull Champion with Soo Line Motive 9016 and at the Toronto Winter Fair they had Reserve Junior Champion Bull with Soo Line Kodiak 9211 owned with Greg Hill.

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By 2010 the need to narrow down their large operation, became a reality and the sale of the Red Angus herd took place on October 15th of that year. As Justin Morrison, Purebred Manager put it … “we have put an awful lot of work and thought into all the aspects of raising these cattle” and the fruits of their labor became evident in what is believed to have been the best Red Angus dispersal on the Soo Line Annie K 9165 was North American continent in recent years or … in history. not to be outdone by her 215 lots sold for a gross of $1,174,000.00 and averaged mother who won the RBC Beef $5460.00 with the high selling bull, Red Cockburn Ribeye Supreme Challenge at Agribition 308U selling for $70,000.00 and the high selling female Red in 2007 and was declared the Soo Line Rhonda 5109 for $30,000.00 to Wildcat Creek 2011 winner and later in the Ranch, Newton, KS. week she was made Supreme “Are you having a bull sale next spring?” “No all will sell Champion Female with her heifer calf at side by Soo Line this coming fall in a complete dispersal. I think there will Motive 9016. She was also at side of her mother when she be a demand for them. We will sell 400 head. We will still was declared the 2009 World Angus Champion Female. run commercial cattle and perhaps have a few purebreds as They went on to capture Reserve Grand Champion Black a reason to continue going to shows and staying in contact Bull with Soo Line Kodiak 0022. with the breeders and friends we have made.”

As of this year, 2012, Soo Line Cattle Company was the breeder of the Grand Champion Female at Denver and Fort Worth for Christy Collins. While the show ring has not been the main focus, it was indicative and was used as a tool to showcase the cattle and the program. “This truly has become a global industry and we have enjoyed meeting and doing business with people from around the world, we even sold embryos to the King of Sweden and our genetics have found their way into countries such as Australia, Russia, Columbia, United States, Mexico, New Zealand, Denmark, South Africa, Argentina and Kazakhstan.” A little closer to home, they have had bull and female sales on an annual basis for the past ten years and have excelled in the sale ring as well. The highlight of course was Annie K selling for a 2/3 interest and full possession for $100,000.00 to Werner Angus, Cordova, IL. “We believe she was the highest priced Angus cow to be sold in Canada in recent history. Maybe a bull or two broke that record, but never a female. I think we also sold the highest priced bred heifer at $32,000.00 for a ½ interest at Red Round-Up. She was purchased by Josh Rust – Rust Mountain Ranch down in North Dakota.”

“I need to reorganize; labor on farms has become a major problem as most have gone to work in the oil patch. I want to spend time with my kids before they go off on their own and get away on me. But mostly because of time and commitment needed, I have to slow down … we’ve been running at a pretty fast pace for a long time. I’m extremely proud of the herd we developed and have tried to stay ‘on track’ in making good breeding decisions in order to propagate genetics to base a cowherd on.” Thus saying, Roger truly appreciates all the people who have worked at the ranch over the years, realizing that because of their dedication … “Our success was their success! We couldn’t have done it without you! As I’ve said before, so many thanks to Justin & Tawnie Morrison and Alistair Burnett for their commitment to our program and to Trent Walls, Mike & Shannon McDonald, Brody & Leslie Gutzke, Geoff Anderson, Martin Koyle, Luke Lewis, Jonathon Thomason and Dawn Halstead. The next chapter will become reality on October 12th!

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Dr. Colin Palmer

Biography: Dr. Colin Palmer is an Associate Professor of Theriogenology (Animal Reproduction) at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Originally from Nova Scotia, Dr. Palmer worked in mixed practices in Ontario and British Columbia and has owned/operated a practice in Saskatchewan. Dr. Palmer along with his wife Kim and children Lauren, Emily and Carter run a herd of purebred Red Angus cattle under the KC Cattle Co. name.

Finding the Balance Between Price and Quality If you sell purebred stock you have undoubtedly been frustrated when you lose customers to a lower priced competitor. Competition in the marketplace is a good thing, but in this case it would seem, only if you are a buyer. Cattle prices are up and with that the price of replacement bulls - for the most part anyway. Buying good quality bulls that sire high value calves is one of the best investments a cattleman can make in his herd yet it seems like we struggle to get that message out there. There are so many variables in raising cattle. Feeding situations, when to calve, labour, facilities, availability of land, finances, marketing to name a few. One of biggest problems in our industry is that few producers know their cost of production. Part of this scenario is not knowing what their calves weigh and not understanding what determines their value. Without this knowledge, it is very difficult to appreciate the return on investment of an input; therefore, the least costs mindset prevails because it is safe. Only the very best will take the time to consider the lost opportunity. How much should you expect to pay for a bull to be used on a commercial herd? An article that I read a few years back in a US beef magazine suggested that a good rule of thumb was 5 to 7 times the value of a commercial weaned calf. Locally, I have heard 4 times the value of a steer calf. For many producers, it seems hard to justify the cost of higher priced bulls and so they try very hard to find cheaper bulls. Supply and demand forces play a big part in determining price. I will not argue that there are bargains to be had; especially, when there are too many bulls out there. However, at all times buyers need to be astute – are you buying better genetics or just something to get your cows pregnant? How has the bull been raised, has his semen been evaluated, what about a guarantee? Those that sell cheap bulls limit the development of the cattle industry. Have they ever attempted to figure out what is involved in raising a quality bull? Good bulls usually have great sires. Costs of herd sires and AI programs can easily exceed those endured by commercial producers. Performance herds must have scales and weigh their cattle; yardage costs are higher as bulls need specialized pens; feed, showing, advertising, registration, delivery and sale costs all must be factored in. What about losses from death, injury and failed semen tests? I estimate all of these costs at perhaps a conservative $1500 to $2000 per bull over that of raising a commercial calf. If a steer calf is now worth $1000 then add this cost to the cost of raising the bull and you will get a $2500 to $3000 break-even price for a yearling bull. If you don’t factor in the lost opportunity to sell that calf as a steer then you are really fooling yourself. The longer that bull remains in the purebred producer’s inventory the higher the break-even price becomes.

Purveyors of cheap bulls can only be truly profitable if they lower their costs of production which can be accomplished by cutting corners or by taking advantage of economies of scale. My personal observations have been that large operations that are in the position to take advantage of economies of scale generally do not sell cheap bulls – they are just more profitable. Taking advantage of economies of scale is what helped to keep them solvent during the years of poor prices. Therefore, sellers of cheap bulls are either cutting corners or simply eroding their equity. Not exactly poster boys for our industry! Large animal veterinary medicine has also changed considerably in the last decade and there are more changes to come. In 2001, the average Saskatchewan beef cow herd consisted of 80 breeding cows; in 2012 that number has risen to 154 cows. Across North America the number of farms is decreasing while the size is increasing. Cattle vets are now and will continue to become consultants rather than focusing on saving sick animals. Our rural vets will need more communication and business skills to better serve the needs of their clients. There really is no shortage of rural vets, but rather a shortage of visible opportunities for veterinarians in some rural areas. In other words, if it is worth while vets will establish practices in rural areas, or more appropriately provide service in those areas in lieu of an actual physical structure. You as a producer, must realize that you probably only need access to veterinary services rather than actually have a vet waiting on stand-by in your community. Believe it or not, many large animal vets lack business sense, but that must change. Like cattlemen offering cheap bulls they continue to offer services at prices at or below what was charged 30 years ago and many of them survive on their small animal business. Most vets have big hearts and they want to help their clients, but usually at their own expense. A segment of the profession have recognized opportunities and are offering more and more specialized services to producers. Competition has resulted in better prices for the producer, but it is still up to the cattleman to determine value. Is the vet doing a good job for you, are they thorough, are they professional and can they stand by their work? Perhaps they are able to package goods and services with rewards for loyalty. Those that are truly focused on the cattle industry are very willing to consider your business needs not just their own. Spend some time thinking about what you want your vet to provide and remember, just like when buying bulls, the lowest price isn’t always the best way to go.

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No matter how you measure success, the fifth annual T Bar Invitational golf tournament was the most successful yet, raising over $42,000.00 for youth in the beef industry. Eight national junior breed associations, representing 2,041 members, will gain the benefit from the generosity of our sponsors. In addition, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Canadian Western Agribition Junior Beef Extreme. “We are extremely proud of this year’s event. Our largest number of golfers made it a resounding success. In the last five years, we have raised over $191,000.00, which provides funding and opportunities to a great number of youth,” said Bryan Kostiuk, co-chairman of the tournament. The 2013 T Bar Invitational will be held at Dakota Dunes on June 25th and 26th. See www.tbarinvitational.com for more information. A special thank you to the Canadian Angus Association, Saskatchewan Angus Association and the following breeders; Blairs.Ag Cattle Co., Diamond B Ranches, Early Sunset Ranch, Eastondale Angus, Mar Mac Farms, Wards Red Angus and Wilbar Farms for your continued support.

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Should all commercial calves be crossbred? If you ask that in a room full of professional animal scientists or officers of multi-breed cattle organizations, you may hear laughter. Or you may see eyes rolling as they realize you’re an Angus breeder, arguably representing an exception to the rule. “Conventional wisdom says crossbreeding equals extra pounds and more revenue at sale time, but those assumptions are often too simplistic,” says animal scientist Nevil Speer, Western Kentucky University. Last fall, he authored a research paper titled “Crossbreeding: Considerations and Alternatives in an Evolving Market,” available at: www.CABpartners.com/news/research.php Since then, the subject has generated much discussion in the U.S., and wound up as a focus of next year’s advertising campaign for the American Angus Association. Speer does not dispute the science; properly planned, well-executed crossbreeding can add maternal benefits and more weaning weight in most environments. But he says the qualifiers mean it’s no open-andshut case. “If we avoid this topic in animal science, it’s because we don’t have enough training in economics and business.” More pounds, more dollars? “It’s just never that simple,” he says (see Graphic). Incremental changes in marketing, capital and cost management, and increasingly accurate genetic tools help explain why the science fails to make a case for profitability on many ranches.

Strategic marketing Historically, the “pounds equal profit” paradigm was easy to pick up. It took little effort to introduce a Continental bull into an English herd and increase output. However, the slight effort often led to a “problem solved” assumption. “There was this perception that crossbreeding would fix everything, regardless of the genetics we put into the system,” Speer says. In the 1990s, consumers grew more discriminating across the U.S., and the strongest export demand was for higher grading beef. So began the “change toward reflecting the entire value chain, increasingly responsive to end-user specifications,” he explains.

Nevil Speer

As more research pointed to superior marbling and tenderness associated with a breed type, cattle with proven potential for carcass performance became more valuable. Speer says these changes laid the groundwork for a shift in conventional marketing, including more interest in retained ownership at the feeding stage and more emphasis on quality over quantity alone.

Cost, capital management As consolidation continued, larger operations moved from “strictly a weigh-up focus to more specified marketing targets,” Speer says. The ability to fill a semi-trailer leads to more desire for uniformity, and interest in value-added marketing through retained ownership… “weight and value are not mutually exclusive.” The cowherd is not usually the primary source of income and, what with other competing enterprises or jobs, labor efficiency is especially critical to those with 200 or more cows. “One of their most time-consuming tasks is managing the calving females,” Speer points out. “In an ideal world, they would be observed regularly, but time constraints often don’t allow such luxury.” That adds emphasis to predictable calving ease. Higher birth weights may be linked to higher weaning weights, but expected progeny differences (EPDs) can defeat those antagonisms. In any case, the risk of losing a calf—or even a cow—at birth verses more weaning weight leans toward the live calf when time and labor are scarce. Other convenience traits also come into consideration: “I don’t care if you get an extra 50 pounds at weaning,” Speer says. “I

By Certified Angus Beef staff Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  40


think most would agree that nursing one cow through a difficult birth in a snow storm when you have 200 more to think about is just not worth it.”

That’s why crossbreeding is the default, blanket prescription for commercial cattlemen looking to make reproductive improvements.

Genetic progress pays As the use of EPDs has flourished over the past 30 years, the desire for data builds. Angus registrations outnumber those for all other breeds, even the next seven breeds combined, and the database involves some 20 million individual records. But it’s not really about the breed so much as the precise decisions that can come with it:

But South Dakota rancher Rich Blair says, “Been there, done that, and don’t want to go back.” He and his brother Ed turned their once-straightbred Herefords into Continental crossbreds in the late 1970s and ’80s, but gradually phased that out in the ’90s when the family turned its focus to Angus.

“As long as our industry is hitting the end target and doing that more efficiently, more productively, and it’s profitable, who cares if the animals are black or white or pink or purple? It just happens to be that Angus has the genetic base to meet consumer demands and the tools to help people drive that forward,” Speer says. The Angus database shows progress in performance traits across the board, narrowing the gap that used to produce the crossbreeding prize of hybrid vigor. In general, breed differences have diminished. “The Angus breed caught up with Continentals in terms of growth and performance, so you just couldn’t get the boost you were used to getting in crossbreeding—plus the premiums,” he notes. “As the business environment has shifted, the sole pursuit of heterosis is no more tenable than single-trait selection for any genetic trait.” Older vs. better cows More longevity and fertility in the cowherd may seem like a “no brainer.” But when those pursuits come at the expense of uniformity or other functionality, it could pay to do some hard studying.

“We always calved out quite a few first-calf heifers and you’d lose or cull 25% of those for one thing or another: disposition, udders, no milk, mothering ability,” he says. “Now we’re closer to 2% and we have a lot more consistency in our heifers.” He gives most of the credit to the breed association’s extensive database and the use of high-accuracy sires. Heartland Cattle Company, near McCook, Nebraska, custom develops heifers for a large number of commercial Angus herds, and also sells bred heifers by forward contract. Many long-term heifer buyers say they want that hybrid vigor in black baldies, but those have been hard to come by. Predictable heifers Comparing the two sets of females, research and information director Janet Rippe says they’re fairly similar. “Our first service conception rate is averages 71% and then after a 45-day AI season, we’ll send heifers out of here at about 91% to 92% percent pregnant,” she says. “If you get a true hybrid or an F1-cross or even just a quarter something else, those cattle are generally more fertile. But we might not see as much difference in the numbers because our long-term Angus customers have put so much selection pressure on fertility.”

“The overwhelming cost and subsequent priority of cow-calf operations is related to cow maintenance and care,” Speer says. “The difference is huge between a cow that lasts until she is 10 versus 8.”

Janet Rippe All are subject to pre-breeding inspections that include pelvic measurements and reproductive tract scores, and outliers exit the program then. Customers may opt to market “recommended culls” that fall out for things like disposition, too. Rich Blair & Ed Blair

“What’s left should be pretty functional,” Rippe says. Regardless of who is growing the replacements, all cattlemen

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  41


have their initial priorities. According to U.S. Agriculture data, 62% of ranches sell cows for reasons other than just being open. Surveys point to the time-saving traits of disposition, birth weight, hoof and leg soundness as ranking above weaning weight and yearling weight.

Highest calling? Longevity in outstanding individuals helps a program but across the herd, it may not be the highest calling. “If you’re not turning that cowherd over, it’s really hard to get much genetic improvement in your calves,” Blair says.

Blair now relies on expected progeny differences (EPDs) within the breed because, he says, “I don’t have time to deal with calving problems.

The Blairs have been using all Angus since feedlot performance data showed them the top end of those calves kept up with the top end of their Charolais calves. Figuring in maternal traits and labor savings, it was starting to look like another kind of “no brainer.” The deal clincher showed up when calves sold on the grid and they saw more than a $200 spread in value. “That was too much money to be giving away, so we wanted to move the bottom end up,” he says.

“Hard births cause a multitude of problems,” he says. “It isn’t just if that heifer had a hard time and you had to pull that calf, but now you wonder if she’s going to breed back and if that calf is going to be healthy.” On the other hand, in a large herd with focused management, predictably shorter gestation periods from high-accuracy EPD bulls can allow a couple more weeks for heifers to breed back, Blair says. Hidden costs Although no producer invites challenges, Speer says the issues become increasingly important as herds get larger. “I have an additional benefit from heterosis, but if it costs me something in terms of functionally of traits, such as calving ease, I don’t want to have to deal with those problems,” he says. “That risk/reward becomes somewhat different when you put all of those factors in together.” Everybody seems to agree that it’s a hard area to quantify. “With fertility there are so many factors: was it weather, was it the technician, was it the bull, was it the sire line that came into it?” Rippe says, “It’s pretty hard to get good enough data when you’re looking at fertility.” Adding in longevity multiplies that difficulty. “It’s a lot more complex than just reproduction,” Speer says. “Why else did she leave the herd? A bad eye, a structural soundness problem, disposition or all those other things you can readily select for?” Those who are making steady progress in any number of traits may not place as much importance on longevity because of the reduced opportunity to make genetic change.

Some Blair loads have hit 50% Prime, selling for $200 above average Kansas price for the U.S. Premium Beef grid for the week. “Everybody looks for the silver bullet, the quick fix, with no time for a long-range plan,” Blair suggests. “If that’s your attitude, then heterosis is the quick way to get there. But if you really want to build something sustainable over a long period of time, you can find the data within one breed and design the cow to be exactly what you want her to be.” Composite quick fix A good crossbreeding program Jarold Callahan takes some background in genetics, a big enough herd and land base, good bull suppliers and time to figure all that out. Producers looking for a simpler route to heterosis often opt to use a composite bull. “In order for a crossbreeding operation to maximize heterosis, it takes a lot of different pasture, a lot of management, which because of size and time a lot of people can’t devote to it,” says Jarold Callahan, president of Express Ranches, Yukon, Oklahoma, “You basically have to have different herds within your herd.” So the composite bull market was born, where breeding stock is billed as already having that built-in hybrid vigor.

Blair remembers a particular bull Rich Blair they used a decade ago with a then-impressive Angus EPD of .4 for intramuscular fat (IMF). “That was really out there in 2000, and one of the big reasons I used him was for that number,” he says. “Now you can find hundreds of bulls that are .4 IMF.” In fact, that’s about breed average today.

“Implementing crossbreeding can be somewhat daunting,” says Speer. “Many operations would rather forgo such effort if production can be maintained while also ensuring relative absence of problems. As a result, producers are often encouraged to utilize composite bulls as a simplified means to boost heterosis and subsequent production.” But Callahan says it’s not always a “quick fix.” Express has sold hundreds of Limousin-Angus crosses over the years, but recently decreased the number of composites (F1) offered on an annual basis.

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“A lot of people we sent F1 bulls to were very disappointed because of gene segregation and what was being transmitted from each parent,” he says. “Some progeny of these bulls really favored traits of one breed and some favored traits of the other, some looked Angus and some looked Continental. You ended up with a set of calves that were not only visually different, but a lot different in terms of outcome and how you needed to manage them.”

says. “But there is still a little bit of an unknown as to where that animal is going to come out.

Progeny appearances Geneticist Bob Weaber, Kansas State University, says that’s partly because what works on average for the whole calf crop varies among individuals. That may shift the balance of traits toward one breed or the other. “Even though the F2s [composite progeny] have half of their genetic material from each breed on average, some re-pairing of chromosomes from the same breed occurs,” he says. “When we make an F2 we see a decrease in heterosis, because on average one-half of the animals’ chromosomes consist of pairings from the same breed of founder.” Data from the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) suggests that the progeny from matings of F1 parents are no more variable than either of their purebred founder breeds for traits like weaning weight or yearling weight. However, for traits controlled by a single gene, these progeny are noticeably less consistent than the F1 parents, especially if the founder breeders were very divergent, Weaber says. Speer says that makes it hard to measure how much productivity they should add to the herd: “In many instances composite bulls actually represent backcrossing and may reduce heterosis potential versus using a breed that serves as a total outcross.” From a seedstock producer’s perspective, it can be much more difficult to create a reliable composite compared to a purebred bull. Purebred: less risk “I have 27 years of objective breeding decisions that harness the power of the AAA [American Angus Association] database,” says Brian McCulloh, Viroqua, Wisconsin. The registered breeder, who makes 350 of those decisions each spring, says the predictive power is strengthened by the broad use of artificial insemination (AI) by Association members, who submit within-herd data that ties all animals together. “Simply put, I am not comfortable ‘experimenting’ with data from other breeds to create a composite bull for our commercial customers. I have more confidence predicting the outcome of our pure line Angus bulls,” he says. The Angus database updates weekly with more than 20 million performance measures and 17 million pedigrees. That data volume explains why, after dabbling in the composite market to try offering customers an outcross, McCulloh abruptly stopped. Using the MARC across-breed EPD (expected progeny difference) adjustment factors help in comparing data, Callahan

Brian McCulloh DNA tools “The purebred cattle evaluations give you better insight in terms of predictability of individuals and their offspring,” he says. Genomically-enhanced EPDs hone that ability. “You can make more progress – because you have greater access to performance information – than you can in most crossbreeding operations, unless they’re extremely well designed.” To date, the DNA technology can only effectively sort out straightbred populations, he adds. “That precludes it from being useful in composites and crossbreds,” Callahan says. When selecting hybrids, commercial producers may face another challenge: “There’s an increasing need to purchase bulls in volume that provide both uniformity of calf crop and deliver on the various traits of interest,” Speer says. “Commercial bull buyers have access to larger sale offerings when shopping for Angus bulls compared to other breeds.” Purchasing siblings in bulk is routine. “That opportunity doesn’t exist when considering composite bulls,” he says. Callahan doesn’t dispute the advantages of genetic diversity, but says he’s concerned with those who are “crossbreeding just for the sake of crossbreeding.” His typical composite customer is in a terminal program, purchasing rather than raising replacement heifers. Otherwise, many have switched back to straightbreds. “They really enjoy the uniformity of their calf crop and the predictability in their genetics,” he says. There are no shortcuts to that.

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Press Release Huge Success for Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed Day

June 20, 2012: for immediate release CALGARY, AB- More than 200 Canadian Angus Association members joined industry sector leaders in Lethbridge Alberta for the first Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed day on Friday, June 15. The day began with an industry panel of speakers featuring John Lettieri of Hero Certified Burgers, Stirling Fox of XL Foods, Tony Saretsky of Cantriex Livestock International Inc., Fred Dewald of Dewald Order Buying Services and Frank Jenkins of Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange and Jenkins Lazy U Ranch. Each sector brings a different point of view to the table and the panel was eager to share these industry demands from each prospective. The industry starts with the producer and works its way through the chain, according to Frank Jenkins. “I raise my cattle hoping there is a premium on the other end,” said Jenkins. “They [Angus] have done a good job promoting the product right through to the restaurant.” The Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed program is a branding program that insures both quality and taste for the consumer. The day included many things to celebrate including the world’s largest branded tag program in the world – the Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed tag program. “When times are challenging, you get together to prop one another up,” said Rob Smith, Canadian Angus Association CEO. “When times are strong, like they are right now, as incredibly buoyant as perhaps the cattle industry has ever been, we get together to celebrate and to share ideas of management practices and production practices and ways to add value to the Canadian Angus Association member experience. That’s really what these days are about.” Lunch included keynote speaker Rob Meijer, president of Canada Beef Inc. Meijer challenged producers to think globally in terms of marketing their product. He shared that Canadian beef is the best in the world, and that there is an opportunity to sell it for a premium. The afternoon included tours of both the Lethbridge Research Center and Feedlot Alley with the final stop at the Lethbridge College Barn for the Southern Hospitality BBQ. The Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed program guarantees that the beef used in products bearing this label come from beef cattle with 50 percent or more Canadian Angus genetics. All cattle in Canada are required to be tagged with a radio-frequency identification tag. The Canadian Angus Association created the Angus tag program that is available only to cattle with at least one purebred Angus parent. To qualify for the Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed program, the cattle used must bear the Angus tag which identifies them as Canadian Angus cattle. The Canadian Angus Association (www.cdnangus.ca) is a not-for-profit association incorporated under the Animal Pedigree Act. The Association represents 3,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle and promoting the breed across Canada. Its member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

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120 Juniors - 150 Head of cattle - 260+ in attendance for the banquet Emcee Gary Harron, Allenford, ON

Judges

This year’s T Bar Invitational Golf Tournament raised $11,437.95

Cathy Brown, Orillia, ON Sarah Buchanan, Victoria Harbour, ON Scott & Paula Cornish, Indian River, ON Don Currie, Nottawa, On Dave Hasson, Guelph, ON Helen Hawke, Coldwater, ON Sylvia Jackson, Caledon, ON Garry Lawson, Toronto, ON Holli Lee, Lindsay, ON Tom & Judy McDonald, Milton, ON Sandy Reid, Moorefield, ON Grant & Lauralee Rolston, Vulcan, AB Rob Smith, Olds, AB

Ringman Nathan Latchford, Beachburg, ON Sean Enright, Renfrew, ON

Photographer Grant Rolston Photography, Vulcan, AB Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  47


CONFORMATION CLASSES PEE WEE DIVISION Heifer Calf 1. Lucy McNiven, Oro Station, ON with McNiven Lady Pine 95Y sired by BC Eagle Eye 110-7 1. Kaycee Buchanan, Victoria Harbour, ON with Red Gold-Bar Lulu 131Y sired by Red LJC Mission Statement P27 1. Nolan Chalmers, Shanty Bay, ON with J P D Charlotte 9Y sired by TJF Freedom 172U BULL CALF 1. Nolan Chalmers, Shanty Bay, ON with J P D Chizam 7Z sired by Shipwheel Chinook

OPEN DIVISION HEIFER CALF Split 1 1. Maiya Bruce, Douglas, ON with EF Penny 17Z sired by Connealy Consensus 7229 2. Carolyn Darling, Castleton ON with WMC Favorite 25Z sired Duff New Attraction 6110 Split 2 1. Robert Marriot, Wingfield, ON with Premier Pride 1201 sired by Connealy Final Product 2. Cody McQuaid, Omemee, ON with Westwind Fancy Snow White 3Z sired PVF All Payday 729 Split 3 1. Brandy Thaxter, Woodville, ON with Brantnor’s Miss Daisy 2Z sired by Brantnor Predominent 10W 2. Jarrett Hargrave, Proton Station, ON with Harprey Barbara McHenry 2Z sired by Southland Free Ride 68R HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Robert Marriot, Wingfield, ON with Premier Pride 1201 sired by Connealy Final Product RESERVE HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Brandy Thaxter, Woodville, ON with Brantnor’s Miss Daisy 2Z sired by Brantnor Predominent 10W

YEARLING HEIFER Split 1 1. Molly Bruce, Douglas, ON with Champion Hill Peg 7980 sired by S A V Brave 8320 2. Morgan Knechtel, Sebringville, ON with DCC MS Foundation 723Y sired by C Q S New Design 8H Split 2 1. Will McDonald, Sutton, ON with Brantnor’s Favorite 25Y sired by S A V Mandan 5664 2. Brett Thaxter, Woodville, ON with Brantnor’s Delia 22Y sired by S A V Mandan 5664 Split 3 1. Brandon English, Douglas, ON with EF Blackbird 25Y sired by EXAR Tiger T659 2. Abby Debus, Brunner, ON with DCC Mayflower 302Y, sired by MVF Freightliner 38U Split 4 1. Cody Walker, Guelph, ON with Harvest IM Gammer 6Y sired by S A V Iron Mountian 8066 2. Allie Wade, Little Britain, ON with Sonny Way Mercedes 2Y sired by S A V Heavy Hitter 6347 Split 5 1. Alex Draper, Bristol, ON with Sunset Edelia 11Y sired by S A V Brilliance 8077 2. Elizabeth Stubbs, Caledonia, ON with DRM Grace 15Y sired by Duff New Attraction 6110 Split 6 1. Brandy Thaxter, Woodville, ON with Brantnor’s Miss Daisy 4Y sired by S A V 004 Predominant 4438 2. Chris Stoneman, Caledonia, ON with First Line Ariat Marie sired by S A V Pioneer 7301 Split 7 1. Jarrett Hargrave, Proton Station, ON with Harprey Edella 6Y sired by S A V Providence 6922 2. Kelsey Ribey, Paisley, ON with Tambri Blackbird 5Y sired by Vin-Mar Focus In 8847 Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  48

Split 8 1. Michael Hargrave, Maxwell, ON with Harprey Barbara McHenry sired by S A V 004 Density 4336 2. Isaac Brubacher, Fergus, ON with Red Serenity Lacie Be 102Y sired by Red Howe Bold Edition 80T JUNIOR CHAMPION Will McDonald, Sutton, ON with Brantnor’s Favorite 25Y sired by S A V Mandan 5664 RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Cody Walker, Guelph, ON with Harvest IM Gammer 6Y sired by S A V Iron Mountian 8066 TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR 1. Robert Marriott, Wingham, ON with Baby Black Lookin Great sired by B C Lookout 7024 with her calf, Premier Pride 1201 sired by Connealy Final Product 2. William Brubacher, Fergus, ON with Red Serenity Rebello 101X sired by Red Dwajo All Star 10T with her calf, Red Serenity Rebello Be 101Z sired by Red Howe Bold Edition 80T MATURE COW/CALF PAIR Split 1 1. Lauren Enright, Renfrew, ON with EXAR Queen Idelete 5929 sired by EXAR Spartan 6225 with her calf, EF Queen Idelete 12Z sired by S A V Bullion 0474 2. Carolyn Darling, Castleton, ON with WMC Favorite 25U sired by Hyline Right Way 781 with her calf, WMC Favorite 25Z sired by Duff New Attraction 6110 Split 2 1. Ashley Baker, Madoc, ON with Whitestone Rita V130 sired by S A V 8180 Traveler 004 with her calf, Triara Rita 228Z sired by Kesslers Front Range 7520 2. Josh Lasby, Shelburne, ON with Locust Grove Blackbird 8T sired by Rito 9FB3 of 5H11 Fullback with her calf, GF Blackbirds Wildfire 8Z sired by Ankonian Werner Wild Fire 96


YEARLING HEIFER Split 1 1. Lauren Enright, Renfrew, ON with Champion Hill Georgina 7908 sired by S A V Brave 8320 2. Denver Bolton, Lansdowne, ON with Hawthorne Queen 9Y sired by Rito 9FB3 of 5H11 Fullback

bred & OWNED DIVISION HEIFER CALF 1. Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 72Z sired by Red Koru Chateau 53U 2. Jay Robertson, Phelpston, ON with High Hope 5682 Cherise 37Z sired by S A V Bismark 5682

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Lauren Enright, Renfrew, ON with EXAR Queen Idelete 5929 sired by EXAR Spartan 6225 with her calf, EF Queen Idelete 12Z sired by S A V Bullion 0474

JUNIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Lauren Enright, Renfrew, ON with Champion Hill Georgina 7908 sired by S A V Brave 8320

HEIFER CALF CHAMPION and Champion Female Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 72Z sired by Red Koru Chateau 53U

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Denver Bolton, Lansdowne, ON with Hawthorne Queen 9Y sired by Rito 9FB3 of 5H11 Fullback

RESERVE HEIFER CALF CHAMPION and reserve champion female Jay Robertson, Phelpston, ON with High Hope 5682 Cherise 37Z sired by S A V Bismark 5682

MATURE COW/CALF PAIR 1. Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 51T sired by Red Moose Creek Glycerine 33R with her heifer calf, Red Koru Thelma 72Z wired by Red Koru Chateau 53U

BULL DIVISION

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Robert Marriott, Wingham, ON with Baby Black Lookin Great sired by B C Lookout 7024 with her calf, Premier Pride 1201 sired by Connealy Final Product

OWNED DIVISION HEIFER CALF 1. Hailie Conley, Plainfield, On with VOS Vegas Showgirl sired by B C C-J C L Emblazon 038-287 2. Jay Robertson, Phelpston, ON with High Hope 5682 29Z sired by S A V Bismark 5682 HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Hailie Conley, Plainfield, On with VOS Vegas Showgirl sired by B C C-J C L Emblazon 038-287 RESERVE HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Jay Robertson, Phelpston, ON with High Hope 5682 29Z sired by S A V Bismark 5682

SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Thelma 51T sired by Red Moose Creek Glycerine 33R with her heifer calf, Red Koru Thelma 72Z sired by Red Koru Chateau 53U

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BULL CALF Split 1 1. Hailie Conley, Plainfield, ON with VOS Vegas Look Out sired by B C Lookout 7024 2. Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Gladiator 69Z sired by Red Soo Line Gladiatior 5297 Split 2 1. Evan Chalmers, Shanty Bay, ON with J P D Chizam 7Z sired by Shipwheel Chinook


COMMERCIAL DIVISION 2. Alyssa Dennis, Warkworth, ON with WMC Bismark 1Z sired by S A V Bismark 5682 BULL CALF CHAMPION Hailie Conley, Plainfield, ON with VOS Vegas Look Out sired by B C Lookout 7024

HEIFER CALF 1. Alex Draper, Bristol, QC with Miss K 2. Corbin McCord, Kanata, ON with ADA Zesty 1Z

RESERVE BULL CALF CHAMPION Sarah Schmidt, Goodeve, SK with Red Koru Gladiator 69Z sired by Red Soo Line Gladiatior 5297 YEARLING BULL 1. Cody Walker, Guelph, ON with City Lights Showtime 101Y sired by HF Tiger 5F 2. Alex Draper, Bristol, QC with Black Lane Yes Man 2Y sired by S A V Heavy Hitter 6347

GRAND CHAMPION STEER Bailey McConnell, Kincardine, ON with Whiskey Bear

HEIFER CALF CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Alex Draper, Bristol, QC with Miss K RESERVE HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Corbin McCord, Kanata, ON with ADA Zesty 1Z YEARLING HEIFER 1. Michael Stubbs, Caledonia, ON with Lazy B Sure Thing 2. Blair Allnutt, Brome, QC with Miss Kentucky

JUNIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION BULL Cody Walker, Guelph, ON with City Lights Showtime 101Y sired by HF Tiger 5F

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION STEER Charles Caldwell, Kamata, ON with Bill CANADIAN CLASS 1. Isaac Brubacher, Fergus, ON with Red Serenity Lacie Be 102Y sired by Red Howe Bold Edition 80T 2. William Brubacher, Fergus, ON with Red Serenity Rebello 101X sired by Red Dwajo All Star 10T with her calf, Red Serenity Rebello Be 101Z sired by Red Howe Bold Edition 80T

JUNIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Michael Stubbs, Caledonia, ON with Lazy B Sure Thing

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION BULL And Reserve GRAND CHAMPION BULL Alex Draper, Bristol, QC with Black Lane Yes Man 2Y sired by S A V Heavy Hitter 6347

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER Blair Allnutt, Brome, QC with Miss Kentucky FINISHED STEER 1. Bailey McConnell, Kincardine, ON with Whiskey Bear 2. Charles Caldwell, Kamata, ON with Bill

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CANADIAN CLASS CHAMPION Isaac Brubacher, Fergus, ON with Red Serenity Lacie Bo 102Y sired by Red Howe Bold Edition 80T


GRAND AGGREGATE

SHOWMANSHIP

JUDGING

JUNIOR CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

JUNIOR CHAMPION Tyler Jarvis

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Scott Miller

SENIOR CHAMPION Lauren Enright

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Bailey McConnell

PRINT MARKETING

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Shawna Sullivan

JUNIOR CHAMPION Emma Long

JUNIOR CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

SENIOR CHAMPION Chad Lorenz

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Abbey Debus

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Denver Bolten

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Will Pilgrim

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers

SHOW RING TEAM JUDGING

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Bailey McConnell

JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Austin McCord and Jarrett Hargrave

SENIOR CHAMPION Katelynn Donaldson

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Scott Miller and Terrance Jarvis

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Elizabeth Stubbs

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Shawna Sullivan and Albert Carroll

SALES TALK JUNIOR CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Brandon English RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Brandy Thaxter

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Kodie Doetzel

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Michaela Chalmers and Bailey McConnell SENIOR CHAMPIONS Chad Lorenz and Erin Toner RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPIONS Elizabeth Stubbs and Alyssa Looney

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Albert Carroll

TEAM GROOMING

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers SENIOR CHAMPION Austen Anderson RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Elizabeth Stubbs

SENIOR CHAMPION And Supreme Champion Showperson Lauren Enright RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Alyssa Dennis JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Jessa Broek and Hailie Conley RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Kodie Doetzel and Jarrett Hargrave

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INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Christopher Hargrave and Bailey McConnell RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Melissa MacIntyre and Brad MacIntyre

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Bailey McConnell

SENIOR CHAMPION Michael Hargrave

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Shawna Sullivan

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Austen Anderson

SENIOR CHAMPION Aubrie Mowat

PUBLIC SPEAKING

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Emily Gibson

JUNIOR CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

ART COMPETITION

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Hailie Conely

JUNIOR CHAMPION Kodie Doetzel

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Melissa MacIntyre

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Owen Chalmers

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Sarah McNiven

SENIOR CHAMPION Sylvia Megens

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Holly Somerville

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Alyssa Looney

SENIOR CHAMPION Austen Anderson

ANGUS COOK-OFF

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Katelyn Donaldson SENIOR CHAMPIONS Lauren Enright and Will Pilgram

SCRAPBOOK

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPIONS Jack Oattes and Blair Allnutt

JUNIOR CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

PHOTOGRAPHY

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Owen Chalmers

JUNIOR CHAMPION Jamie Lea Wade

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Morgan MacIntyre

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Brittany Caldwell

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Melissa MacIntyre

SENIOR CHAMPION Katelyn Donaldson

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Christopher Hargrave

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Emily Gibson

SENIOR CHAMPION Allison Speller

GRAPHIC DESIGN

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Michael Hargrave

JUNIOR CHAMPION Hailie Conely

LITERATURE COMPETITION

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Morgan MacIntyre

Chalmers/Sullivan/McNiven/Christopher Hambley and Brandon Stiener

JUNIOR CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers

SPIRIT OF YOUTH AWARD

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Hailie Conley

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Melissa MacIntyre Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  52

1. Team Eat Beef

2. Backyard Barbecue

HERDSMAN AWARD

Michaela Chalmers


There is a reason w hy successful breeders and breed leaders advertise

... because it works

Advertising deadline August 21, 2012 4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Ph: 306.934.9696 ::: Fax: 306.934.0744 info@todaysangus.com ::: www.todaysangus.com Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  53


Press Release New President for the Canadian Angus Association June 20, 2012: for immediate release CALGARY, AB — Canadian Angus Association members gathered in Lethbridge, Alberta, over the weekend for the 2012 Canadian Angus National Convention. The Board of Directors affirmed Gary Latimer as president of 2012-2013. Gary and his wife Jacci, along with their son Richard and his wife Kelly, own and operate Remitall Farms of Olds, Alberta. The family is in a growth stage right now increasing their cattle heard numbers to 270. The family markets their cattle in some sales including the Black Magic in Olds. They mostly sell bulls directly off the farm and are seeing a lot of success. Gary is excited about his term as president and is looking forward to working with Angus breeders as the breed continues to develop. The priority this year will be working on the new Canadian Angus Association building project which is underway. Gary is excited for the ground breaking event and looks forward to facilitating the growth that we have seen within our Angus breed and the growth of the Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed program. With his passion in marketing cattle, Gary hopes to provide the CAA membership with increasing tools that will assist a diverse group in promoting and selling their purebred and influenced Angus cattle. Gary will be supported in this role by Kevin Blair of Lanigan, Saskatchewan, who was chosen as President Elect. The Canadian Angus Association (www.cdnangus.ca) is a not-for-profit association incorporated under the Animal Pedigree Act. The Association represents 3,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle and promoting the breed across Canada. Its member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

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By: Chris Poley Summer is here and the cattle are all on grass. However, most producers are already anticipating fall, as they listen to marketing representatives, order buyers and analysts, who are all predicting a very steamy fall calf run. Many are saying ten cents a pound higher than last fall’s much improved prices. This is welcome news to all producers. Many of whom need to update aging equipment and infrastructure that has been in operation since before 2003. With strong prices and increased cash flow, this fall also presents great opportunities to add some top females to your program. There are both elite commercial and purebred dispersals booked, adding those untouchable females to any program, will only make it’s foundation stronger. We have also wrapped up one of my favorite seasons; 4-H regional shows and sales. I truly believe that 4-H is the greatest youth development in this country! Anytime you see a current or past 4-H member in the newspaper, it is for positive contributions to their communities, not for making criminal headlines. The junior associations we have in this country are getting stronger and stronger for youth involved. This experience expands their development beyond the 4-H program. However, 4-H is the foundation to these kids and is very close to my heart. I grew up on a mixed farming operation with commercial cattle and I did not have the opportunity to be involved in a junior breed association. 4-H had a major impact on my life. It was through the 4-H program that I got my first exposure to purebred cattle and marketing; the two things which obviously today, are a huge part of my life! Even the dreaded 4-H speeches and public speaking served me well. I bet you never thought public speaking was ever terrifying to me. 4-H prepared me and gave me the skills and foundations that I have today! I have the great privilege to auction two of the strongest regional 4-H sales in Saskatchewan. Every year I am blown away by the repeat buyers who attend and support the sales so strongly. They too can obviously see the positive impact the 4-H program has in the lives of these kids. I do notice a rural/urban disconnect in larger centres; you would think it would be easier to sell steers with more business owners and at a higher price, they are averaging less than rural clubs. The smaller centre business owners dig a little deeper and have more of a connection with the kids and their families. Many of them were 4-H member themselves. It is great to hear a lot of their families are using steer money to set up education funds. There are many young members with excess of $25,000.00 in funds from the sale of their 4-H steers. I overheard a few young girls saying how they “wish they could get their hands on that cash now”. I have a feeling they will feel differently when they graduate and do not have the burden of huge student loans, as many of their classmates will. Then they will really understand the value of their time spent in 4-H and leading their beloved steer onto the truck won’t seem as bad as it once did. They will be there to encourage and support their own “little 4-Hers”, when their time comes. Enjoy your summer, see you on the road. Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  55


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Press Release Seventy-five Year Pioneer Award to the Anderson Family

June 20, 2012: for immediate release Lethbridge AB- Canadian Angus breeders gathered in Lethbridge, Alberta for the 2012 Canadian Angus National Convention. At the Convention the Anderson Family of Swan River, Manitoba were honoured with the 75 Year Pioneer Award presented by the Canadian Angus Association. Anderson Cattle Co. Inc. is a family operation with Bruce and Ione Anderson along with children Austen and Breanna. The family focuses on the values developed through the generations of honesty, integrity and hard work and look forward to the future of the Angus Breed. Alexander Anderson immigrated to Canada in 1880 from Aberdeenshire, Scotland. After settling in Carberry, Manitoba the family moved to the Swan Valley in 1898. Alex’s son Bruce purchased the first purebred Angus female in 1933 and continued to develop the herd through the 40’s and 50’s with sons Robert and Doug as AB Anderson and Sons. The herd grew and became known as Mountain View Farms. Bruce, Doug’s son, purchased his first female at the age of eight. He worked with his family through the years until the Mountain View Farms dispersal in 1991. Anderson Cattle Company Inc. was formed in 1992 and Bruce and Ione developed the Red Tibbie line. Over the next twenty years the herd was established and the farm was built from a bare quarter section. Anderson Cattle Co. Bull Sale was started in 2010. Two hundred females, both Black and Red will be bred in 2012. Through the use of AI, embryo transplant and the Canadian Angus Performance Program the focus has been on producing a functional mother cow and bulls for the commercial cattleman. Community is very important to the Anderson family and everyone is involved with 4-H and the Swan Valley Agriculture Society. Both children have taken an active part in the Canadian Junior Angus Association and last year Austen served as the 2011 Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador, traveling all of the world representing the CAA. As fifth generation Angus breeders, both are proud to promote the breed continuously. The Canadian Angus Association introduced the 75 and 100 year honouree awards to recognize those breeders who had been a member for 75 and 100, respectively, consecutive years within the association. The inauguration of the award was in 2011 and since then, nine breeders have been established into this unique group. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents 3,000 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herd Book and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  59


You might just say John Nostadt “steered” his way to victory. Nostadt, who farms in Maidstone, ON, near Windsor, had a feeling about his 1,324-pound crossbred steer this spring – enough of a feeling that he decided to make the cross-continent trek to Calgary for the first time in a decade. “We had truck trouble coming out. I put a motor in it just before we left home, and a hose blew off it . . . right in downtown Chicago,” recalled Nostadt on Saturday with a rueful chuckle. “I was almost going to turn around, but I thought I had a nice one, so I thought I’d better get it fixed.” That Windy City mechanic may suddenly be on Nostadt’s Christmas card list. That crossbred steer – Angus, Simmental, and Maine Anjou – ended up earning Nostadt and his business partner, Martin Koyle, a cool $11,000 as the grand champion of the Calgary Stampede’s 30th annual UFA Steer Classic, held Saturday under the Big Top. Nostadt and Koyle collect $10,000 from UFA for overall grand champion honours, as per the verdict of show judge Brandon Callis of Brenham, Texas, plus $1,000 for winning the Open class. As per a decade-long tradition, the grand champion steer has been purchased by the Penny Lane Entertainment Group – and is most likely destined to be the main course at Zen 8 Grill for a fall gala fundraiser. Nostadt has enjoyed a real hot streak during his infrequent appearances at the Stampede. He also took top honours at the UFA Steer Classic in 2002 when he brought a Limousin out West, and another of his animals took a best-in-breed red ribbon during the first edition of the show back in 1983. “I’m a little jittery, still, getting over the hype of winning in Centennial year. It’s a real privilege to come here, and do so well . . . it’s just an honour to show at the Calgary Stampede,” he said. “We haven’t shown him anywhere. This was a one-time deal. But we liked him . . . knew he was nice.” The UFA Steer Classic continues to chart a steady growth in terms of participation – going from 79 entries in 2010, to 98 to last summer, to 129 this time around, with exhibitors arriving from across British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and even Iowa. The culmination of the regional steer show season, and the richest steer show in Canada, the UFA Steer Classic sees members of the beef industry congregate at the Stampede to promote and compete in everything from the merits of purebred genetics to the current trends in consumer beef demands. “This is a friendly, yet aggressive competition. There’s straightbred cattle being shown, as well as crossbred cattle. The steers that compete at the UFA Steer Classic have been competing against each other at shows all year. The excitement has been building all season,” notes Don Miller, who chairs the Stampede’s Steer Classic committee. “This event attracts breeders and cattle people from all over. It’s got a tremendous following among both purebred and Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  60


commercial cattle breeders who want to see how things turn out.” Just as importantly, the UFA Steer Classic represents a tremendous opportunity for the cattle industry to educate the urban public about its safe food production standards and responsiveness to consumer market trends. “It’s important to let urbanites know that the quality of Canadian beef is world-class,” says Miller. Event organizers continue to emphasize youth involvement, with the second annual Junior Steer Champion Auction held immediately following the UFA Steer Classic on Saturday afternoon. The owner of the grand champion in the Junior Class, Chase Miller of Cremona, AB, received a $3,000 post-secondary scholarship, as well as $2,000 cash, while the owner of the reserve champion, Kathryn Dolliver of Stettler, AB, earned a scholarship in the amount of $2,000, plus $1,500 cash. Both animals immediately went under the gavel, with proceeds going toward the growth of a self-sustaining Stampede scholarship fund. For the second year, the UFA Steer Classic also features a Jackpot Heifer Show, which was held Sunday, July 15 at 11 a.m. in the Northern Lights Arena. Following is the 30th annual UFA Steer Classic’s list of grand, and reserve champions, respectively: Piller Show Cattle of Neudorf, SK, and Kolby Heaven of Whitecourt, AB, in Angus; 3G Ventures of Cochrane, AB, and Miller Ranching Ltd. of Cremona, AB, in Red Angus; Rhett Jones of Morse, SK, and Jackson Cattle Co. Ltd. of Sedley, SK, in Charolais; Townsend, Curtis Flewelling, Bowden, AB and Lucky Springs Farm of Rocky Mountain House, AB, in Hereford; Symens Land and Cattle of Claresholm, AB, and Dale Bushfield of Irricana, AB, in Hereford Influence; Koyle and Kelsey Stewart of Russell, MB, in Limousin; Fraser’s Murray Grey of Ardrossan, AB, and Victor Zuidhof of Lacombe, AB, in Market Heifer; Brecon Farms Ltd. of Denfield, ON, and 2020 Angus of Paynton, SK, in Maine Anjou; Red Neck Stock Club of Airdrie, AB, and Red Neck Stock Club of Airdrie in Murray Grey; Barrett Elliot of Saskatoon, SK, and Joe Lofthouse of Acme, AB, in Shorthorn; Brandon Konrad of Abbotsford, B.C., and Dennis Serhienko of Maymont, SK., in Simmental; River Hill Park of Neilburg, SK, and River Hill Park of Neilburg, SK, in Speckle Park; and Nostadt/Koyle and Brecon Farms Ltd. of Denfield, ON, in Open.

Grand Champion Steer

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Breeders

services

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  62


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  63


Advertiser’s Index

20/20 Angus

56

Abacus Angus 36 Alameda Agencies Ltd. 62 Alta Genetics 62 Anderson Cattle Co. 32 Animal Health Centre 62 Arda Farms 36 Arm River 56 Arntzen Angus 36 Arntzen, Dean 63 Arway Angus 44 Atlasta Angus 36 Autumn Angus Classic 6 Autumn Tradition 8 Baby Black Angus 15 Bar CR Angus 56 Bar DK 56 Bar-E-L Angus IFC Bear Hills Angus 56 Beverly Hills Angus 56 BJ Cattle Co. 36 Black Ridge Angus Farm 56 Blairs.Ag Cattle Company OBC Blast Angus 62 Border Butte Angus 36 Breed Creek Angus Ranch 56 Brendale Acres 7,44 Bridgehaven Farms 14,15 Bouchard Livestock Int. 62 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. 62 Brockhill Farm 14 Brookmore Angus 32 Bryces Bar B Ranch 56 Burnett, Bryce 56 Buschbeck Farms 7 BuyAgro.com 39 Cadillac Stock Farms 44 Cairnlee Acres 15 Canadian Cattlemen 62 Canadian Farm Insurance Corp. 62 CRAPS 62 Chapman Cattle Company 36 Circle 7 Angus 56 Clair Lane 15 Clegg Angus 36 Crescent Creek Angus 56 Cripps, Greg 63 Curraghdale Cattle Corp. 14 D & K Black Angus 44 Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd. 63 Dayora Farm 44

DeCorby, Marcel 63 Deer Park Farms 15 Deer Range Red Angus 56 Deer River Ranching 36 Delor Cattle & Quarter Horses 36 Diamond T Cattle Co. 36 DKF Red Angus 56 Dolittle Angus 56 Double Bar D Farms 56 Drumore Farms 15,44 DSMR Stock Farm 15 Dudgeon Livestock 44 Dunford Royal Cattle Company 44 DWAJO Registered Angus 36 Early Sunset Ranch 1 Eastondale Angus 56 Edwards Livestock 63 EKW Red Angus 16,56 Enright Farms 10,11 Ferme Wilgor Farms 62 First Line Angus 15 Flewelling Cattle Services 63 Forsyth Ranch Ltd. 57 GBS Angus Farm 57 Gerlei Angus 57 Get-A-Long Stock Farm 36 Gilchrist Farms 15,44 Gillco Farm 14 Glesbar Cattle Co. 36 Glen Gabel Angus 57 Glen Islay Angus 44 Graham Red Angus 44 Grant Rolston Photography Ltd. 63 Halcyon Angus Farm 57 Harprey Angus 15,44 Hamco Cattle Co. 32 Hamilton Farms 36 Harron Farm 14,44 Hartford Bros. 44 Hawthorne Farms 15 Heatherlea Angus 45 Highgrove Angus 15 Hi Low Angus 57 High Tree Cattle 57 H.S. Knill Co. Ltd. 32 Ivanhoe Angus 57 J & S Cattle 16,57 Johnson Livestock 15 JPD Farms 45 Justamere Farms Ltd. 57

K-Deen Angus 36 KBJ Round Farms 36 KC Cattle Co. 57 Kembar Farms 32 Kemp Bros. 14 Kenbert Acres 57 Kenray Ranch 57 Kuntz Farms 57 Lazy MC Angus 36 Leela Farms 45 Lewis Farms Ltd. 37 LiveAuctions.TV 63 Locust Grove Angus 8,14,45 M & J Farms 32 Macks Red Angus 45 Maple Ridge Acres 57 Marin Cattle Presentation 63 Mar Mac Farms 32 McGowan Farms 37 McMillen Ranching Ltd. 57 Meadow Ridge Ent. Ltd. 57 Merit Insurance Brokers 63 Miller-Wilson Angus 37 Minburn Angus 37 MJT Cattle Co. Ltd. 3,37 Moose Creek Red Angus 57 MWC Investments Inc. 37 New Force Consultants 63 Nordal Limousin & Angus 5,58 Northern View Angus 58 Nu-Horizon Angus 58 Oak Manor Angus 45 Ockerman Angus 37 O’Grady, Lyndon 63 Ole Farms 37 Paradise Farms 15,45 Pasquia Red Angus 58 Peak Dot Ranch Ltd. 58 Prairielane Farms 21,32 Premier Livestock 15 Poley, Chris 63 Poplar Meadows Angus 20,62 Pugh Farms 37 Redrich Farms 37 Red Rock Red Angus 37 Red Rose Angus 19,58 Reich Angus Ranch 37 Rehorst Farms Inc. 15 Remitall Farms 9 Remitall West 37

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Ring Creek Farms Ltd. 37 Rivercrest Angus 37 Rock’n Valley Angus 15 Rolling Acres Farms 62 Royal Angus 58 Sandy Bar Ranch 58 Schaff Angus Valley 62 Scotch Line Farms 45 Scott Stock Farm Ltd. 37 Six Mile Angus 17 Skinner Farms 58 Skyebrook Angus 58 Soo Line Cattle Co. IBC Spring Creek Simmentals 19,58 Spruce Grove Cattle Co. 58 Spruce Ridge Stock Farms 32 Spruce View Angus Ranch 37 Standard Hill Angus 58 Steen Agencies 63 Stock, Mark 63 Stockmens Insurance 63 Sunrise Angus 45 Sunset Acres 15 Sunset Ridge Red Angus 32 Tambri Angus 14,45 T Bar K Ranch 58 Ter-Ron Farms 38 Today’s Publishing Inc. 23 Triple L Angus 2,58 Tullamore Farms 12,14,45 Twin Heritage Farms 58 Twin Valley Farm 14 Tyler Harris Photography 63 Upper Glen Angus 15,45 Vancise Cattle Company Inc. 45 Vikse Family Farm 38 Walnut Hill Farm 45 Western Angus 38 Whiskey Lane Livestock 14 Wilbar Farms 58 Willowside Farm 45 Wilgor Farms 13 Worth-Mor Angus 14 Wraz Red Angus 58 Y-Coulee Land & Cattle Co. 18,58 Zaniabar Angus 38


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Egos versus economics … have created a lot of financial woe for livestock producers. COOL (Country of Origin Labeling) has proven to be a ‘big farce!’ What is most amusing, is the fact that R-CALF supporters who lobbied to close borders and shut down trade, are now buying forage from Canadian producers … the same producers they tried to exclude or shut out. The past four hot and dry months in the United States and Eastern Canada have put a different light on the agricultural picture and its markets. The lack of rainfall will undoubtedly put pressure on markets, as grain prices have spiked. The shortage of livestock inventories coupled with high feed prices will be felt in consumer spending. The price of beef over the counter has risen and will continue to rise, but the average consumer does not realize that the drought in the Corn Belt will push the price of Coke and a box of Frosted Flakes much higher, in comparison, to a pound of ground beef. Most areas of Eastern Canada look like Roundup was sprayed from the sky; yet Western Canada enjoys a rosy picture with abundant rain fall and very promising crops and forage. During my travels this past summer, the only grasshopper I’ve seen was west of Renfrew, Ontario. The change in climatic conditions throughout Canada is very distinct. These changes are short term and in all cases affect supply and demand, the factor which has determined economics dating back to the age of the caveman. The change that stirred my interest the most, while attending a major livestock event, was the societal structure of generations in the livestock industry, from the Silent generation down to Generation Y or what is called by many, the Millennial generation. The Silent generation or often referred to as the Crisis generation, are/were the people born in the 1920’s through the first half of the 1940’s. They were mostly sons and daughters of pioneers who immigrated to North America from Europe. They were an adaptive generation formed by necessity; they lived through a volatile era surviving the Great Depression, the Dirty Thirties and World War II. In the purebred livestock industry, they were the builders and pioneers, establishing their herds and founding associations. County fairs were the mode for marketing, while advertising and all communication was done in print or by word of mouth. The generation to follow is the Baby Boomers, born after World War II and up to the early 1960’s. Baby Boomers lived to work and their job, was their life. As a group, they are the wealthiest, most active and physically fit generation today. They were the TV generation growing up with Ed Sullivan, Andy Griffith, and Lucy, Dennis the Menace, Gunsmoke and Bonanza. Baby Boomers control over 80% of personal financial assets and are responsible for more than half of all consumers spending which includes 80% of all leisure travel. Baby Boomers grew and financed the purebred livestock industry. To them it was fashionable to be a breeder, events were always well attended and “white shirt” pre sale dinners were commonplace the evening prior a sale. Baby Boomers were loyal to the breed they chose to work with and in most cases, very voluntary in breed and community activities.

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Generation X, people born from the mid 60’s through to the early 1980’s. Generation X came of age in an era of two-income families, rising divorce rates and a faltering economy. Women were joining the work force in large numbers, spawning the age of “latch-key” children, who, for the most part, spent time away from family. This resulted in Generation X being independent, resourceful and self-sufficient; the first generation with computer technology woven into their lives. Generation X is less committed to one employer, with many having changed jobs numerous times by their early thirties, in comparison to Baby Boomers, who worked to climb the corporate ladder. Members of Generation X are adventurous, value their weekends, vacation time, and are goal orientated. In the livestock sector, many Generation Xers changed breeds from traditional types to continental breeds which were being imported to North America. Even more farm women took jobs off farm to supplement farm income and over half abandoned the family farm to pursue careers in the urban market place. The Millennial generation (Generation Y) is those born in the mid 80’s through the early years towards the turn of the century; the second largest group after the Baby Boomers. The Millennial’s have an increased knowledge and familiarity with communications and digital technology; they have great expectations of the work place often wanting large starting salaries, while many still live at their childhood home well into their mid twenties and are less likely to practice religion than that of the previous generations. The global financial crisis has had a major impact on this generation; causing historically high levels of unemployment among today’s young people, especially in Europe and the United States. Many new university and college graduates are unemployed or underemployed and carry a huge debt through student loans. Generation Y is the first to grow up with computers a part of their home life and cable television has brought them a 500 plus channel viewing opportunity. One of the most popular forms of media use for Millennial’s is through social networking. Some purebred industries have caught up with the habits of the Millennial’s; technology has placed e-mail, text messaging and Facebook ahead of past principles. Most Millennial’s rely on technology to add, subtract and divide; results of events are known as they occur and less and less face-to-face communication is resulting. Text messaging has become as habit forming as the use of tobacco and often employers pay for a lot of time to their employees who text message their social agendas. Although there is a slight glimmer of Millennial’s remaining in agriculture, many have chosen other careers, especially in the oil, gas and mining industries. A young farm adult can get $400.00 to $500.00 per day in the oil field, the same amount their Baby Boomer grandfather got for a bull or a steer in his day. Associations have seen major declines in membership as the Millennial’s seek other venues of employment. In this era we have seen farming operations largely expand while farm population has diminished. The challenge lies ahead for all of us in agriculture. Breed associations have to adapt and conform to the “new era” where the new generation is enticed by technology and net-working. Since they are the builders of the future and also our consumer, we must communicate at their level. The new leaders of the industry, along with folks working in various venues of the livestock fraternity, must be youthful, shedding the past ideas of the founding “Baby Boomers.”

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  67


schedule of

Events

August Published by:

Today’s Angus Advantage #4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Phone: (306) 934-9696 Fax: (306) 934-0744 info@todaysangus.com www.todaysangus.com Our Staff Bryan Kostiuk - Editor Ted Serhienko - Marketing Chris Poley - Marketing Mina Serhienko - Controller Debbie Thiessen - Circulation Treena Ballantyne - Accounting Tiffany Peters - Design Melissa McRae - Design Terra Montes - Design Cherise Tuzakova - Design

Published 5 times/year- Winter, Spring, Summer, Autumn and Fall Careful consideration has been placed on production of this magazine and we are responsible for the value of the advertisement; however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Printed in Canada by: Houghton Boston Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Publications Mail Agreement: 40021107 Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Today’s Angus Advantage Circulation Dept. #4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, SK S7K 7G9 Email: info@tbarc.cominfo

August 4-5 Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up 13 The August Event 14 Alberta Angus AGM & Junior Show 15 International Livestock Congress 17 Old Home Week 23-26 Bulkley Valley Exhibition 29-Sept 2 Interior Provincial Exhibition

September 1 16 21-22 29 29 29 30

Autumn Angus Classic Sale Brampton Fair New Brunswick Beef Expo Eastern Extravaganza Angus Sale Pacific Invitational All Breeds Sale Brylor Tradition With A Vision Sale Autumn Tradition Sale

October 5 6 6-7 6 6 7 9 12 13 13 14 14 19 20

13th Annual Black Magic Angus Sale Black Magic Sale Olds Fall Classic Gilchrist & Friends In It To Win It Sale Expo Boeuf Maritime Fall Fair Justamere Sale of the Year Soo Line Cattle Complete Dispersal Six Mile Female Sale Prairieland Farms Complete Dispersal Blairs.Ag Cattle Co. Female Sale Genetics in Motion Enright Farms & Guests Angus Sale Canadian Red Roundup Futurity & Banquet 40th Annual Canadian Red Roundup Sale

Neepawa, MB Lloydminster, SK Bashaw, AB Calgary, AB Charlottetown, PE Smithers, BC Armstrong, BC

Hanover, ON Brampton, ON Sussex, NB Uxbridge, ON Williams Lake, BC Fort Macloed, AB Blackstock, ON

Olds, AB Olds, AB Olds, AB Lucknow, ON Victoriaville, QC Halifax, NS Lloydminster, SK Midale, SK Fir Mountain, SK Virden, MB Moose Jaw, SK Renfrew, ON Red Deer, AB Red Deer, AB

November 1-4 1-2 2-4 3 3 8-11 8-10 17 19-24 23

Manitoba Livestock Expo Lloydminster Stockade Round Up Toronto Royal Royal Elite All Breeds Sale 4th Annual LLB Autumn Opportunity Bull & Female Sale Farmfair International Saskatoon Fall Fair Northern Select Angus Sale Canadian Western Agribition Power & Perfection Angus Sale

Brandon, MB Lloydminster, SK Toronto, ON Toronto, ON Erskine, AB Edmonton, AB Saskatoon, SK Camrose, AB Regina, SK Regina, SK

December 1 4 7 10 31

Manitoba Keystone Klassic Sale MJT Cattle Co. Hereford & Angus Dispersal Touch of Class Sale You Be The Judge Fall Heifer Sale New Years Resolution Frozen Genetic Sale

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2012  68

Brandon, MB Edgerton, AB Saskatoon, SK Vermilion, AB Red Deer, AB


160 Cows all under 4 years of age

80

Heifer Calves

80

Bull Calves

100

Yearling Bred Heifers

Elite Herd Sire Battery Semen & Embryo Inventory


Today's Angus Advantage Summer 2012  

Summer 2012 Edition of the Today's Angus Advantage

Today's Angus Advantage Summer 2012  

Summer 2012 Edition of the Today's Angus Advantage