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Today’s Angus Advantage Early Sale Issue Summer 2015 Volume 9 Issue 3


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ction Sale - Nov. 27th, Regina , SK & Perfe r e w o n Sale - Dec. 19th, Old P o i t c e l e l o h C t s, AB us ll in e Ang a h t f s s a i l s th as we l e r Richard Latimer 403.507.1122 atu e f Gary Latimer 403.507.1123 r ou Packages of r RR 4 Site 3 Box 16, Olds, Alberta T4H 1T8 fo h bred females www.remitall.ca • cattle@remitall.ca c at available this fall. W Office: 403.556.2742 • Fax: 403.556.2761 Call or email on groups Directions: of bred females for sale 4 miles South of Olds on HWY 2A, 1 mile West on Amerada Road


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  1


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  2


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  3


Summer 2015 - Table of Contents

Features 14

Higher Beef Prices, High Expectations

38

Mutually Relevant

22

CJAA Showdown Results

44 BIXS 48

How and When to Change Vaccine Lines

58

Manitoba Summer Gold Show Results

68

Schedule of Events

22 As In Every Issue 20 36 50 55 66

Rates & Subscriptions Not Taken for Granted A Breeder’s... Veterinary Perspective The Real World The Final Word Cover Photography By Grant Rolston Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  4


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  5


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Building Blocks...

it is a continual work in progress. Regardless the business, the desire to improve must be the driving force in every decision made. It is our goal to improve with every generation made and for that reason we are constantly in search of fresh new genetics with a specific purpose in mind. This breeding season we have added two new and very exciting components to our program. KR Cash CI 4602 and S Open Country 454 will play key roles to an already solid foundation here at our ranch.

Herd Sires

S Titlest 1145 S Glenfield 2141 Bar-H Crossfire 63A Bar-H Ellis 59Z EXAR Foreman Bar-H Turning Point 50A KR Cash CI 4602 S Open Country 454

KR Cash CI 4602 By Barstow Cash

Langenburg, SK. Can S0A 2A0 306.743.2840 Robin, Michelle and John Hogberg www.barh.ca

Visitors welcome! 40 miles east of Yorkton, 9 miles south of Langenburg

S Open Country 454 By HA Open Country

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HBH Checkmate 35C Remitall Rage X TC Foreman HBH Farms Inc.

Oak River, MB

Manager: Barb Airey

204.566.2134 • 204.761.1851

rbairey@hotmail.com

Sunday, October 4, 2015 - 1:00 pm Maple Line Farm

3320 Bradburn Road, Blackstock, Ontario maplelinefarm@hotmail.ca

Consignors... MAPLE LINE FARM Ian & Joy Rudkin 905.718.5331

SOUTHVIEW FARMS Terry & Monica Ormiston 905.439.4235

WESTWIND FARMS Bill & Laura Staples 705.312.0112

BRANTOR ANGUS Ron & Linda Bryant 705.374.4853

Bred Heifers, Young Cows and Calves, Herd Sire Prospects

SALE MANAGEMENT... T Bar C Cattle Co Ltd. P: 306.933.4200 | info@tbarc.com | www.tbarc.com Ted: 305.221.2711 | Chris: 306.220.5006 | Shane: 403.363.9973

View the Catalogue online at www.buyagro.com Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  8


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  9


Sired by SCC Grid Topper 58U

Tullamore Jenny 30B

Tullamore Endella 51B

Sired by SCC Grid Topper 58U

Sired by SCC Baloo 60Y

Sired by SCC Grid Topper 58U

Sired by SCC Grid Topper 58U

12201 Torbram Rd., Caledon, ON L7C 2T4 Ph: 905.843.1236 Email: tullamore.angus@gmail.com

Proven Predictability and Profitability

Advantage 4C

Autumn Angus Classic Dawn 3C Locust Grove

Advantage 4C is a strong January Bull by Sandy Bar Advantage who needs no introduction.

Tibbie 1C

Sept 5, 2015 Hanover, ON.

Locust Grove

Locust Grove

Blackbird 7B Locust Grove

Sired by SCC Grid Topper 58U

Tullamore Jestress 80B

Tullamore Elba 85B

Tullamore Edam 84B

Tullamore Blackbird 72B

Featuring at the Autumn Angus Classic Sale - Sepetember 5, 2015 at Maple Hil Auctions, Hanover, ON

Here is a very powerful and complete heifer that can’t be missed expressing tremendous mass, volume and growth.

7B is sure to catch your eye sale day. Bred to SAV Radiance 0801

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  10

Dawn is a powerful, long bodied high volume heifer from the outcross performance bull Smart One.


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Kenray’s 2015

Fall Collection Watch for us at these 2015 Fall Sales & Events!

Roundup, Red Deer, AB. - Oct 22-24 Canadian Western Agribition, “YARDS” Regina, SK. - Nov 23-28 Kenray 3rd Annual Online Production Sale, Nov 30-Dec 2nd Keystone Klassic, Brandon, MB. - Dec 5th Beyond Borders Commercial Bred Heifer Sale, Heartland Livestock -Virden, MB. Dec (Date TBA)

Check our website at kenrayranch.com for more information Stop by our stall at any of these events or stop by the Ranch anytime for a tour!

Kenray K R a n c h

CONTACT:

Box 218, Redvers SK S0C 2H0

Sheldon [t] 306.452.7545 or Ray [t] 306.452.7447

[e] sheldon@kenrayranch.com [w] kenrayranch.com @KenrayRanch @facebook/KenrayRanch Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  12


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Higher beef prices, high expectations Canadian producers must double high-quality beef production to meet demand

by Laura Nelson LETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA— Canadian cattlemen are producing the highest quality beef ever, and opportunities continue to grow. In the past three years alone, Canadians have increased the percentage of beef grading AAA by 8 percent, and Prime-grading beef increased, too. Larry Corah, who oversees producer outreach north of the 49th Parallel for the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB) brand, said by this spring, 2015 was already shaping up as a phenomenal year for quality grade in Canada. In fact, for the first nine weeks, 2.4 percent of the beef mix graded Prime—still small, but 140 percent higher than the minuscule 1 percent that graded Prime in 2012. Larry Corah

“Prime is a product that is heavily demanded. It has immense value in the global marketplace,” Corah said. “Prime is what differentiates Canadian and U.S. beef from the rest of the world.” Beef that graded AAA moved from 54.7 percent of the grading mix in 2012 to 62 percent in 2015. That mirrors trends in the U.S., where Choice-grading beef jumped from 62.7 percent Choice to 69.2 percent Choice between 2009 and 2014.

Double up on quality?

In 2014, CAB licensed partners sold 40.5 million pounds of the branded beef to Canadian consumers, but less than two-thirds of that was produced in-country. To qualify for CAB, beef must grade in the upper 2/3 of AAA and meet nine additional carcass quality specifications. “Easily, this could be a 50-million-pound market, and it could all be produced in Canada,” Corah said. “Canadian consumers want Canadian beef. That’s why we want to increase production here.” Beef industry leaders point to drought, market dynamics and genetic tools to explain the climbing quality grade trends in North America. They presented updates and insights this spring in Lethbridge, Alta., at the Feeding for Profit seminar.

John Paterson

Brian Perillat

“Because of the drought, we got rid of a lot of the poor quality cows,” John Paterson said. “So the quality of the cowherd is probably better than it’s ever been in the history of our industry.” The director of producer education for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (and former Montana Extension beef specialist) pointed to the southern U.S. Texas alone has liquidated 25 percent of its cowherd – 1.472 million head – in the past decade, primarily due to drought, but also feed prices, operating costs and competition for crop land. In Canada, the post-“Mad Cow” market crash had similar impacts. “In Canada, those guys who stuck it out are finally getting rewarded,” Brian Perillat of Can-Fax said. “Anecdotally, we’re finally seeing the value of breeding stock come up here and starting to stabilize. In 2014, we had both cow-calf guys and feeders making money.” Looking ahead, he said cow-calf producers may see three to five profitable years, but feedlot buyers must be able to afford feeding the calves. Otherwise, Canada may continue exporting more than a million calves per year. Better marbling potential could help.

Changes add marbling

“Cattle prices have changed how we manage cattle,” Corah said, noting that in the past four years, feeder calves have seen a 129 percent price increase and fed cattle marked a 71 percent price increase. The feedlots’ response has been to feed cattle longer and maximize pounds, which in turns add marbling. There’s a significant increase in grading ability when an animal moves from 0.4 to 0.6 inches of back fat. Not surprisingly,

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the percent of carcasses that are discounted for yield grade follows. is

Leighton Kolk

Leighton Kolk, Iron Springs, Alta., one of five cattlemen in the Allied Marketing Group (AMG), which collectively manages 11 feedlots in the Lethbridge area with a onetime combined capacity of 110,000 head. Kolk Farms LTD accounts for 12,000 of that capacity.

Breaking down where the dollars come from helps paint a better picture of “value” for AMG, he said. Last year, the 26,564 Angus-type cattle marketed in the group earned an average of $20/head over base price. Of that, $16 was earned based on quality grade of AAA or higher. A little more than $8/head was earned for qualifying for branded beef programs like CAB, but about $4/ head was lost on yield grade discounts, he said. Comparatively, the 2,075 head of calves that were lighter-hided – grey or tan and likely of continental influence – earned an average of $17/head over base. They earned an average of $8/head on quality grade premiums, $2.50 on other branded programs, and $7 on yield grade premiums.

Genetic keys to carcass, yield

Brothers David and Dyce Bolduc, Stavely, said that with today’s genetic selection tools, cattlemen who understand those values can have the best of both worlds. “This is the biggest challenge in the industry for Angus producers,” David Bolduc said. “We’re still trying to determine exactly where we need to be there to put those pounds on while we keep the quality grade up and make them leaner.”

“This is where Canada has the potential to make the most progress,” he said. “You’re going to see amazing changes in the industry with this kind of knowledge.”

International expectations

As those genetic changes take place, more markets will keep opening to beef despite high prices and tight supplies. Between 2009 and 2014, red meat production and consumption decreased worldwide, while pork and poultry keep trending higher. “Pork’s cheap, chicken’s cheap, but hey… that’s pork and chicken. We’re selling beef. Traditionally, we’ve been concerned with that price spread, but I’m not,” Perillat said. Beef that differentiates itself carves out its own market among global beef eaters. “People expect quality with today’s prices. When we compete with pork or poultry, that’s a lower Choice/Select market competition. But when you get into Choice-plus and Prime, that’s a market in itself,” Corah said. For every opportunity, however, there is more for producers in every segment of the cattle business to juggle. “The cattle industry must produce big, high-value cattle to maximize revenue per unit,” Paterson said. Signals are still mixed on herd expansion. Perillat noted more than two-thirds of last year’s exported calves were heifers. “So we’ll see less heifers fed and slaughtered. But are we keeping back replacements or exporting them?” For now, the focus must remain on maximizing every pound on every plate to continue to add value to the beef production chain, the men agreed. “We’re on the cusp of a lot of really exciting things. Are we producing the highest quality beef ever? Yes, we are. But, we can also do a lot to improve on what we’re doing now,” Corah said. “Never, never, never forget that the dollars you work with come from one place, and that’s the consumers of our product.”

David Bolduc

Dyce Bolduc

He shared carcass data from a set of virgin bulls that didn’t make the breeding program but certainly made the grade. The entire harvest set graded either AAA or Prime, with the exception of one that had sustained a leg injury before harvest and graded AA. In those high-marbling animals, only two were YG 3; the rest yielded in categories 1 or 2. Corah outlined the impact focused genetic management can have on improving quality grade while reining in yield problems. In a 2013 study in the southern U.S., Brahman-Continental crossbred cows were bred to local hybrid bulls while a similar test group was bred to Gardiner Angus bulls with proven marbling ability. The offspring show a huge gap: calves sired by the typical southern bulls graded a minute 25 percent Choice. Their contemporaries, sired by the Angus bulls, graded an average of 76 percent Choice.

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  15


International Trade Centre Investment Announced by Governments of Canada and Saskatchewan Released on July 23, 2015 Today Federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and Saskatchewan Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart announced a commitment of $22 million, through Growing Forward 2, for the construction of a new 150,000 square foot multipurpose facility at Evraz Place called the International Trade Centre. "Both Agribition and Farm Progress are institutions here in Regina and major contributors to the Saskatchewan economy," Ritz said. "This investment provides a world-class venue that will draw international visitors to Saskatchewan to get a firsthand look at Canada's dynamic agriculture industry." "Our government is proud to invest in the International Trade Centre," Stewart said. "This multifunctional facility will make significant contributions to our province's strong and diverse economy. It is going to be an important facility with the ability to attract and host a variety of large events that benefit trade and agri-business in our growing province." The primary goal of this investment is to enhance the stature of significant agricultural events such as Canadian Western Agribition and Canada's Farm Progress Show which generate significant agricultural-related spending and returns for the industry. In addition, the facility is expected to attract other large events such as consumer trade shows. The facility will also connect existing buildings on the grounds, making it one of the largest interconnected event facilities in North America. "I am very proud of council for starting the work on this project, along with our team at Evraz Place," City of Regina Mayor Michael Fougere said. "As a city-owned facility, this venue will help increase the profile of Evraz Place and offer a lot more possibilities for events being held there." Evraz Place is a 102 acre site made up of a variety of multipurpose event buildings, barns, and sport and recreation facilities. It also contains an arena and a convention centre. The International Trade Centre will replace a number of old buildings and barns on the property. It will be located between the Ag-Ex Pavilion and the Canada Centre complex. "We are very grateful for this funding that will help to make the International Trade Centre possible," Evraz Place President and CEO Mark Allan said. "This project will take the facilities at Evraz Place to a world-class level." Regina City Council will discuss the city's portion of the funding at its meeting Monday, July 27. Pending their approval, the project is expected to kick off in November 2015, following Agribition. Construction should be completed by November 2017. Growing Forward 2 is a cost-shared partnership between federal, provincial and territorial governments designed to support an innovative, competitive and profitable Canadian agriculture and agri-food sector. Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  16


Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  17


Canadian Angus Auction Market of the Year Award Presented to Heartland Livestock Services June 24, 2015: for immediate release

ROCKY VIEW COUNTY, AB - The Canadian Angus Association (CAA) is pleased to honour Heartland Livestock Services from Virden, Manitoba with the Auction Market of the Year Award. CAA Director of Field Services, Brian Good, and Manitoba Field Staff, Lois McRae, presented this award in Winnipeg, Manitoba at the Livestock Markets Association of Canada annual conference. Heartland Livestock Services has been connecting buyers and sellers for over 60 years. More recently, the facility has been managed by Jim McCarthur from 1997 until October of 2009, at which time it was taken over by Robin Hill. The auction mart handles over 100,000 head annually, drawing cattle from Manitoba as well as Eastern Saskatchewan. There are several long-time employees to be recognized, including: Rich Gabrielle, Field Man; Drillon Beaton, Field Man; Stewart Stone, General Manager; as well as the late Jim Blackshaw who was a longtime Field Man for the facility. Five words that mean good business for Heartland are: leadership, knowledge, reputation, responsibility and commitment. Whether it’s selling a producers calf crop, managing a bison sale or exporting livestock across North America and overseas, Heartland is a reputable name in the livestock marketing business. Congratulations to all of the owners, managers and staff at Heartland Livestock Services. Your hard work and dedication to the agriculture industry does not go unnoticed. The Canadian Angus Association proudly awards you for your efforts and wishes you continued success in the future. The Auction Market of the Year Award was introduced in 2006 to recognize and honour those auction markets that work hard to promote Angus cattle. Auction markets across Canada have been recognized for their support of the Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed Program. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents 2,700 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herd Book and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

For more information, please contact: Karla Ness Director of Member Engagement kness@cdnangus.ca 1-403-571-3580

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Today’s Angus Advantage along with the Canadian Angus Association have entered into a “Strategic Alliance” creating a unique opportunity for Canadian Angus members to benefit through added value exposure. Today’s Angus Advantage is published five times a year and will feature two Canadian Angus Assocation Special Issues. Canadian Angus Special Issues will be published twice a year. Our August issue previously known as the Early Fall Issue will now be known as the Canadian Angus Association Member Directory and the January Winter Issue will now be known as the Canadian Angus Association Bull Buyer’s Guide. Both issues will have 15,000 copies mailed to the entire membership as well as the complete Canadian Angus commercial mailing list that is comprised of all current Angus bull purchasers throughout Canada. These two breeder tools are unique and the only opportunity for producers to access the value created by the commecial mailing list.

Canadian Angus Association Special Issue Advertising Booking Deadlines... Canadian Angus Association Member Directory Booking Deadline: August 10, 2015 Mailing: September 15, 2015 - 15,000 Copies Distributed To The Canadian Angus Members And Commercial Mailing List Canadian Angus Association Bull Buyers Guide Booking Deadline: January 1, 2016 Mailing: February 1, 2016 - 15,000 Copies Distributed To The Canadian Angus Members And Commercial Mailing List

Regular Issue Advertising Deadlines & Editorial Calendar... Spring Issue Summer Issue Late Fall Issue

April 10 July 10 October 10

Female Issue - 2,500 Copies Distributed Early Sale & Prospects - 2,500 Copies Distributed Late Sale & Shows - 2,500 Copies Distributed

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  20


CAA Special Issue Advertising Rates...

Regular Rate

1 Page $1250.00 1/2 Page $700.00 1/4 Page $450.00 5 Issue Annual Card Ad

Regular Advertising Rates...

With Contract

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With Contract

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Ad Sizes... Contracts are simple, clear and customizable. Full Page - Trim Size 8.25”w X 10.875”h Contact us to see how easy it is to maximize your Full Page - Live Size 7.25”w X 9.875”h marketing. Full Pages add .25” bleed on all 4 sides

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For More Information Contact: Bryan Kostiuk - 306-934-9696 bryan@todaysangus.com Chris Poley - 306-220-5006 chris@todaysangus.com Shane Michelson - 403-363-9973 shane@tbarc.com Office: 306.934.9696  F: 306.934.0744 info@todaysangus.com

www.todaysangus.com

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  21


Emcee Erin Toner

Judges

Laura Bodell Mike Friesen Brody Gardner Tami Gardner Tracy Gardner Brian Good Mabel Hamilton Quinn Hamilton Trish Henderson Rob Holowaychuk Kathy Matejka Karla Ness Grant & Lauralee Rolston Rob Smith Raymond Turney Michael Wheeler Lee & Dawn Wilson

Ringmen

Austen & Katie Anderson Doug Domolewski

Photographer

T bar Invitational Donation This year’s CJAA donation was $13,093.38

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  22

Grant Rolston Photography


CONFORMATION CLASSES PEE WEE DIVISION

HEIFER CALF 1. Ryder Wildman, Sangudo, AB with Red Towaw Monique 404C sired by Red SSS High Line 402M 2. Tavianne Yoder, Barrhead, AB with Red Cinder Cheta 193C sired by Red SLGN X-Files 006X YEARLING HEIFER SPLIT 1 1. Cort Simpson, Theodore, SK with Trixie sired by Angus 1. Sadee Howell, Penhold, AB with Fairland Trixie 20B 1. Eric Smith, Mankota, SK with Red Six Mile Atomic Audry 342B sired by Red Six Mile Rawhide 222X 1. Tavianne Yoder, Barrhead, AB with Red Cinder Glitter 29B sired by Red Lone Stone Revolver 138Z 1. Nate Rigney, Westlock, AB with Moonshine SPLIT 2 1. Luc Smith, Makota, SK with Six Mile Annie K 114B sired by Soo Line Motive 9016 1 .Kasey Adams, Forestburg, AB with Betsy 135B 1. Louis Latimer, Olds, AB with Remitall F Miss Queen 123B sired by Remitall F Odyssey 67X 1. Reed Howell, Penhold, AB with Remitall F Ruby 61B sired by Remitall F Odyssey 67X 1. Mya Latimer, Olds, AB with Remitall F Ellen 62B sired by S A V Harvestor 0338 1. Roan Bosch, Coutts, AB with Border Butte Black Lass 69B sired by Border Butte Grid Topper 53U

BULL CALF 1. Reese Wildman, Sangudo, AB with Red Towaw Bombadier 428C sired by Red Towaw Polaris 447A 1. Luke Henderson, Cochrane, AB with LLB Eliminator 32C sired by Peak Dot Eliminator 765Z 1. Alexi Smith, Mankota, SK with Six Mile Breed Creek 144C sired by Anderson Reflection 1341 1. Colby Symens, Claresholm, AB with SY Crave Time 12C sired by SY Micheal 45Z 1. Landon Brandl, Jarvie, AB with BCC Do Ma Thang 13C sired by Mohnen South Dakota 402

OPEN DIVISION HEIFER CALF 1. Garrett Liebreich, Radville, SK with Merit Socialite 5038C sired by EXAR One-Iron 3889B 2. Brandon Steiner, Alliston, ON with Red Towaw Monique 404C sired by Red SSS High Line 402M CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Garrett Liebreich, Radville, SK with Merit Socialite 5038C sired by EXAR One-Iron 3889B RESERVE CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Brandon Steiner, Alliston, ON with Red Towaw Monique 404C sired by Red SSS High Line 402M YEARLING HEIFER SPLIT 1 1. Brianna Kimmel, Lloydminster, AB with Royal S Pride 42B sired by Soo Line Yellowstone 9286 2. Keaton Kaufmann, Ceylon, SK with SVR Favorite 437B sired by SVR Dominate 478Y SPLIT 2 1. Dakota Townsend, Sylvan Lake, AB with Lone Star Elchies Prides 21B sired by Connealy Right Answer 746 2. Carson Liebreich, Radville, SK with Merit Flora 4120 sired by Bar-E-L Iron Will 32Y

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  23

SPLIT 3 1. Cayley Peltzer, Rosemary, AB with Bandura Miss Phyllis 34B sired by Sitz Upward 307R 2. Hayden Teeple, Paisley, ON with Remitall F Miss Queen 123B sired by Remitall F Odyssey 67X SPLIT 4 1. Colton Symens, Claresholm, AB with SY Annie’s Angel 77B sired by Dameron First Impression 1703166 2. Tyra Fox, Lloydminster, SK with Justamere 1447 Barbara 604B sired by Exar Fortify 1447B SPLIT 5 1. Jill McLerie, Red Deer County, AB with HF Echo 75B sired by HF Simulator 62Z 2. Drayce Robertson, Lloydminster, AB with Exar Henrietta Pride 4934 sired by Baldridge Waylon W34 JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER Cayley Peltzer, Rosemary, AB with Bandura Miss Phyllis 34B sired by Sitz Upward 307R RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER Brianna Kimmel, Lloydminster, AB with Royal S Pride 42B sired by Soo Line Yellowstone 9286 TWO YEAR OLD COW/ CALF PAIR 1. Nicole Booth, Jolicure, NB with Six Mile Lady of Six 735A sired by Connealy Complete 8454 with her calf Six Mile Complete 144C sired by Anderson Reflection 1341 2. Megan Hunt, Rose Valley, SK with Red T & S Sage 33A sired by Red Cockburn Ribeye 346U with her calf Red T & S Sage 51C sired by Red Mar Mac Determination 70A MATURE COW/ CALF PAIR 1. Garrett Liebreich, Radville, SK with Merit Socialite 48X sired by Gdar Insight 7201 with her calf Merit Socialite 5038C sired by EXAR One-Iron 3889B 2. Ty Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Soo Line K Pride 2053 sired by Soo Line Thor 0095 with her calf Schwan First Cut 516C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338


SPLIT 3 1. Keely Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red Ter-Ron Brandy 31B sired by Red Ter-Ron Solo Cup 180Z 2. Lauren Latimer, Olds, AB with Remitall F Barbara Bea 17B sired by S A V Harvestor 0338

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Garrett Liebreich, Radville, SK with Merit Socialite 48X sired by Gdar Insight 7201 with her calf Merit Socialite 5038C sired by EXAR One-Iron 3889B

JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER Keely Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red Ter-Ron Brandy 31B sired by Red Ter-Ron Solo Cup 180Z RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION HEIFER Lauren Latimer, Olds, AB Remitall F Barbara Bea 17B sired by S A V Harvestor 0338 TWO YEAR OLD COW/ CALF PAIR SPLIT 1 1. Maguire Blair, Drake, SK with Bar-E-L Erica 74A sired by Bar-E-L Natural Law 52Y with her calf Blairswest Miss Erica 400C sired by Mich Pit Boss 121Y 2. Baxter Blair, McLean, SK with Red Blair’s Larkaba 42A sired by Red Wheel Gangster 31Y with her calf Red Double B Backroad 2C sired by Red Lazy MC CC Detour 2W

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Nicole Booth, Jolicure, NB with Six Mile Lady of Six 735A sired by Connealy Complete 8454 with her calf Six Mile Complete 144C sired by Anderson Reflection 1341

OWNED DIVISION HEIFER CALF 1. Brianna Kimmel, Lloydminster, AB with Twisted Zorzal’s Lady Lawn 51C sired by WAF Zorzal 321U HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Brianna Kimmel, Lloydminster, AB with Twisted Zorzal’s Lady Lawn 51C sired by WAF Zorzal 321U YEARLING HEIFER SPLIT 1 1. Halley Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red Ter-Ron Brandy 177B sired by Ter-Ron Park Place 18Y 2. Baxter Blair, Mclean, SK with Red Blair’s Bonita 3B sired by Red Haycow Cutting Edge 055

SPLIT 2 1. Brynne Yoder, Barrhead, SK with Red Cinder Cheta 93A sired by Red Lone Stone Persuit 81W with her calf Red Cinder Cheta 193C sired by Red SLGN X-Files 006X 2. Luke Haggart, Onoway, AB with KBJ Pride 49A sired by Geis Baloo 13’08 with her calf Renegade Foolish Pride 5C sired by MWC Body Builder 30Y MATURE COW/CALF PAIR 1. Halley Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red K Adams Zaria 091Z sired by Red Ter-Ron Realdeal 01W with her calf Red Ter-Ron Shocker 10C sired by Red Ter-Ron Parker 34A 2. Laurie Morasch, Bassano, AB with Red MPV Hannah 22Z sired by Red Lazy MC Grizzly 20W with her calf Red Lazy MC Knockout 50C sired by Red MPV Young Gun 7X

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Halley Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red K Adams Zaria 091Z sired by Red Ter-Ron Realdeal 01W with her calf Red Ter-Ron Shocker 10C sired by Red Ter-Ron Parker 34A

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Maguire Blair, Drake, SK with Bar-E-L Erica 74A sired by Bar-E-L Natural Law 52Y with her calf Blairswest Miss Erica 400C sired by Mich Pit Boss 121Y

BRED AND OWNED DIVISION HEIFER CALF 1. Brynne Yoder, Barrhead, AB with Red Cinder Cheta 193C sired by Red SLGN X-Files 006X 2. Maguire Blair, Drake, SK with Blairswest Miss Erica 400C sired by MICH Pit Boss 121Y CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Brynne Yoder, Barrhead, AB with Red Cinder Cheta 193C sired by Red SLGN X-Files 006X RESERVE CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Maguire Blair, Drake, SK with Blairswest Miss Erica 400C sired by MICH Pit Boss 121Y YEARLING HEIFER SPLIT 1 1. Kodie Doetzel, Lipton, SK with Nu-Horizon Ruby 470B sired by MVF Pioneer 104X 2. Bryce Bablitz, Cherhill, AB with Red Rainbow Rebecca 50B sired by Red LFE Turbulence 3082Y

SPLIT 2 1. Laurie Morasch, Bassano, AB with Red Lazy MC Miss 121B sired by Red Lazy MC Eye Spy 64Y 2. Lilly Howell, Penhold, AB with Remitall F Ruby 61B sired by Remitall F Odyssey 67X Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  24


SPLIT 2 1. Becky Domolewski, Taber, AB with Red C.D Ziva 703B sired by Red RCR RIO Grande 123Z 2. Macy Liebreich, Radville, SK with Merit Blacklass 4016 sired by Bar-E-L Iron Will 32Y

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Connor Douglas, Barrhead, AB with Douglas Lena 1A sired by S A V Bismarck 5682 with her calf Douglas Terragator 3C sired by Douglas El Diablo 5A

YEARLING BULL 1. Kailey Brandl, Jarvie, AB with BCC Fire It Up 2B sired by Remitall F Odyssey 67X 2. Riley Leeson, Vauxhall, AB with Allencroft R Impression 02 01B sired by Connealy Impression 89

JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Kodie Doetzel, Lipton, SK with Nu-Horizon Ruby 470B sired by MVF Pioneer 104X RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Bryce Bablitz, Cherhill, AB with Red Rainbow Rebecca 50B sired by Red LFE Turbulence 3082Y TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR 1. Connor Douglas, Barrhead, AB with Douglas Lena 1A sired by S A V Bismarck 5682 with her calf Douglas Terragator 3C sired by Douglas El Diablo 5A 2. Will Jermey, Ashern, MB with SPR RDG Blackbird 23A sired by Spridge Worth The Weight 813W with her calf SPR RDG Sparky 123C sired by S A V Camaro 9272 MATURE COW/CALF PAIR 1. Wacey Townsend, Sylvan Lake, AB with Lone Star Miss Bloomindale 3Z sired by Salt Creek Bob 7003 with her calf Lone Star Commodity 10C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338

SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Wacey Townsend, Sylvan Lake, AB with Lone Star Miss Bloomindale 3Z sired by Salt Creek Bob 7003 with her calf Lone Star Commodity 10C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338

RESERVE CHAMPION BULL CALF Wacey Townsend, Sylvan Lake, AB with Lone Star Commodity 10C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338

JUNIOR CHAMPION BULL Kailey Brandl, Jarvie, AB with BCC Fire It Up 2B sired by Remitall F Odyssey 67X RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Kodie Doetzel, Lipton, SK with Nu-Horizon Ruby 470B sired by MVF Pioneer 104X

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION BULL Riley Leeson, Vauxhall, AB with Allencroft R Impression 02 01B sired by Connealy Impression 89

BULL DIVISION BULL CALF SPLIT 1 1. Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Wrights 135Z By Design 16C sired by Red Six Mile Kill Switch 135Z 2. Wacey Townsend, Sylvan Lake, AB with Lone Star Commodity 10C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338 SPLIT 2 1. Miranda Brownell, Falkland, BC with Arete Lively 203Z 53’15 sired by Arete Mythos 3R 11’11 2. Bailey Dietrich, Forestburg, AB with Red Redrich Cloud Nine 99C sired by Red Cockburn Alcatraz 394A

GRAND CHAMPION BULL Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Wrights 135Z By Design 16C sired by Red Six Mile Kill Switch 135Z

SPLIT 3 1. Payton Schwan, Swift Current, SK with Schwan First Cut 516C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338 2. Chad Lorenz, Markerville, AB with Lorenz Unanimous 17C sired by Peak Dot Unanimous 730A CHAMPION BULL CALF Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Red Wrights 135Z By Design sired by Red Six Mile Kill Switch 135Z

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RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION BULL Wacey Townsend, Sylvan Lake, AB with Lone Star Commodity 10C sired by S A V Harvestor 0338


COMMERICAL DIVISION HEIFER CALF 1. Cade Rutten, Wawota, SK with Cherry Pie 2. Avary Hickman, Vermilion, AB with STON Zahara 60C CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Cade Rutten, Wawota, SK with Cherry Pie RESERVE CHAMPION HEIFER CALF Avary Hickman, Vermilion AB with STON Zahara 60C YEARLING HEIFER SPLIT 1 1. Lilly Howell, Penhold, AB with Fairland Trixie 20B 2. Cache McLerie, Red Deer County, AB with BCL Arizona 434B

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Cade Rutten, Wawota, SK with Cherry Blossom

SPLIT 2 1. Keely Adams, Forestburg, AB with Betsy 135B 2. Lauren Blair, McLean, SK with MJNB Cherry Blaster 4B JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Lilly Howell, Penhold, AB with Fairland Trixie 20B RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Keely Adams, Forestburg, AB with Betsy 135B TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR 1. Cade Rutten, Wawota, SK with Cherry Blossom and her calf Cherry Pie 2. Avary Hickman, Vermilion, AB with VV Zahara 42A and her calf STON Zahara 60C

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE Lilly Howell, Penhold, AB with Fairland Trixie 20B RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION FEMALE Avary Hickman, Vermilion, AB with VV Zahara 42A FINISHED STEER 1. Katie Wright, Melfort, SK with Big Country 2. Maguire Blair, Drake, SK with Orange Crush

GRAND CHAMPION STEER Katie Wright, Mefort, SK with Big Country

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION STEER Maguire Blair, Drake, SK with Orange Crush

CANADIAN CLASS SPLIT 1 1. Nicole Booth, Jolicure, NB with Red Six Mile Atomic Audry 342B sired by Red Six Mile Rawhide 222X 2. Brittany Hunt, Rose Valley, SK with Red McGowan Empress 5B sired by Red Bar-E-L Power Up 220X SPLIT 2 1. Keely Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red Ter-Ron Brandy 31B sired by Red Ter-Ron Solo Cup 180Z 2. Brooke Bablitz, Cherhill, AB with Red Rainbow B Larkaba 39B sired by Red Six Mile Redwood 259X

CANADIAN CLASS CHAMPION Keely Adams, Forestburg, AB with Red Ter-Ron Brandy 31B sired by Red Ter-Ron Solo Cup 180Z

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GRAND AGGREGATE

SALES TALK

JUNIOR CHAMPION Keely Adams

JUNIOR CHAMPION Baxter Blair

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Baxter Blair

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Will Bradford

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Halley Adams

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Chris Jermey

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Chris Jermey

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Wacey Townsend

SENIOR CHAMPION Brooke Bablitz

SENIOR CHAMPION Chad Lorenz

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Chad Lorenz

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Patrick Holland

PRINT MARKETING

SHOWMANSHIP

JUNIOR CHAMPION Amanda McGillivray

JUNIOR CHAMPION Keely Adams

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Tyra Fox

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Halley Adams

SENIOR CHAMPION & SUPREME CHAMPION SHOWMAN Bailey Dietrich

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Brynne Yoder INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Halley Adams RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Cache McLerie SENIOR CHAMPION Nicole Booth RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Michaela Chalmers

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Lilly Howell

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Brooke Bablitz


JUDGING COMPETITION

TEAM GROOMING

JUNIOR CHAMPION Baxter Blair

JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Kailey and Wynton Brandl

SENIOR CHAMPIONS Ty and Bailey Dietrich

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Brynne Yoder INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Payton Schwan SENIOR CHAMPION Brittany Hunt RESERVE SENOIR CHAMPION Allison Speller

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Keely Adams and Lexi Dietrich

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPIONS Dakota and Wacey Townsend

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHOW RING TEAM JUDGING

JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Baxter Blair and Amanda McGillivray

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Maguire Blair and Davis Schmidt

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Avary Hickman

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPIONS Will Bradford and Keely Adams

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Heidi Tymko

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Maguire Blair and Luke Haggert

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Lauren Blair

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Payton Schwan and Davis Schmidt SENIOR CHAMPIONS Ty Dietrich and Allison Speller RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPIONS

JUNIOR CHAMPION Amanda McGillivray

SENIOR CHAMPION Chad Lorenz RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPIONS Jill and Cache McLerie

Kelsey Ribey and Patrick Holland

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RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Becky Domolewski


LITERATURE COMPETITION

SCRAPBOOK

FARM SIGN

JUNIOR CHAMPION Keely Adams

JUNIOR CHAMPION Keely Adams

JUNIOR CHAMPION Kailey Brandl

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Colton Symens

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Lilly Howell

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Amanda McGillivray

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Macy Liebreich

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Brianna Kimmel

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Jarrett Hargrave

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Halley Adams

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Hillary Sauder

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Brianna Kimmel

SENIOR CHAMPION Meghan McGillivray

SENIOR CHAMPION Jennifer Jermey

SENIOR CHAMPION Becky Domolewski

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Ty Dietrich

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Brooke Bablitz

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Allison Speller

ART COMPETITION

GRAPHIC DESIGN

PUBLIC SPEAKING

JUNIOR CHAMPION Brynne Yoder

JUNIOR CHAMPION Amanda McGillivray

JUNIOR CHAMPION Amanda McGillivray

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Lilly Howell

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Avary Hickman

RESERVE JUNIOR CHAMPION Keely Adams

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Wade Olynyk

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Halley Adams

INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Chris Jermey

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Chris Jermey

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Kodie Doetzel

RESERVE INTERMEDIATE CHAMPION Brianna Kimmel

SENIOR CHAMPION Becky Domolewski

SENIOR CHAMPION Ty Dietrich

SENIOR CHAMPION Brooke Bablitz

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Ty Schwan

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Brooke Bablitz

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION Jennifer Jermey

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ANGUS COOK-OFF

CJAA STOCKMEN OF THE YEAR

Ty Dietrich

CHAMPION Northern Minions and a Couch - Brooke and Bryce Bablitz, Connor and Kayleen Douglas,Thomas, Reese and Ryder Wildman and Jared Couch

HERDSMAN COMPETITION

Morasch Stall

SPIRIT OF YOUTH AWARD

Becky Domolewski

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Highway 21 Feeders Ltd. Announced as Canadian Angus Association Western Feedlot of the Year June 24, 2015: for immediate release ROCKY VIEW COUNTY, AB - The Canadian Angus Association is pleased to honour Highway 21 Feeders Ltd. with the Western Feedlot of the Year Award. This award was presented on June 5 during Cattleman’s Connection Day at the Canadian Angus National Convention. The presentation was made to Scott Brady, the Cow/Calf Manager at Highway 21, during the afternoon tours at Grow Safe Systems in Airdrie, AB. His vast knowledge in the feedlot and cow/calf sector brought Scott to Cattleman’s Connection Day as a speaker panel during the morning sessions. Owned by Ed and Lyle Miller, Highway 21 is a father son operation located in Acme, AB. between Strathmore, Drumheller, Olds, and Red Deer. Their operation consists of around 25,000 head of feedlot cattle as well as around 8,500 cows. They have a very large land base on which they can produce enough feed to supply both their feedlot and cow/calf operations. The Highway 21 team puts a large emphasis on genetic improvement, utilizing artificial insemination (AI) to breed over 5,000 of their cows in 2015. They purchase high carcass quality bulls and have them collected at stud so they can be used in their AI program. This year Highway 21 purchased an Angus bull that scanned the highest recorded rib eye in Canada, an incredible feat for any commercial operation. Highway 21 has also run Angus bull tests at their facility, contributing to genetic improvement across the breed. As one of the largest operations in South Central Alberta, the Highway 21 team values hard work and the western lifestyle and a ppreciate people who share those same values. They are proudly family owned and operated and take pride in being good stewards of their land and animals. Highway 21 Feeders Ltd. has been adding value to the beef industry for many years. The Canadian Angus Association is pleased to recognize this family operation for all of their hard work. Congratulations to Ed and Lyle Miller and family and all of their staff on winning the Western Feedlot Award. The Canadian Angus Association introduced the Feedlot of the Year award five years ago to recognize feedlots that promote Angus to their customers and that feed Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed tagged cattle. The Canadian Angus Association is Canada’s largest purebred beef breed organization. The Association represents 2,700 members across Canada for the purposes of registering and recording the pedigrees of purebred Angus cattle in the closed Herd Book, and promoting the breed across Canada. The member-approved mandate is to maintain breed registry, breed purity and provide services that enhance the growth and position of the Angus breed.

For more information, please contact: Karla Ness Director of Member Engagement kness@cdnangus.ca 1-403-571-3580

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internet How to do things

Search all the things you could possibly want but only find the ones you don’t

...and Go

Only five impossible steps!

1

Get a piece of string and two empty cans (preferably soup cans). If you don’t have cans or you don’t want to work with them, you can also use cups (preferably plastic),such as the ones shown here. Plastic is a little easier to work with than metal. Styrofoam cups do notforget work well it. because they are soft and spongy Ahh, and absorb sound instead of transmitting it. In a pinch, you can use disposable paper cups, but plastic and metal take more wear-and-tear.

Time-tested and the best way to have your message heard. Contact us today to add your production sale catalogue online or to join the breeders who have seen how easy it is to have a custom website.

Bryan Kostiuk

bryan@tbarc.com

P: 306-933-4200

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  35

www.buyagro.com F: 306-934-0744


NOT TAKEN FOR GRANTED Brothers

Shorty wasn’t real big on hospitals, not the buildings or for that matter the institution, but he disliked the whole concept. He had been there a time or two, when family members were in need of health care, and generally things worked out well. This time was different. Shorty was on his way to see his younger brother, who was a resident in a new, bright and shiny hospital. As his truck rumbled towards town Shorty was thinking back on his youth. This particular brother had been a pain in the ass as a kid. He and Shorty had scrapped constantly, driving his parents half crazy. Shorty smiled as he remembered the time his younger sibling had gone missing. They found him sitting on the peak of the roof of a nearby shed, as proud as can be at his accomplishment. Looking back, it was a pretty good climb for a four year old. Shorty wanted to knock him off the roof by throwing rocks at him. He knew that throwing rocks at things was the brother’s preferred method of problem resolution. Then there was the time he had pissed off their Mom and in her anger and without thinking she said to the younger brother, “Go outside and get me something to spank you with!” The younger brother obeyed, left the house and returned some time later with a leaf from the lilac bush clutched in his hand. He and his brother had spent hours working on rolling rocks down mountainsides…they were never too busy or too tired to do that. Neither of the brothers could pass a body of water without skipping stones, something that they had continued into adulthood. As the two had gotten older they forged a solid bond, one that both probably had taken for granted. Shorty was the first one that his brother called when he had gotten engaged, when his kids were born and when he found out he had cancer.

Shorty’s life changed a little with each of those announcements, but the last one was hard to take. His nieces and nephew were now adults; each doing well in their chosen endeavours, the sister in law had eventually been replaced, at her request, by an old family friend that made his brother smile for the first time in ages. Shorty’s mind wandered to the water fights during their 4-H years, to the time that his brother’s university dorm neighbour was nearly a twin, in mannerism and physical appearance. They had some fun with that and the two had remained friends. His brother had that sort of an effect on the people he met….he was charismatic. He could argue up a storm as well. The most frustrating part of an argument with him was that half way through he would change sides with whomever he was arguing. It wasn’t the subject matter; it was the argument that mattered to him. Shorty shook his head. His brother had always made him smile, even now. He looked up the hill at the shiny building with a big ‘H’ on the top. He wasn’t really sure why he was even here, there was nothing he could do, but he wheeled the truck into the parking lot, found a spot and turned the truck off. He had planned on getting out and going in but…. “Shorty! Shorty! Are you alright?” Shorty jerked his head to the sound of the voice. It was the new sister in law, she smiled at him. Shorty wiped away the tears, got out of the truck and gave her a hug. “Yeah…I am okay.

Hey can you wait a minute?”

The sister in law looked at him for a second. “Sure?” Shorty walked to the edge of the asphalt and looked at the ground. He searched for an especially nice stone, bent over and picked one up.

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“What?” The sister in law looked at him like he had lost his marbles, “are you going to do with the rock?” “You will have to ask your husband. You see, when he was younger he used these as problem solvers…” Shorty’s voice tailed off, his sister in law took his arm and walked with him towards the building. A few weeks later Shorty found himself walking with his sister in law once more, this time into a funeral home. She stopped on the walk just outside the door, turned to Shorty and handed him a stone. “He had this in his hand when he passed. He kept it with him ever since you handed it to him in the hospital.” Her voice trailed off as she handed the stone to Shorty. Shorty sat through the service with his sister in law, his wife and his nephew and nieces in the front row, the stone in his pocket. When the family filed out, they loaded into vehicles and headed to the cemetery. Shorty’s wife rode with his sister in law, Shorty rode alone in the back of the procession. When the vehicles turned right, Shorty went left.

His phone chirped. It was his wife sending a text. ‘Where are you? We are waiting at the grave, are you coming?’ His answer was simple….’No.’ He stood up and reached into his jean pocket and pulled out the stone he was given before the funeral. It was smooth, flat, nearly round and fit nicely in his hand. He walked to the water’s edge, and put the stone into his right hand. It rested on his middle finger and was held between his thumb and index finger. He drew back his arm and flung the stone, side armed, across the water. The first two skips were long and graceful, followed by a series of shorter and faster skips, until the stone lost momentum. The stone appeared to float across the water’s surface and then, just for a split second it stopped, and slipped below the surface. Gary Donald Rolston recently lost a long, courageous battle with cancer. Ironically he passed away on the calendar day on which I was born. He was my younger brother, my oldest friend and my hero.

Shorty found himself sitting on a rock at the nearby lake a few minutes later, staring blankly across the water at the mountains in the distance. He was thinking about the last few times he had spent with his brother and all the times he hadn’t.

Grant Rolston was born and raised in ranching country near Penticton, British Columbia. After graduating school, he worked on a purebred Hereford ranch, then assumed a position at Western Breeders Artificial Insemination Unit. In 1980, he left the livestock scene and joined the Edmonton Police Department, where he received his formal training in photography, working for the IDENT unit (crime scene investigation). After a decade, he returned to the industry, purchasing a herd of purebred Angus cattle but both Grant and his wife, Lauralee, worked off the ranch to make a living. He chose livestock photography and is now Canada’s premier livestock photographer of beef cattle. Grant and Lauralee travel throughout nine provinces in Canada for on farm photography, in addition to all major livestock shows, including the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, the Canadian Western Agribition, and all major National Junior shows in the summer months. Grant and Lauralee Rolston reside in Vulcan, Alberta. With four decades of experience, Grant shares things that are “Not Taken for Granted.”

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Mutually Relevant Canadian Angus producers hear from president of Certified Angus Beef brand

by Trish Henderson CALGARY, ALBERTA— U.S.-based efforts to market the world’s most popular brand of fresh beef add value to Canadian Angus cattle, according to Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand President John Stika.

John Stika

“Our ability to deliver high-quality, great-tasting beef impacts your business,” he told a group of 200 Angus breeders gathered for the annual Canadian Angus Association Convention in Calgary this June. In turn, the ranchers’ ability to produce cattle with premium marbling impacts the brand, so the two are “mutually relevant.”

Stika said ranchers own the brand, but it can be hard to focus on something so far removed from the ranch. “We get paid for cows that breed back, for live calves, and healthy, fastgrowing animals, but the carcass is the most valuable thing we produce,” he said. “This is the only source of revenue for the beef industry, even though it’s the last thing we’re paid for. Consumers value great tasting beef, and our ultimate goal is to increase overall beef demand by pleasing consumers.”

one reason for such phenomenal growth in demand. That’s all based on the brand’s carcass specifications (https://www.certifiedangusbeef.com/ brand/specs.php) “in place with few changes” for 37 years. “We’re a marketing organization and we create value. Not just a feel-good, but economic value and pull-through demand that starts with consumers,” he said. “You might think the goal is to be different, unique or flashy, but that’s not really it. We just have to produce something that is relevant and useful to our customers. If we do that, they will pay more, because it delivers more.” Packers and feedlots pay more for the cattle that meet those specifications. The commercial cattleman in turn pays more for the registered Angus bulls that can deliver those genetics. “That strengthens the demand for Angus cattle, which is CAB’s mission,” Stika noted. The price-to-value relationship has grown strong enough to weather the ups and downs of long-term cycles from cattle to financial. “We’re among an elite group of brands in our ability to increase market share during years of poor economic performance,” Stika said. “CAB has experienced ten consecutive years of growth and eight consecutive years of record sales, and our prices did not drop. Consumers felt our product was worth more relative to other protein sources. And with today’s high beef prices – 185% more expensive than chicken – our product must be better.”

Some Angus producers rely on their phenotypic judging ability – the eye of the stockman – more than genetic trait predictors like expected progeny differences (EPDs), he noted. “But whether you’re focused on carcass EPDs or not, you need to realize the consumer is focused on taste, and that is what ultimately impacts our businesses,” Stika said. Research from Kansas State University proves demand for premium beef is growing. Despite adverse economic conditions and a shrinking North American cow herd, demand for CAB has increased 96.5% since 2009. During the same period, demand for USDA Choice (Canadian AAA equivalent) decreased by 2.3% (See Chart 1). Stika cited the strong price-to-value relationship represented by CAB as

Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  38

Chart 1


As consumers buy more of the better beef, the category becomes less of a commodity (See Chart 2), he explained.

“That means Canadian CAB product met only 64.5% of domestic demand,” Stika said. “There’s opportunity to produce and sell more of this brand in Canada while adding value to your cattle.” Progress will have to start with more Angus breeders including aboveaverage marbling in genetic selection, a strategy that research has shown need not impair selection for other traits, he said. “The number one reason carcasses fail to meet CAB specifications is lack of marbling. Marbling scores must be in the upper two-thirds of the AAA grade or higher to earn the right to bear the CAB logo,” he said. In general, Angus cattle are well-marbled, but differences still exist between individual animals. Marbling is a highly heritable trait, meaning beef quality can be enhanced by selecting breeding stock—bulls or replacement heifers—with proven high levels of marbling.

Chart 2 “This is good news if you’re an Angus breeder, and speaks to the strengths of our cattle,” Stika said. “There’s a quality revolution taking place on the palates of consumers, and no one’s better suited to deliver on this than those raising Angus genetics.” How much more do packers pay? Last year, $50 million in premiums were paid for CAB-qualifying carcasses. While Stika acknowledged those packer grid premiums are still higher in the United States than in Canada, the difference is shrinking. “Angus calves are also bringing more at sale barns in both Canada and the U.S.,” he said. “That tells ranchers they need more Angus genetics—not just black-hided calves—and translates to higher prices for Angus cattle.”

CAB in Canada

Canada is the largest market for CAB outside of the U.S. In 2014, the four Canadian plants licensed to process the brand produced 26.5 million pounds. However, actual Canadian consumers purchased 41.1 million pounds.

“But we don’t have to chase carcass traits alone. Through selection, producers can improve quality grades while still maintaining maternal cow functions and other important characteristics,” said Stika. Tools and technologies to evaluate marbling quality grade potential include intramuscular ultrasound measurements, genomic tests such as GeneMax or HD50K, EPDs and collecting actual carcass data from cull animals. “While some of the new technologies aren’t perfect, they’re better than nothing,” Stika admitted. “By combining the eye of a stockman and using all the technologies available, we can do our part as Angus breeders to improve the quality of our product and meet consumer demand for great tasting beef.” Even a 1% increase in the number of Canadian carcasses meeting CAB quality specifications would equate to 8,000 additional carcasses annually, or 2 million more pounds of CAB to market. “Our ability to maintain our lifestyles on the farms and ranches we love depends ultimately on the acceptance of our products by those furthest from our rural communities,” Stika concluded. “Focusing on quality, taste and what the consumer values will have a positive impact on our business.”

Certified Angus Beef ® 10 Quality Specifications

Quality standards ensure that every carcass earning the CAB brand offers consumers the same exceptional eating experience. To be accepted cattle that are at least 51% black-hided must meet these criteria: 1) Modest or higher marbling (starting with the upper 2/3 of AAA grade) 2) Medium or fine marbling texture 3) Less than 30 months of age for youthful lean and skeletal characteristics 4) 10 to 16 square inch ribeye area 5) Less than 1,000 pound hot carcass weight

6) Less than 1 inch fat thickness 7) Superior muscling (restricts dairy influence) 8) Practically free of capillary rupture 9) No dark cutters 10) No neck hump exceeding 2 inches (restricts Bos Indicus influence)

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Clint, Suzanne, Eric, Luc & Alexi Smith Box 284, Mankota, SK H: 306.478.2470 C: 306.478-7470 F: 306.478.2480 breedcreekranch@sasktel.net

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Mark & Pamela Wushke Whitewood, SK, S0G 5C0 306-735-7980

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Box 176 Dundurn, SK S0K 1K0 306.492.2161 wilbarcattle@gmail.com b r ya n a n d t r a c e y w i l l m s w w w . w i l b a r fa r m s . co m

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Deborah Wilson is Sr. Vice-president of BIXSco Inc, the partnership between Viewtrak Technologies Inc. and Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.

The key to unlocking the value of data is in the industry’s hands During the month of June 2015, I had the great privilege of formally interviewing nearly twenty industry leaders from all parts of the supply chain to discuss a critical topic—the issue of exchanging information. Those of you who know me know that this issue has been on my radar for years. This is why I agreed to join a startup technology company (BIXSCO) when most women at my stage of life (notice I didn’t say age, I said stage) would be finding ways to wind down. I believe that industry-wide data sharing is critically important. Despite my passion, I realize that not everyone shares my enthusiasm. Talk to the hand Deb, some might say. Instead, let me talk to a couple of other important localities. The first is your back pocket. The second is your chest pocket. But don’t take my word for it. Take it from the cross section of industry leaders I spent hours with on the phone. The first thing they will tell you, as they told me, is that information is power. It’s the key to understanding what you’re producing so you can do it better, faster, with a higher quality—and get properly rewarded for the meat you’re able to produce. One insider told me that there could be up to twenty-five percent more profit if producers have access to data information flow at the cow/calf stage. It’s also the key to accessing the world’s high value markets like Asia and Europe— who are asking us to prove the history of care of our animals, which at the moment, we aren’t able to do. Countries that can—like Ireland and Australia—are going to gain a much bigger share of these markets while fight amongst ourselves, thinking that the best way to make money is at someone else’s expense (their words, not mine). I was happy to hear them say that the industry has a lot of confidence in BIXSCO’s management and is willing to give BIXS another shot after a disappointing first attempt. And while they’re optimistic, they’re also realistic about our chances for success. So they’re sceptical about whether BIXS can overcome the competitiveness, mistrust, and complacency that plague the industry and have delayed the evolution of datasharing. That’s why our job at BIXSCO is to help the industry imagine the value of an integrated supply chain, and to help everyone (from producers through to packers) find their own ways to unlock the value of information by buying and selling it to others. We’re here to help facilitate those relationships so that everyone can find value. When we do that, some believe that industry fragmentation will be a thing of the past. Others wonder if mandating data sharing

is the only realistic solution. The answer is clearly in the industry’s own hands.

Now that I’ve addressed your back pocket, let me talk to the chest pocket—specifically the left side pocket. Yes, I’m speaking to your heart now, and the pride that every one of us feels about being part of this industry. But again, don’t take my word for it. Listen to the industry leaders I interviewed. They’ll tell you that Canadian beef is recognized as the highest quality protein in the world, raised right by producers who care. They’ll tell you that you’re part of a great industry with a great story. They’ll also tell you that none of that matters because we can’t prove our promises. And that’s the other important thing that BIXS can do— reflect the pride of care that goes into raising, feeding, and packaging our beef. By helping to track those practices through the chain, we can strengthen and protect the whole industry while helping individual players extract value from their data. The last thing these industry leaders told us is that our job isn’t going to be easy. So our goal is to start with some small wins. As a sign of positive momentum, several breed associations are now prepared to bridge their databases with BIXS to allow their data to flow through the chain. This is an important first step, providing us with thousands of new records. Secondly, the packers have agreed to re-engage with BIXS by inputting their most recent carcass data into the system. These are exciting new developments for sure, but we still have other hurdles to overcome. We’re working on technology and website improvements, and have developed a strong industry engagement plan that we’ll roll out later this fall. Over the next few months, we’ll keep building momentum by getting support from different parts of the chain— starting with the most interested and engaged parts of the industry that already buy into the importance of data sharing. Maybe you’re not interested in unlocking the value of the data that you already have. Perhaps you don’t want to get compensated by other parts of the chain for the value of your work or the pride you take. After all, improving marketing, management, and profitability isn’t for everyone. But if it’s for you, get on board! In fact, what are you waiting for? If everyone waits until someone else takes the first move, we’ll never progress. If you haven’t already signed on to BIXS, please take a moment to sign up now—it’s as easy as three simple steps(www.bixs2.ca). And please encourage others to do the same. BIXSCO is helping to unlock the value of data. But you hold the key.

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Research Summary

July 7, 2015

Background and Methodology BIXS is an information exchange system that allows various segments of the cattle industry to exchange data. The early version of BIXS was a disappointment. Under a new ownership structure, BIXS is working to overcome negative perceptions, re-establish confidence, and re-engage the industry in the program. In addition to one-on-one meetings and events, the new ownership has undertaken a research project with various industry partners through a series of nineteen individual phone interviews (30 to 60 minutes each). Respondents included a cross section of industry members including representatives from the breed associations, producer groups, individual producers, NGOs, packers, feedlot, genetics, and auction marts. The interviews were conducted by Joni Avram of Cause & Effect Marketing, a well-respected Calgary marketing agency, and facilitated by Deborah Wilson, Senior Vice-President of BIXSco Inc. Through this process, BIXS has sought to understand the industry’s concerns, needs and wants, and their level of confidence in BIXS moving forward. In order to be as open and transparent as possible, we are making public a summary of our findings. While the names of all participants have remained anonymous, we have asked for objections before publishing this document, and have received none.

Executive Summary Industry fragmentation was identified as a major concern, and data sharing through the supply chain as necessary for competitiveness. As consumers and retailers demand verifiable information about their food, industry can’t afford to let other protein producers take the lead (which is already happening). At the moment, much of the data that has improved both the pork and poultry industries is being lost in the cattle industry. While the industry has confidence in BIXS’ new leadership, it’s on the fence about whether it can deliver on its promise of facilitating industry-wide data sharing—partly because the industry is competitive, mistrusting of one another, and comfortable with the status quo. While packers are seen as a “choke point,” some respondents were optimistic that they could be brought onside if there is

a clear value proposition; others wondered if mandating data sharing was the only solution. Three main themes emerged from the research. First, that BIXS needs to prove the value proposition of data sharing—to clearly demonstrate how data will add value. Two, that the greater outcome of the program is a viable and sustainable industry able to access world markets, and respond to consumer demand for the story behind their beef. Three, that the pride producers (and others) feel in their work gets lost when they don’t have a sense of how their efforts contribute to the positive perception of their industry—this is a major emotional driver that is overlooked. Meanwhile, there appears to be a certain urgency to make BIXS viable. BIXS needs some quick wins to show momentum and should focus on the top 10-15% of the industry who “get” it. BIXS’s positioning as a stock exchange resonates—because BIXS is a vehicle for people to connect, share, buy and sell information based on their own value proposition. Ultimately, BIXS needs a sales job, but the story is not about data. “This is not an IT challenge. It is all about people, their context and their view of the world.”

Overview of Findings Fragmentation is a major concern—all respondents agreed that fragmentation and the need to share information through the value chain is a major challenge facing the industry. The identified issues related to privacy, competition, confidentiality, and a lack of trust that pervades the industry. CAPPI, Strawman, and Canadian Beef Improvement Network Reports have all said that data sharing needs to happen. Everyone is collecting data and there is no means to share it. Until we can share the data the industry will not evolve. • “The Memorandum of Understanding in the beef industry is “I win, you lose.’” • The easiest way to make money is at someone else’s expense. • Data is power. Industry is happy with the new management of BIXS and believes it has promise, but has not realized its potential. BIXS was a major source of hope for the industry and a major source of disappointment. However, there is strong willingness to take a second look at BIXS now that there is new management. Respondents like the tech background of ViewTrak particularly their history in the auction

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markets. Deborah Wilson’s boots-on-the-ground experience creates an enormous level of trust and credibility. The new version of BIXS is more user-friendly, but there isn’t enough data in the system to make it work yet. Respondents liked that BIXS is independent and industry-driven, not an arm of government. CCA is perceived as quasi-governmental, so positioning BIXS as independent is better. As a sign of positive momentum, several breed associations are now prepared to bridge their databases with BIXS to allow their data to flow through the chain. • The new team brings a different set of traits…. • BIXS has the oxygen mask on and we’re waiting to see if it will survive. BIX is one of the many important pieces related to information exchange that will help the industry survive. If we don’t make this work, chicken will blow away beef…. Consumers and retailers are driving the bus. Consumers want to know where their food comes from and how it was raised. Producers are offended because they feel they’ve been operating sustainably for 200 years. They’re taken back by the consumer backlash and are questioning why they have to “prove” their sustainable practises. McDonald’s and A&W efforts are just the beginning of a wave. • The consumer is forcing us to work collectively to address food safety and verification issues while still being profitable. • The industry has fundamentally changed and most people don’t realize it. • It is possible to create a BIXS verified program through the packers…? At the moment, much of the value of the data is lost. In particular, no one is getting rewarded for economic indicators—marbling, tenderness, ribeye size, and other attributes. With data sharing, producers can enhance those characteristics. This data means more money for the feedlots because there’s more predictability in the cattle and more return on the carcass. At least half of respondents referenced this issue in relation to the pork industry and how carcass data has improved the quality of their product, and returns to producers. • There could be up to 25% more profit if you have access to data information flow at the cow/calf stage. • BIXS gives me a competitive advantage…I’m able to demand what the product is worth. • There are lots of inefficiencies in the production system and huge value in information flow. Until we work collectively as an industry and stop fighting among the different sectors we’ll never capitalize on our potential.

Major concerns related to privacy, confidentiality, maintaining the competitive advantage that data provides, and the quality of data—not only in terms of its accuracy, but also how the data will be analysed by the end users. • Better to have no data than bad data. Packers and feedlots are seen as a chokepoint. Unless producers and breed associations believe they will get meaningful data back from up the chain, they don’t see the point in going through the effort of inputting their data. But if that data is accessible, then producers will participate and that chain of data can go right up to the consumer. • Packers have a lot of control on the ultimate success of this whole program. Optimistically I think it’s possible, realistically I’m not so sure. It may have to be mandated by government—we can’t keep bowing down to the packers and paying them for data. • In Ireland, the packers took a while to come around. There’s no cost to putting the information in. There is a cost to getting a report out. Packers should put info in to get something out. • The tag is paid for by the producer. Once the data gets to the plant, the data should still belong to the producer because he paid for the tag. • BIXS’s positioning as a stock exchange resonates because it’s a vehicle for people buy and sell information based on their own value proposition. The opportunity is to figure out ways to market information that matters and help everyone succeed. Despite the pressure to share data, producers remain unclear about the value proposition. Producers already feel over regulated and this is just one more thing to do, with questionable ROI. Plus, they already carry the brunt of the cost of traceabilty— they’re buying the tags and readers, and their tag dollars go toward operating CCIA. BIXS needs to focus on tangible benefits—like marketing, management and genetics improvements, profitability, and access to world markets. • Carcass data is not the Holy Grail. Often it’s the cumulative value of tiny pieces that give more value. These are hard to quantify—birth weights, fertility, food programs—this data all starts to add up. • This is the cost of doing business in today’s world. Our high value markets ask us to prove where it came from, how it was treated and where it’s going—we can’t. Media are reporting that Canadian traceability is a joke compared to Australia’s. So, if someone has a better system they’ll get the business.

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Pride is a driver. Several respondents spoke to the pride that gets lost because there is no way to verify individual contributions to the bigger ideals of the industry—which minimizes the individual’s sense of significance and the value of their work. However, one respondent said that if producers really had a sense of pride in their product then we’d have had true traceability years ago. While many agreed that pride is an emotional button, it has to be communicated in combination with economics. • People are proud of what they do, but aren’t able to see the fruits of their labour except in terms of a paycheque. In Ireland, once producers got their data back, they get really excited about that information. We forget about how significant that is—they feel like they’re actually making a difference. There’s a lot of psychology behind that. Seeing how your animals perform all the way down the chain is significant—this is self-motivation and mastery and significance. The consumer perception is a source of hurt and they express it in anger because their pride is being hurt. When we can start to create these good stories, it makes producing animals feel good to the producer. • Canadian beef is recognized as one of the highest quality proteins in the world raised right, by producers who care. We’re part of this great story. BIXS can illustrate and prove this point.

• • •

Quit talking and start showing. This is an uphill battle and a marketing challenge. Focus on the top 10 to 15 per cent of the industry who are early adopters and interested.

There is a certain urgency to make BIXS viable. • If BIXS can’t bring everyone to the table, who will take the lead? • If the shift is slow, in five years, BIXS won’t be around. We won’t be around. • Try and find the wins—and find small wins quick. Other issues identified by respondents included access to markets, labour and succession planning, and access to capital. The ability to use data will draw more young people who have been drawn toward other industries. BIXS may be able to help alleviate the burden related to overregulation of the industry, for instance by allowing documentation of environmental farm plans and the Verified Beef Production Program.

The industry is too comfortable to change. Some respondents felt the biggest hurdle to data sharing is the comfort level of industry leaders who don’t want to do anything to change the status quo even though it would be best for the long-term sustainability and profitability of the industry. • Lots of old boys will fight against this because they don’t like the idea—they’re not large in numbers but they’re powerful. Leadership is starting to shift because companies realize they have to meet the challenges of consumers and regulations. We’re also seeing a younger, more innovative group who can work around these old boys. BIXS needs a sales job. BIXS is the only platform that can facilitate relationships and information sharing among a fragmented industry. BIXS is a solid platform, and consensus through industry is that it should be enhanced and improved. Furthermore, no one argues with the need for BIXS to make money. But this is not a data issue. It’s about the industry cooperating. • BIXS needs a sales job, but the story is not about data. This issue is not an IT challenge. It is all about people, their context and their view of the world.

Hubert Lau is President of BIXSco Inc, the partnership between Viewtrak Technologies Inc. and Canadian Cattlemen’s Association.

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How and When to Change Vaccine Lines By Roy Lewis DVM There are many difficult decisions to be made when changing the brand or manufacturer of a vaccine line. Hopefully this article will clarify how to go about the decision and avoid any gaps or overlaps that could develop if the right combinations are not chosen. The real comparisons can be made when you know what specific diseases you need to vaccinate for in your herd, whether you use a modified live, killed or combined program and how efficacious (effective) you think your program was originally. This will help you and your herd veterinarian determine where to come in with different products. This is all assuming the previous vaccines were purchased, stored, handled, administered properly and timely in the past to all necessary cattle in your herd. If you do purchase your vaccination supplies from your herd health veterinarian and they are changing lines it could be for several reasons, only one of which might be the efficacy of the product. Other reasons are availability, cost, dosage formulation, number of doses per bottle and even service provided by the pharmaceutical company. I have known clinics changing trade names simply based on route of administration. If two vaccines are equal and one is approved to give subcutaneously, that may be a more desirable route and supports “Beef Quality Assurance”. Sometimes newer products may have a broader range of bacteria or viruses it protects against making them more desirable and vaccines that provide greater protection in fewer shots may be more desirable as well. More shots simply mean more labor and stress (another needles poke) on the calves. The intranasal route eliminates the needle but may have a shorter duration. These are all decisions you and your veterinarian need to make. Knowing which vaccines do what requires essentially reading the fine print and you will find most pharmaceutical companies have pretty good spread sheets indicating which vaccines protect against which diseases. We must pay close attention as vaccines can be very close in protection yet one organisms protection may be missing. This is where it’s best to consult with your veterinarian in case there are any differences in coverage. Once one has determined that all the diseases are the same, then there is the question of whether you can carry on boosting the same way you have in the past. Just because you have changed vaccines does not necessarily mean you need to start a vaccine program all over again. In fact the opposite is the case. Vaccines in general stimulate the body to produce antibodies or protection against that

specific disease. If you then come in with a different vaccine as long as immunity is there and the diseases are the same in the new vaccine it should booster the previous vaccine response. This is much the same principal as if a natural viral infection came through, it would essentially stimulate the immune system the same way. You need to follow label directions and if the previous vaccination program has worked well and you trust the protection it is giving then bolstering with a comparable product should work fine. My only caution is if killed vaccines were previously given that boostering was done at the recommended label and then modified live vaccines or different killed products can be followed up with. My personal preference is using modified live vaccines for the longer duration of immunity, but some vaccines such as the footrot vaccine only come as a killed product. Starting over anew may be recommended in several instances such as the acquisition of new stock with a sketchy vaccination history or if a year has been missed meaning now it is two years between vaccinations. If potentially vaccinations were missed such as escaping from the chute, dosage was not calculated or automatic syringes were not working properly: all these and other reasons I have missed may be justification to starting the vaccination program all over again. If an additional organism (virus or bacteria) has been added into the program it is highly likely it will need to be boostered the first time. The bottom-line is if you are changing vaccines and your previous one gave protection and all the antigens (organisms) are the same you should be protected with using the new vaccine. If new protection has been added it may need to be boostered but these are all good questions to pose to your veterinarian so gaps are not created in the new vaccination program. As we all know vaccination is commonplace and it is far better to prevent disease than treat it. It also allows more savings in cost of using antimicrobials as well as sparing usage does not allow antimicrobial resistance to build up as quickly. All good reasons to work with your veterinarian yearly on the most updated , least stressful most comprehensive and efficacious vaccination program necessary for your particular farm and management style. Pharmaceutical companies will continue to improve vaccines making them more efficacious, broad spectrum and less reactive coupled with in some cases easier means of administration. The future looks promising to use vaccination to improve the health of our cattle herds and reduce antimicrobial usage.

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Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  49


Biography: Dr. Colin Palmer is an Associate Professor of Theriogenology (Animal Reproduction) at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Originally from Nova Scotia, Dr. Palmer worked in mixed practices in Ontario and British Columbia and has owned/operated a practice in Saskatchewan. Dr. Palmer along with his wife Kim and children Lauren, Emily and Carter run a herd of purebred Red Angus cattle under the KC Cattle Co. name.

Winter Feed Alternatives Every spring I think of an old line passed down from my father to me – “A wet May and dry June are what you need for a good hay crop”. This year record low levels of precipitation were set for many areas of the prairies for both May and June with a couple of frosts in June doing their best to clobber already suffering plants. One of our hay fields yielded a third of the production of last year; however, others are much less fortunate experiencing complete hay crop failure. My pessimistic side figures the perfect hay growing year has not been seen in a while - too wet, too cold, too dry and too hot seems to be the best way to describe what has occurred over the last several seasons. Hey! Making of the best of a less than perfect situation is what we are good at, right? Two of the many great things about our industry is the ability of our animals to utilize feedstuffs that are useless for most other beasts, and that most of the cattle are neighbored with an even larger crop sector. Many crops have been hit hard by the drought conditions leading to poor emergence and delayed maturity. A late August or early September frost is a not all that infrequent in most jurisdictions so a crop demise may be the salvation for the cattleman. Even without frost damage some crops look so bad that harvesting for forage should be considered saving the cost of combining and grain handling. Given the feed value of the crop, the available tonnage and the dollars in the cattle sector these days a poor growing season could be turned into a win-win for the beef producer and the grain farmer. Information regarding time to harvest, crop values, and ration balancing are available from ag industry specialists and websites; however, there is almost no limit to what can be fed including field peas and canola. Field peas offer an excellent source of protein and even if the crop has been harvested the pea vines or straw can be baled and used as cattle feed. Peas are best harvested (highest feed value) when the pods first start to wrinkle. Canola is ideally harvested late flower to mid-pod, but has a tendency to take several days to dry down and because of the high sulfur content it must be used with other feeds. Sulfur can be directly poisonous to cattle, but this usually occurs with accidental exposure to elemental sulfur. Naturally increased sulfur concentrations in feed are most likely to interfere with copper and selenium availability. If cut at the right stage canola can be comparable to alfalfa hay, but its value declines substantially with plant maturity. Too much canola forage and cattle do not perform very well so limiting it to no more than 50% of the ration is a good idea.

Cereal crops intended for green feed should be harvested at the late milk to soft dough stages, but if they have been hit by a hard frost then about 10 days should elapse to allow the nitrate levels to decline in the plant. Nitrate may also accumulate in any heavily fertilized crop unrelated to a frost situation, for example - corn and canola. If you are concerned about nitrate levels submit a representative sample of harvested material for analysis. Concentrations greater than 1% definitely require feed management; however, animals should not be exposed to large quantities of feeds containing more than 0.5% nitrate if they have not been consuming nitrate containing feed already. Feeding smaller amounts frequently is better than feeding a large amount in 1 or 2 feedings. Mixing higher nitrate forages with low nitrate forages through grinding and mixing is the best way to handle nitrate intake. Offering a high nitrate bale and a low nitrate bale at the same time is a recipe for disaster. Animals should be carefully exposed to nitrate containing feeds over 1 or 2 weeks. Damp or wet nitrate containing feeds are particularly dangerous as the nitrate has already been converted to the more toxic nitrite. Nitrates by themselves irritate the gut lining causing gastroenteritis; however, it is nitrite produced from nitrate before ingestion, or within the rumen that is more lethal. Nitrite is more toxic to cattle than sheep because sheep are better at converting nitrite to ammonia in the rumen. Nitrite competes with oxygen for attachment to hemoglobin in the blood, thereby preventing the movement of oxygen to the tissues effectively suffocating the animal. The most common signs are trouble breathing – gasping and rapid shallow respiration; muscle tremors; staggering and blue/ purple mucus membranes. Animals eventually go down and exhibit convulsions before death. Signs of toxicity occur within 6 hours of ingestion with death occurring within 12 to 24 hours. Cattle producers may also consider including cereal straw in the ration. Straw is usually readily available and with a proper feed analysis can be incorporated into most cattle rations with the addition of supplementary protein, mineral and vitamins. When considering the typical yield of straw, the fertilizer value, baling costs and so on straw will pencil out as a much cheaper alternative to hay this year.

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Agribition and Semex Partner for a New Purebred Beef Jackpot

R

EGINA, SASKATCHEWAN Canadian Western Agribition (CWA) will host a new bull calf jackpot event at Agribition in 2015. President’s Classic presented by Semex, will take place in the Chevrolet GMC Stadium on Tuesday, November 24th. A panel of three experts will judge bull calves within their breed, culminating in a grand finale featuring the champion of each breed vying for the President’s Classic title. The total payout for the event will exceed $7,500. “Semex is proud to be a part of this inaugural and exciting event. Bulls are our business and we are happy to support Agribition’s platform to identify the next great group of future herd sires developed by purebred beef breeders,” says Myles Immerkar, Manager of Global Beef Programs with Semex Alliance.“Agribition is the country’s largest purebred beef show,”

says CWA Beef Committee Chair, Chris Lees. “Integrating First Lady Classic and President’s Classic is an ideal way to kick off the week.” Agribition drew in over 800 visitors from over 70 countries last year. “These types of competitions are a catalyst in securing exports to new markets; they are widely regarded as an integral part of marketing beef cattle genetics for our producers,” says Lees. First Lady Classic, presented by Merck, is also a jackpot event which sees judges select the top yearling heifer at Agribition. Last year the total amount paid out in First Lady Classic was $7,600. Entries for President’s Classic and First Lady Classic close October 1st. For more information, please contact: Chris Harris, Communications Associate P: 306.924.9583 C: 306.551.1713 charris@agribition.com

Canadian Western Agribition (CWA) , located in Regina, Saskatchewan, is the best beef show on the continent and the largest livestock show in Canada. The show is anchored by beef cattle and features horses, bison, sheep, goats and an extensive agribusiness trade show. CWA continues to promote the expansion, development and interest in agriculture. The 45th edition of CWA will be held November 23-28, 2015.

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Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  52


Lee & Laura Brown

Box 217, Erskine, AB T0C 1G0 403-742-4226 Lee cell 403-740-9429 llbangus@telus.net www.llbangus.com

Annual Bull and Female Sale second Saturday in March

Mick & Debbie Trefiak

14 miles east of Wainright and 11 miles north on range road 4-3

RR 1 Edgerton, Alberta T0B 1K0 P :: 780-755-2224 F :: 780-755-2223 C :: 780-842-8835 mick@mjt.ca www.mjt.ca

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Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  54


By: Chris Poley Over the past three weeks, I have travelled across Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. One thing I learned is that no two farms are in the same situation; things change dramatically within five miles. Ontario is generally wet...some areas are so wet that crops are under stress while others appear really good. Manitoba has generally been the promised land this year, with fairly adequate moisture throughout, although it has been a hot bed of activity, as of late, attracting international storm chasers. So far, the damage has been limited and the silver lining for cattle producers is that damaged grain crops turn in to feed. Saskatchewan is where the tide begins to turn...the Eastern half is in pretty good shape, with some producers reporting their best hay and grain crops in recent history. The Western half of the province definitely has areas that are extremely dry as do Alberta and British Columbia.

the cost! People’s first choice when they dine out or fire up the barbecue is beef. To quote Brad Wildeman, who recently spoke at our T Bar Invitational, “People will buy as much beef as they can afford and as much chicken and pork as they can tolerate.”

One of the most asked questions right now is “How will the fall sales be?” The answer is simple, “They will be great.” With less sales advertised, meaning less breeding stock offered, the market will be strong. The Media is good at spreading doom and gloom. For real elite individuals may cost more than ever. many producers, getting away from home is difficult to do at the best of times. For those in extreme Everyone had a tremendous bull sale season. Those, dry areas, it is easy to hear these reports and think who may be forced to cull extra numbers and send that everyone is in the same situation. The less than steer calves to town this fall due to a short hay stack, average hay crop is wide spread....the cold conditions will be in the market for a great one or two, for a in many areas have had as big of an effect as the dryness. couple of reasons. When the industry is in this position, Most areas have a decent or at least okay grain crop no serious, progressive seed stock producer can afford which will provide straw, feed or green feed. Water to miss out on adding genetic pieces that will move supplies are generally adequate. Rains, throughout your program ahead, keeping your bull pen desirable in the month of July, have been more general in Western an ever competitive market. The second reason is tax. Canada than spring rains, helping to fill cereal crops None of us want to pay it.When you get looking at bull that will be baled or harvested forcing feed prices to sale receipts, steer sale receipts and cheques received begin to moderate. Beef producers have all faced hay from those cull cows, what’s one or two more in the shortages in the past...they are resourceful. A beef cow pen...right! After all, we know Ottawa is not going to is a hardy animal that can adapt and still produce on use that money to suit us. non-traditional feed supplies. In agriculture, there are always challenges...mother The attitude in the beef business is great, and so it nature, politics, and so forth. We do it because we are should be. Even producers in the hardest hit drought passionate and believe in it. Take the positives out of areas remain upbeat and excited about their future.Yes, every situation...the Canadian Dollar is low and could some will be culling extremely hard this fall, but there is go lower, making the calves you and your customers not much pain in selling $2000.00 to $2500.00 cull cows sell this fall worth more than ever. (805 lb. steers at a who are most likely already on the truck. Consumer sale barn in Ontario sold for $2.98 per pound the other demand is staying strong....people are not backing away day!) The tight hay supply will stifle beef cow expansion from the beef counter; they recognize the value and in Canada this year, pushing back forecasts for when wholesomeness of beef. The eating experience justifies production will meet demand. Even bankers don’t mind the smell of a cowman’s boots again! Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  55


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IAN & JOY RUDKIN

3320 BRADBURN ROAD BLACKSTOCK, ON, L0B 1B0 905.718.5331 maplelinefarm@hotmail.ca

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Rick Stull 12249 8th Line, Georgetown, ON L7G 4S4 Ph: (905) 877-8145 • Cell: (905) 703-0503

Breeders of quality Angus Cattle


Oak Lake, MB July 18, 2015 Judge: Geoff Anderson, Bethune, SK

FEMALES HEIFER CALF Split A 1. NYK Cattle Co. with NYK Mary Kate 18C by N7’s Toro Negro 32A 2. NYK Cattle Co. with NYK Lass 15C by N7’s Motive 26A Split B 1. N7 Stock Farm with N7’s Heroine 22C by SAV Resource 2. N7 Stock Farm with N7’s Black Woodlady 21C by SAV Bismarck Split C 1. HBH Farm Inc. with HBH Bella 12C by Jindra Double Vision 2. N7 Stock Farm with N7’s Heroine 11C by SAV Resource

Split C 1. Tom Bennie with RamRod Nova 407B by Hoover Emperor 2. N7 Stock Farm with DJCC Queen 13B by SCC Heritage 92W

2. RamRod Cattle Co. with RamRod Nova 230Z by RamRod No Fear 921W with her heifer calf RamRod Nova 555C by Duralta Heavy Hitter

CHAMPION JUNIOR FEMALE Tom Bennie with RamRod Nova 407B by Hoover Emperor RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FEMALE N7 Stock Farm with DJCC Queen 13B by SCC Heritage 92W

TWO YEAR OLD COW/CALF PAIR Split A 1. HBH Farm Inc. with Atlasta Barabara 187A by LFE BA Lewis 809U and her bull calf HBH Barbara 3C by HEIFER CALF CHAMPION Brookmore Bismarck 19A HBH Farm Inc. with HBH Bella 12C by 2. NYK Cattle Co. with N7’s Tibbie 10A Jindra Double Vision by N7’s Elvis 9Y with her heifer calf NYK Fargo 7C by SAV Bismarck 5682 RESERVE HEIFER Split B CALF CHAMPION N7 Stock Farm with N7’s Heroine 11C by 1. Airey Cattle Co. with DJCC Erica 2A by SCC Heritage 92W with her heifer SAV Resource calf ARY Chopper 501C by PA Fortitude 2500 YEARLING HEIFER 2. Levi Best with Topview Karama 3A by Split A 1. Raina Syrnyk with Red Six Mile Flower SAV Bismarck 5682 with her heifer calf CHL Karama 58C by TVA Networth 196B by Red Six Mile Ruger 221X 8Y 2. Nolan Glover with Fairlight Blkwoodlady 1B by N7’s Bismarck 72Z MATURE COW/CALF PAIR Split B 1. NYK Cattle Co. with N7’s Annie K 53B 1. NYK Cattle Co. with N7’s Mary KT 30Z by SAV Bismarck 5682 with her by Belvin Tres Maria Patron 205 bull calf NYK Mary Kate 18C by N7’s 2. Levi Best with N7’s Heroine 17B by Toro Negro 32A N7’s Elvis 9Y

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SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE NYK Cattle Co. with N7’s Mary KT 30Z by SAV Bismarck 5682 with her bull calf NYK Mary Kate 18C by N7’s Toro Negro 32A

RESERVE SENIOR CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION FEMALE RamRod Cattle Co. with RamRod Nova 230Z by RamRod No Fear 921W with her heifer calf RamRod Nova 555C by Duralta Heavy Hitter


BULLS BULL CALF Split A 1. NYK Cattle Co. with NYK Fargo 7C by SAV Bismarck 5682 2. N7 Stock Farm with N7’s Dakota 17C by Soo Line Motive 9016 Split B 1. HBH Farm Inc. with HBH Casino 8C by PA Fortitude 2500 2. HBH Farm Inc. with HBH Coal Miner 50C by Remitall F Rage 9A

RESERVE BULL CALF CHAMPION HBH Farm Inc. with HBH Casino 8C by PA Fortitude 2500 YEARLING BULL 1. NYK Cattle Co. with N7’s Graceland 39B by N7’s Elvis 9Y 2. Levi Best with CHL Legacy 14B by TJF Legacy 1404 JUNIOR BULL CHAMPION NYK Cattle Co. with N7’s Graceland 39B by N7’s Elvis 9Y RESERVE JUNIOR BULL CHAMPION Levi Best with CHL Legacy 14B by TJF Legacy 1404 TWO YEAR OLD BULL RamRod Cattle Co. with RamRod No Fear 302A by RamRod No Fear 921

BULL CALF CHAMPION AND RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION NYK Cattle Co. with NYK Fargo 7C by SAV Bismarck 5682

SENIOR CHAMPION AND GRAND CHAMPION BULL RamRod Cattle Co. with RamRod No Fear 302A by RamRod No Fear 921W BREEDER’S HERD 1. RamRod Cattle Co. 2. N7 Stock Farm 3. NYK Cattle Co. 4. Sunset Ridge Red Angus GET OF SIRE 1. RamRod Cattle Co. 2. NYK Cattle Co. 3. Sunset Ridge Red Angus COMMERCIAL COW CALF PAIR Jay Rimke, Oak Lake, MB with his Angus X pair

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Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  60


Canadian Angus Foundation Announces Scholarship Recipient, Ambassador, Outstanding Young Angus Breeder and Junior Angus Stockman of the Year Award June 17, 2015: for immediate release

ROCKY VIEW COUNTY, AB - Canadian Angus Foundation award recipients were announced on Saturday, June 6th, at the Angus National Convention in Calgary, AB. just before the fourth annual Building the Legacy Sale. The 2015 Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador is Patrick Holland of Montague, Prince Edward Island. The Dick Turner Scholarship recipient is Allison Speller of Monte Lake, B.C. The Outstanding Young Angus Breeder is Michael Wheeler of Saskatoon, SK. The first Junior Angus Stockman of the Year is Tyler Dietrich of Forestburg, AB. The Robert C. McHaffie Junior Ambassador program selects one Canadian Junior Angus Association member to be an ambassador for the Canadian Angus Association at events across Canada and one international experience. Four other CJAA members competed for the award: Brooke Bablitz of Cherhill, AB; Raina Syrnick of Gilbert Plains, MB; Micheala Chalmers of Shanty Bay, ON and Katie Wright of Melfort, SK. All the juniors deserve recognition for their impressive efforts in the competition. The Dick Turner Memorial Award was established after the passing of legendary Angus icon Dick Turner in July of 2010. During his lifetime, Dick committed 55 years of his career to livestock publishing and successfully promoted and advertised the Angus breed, specifically through the Canadian Aberdeen Angus News magazine. It was Dick’s ability to foster relationships that led to his successful tenure. Dick was a hard worker and recognized the quality of life and relationships as the most rewarding part of his job. The Outstanding Young Angus Breeder Award started in 2014. The award recognizes an Angus breeder between the ages of 22 and 30 who has demonstrated a desire to stay involved in the Angus business for years to come based on their involvement within the breed up to this point in his or her career. The award comes with a cash prize. The Junior Angus Stockman of the Year Award is a new initiative of the Canadian Angus Foundation. This award was developed to recognize those outstanding young cattlemen who are constantly growing their ‘stockmanship’ capability by actively working with their Angus cattle. The first recipient, Tyler Dietrich, will receive his award at the National Junior Angus Showdown hosted in Olds, AB this July. Congratulations to all of the Foundation award winners for 2015. The Canadian Angus Foundation was incorporated in 1993 and is the charitable arm of the Canadian Angus Association.

For more information, please contact: Karla Ness Director of Member Engagement kness@cdnangus.ca 1-403-571-3580

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Breeders

services

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Chris oley Auctioneer 4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, SK S7K 7G9

Cell (306) 220-5006 chris@tbarc.com

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATION Established in 1933

Specializing in Purebred Livestock Transportation Providing Weekly service across Canada & The USA. Gooseneck service available to your farm in Ontario. Pick up & delivery points across Canada and USA. U.S. and Canada Customs Bonded Carrier. We thank you for your past business and look forward to your future livestock transporting needs. 155 King Edward St., Paris, ON, Canada, N3L 0A1 Toll Free 877-442-3106 or 519-442-6242 Fax 519-442-1122  hsknill@pppoe.ca www.hsknilltransport.com Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  63


Advertisers Index 20/20 Angus 40 Abacus Signs 52 Alameda Agencies Ltd. 62 Alta Genetics 62 Anderson Cattle Co. 60 Andrew Angus 3 Arda Farms 52 Arm River Red Angus 40 Arntzen Angus 52 Arway Angus 54 Atlasta Angus 52 Bar CR Angus 40 Bar DK 40 Bar H Land & Cattle Co. 7 Bar-E-L Angus IFC Beverly Hills Angus 40 BJ Cattle Co. 52 Black Ridge Farm 40 Blairs.Ag OBC Blast Angus 62 Bootis Black Angus 60 Border Butte Angus 52 Bova-Tech Ltd. 62 Bow Valley Genetics 62 Brantor Angus 8 Breed Creek Angus Ranch 40 Brendale Acres 3,56 Brookmore Angus 60

Consistently Breeding the Right Kind

Hustle 13X •Consistent performance •High selling sons ($17,000 & $24,000) two years in a row •13X genetics are exclusive to Twin Heritage Cher 9C is a standout daughter & full sib to Hustle 25A; the high selling bull to TerRon Farms in 2014

Sheho, SK twin.heritage@sasktel.net www.twinheritage.com Mitch: 306.849.2112

Allan & Ann: 306.849.4638

Michael: 306.955.6553

"Add a touch of heritage to your herd”

Bryce Burnett 40 Buschbeck Angus Ranch 11 BuyAgro 35 Cadillac Stock Farms 56 Canadian Farm Insurance Corp 62 Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society 62 Chapman Cattle Company 52 Chris Poley 63 Circle 7 Angus 40 Clairlane Stock Farm 3,56 Clear View Angus 3 Clegg Angus 52 Craig Flewelling 63 Crecent Creek Angus 40 D & K Black Angus 56 Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd. 62 Dayora Farm 56 Deer Park Angus 3 Deer Ridge Red Angus 40 Deer River Black Angus 52 Delar Cattle & Quarter Horses 52 Delorme Livestock 40 Diamond T Cattle Co. 52 DJ Cattle Co. 60 DKF Red Angus 40 Dolittle Angus 40 Double Bar D Farms 40 Double F Cattle Co. 40 DSMR Stock Farm 3 DWAJO Angus 52 Early Sunset Ranch 1 Eastondale Angus 40 Edwards Livestock 62 EKW Red Angus 41 Emmatt Creek Red Angus 41 Everblack Angus 52 Ferme Wilgor Farms 62 Forty Creek Cattle Co. 3 Fraser Farms 60 GBS Angus Farm 41 GBT Angus 41 Gerlei Angus 41 Get A Ling Stock Farm 52 Gilchrist Farms 3,56 Glen Gabel Angus 41 Glen Islay Angus 56 Glesbar Cattle Co. 52 Graham Red Angus 56 Grant Rolston Photography 63 Greenbush Angus 60 Halcyon Angus Farm 41 Hamco Cattle Co. 60 Hamilton Farms 52 Harprey Farms 3,56 Hartford Bros. 56 Hasson Livestock 3 HBH Farms Inc. 8 Hi Low Angus 41 High Tree Cattle 41 Hollinger Land & Cattle 41 Ivanhoe Angus 41 J & S Cattle 41

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Jim Nugent Livestock 63 Johnston-Fertile Valley 65 JPD Farms 57 Justamere Farms Ltd. 41 KBJ Round Farms 53 KC Cattle Co. 41 Kembar Farms 60 Kenray Ranch 12, 41 Kueber Farms 53 Lazy MC Angus 53 Lazy S Ranch Inc. 53 Leela Farms 57 Lewis Farms 53 LLB Angus 53 Locust Grove Angus 10,57 Lone Stone Farms 53 Lucky 7 Cattle Co. 53 M & J Farms 60 Macks Red Angus 57 Maple Line Farm 8,57 Maple Ridge Acres 42 Mar Mac Farms 60 Marcel DeCorby 63 Marin Cattle Presentation 63 Mark Stock 63 McGowan Farms 53 McMillen Ranching Ltd. 42 Mcnab Angus 42 Meadow Ridge Ent. Ltd. 42 Mel Mac Angus 3 Merit Insurance Brokers 63 Midnight Fire Cattle Company 42 Midnight Oil Land & Livestock 42 Miller-Wilson Angus 53 Minburn Angus 53 MJT Cattle Co.Ltd. 53 Moose Creek Red Angus 42 Nordal Limousin & Angus 5,42 Northern View Angus 42 Nu-Horizon Angus 42 Ockerman Angus 53 O’Grady Steel 63 Ole Farms 53 Paradise Farms 3,57 Pasquia Red Angus 6,42 Johnston Fertile Valley FI 12_Layout 1 13-01-02 2:36 PM Page 1 Peak Dot Ranch Ltd. 42 Pedersen Livestock 53 Poplar Meadows Angus 62 Premier Livestock 3 Pugh Farms 53

Red Rock Red Angus 53 Redrick Farms 53 Remitall Farms IBC Remitall West 54 Right Cross Ranch 42 Ring Creek Farms Ltd. 54 Rivercrest Angus Ranch 54 RNR Flicek Black Angus 42 Royal Angus 42 RSL Red Angus 42 Sandy Bar Ranch 13,42 Schaff Angus Valley 62 Section 7 Ranch 42 Shiloh Cattle Company 54 Six Mile Ranch Ltd. 67, OBC Skinner Farms 43 Skyebrook Angus 43 Southview Farms 8 Spring Creek Simmentals 43 Spruce Ridge Stock Farms 60 Spruce View Angus Ranch 54 Steen Agencies 63 Still Meadow Farm 62 Stockmen’s Insurance 63 Stromsmoe Black Angus & Herefords 54 Sundown Angus 6 Sunny Grove Angus 43 Sunset Ridge 2,60 T Bar C Cattle Co. 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 17 T Bar K Ranch 43 Tambri Farms 3,57 Ter-Ron Farms 54 Today’s Angus Advantage 19 Today’s Publishing 49 Triple L Angus 43 TSN Livestock 60 Tullamore Farms 10,57 Twin Heritage Farms 43,64 Tyler Harris Photography 63 Upper Glen Angus 57 Vikse Family Farm 54 Walerbrae Farms 57 Westwind Farms 8 Wilbar Cattle Co. 43 Willowside Farm 57 WRAZ Red Angus 43 Xcel Livestock 3 Y Coulee Land & Cattle Co. 43 Z Bar Angus 43

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The Final Word

From the moment you awake in the morning to going to sleep at night, virtually all the decisions you have made or will make are directly affected by advertising. Whether it is your toothpaste, the brand of coffee you drink, the clothes you will wear or the vehicle you drive and so on... your eyes and ears have seen, heard and related to the product brand which influenced your usage. Advertising is a gear which directly affects a country’s economy through consumer spending. Hockey, Canada’s national sport is the simplest way to explain advertising effect. In the original National Hockey League there were six teams, players salaries were generated by gate revenue and hockey legends of yore played for pennies and pride of competition. With the advent of television and resulting advertising, the sport of hockey became a huge affluent business in which advertised broadcasting rights have direct correlation to the salaries of players. Therefore those who whine about the price of a ticket for a NHL hockey game, consider this one thought... without advertising these superstars could likely not afford beer after the game! Advertising likely dates back to the days of the caveman, with writings on stone, but the invention of Gutenberg’s press in 1450 changed the history of marketing and consumer information with flyers, posters and brochures. In the early years of building North America, advertisements were frequently of goods on hand or availability, with description of the products. Virtually all ads were similar in type and style, no wider than one column and segregated to the back pages of a newspaper. By the 1880’s, national advertising of branded goods emerged in the changing business environment with products like cigarettes, canned goods, soaps and patent medicine ads... promising to cure any and every ailment. By the roaring ‘20’s, automobile, farm machinery and appliance manufacturers used advertising to promote products and services. Eaton’s in Canada and Sears-Roebuck in the United States developed mail-order catalogues for the rural markets. Since, advertising has grown with agencies designing massive campaigns for companies and products... while helping build corporate stature and quietly persuading an audience, rather than one-to-one communication, with a potential customer. The advent of internet has now overtaken the globe with new and exciting advertising venues and communications aimed at the “modern techs” and a new way of life. Although we can pride ourselves in having the greatest livestock breeders in the world, their downfall is marketing... afraid of getting out of their “comfort zone.” A producer will spend thousands of dollars in fertilizer and chemicals annually to get an extra five bushels an acre yield, yet having bred and developed an awesome herd of seed stock... struggles to market the offspring... then becomes frustrated and disperses his herd (by simply not telling anyone.) Advertising is done through many forms... farm signs (with directions), livestock exhibitions, social media, web sites, and local and national print advertising. Successful advertising is based on continuity, consistency and regularity with four most important criteria... who, what, where and when. Why do major fast-food chains advertise in late afternoon and early evening near mealtimes? To target market the young generation with ads that are consistent, even though the menu might be different, the message remains the same. ( I am cheering for them because they are promoting our product (Angus Beef)... so let’s take a lesson from them.) As much as everyone is logged on the internet and social media, print advertising is a staple in marketing purebred cattle. Cowboys like to read and explore... publications can be found near kitchen tables and/or the bathroom and rarely get discarded as they are used for return research. Contract advertising in publications is effective for both economic and herd stature. The past two years of the livestock industry have been exciting and the future looks even brighter. Since restocking the North American cowherd is just beginning, there is a new generation of cowboy exploring the industry. Since the Angus breed is the customer’s choice in the pasture, marketplace and on consumers plates, this new generation will want an Angus base... make sure they know you are in the breed producing your best! The Staff and directors of the Canadian Angus Association are leaders in innovation and breed promotion. Their “ strategic alliance” with Angus Advantage in publishing a “Member Directory” and “Bull Buyers Guide” will give all members of the Angus Association the highest exposure in the history of the breed... a distribution of over fifteen thousand to their most current breeders and customers. These two “kitchen table” issues will offer unlimited opportunities in the promotion of member herds and breeding programs... plan to be a part of this new exciting venture... After it’s out... you’ll wish you had!

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Today’s Angus Advantage Summer 2015  67


schedule of August 9 - 11 10 11 31 - 1

Events

Alberta Junior Angus Association Show, Bashaw, AB CANADIAN ANGUS ASSOCIATION MEMBER DIRECTORY BOOKING DEADLINE Alberta Angus Annual General Meeting, Bashaw, AB Manitoba Youth Beef Round-Up, Neepawa, MB

September 5 26 26

Autumn Angus Classic Sale, Hanover, ON Brothers from Different Mothers Steer & Heifer Sale, Bentley, AB Pacific Invitational All Breed Female Sale, Williams Lake, BC

October 4 9 - 12 10 10 19 23 23 24 29 - 31 31

Autumn Tradition Sale, Blackstock, ON Diamond T Cattle “Diamond Mine” Online Heifer Calf Sale, Olds, AB Gilchrist Farms “In It To Win It” Production Sale, Lucknow, ON TODAY’S ANGUS ADVANTAGE LATE FALL ISSUE DEADLINE Justamere “Sale of the Year” Female Sale, Lloydminster, SK Angus Harvest Classic Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Canadian Red Round-Up Frozen Genetic Sale & CRAPS Fundraiser, Red Deer, AB 43rd Annual Canadian Red Round-Up Red Angus Sale, Red Deer, AB Manitoba Ag Expo, Brandon, MB Enright Farms & Vos Vegas Farms Production Sale, Renfrew, ON

November 4 - 7 6 6 6 6 - 15 11 - 15 15 - 16 17 23 - 28 25 27 27 28

Lloydminster Exhibition Stockade Roundup, Lloydminster, SK/AB Queen’s Guineas Sale, Toronto, ON Royal Elite All Breeds Beef Sale, Toronto, ON Stockade Round-Up Fall Fusion All-Breed Sale, Lloydminster, SK Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, Toronto, ON Farm Fair International, Edmonton, AB Brooking Angus Ranch Open Book Invitational - Chapter 3, Radville, SK Acadia Colony Bull Sale, Oyen, AB Canadian Western Agribition, Regina, SK Agribition Speckle Park Sale, Regina, SK Champions By Design - Club Calf Genetics Sale, Regina, SK 5th Annual Power & Perfection Angus Sale, Regina, SK North Perth Angus Production Sale, Listowel, ON

December 1 3 3 5 5 7 10 12 13 15 16 19 19 29 31

Stromsmoe Black Angus & Hereford 31st Annual Production Sale, Etzikom, AB Peak Dot Ranch Fall Bull Sale, Wood Mountain, SK 4th Annual Pugh Farms Online Production Sale, Edgerton, AB Spring Creek Golden Opportunity II Female Sale, Virden, MB Manitoba Keystone Klassic, Brandon, MB Y Coulee “You Be The Judge” Fall Bull & Heifer Sale, Vermillion, AB Genetic Focus 2015 Female Production Sale Presented By Six Mile Ranch & Blairs.Ag, Regina, SK Pasquia Red Angus Dispersal, Saskatoon, SK Mar Mac Farms New Generation Red & Black Angus - Simmental Female Sale, Brandon, MB Johnson Livestock Female Sale, Peebles, SK Nordal Limousin & Angus Production Sale, Saskatoon, SK Sunset Ridge Red Angus Dispersal, Virden, MB The Angus Collection Sale: Vol III, Olds, AB Sandy Bar Ranch Dispersal, Aneroid, SK New Year’s Resolution Frozen Genetic Sale: Vol IV, Saskatoon, SK

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ction Sale - Nov. 27th, Regina , SK & Perfe r e w o n Sale - Dec. 19th, Old P o i t c e l e l o h C t s, AB us ll in e Ang a h t f s s a i l s th as we l e r Richard Latimer 403.507.1122 atu e f Gary Latimer 403.507.1123 r ou Packages of r RR 4 Site 3 Box 16, Olds, Alberta T4H 1T8 fo h bred females www.remitall.ca • cattle@remitall.ca c at available this fall. W Office: 403.556.2742 • Fax: 403.556.2761 Call or email on groups Directions: of bred females for sale 4 miles South of Olds on HWY 2A, 1 mile West on Amerada Road


Today’s Angus Advantage Early Sale Issue Summer 2015 Volume 9 Issue 3

Todays Angus Advantage Summer 2015  

Todays Angus Advantage Summer 2015

Todays Angus Advantage Summer 2015  

Todays Angus Advantage Summer 2015