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Volume 13 Issue 2 September 2014 What’s Inside Paul Kempter — Simmentals well suited to a variety of grazing conditions

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From the Gate Post The Canadian Simmental Conference – A great success!

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Simmental Innovations What’s In It For Me?

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Ranching Industry Helps Keep STARS Flying

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Focus On Genomic Technologies

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What’s Happening

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Publication Mail Agreement # 40012794

Paul Kempter Simmentals well suited to variety of grazing conditions

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rowing up with Simmental-cross cattle on the family cow-calf operation in central B.C., it just made sense for Paul Kempter to stick with the high performing genetics as he developed his own ranching operation. Kempter, along with his wife Irene and family, have a farm at Barriere, B.C., just North of Kamloops. He says the Simmentalcross are an excellent fit for his ranch, whether cattle are grazing native range, dryland pasture or irrigated hayland. “Over the years we have looked at other breeds, and my dad did some experimenting years back, but Simmental cattle always seemed to work well for our operation,” The Simmental/Angus cross calves do well on Crown range says Kempter. “We also like being able to pasture, with steer calves last year averaging 720 lbs at buy local bulls that are raised under the weaning. Photos by Paul Kempter. same conditions we are ranching in. That is important. We could bring bulls in from the prairies, but they aren’t conditioned to the pasture and range environment we have here in the North Thompson region.” While Kempter grew up in the mid-70s on the family cow-calf operation in the Pemberton Valley, his parents Tom and Verena Kempter relocated their farming operation to Barriere about 60 kilometres North of Kamloops in the early 1990s. Tom Kempter was one of the Canadian pioneers of using AI with Simmental genetics in his cow-calf herd in the mid-70s.

DIVERSIFIED GRAZING

Today, Paul and Irene have developed a diversified grazing operation that relies on the performance of Simmental genetics under a variety of pasture conditions. Their ranch is based around a 200 head commercial cow-calf herd, with Simmental/Angus cross females, bred to either red or black Simmental bulls. They have been sourcing their bulls from Ian and Anja Mitchell of nearby Mitchell Cattle Co. for many years. Along with the cow-calf herd, Kempter also takes on about 80 to 90 other cow-calf pairs for custom grazing, and runs about 70 head of heifers some of which will be replacement heifers in his own herd, while others will be sold as bred heifers to other area producers. The ranch land base includes about 700 acres of deeded land, and of that about 200 acres are irrigated hay and pasture land with about 500 acres of dryland pasture. Kempter also rents another 1,800 acres of dryland pasture and he holds a lease on nearby Crown grazing land that can accommodate 300 cow-calf pairs over a mid-May to mid-October grazing season. “The basic split is that we run our own cow-calf herd on the Crown grazing land, and then use our own pasture and rented land for the custom grazing cattle and replacement heifers,” says Kempter. “There is some cross-over at certain times of the year, but basically the Crown range pastur e conditions can var y from lower elevation groups run separately.” grasses,

NEED FOR CHANGE

Kempter began implementing change and developing the current grazing system after the BSE

Commercial Country

to logged over cutblocks, to old burn are on the site can be a com as, and depending bination of native an domestic grasses. d

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#13, 4101 19th St. N.E., Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4

Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121

Website: www.simmental.com Email: cansim@simmental.com

CSA Executive

President Kelly Ashworth Oungre, SK P: (306) 456-2749 C: (306) 861-2013 jashworth@sasktel.net First Vice-President John Sullivan Kazabazua, PQ P/F: (819) 467-2713 Sullivan.simmentals@bell.net Second Vice-President Lacey Fisher Amherst, NS P: (902) 661-0766 C: (506) 536-8454 timberwoodfarms@seasidehighspeed.com

CSA Directors

Provincial Associations

Randy Mader Carstairs, AB P/F: (403) 337-2928 C: (403) 660-1123 rrmader@xplornet.com

British Columbia President Lorne Webster Abbotsford, BC P/F: (604) 823-6797 Secretary: Jan Wisse P: (604) 794-3684

Wes Mack Estevan, SK P: (306) 634-4410 C: (306) 421-1853 wkmack@signaldirect.ca Blair McRae Brandon, MB P: (204) 728-3058 C: (204) 729-5439 marmac@inetlink.ca Maureen Mappin-Smith Byemoor, AB P: (403) 579-2175 silversmithcattle@yahoo.com Lee McMillen Carievale, SK P: (306) 928-4820 C: (306) 483-8067 bfcss@telus.net David Milliner Dundalk, ON P: (519) 923-9188 dgmilliner@everus.ca

Alberta President Ryley Mader Carstairs, AB P: (403) 337-4014 rjmader@xplornet.com Office Contact Heather Saucier Airdrie, AB P: (403) 861-6352 F: (403) 948-2059 saucierh@telus.net Promotion / Fieldperson Chuck Groeneveld High River, AB P: (403) 938-7843 barnboss@telus.net Saskatchewan President Dave Erixon Clavet, SK P: (306) 270-2893 Secretary: Carolyn McCormack P: (306) 697-2945 sasksimmental@yourlink.ca

Manitoba President Everett Olson Rapid City, MB P/: (204) 826-2643 everettolson@mymts.com Secretary: Donalee Jones P: (204) 529-2444 Email: donalee@midcan.com Ontario President Tina Hiddink Bloomfield, ON P: (613) 399-3239 wildoak@xplornet.ca Quebec PrĂŠsident Rosaire Cote. La Presentation, PQ P: (450) 796-5914 Secretaire: Sandra Berthiaume Saint-Garmain, QC P/F (819) 395-4453 info@simmentalquebec.ca Maritimes President Don Godfrey Meadow Bank, PEI P: (902) 566-3613 Secretary: Ralph Taylor P/F: (902) 895-2117

Users of any information contained in Commercial Country are encouraged to validate that information by independent means.

CSA Staff

General Manager Bruce Holmquist C: (403) 988-8676 bholmquist@simmental.com Office Manager Barb Judd P: (403) 250-7979 bjudd@simmental.com Marketing Co-ordinator Margo Cartwright Tel: (403) 250-5255 mcartwright@simmental.com Industry & Member Services Representative Kelly Richardson P: (403) 559-6596 krichardson@simmental.com Processing Department Perry Welygan pwelygan@simmental.com Beth Rankin brankin@simmental.com Receptionist and Member Services Devra Leavitt reception@simmental.com

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Advertising Content - The Commercial Country assumes no responsibility for the accuracy and truthfulness of submitted advertising copy or electronically supplied pictures and has the right to refuse any ad copy or photos. Advertisers shall indemnify and hold harmless the Country containing pedigrees or statements regarding performance must conform to records kept by the Canadian Simmental Association. Copy deviating from official records may be changed as necessary without advertiser consent. Š 2014 Simmental Country (1997) Ltd. All rights reserved. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced by any means, in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the Canadian Simmental Association.

Published September 2014 For: Canadian Simmental Association #13 , 4101 - 19th Street N.E., Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121 With Editorial Contributor

Western Sales Consultant Kelly Richardson 403-559-6596 richardson@simmental.com Editorial Policy - Articles and information in this magazine represent the opinions of the writers and the information that, to the best of our knowledge, was accurate at the time of writing.

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Phone: 306-867-8126 Email: office@springcreekconsulting.ca

4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Office: 306-934-9696 Fax: 306-934-0744 www.todayspublishing.com Editor: Bryan Kostiuk Marketing: Chris Poley & Ted Serhienko Accounting: Treena Ballantyne & Mina Serhienko Circulation: Debbie Thiessen Production: Tiffany Peters, Jamie Van Cleemput, Amanda Adam, Paige Holmquist Please Return Undeliverable Copies To: Canadian Simmental Association #13 , 4101 - 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 403-250-7979 Fax: 403-250-5121 Publication Mail Agreement #40012794


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Some of the Kempter cow-calf pairs on summer Crown range, grazing cutblocks that have both native and tame grasses.

Some of the Ke mpter yearling he heading to sum mer pasture on ifers on the road Crown Range.

right — Paul and Irene at The Kempter family ace, Riley, Gr vi, Le t, lef m fro and their children and Christine.

crisis of May 2003. “The BSE issue put a lot of pressure on all producers so we had to look at doing things at bit differently,” says Kempter. One opportunity that came along was to rent some of their better producing hayland to a seed company looking to produce genetically-pure canola seed. And more recently they’ve rented another parcel to a local ginseng producer. He also looked at ways to increase cash flow and extend the grazing season. That’s when he rented about 1,800 nearby acres for pasture. It was cross-fenced into about 45 different pasture or paddocks for a more intensively managed grazing system. “We really focused on getting the most out of that rotational grazing system,” says Kempter. “We wanted to be able to custom graze cattle for the summer, and also extend the grazing season for our own cattle spring and fall.” While much of that Kamloops region can be hot and dry during the summer, Kempter says most years the Barriere area gets enough seasonal rainfall to support good pasture growth. Environment Canada shows the annual seasonal rainfall for Barriere at about 15 inches, compared to 8.5 inches at Kamloops. Kempter manages the cowherd to start calving the first of March and usually has calving wrapped up by early to mid-April. At that point, midApril, with pasture aftermath and a bit of new grass growth, he is done feeding and moves his cow-calf pairs onto the rented pasture for short duration grazing. “Depending on the size of pasture we are usually moving the herd every three to four days,” he says. He maintains that pace until about late May when usually pasture on Crown grazing land is ready for turnout and he moves his cow-calf herd to Crown land. Cattle start grazing at lower elevations early in the season and move higher up into cutblocks and native pasture as the season progresses. As his cowherd moves out, the 80 to 90 pairs for custom grazing arrive at the rented pasture for a season of rotational grazing. As well he also has the 70 head of replacement heifer calves, kept since the previous fall. They overwintered on the farm and now they head into the rotational grazing system as well, and are bred on pasture over summer. He wants to make sure the custom grazing cattle and replacement heifers make at least one pass over all the intensely managed pasture to condition the grass, so it will provide good quality feed for his own cattle through early winter, after they return from native range. Out on the Crown range, proper distribution of cattle is maintained with riders herding cattle to new grazing areas. Kempter aims to have his cow herd exposed to bulls for one cycle at home in mid-May and as they move out to crown range they are covered by cleanup bulls. It took a bit of convincing but he is pleased to see even on the crown range with mixed herds from different ranches, all are using red and black Simmental bulls.

NINE MONTHS OF GRAZING

Kempter manages the custom grazing cow-calf pairs until late September or early October when they return to their home ranch. By about mid-October his own cow-calf herd is brought home from the summer Crown range pasture. The cow-calf pairs are placed on pasture and alfalfa/grass hay regrowth for about a month until the calves are

om grazing program Paul Kempter manages a cust running his own as well as s, with cow/calf pair cattle on Crown range.

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weaned in late November. Depending on snow conditions, cows will continue grazing on the rest of the conditioned pastures until Kempter starts feeding usually in mid- to late January. He’ll feed the herd about three months, until after calving, and then they return to pasture in early April. “We’ve been fortunate the last few years that snow hasn’t been an issue, allowing for this extended winter grazing,” he says. “But we are prepared with extra stockpiled hay in a year when we do have more snow.” After weaning all steer calves are marketed through the TEAM marketing network and shipped to feedlots. While some of the lighter heifers might be sold, he again keeps about 70 head of heifer calves for the heifer replacement program. He’ll keep between 25 and 30 head of bred heifers for his own replacements and market the rest to local ranchers. “We’ve been very pleased with the overall breeding program producing good quality cattle,” says Kempter. Working with red and black Simmental bulls bred to mostly black Angus/Simmental cross cows, his herd is predominantly black, with some red influence. And when selecting bulls he likes to look at the dams of those bulls, to get a better idea of the female qualities that bull could pass along.

TOP PERFORMING CALVES

“The combination produces a nice moderate size cow and she in turn produces a calf with lots of vigor,” says Kempter. “Years ago there would be these big 1,800 pound cows, but now we’re seeing more of the 1,450 pound moderate size cows, and they are producing calves with 100 pound birth weights. I think the red and black Simmental produce calves with much more vigor than the more traditional tan and white line of cattle.” Even out on native range, travelling up to 35 kilometres to pasture at top elevations of about 7,400 feet above sea level, Kempter says steer calves last year averaged a very respectable 720 pounds weaning weights. While he is strict about culling the cowherd, some of cows just keep on producing. “I have to draw the line and not keep a cow longer than 11 years,” he says. “Some of these old gals just keep producing an excellent calf year after year. But 11 years is the limit. I’d rather sell an 11-yearold bred cow than a 12-year-old open cow.” Keeping the cowherd on the younger side also contributes to improved conception rates, says Kempter, and ultimately to a relatively tight calving season. Kempter isn’t planning any major changes to the current breeding and grazing program. “We plan to stay with the current size of the main cowherd for now,” he says. “We want to continue to focus on the replacement heifer program and produce good quality bred heifers for our own herd as well for other local producers. One area where we may have opportunity to expand is with the custom grazing. “I believe we still have some capacity in the pastures we use for rotational grazing. We need to pay attention to overall herd health as we do this. We need to know the cattle that are coming onto the ranch, but as long as we do that I believe there is room to expand, if there is a demand. A few years ago not too many people were looking to expand their beef herds or put extra cattle out for custom grazing, but as the market remains fairly strong, we’re starting to see more interest. And that provides an opportunity for us.”

While cows are exposed to bulls on home pasture during their first heat cycle in May, clean up bulls are used on summer Crown range.

Paul Kempter checking on cattle that are part of a rotational grazing progra m.


From the Gate Post

By Bruce Holmquist General Manager, Canadian Simmental Association

The Canadian Simmental Conference – A great success!

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he Canadian Simmental Association (CSA) 2014 Conference was held July 25th – 27th at the beautiful Elkhorn Resort, Onanole, MB. and for those who did not attend you truly missed one of the best Simmental events in many years. The weekend began with golf on the local course which is one of the top rated courses in Manitoba. Later in the afternoon the registration desk opened with an informal “meet and greet” to welcome the attendees who came from across Canada. The afternoon also included a meeting of the CSA board and staff and representatives from the Provincial Simmental Associations. This is the first face to face meeting such as this and provided great value in discussing and updating all on the programming of the CSA as well as the various activities within the respective provinces. All regions of the country were represented with the exception of BC and Quebec however it is hoped that next year we will see a full slate of attendees from coast to coast. The evening events began with a presentation on Genomics as it applies to genetic improvement by Dr. Dorian Garrick, Professor of Animal Science - Jay Lush Endowed Chair in Animal Breeding from Iowa State. Dr. Garrick is one of the leading experts in the world in this field and is playing a large role in the integration of molecular breeding values (MBV) into Canadian Simmental’s genetic evaluation. After his presentation Dr. Garrick answered questions from the CSA membership and without a doubt those who attended added to their understanding of the science and how it relates to our business. Following the presentation the delegates went on a boat cruise which allowed networking and getting to know each other in a more informal setting. Saturday was a day full of activity that began with a CSA directors meeting; and while the Board met to deal with the business of the association there was opportunity for others to visit some of the local breeders and see their programs. The afternoon began with the CSA Annual General meeting which saw the largest attendance in many years and more importantly some great interaction in the question and answer process during the various reports. The financial status of the CSA remains very solid with a another slight profit recognized for the 2013 fiscal year which mirrors the positive environment that Simmental is enjoying in the marketplace but

is also a credit to the CSA board and their adherence to balanced budgeting. An election was held for three CSA director positions which saw Kelly Ashworth return for his second three year term as well as Blair McRae and Lee McMillen who will begin their first terms. Outgoing President Fraser Redpath and Deanne Young were thanked for their commitment to the Simmental breed and the time they served on the CSA board. Following the meeting the new CSA executive was elected; President Kelly Ashworth, 1st Vice President John Sullivan, 2nd Vice President Lacey Fisher. The committee Chairs will be: Promotion Lacey Fisher, Breed Improvement Wes Mack and Finance Maureen Mappin-Smith. The entire CSA annual report can be found at www.simmental.com One of the highlights of the weekend was the Friends of Canadian Simmental Foundation Auction. This event was the first conducted by the newly structured Foundation and was a huge success raising $89,656 for research, youth programing and scholarships. This was the most successful event to date and congratulations to all involved; especially the Auction committee and its co-chairs Deanne Young and Fraser Redpath as well as thank you to all who donated and those who bought and bid on the items. A complete list of sale results can be found at www.simmental.com Sunday began with a Foundation board meeting and then the focus moved solely to the YCS conformation and showmanship classes. This was the culmination of the YCS events which occurred over the weekend and included various competitions as well as the YCS Annual General Meeting. Although the overall numbers were affected by the harsh weather conditions Manitoba and Eastern Saskatchewan faced in June there was representation of attendees from across Canada and cattle that traveled from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. CSA members and Simmental enthusiasts from across Canada came together to enjoy excellent Manitoba hospitality and all should be commended for their enthusiasm and dedication to the breed. Plans are well underway for the 2015 Canadian Simmental conference that will be held in Ontario at the beginning of August so be sure to make plans to attend and be part of the Simmental excitement!

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Western Harvest Simmental Heifer Sale Thursday, November 13, 2014 Innisfail, Ab

CONSIGNORS Virginia Ranch Czech-Mate Livestock Tymarc Simmentals Star West Farms & Guests

Professionally Managed by:

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PROSPECT HILL SIMMENTALS

The Fall Finale for PHS... Our dispersal sale will occur October 4, 2014 at the Bar 5 Extravaganza in Markdale, Ontario. Having bought the top end, we are now bringing the top end to you! Herd Sires: Sibelle Dirty Harry Donovandale Pol Imprint

Bred Cows including some great donors such as:

Semen and Embryos

Wells’ Ultrix Bar 5 Belle Rolling Acres Fern Gagnon’s Precious Thing Virginia’s Jane West So many more!

Heifer and Bull Calves Sired by:

Yearling Bred Heifers: PHS Awe Struck Sunny Valley BLK Jenna PHS Augustina PHS Amazing Jane Starwast Pol Abbie Check the catalogue for the rest!

Sibelle Dirty Harry Donovandale Pol Imprint Champs Bravo Crossroads Radium PHS Sterlyn

Registered Heifers with Implanted Purebred Embryos: Roxie x Lotto Yara x Captain Morgan Roxie x Harley Iron Sugar x Cobra

Call John for more information and to set up your farm tour today! John Cartwright Farm Manager Cell (519) 317-0507

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Andrew Schuller & Family Farm (519) 225-2151 www.prospecthillsimmentals.com info@prospecthillsimmentals.com


The Boys of the Fall Finale They all sell October 4th at Bar 5!

DONO 28Z - DONOVANDALE POL IMPRINT

GHBE 25Z - SIBELLE DIRTY HARRY 25Z

AP 311B - Son of Radium

AP 317B - Son of Harry

AP 323B - Son of Harry

AP 327B - Son of Harry

AP 328B - Son of Bravo

AP 341B - Son of Sterlyn

AP 345B - Son of Harry (Polled)

AP 347B - Son of Bravo (Homo Test Pending)

AP 355B - Son of Imprint

(Homo Test Pending)

Sales Managment:

Bohrson Marketing Services Scott Bohrson (403) 370-3010 Darryl Snider (780) 385-5561 www.bohrson.com

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CSA Genomics Project Manager – Sandy Russell

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ver the past three years there has been extensive communication about the work undertaken in the various research projects that CSA has not only led but also partnered in. With the majority of the first round of research initiatives completed or coming to completion by the end of 2014 we begin to shift gears to discuss research findings and most importantly how cattle breeders and producers can capitalize on the advancements in genomic technologies. In doing so the focus will be on not only communicating results but also educating producers about the technology itself and how it can be utilized in their beef cattle businesses to improve their bottom line. The most common question that is often asked in regards to the Simmental Innovations initiatives to date is: What was accomplished? While the data analysis and full benefits of the research to Canadian Simmental have only just begun there are some very tangible and significant accomplishments that have catapulted CSA into the forefront of genomic beef cattle research not only in Canada but also around the globe. The following are the top highlights of what the Canadian beef industry was able to achieve through the research initiatives led by CSA in the past three years. • Nearly 15,800 genotypes were completed of varying densities from low density (6K) to high density (770k) along with full sequencing of 70 key animals within the Simmental breed. The vast majority of these genotypes were completed on influential foundation animals within the Canadian Simmental breed today. This is an invaluable resource as we work to develop accurate prediction equations for Canadian breeders and our dataset rivals any other breed in the world. • Secondly, a stayability EPD was developed and will be incorporated going forward as we jointly work with ASA to improve the stayability EPD that is currently being used in the North American evaluation. • Relative feed intake data was capture on nearly 1,650 Simmental animals which provides invaluable information on how Simmental cattle perform in the feeding phase of the beef production chain. This is a significantly large dataset on a trait that is very costly to measure and is not only being analyzed within this research project but has been utilized in larger multi-breed research analysis. • Last but certainly not least complete carcass and meat quality data was captured on 2,660 head of Simmental cattle. This dataset provides the link between the genetic makeup of cattle and insight that genetics have on the end product. As Canadian beef producers work to improve the predictability and consistency of beef for consumers it is essential that the genetic potential of the animal with respect to beef production and meat quality be fully understood. It is clear that a vast amount of information was captured from the research completed to date and it is being utilized at the industry

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level in various forms. As a breeder though you are likely saying that’s great to know but what’s in it for me or what should I be doing to benefit from the advancements CSA has made through its Simmental Innovations projects? The following are the top 5 things every breeder should consider in order to benefit from genomic technology: 1. Take a DNA sample on all animals in your breeding program. If nothing else pull hairs on every animal the next time you process cattle, ensure each sample is stored in an individual envelope and clearly identified then stored in a safe place should you need to genotype animals in the future. The Genotyping Incentive program that the CSA is offering until October 15th provides a considerable cost saving for CSA members to genotype animals so it is to your advantage to do as much testing as possible while the program is still available. For more information on the Genotyping Incentive program please visit the CSA website at www.simmental.com or contact the office at 1-866-860-6051. 2. Conduct high density (HD) genotype tests on all influential animals in your breeding program (i.e. key sires and dams that have had a major influence on the genetics you are utilizing today). Keep in mind that all AI sires and donor dams require HD tests be conducted via CSA policy. 3. Conduct low density (LD) genotype tests on all other animals or at minimum do your up and coming young animals that you will be utilizing in the future. Ideally, LD tests would be conducted on the entire herd however if you don’t wish to make this investment all at once breeders can start by doing young influential animals each year with the intent to build up the number of genotypic data available on your breeding program. Keep in mind LD genotype tests are required on all walking herd-sires for parentage verification. 4. Continue to collect and report all performance data. Although genotyping is the new technology capturing all the attention it is of very little value without phenotypic data continuing to be submitted through the CSA’s Total Herd Enrollment (THE) program. 5. Become informed! Learn about genomic technology and how it is being utilized within the beef cattle industry and what Canadian Simmental is doing so you can better capitalize on opportunities in order to develop better genetics for your commercial bull buyers. All of agriculture including the beef cattle industry is adopting these technologies and you cannot afford to be left behind. Please visit www.simmentalinnovations. com for more information and resources on genomics in the beef cattle industry. For more information on CSA’s research initiatives please contact CSA General Manager Bruce Holmquist at 403.988.8676 or bholmquist@simmental.com.


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Appuye sur le poteau de cloture

Par Bruce Holmquist Directeur General - Association Simmental du Canada

Immense succès du Congrès canadien de l’Association Simmental !

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e Congrès 2014 de l’Association Simmental du Canada (ASC) s’est tenu du 25 au 27 juillet dernier sur le site du magnifique centre de villégiature Elkhorn, situé à Onanole au Manitoba. Ceux n’ayant pas été en mesure d’être présents ont sans doute manqué l’une des meilleures activités de la race Simmental depuis plusieurs années. La fin de semaine s’est amorcée le vendredi par une partie de golf sur le parcours local, d’ailleurs classé parmi les plus beaux terrains de golf du Manitoba. En fin d’après-midi, les participants venus de toutes les régions du Canada ont été accueillis au comptoir d’inscription, tout en prenant part à une séance informelle de bienvenue au Congrès. Une rencontre du conseil d’administration de l’ASC, du personnel et des représentants provinciaux s’est également tenue lors de cet après-midi. Il s’agissait ainsi d’une première rencontre face à face du genre, laquelle a été très appréciée de tous, permettant ainsi de faire une mise à jour et de discuter à la fois des programmes de l’ASC et des nombreuses activités effectuées dans toutes les provinces. La plupart des régions du pays était représentée, à l’exception du Québec et de la Colombie Britannique. On espère toutefois l’an prochain pouvoir compter sur une présence de délégués d’un océan à l’autre. Pour débuter le programme de la soirée, le Dr Dorian Garrick, professeur de sciences animales, associé à la chaire de recherche en élevage des animaux Jay Lush de l’Université de l’état d’Iowa, a effectué une conférence portant sur les applications pratiques de la génomique dans le secteur de l’amélioration génétique. Le Dr Garrick est un expert reconnu mondialement dans ce domaine et il est grandement impliqué dans la démarche visant à intégrer les valeurs d’élevage moléculaires (VEM) au sein de l’évaluation génétique des bovins Simmental du Canada. Après son exposé, celui-ci a répondu aux questions des membres de l’ASC et, sans aucun doute, les personnes présentes ont donc pu mieux comprendre ces nouvelles technologies et apprécier les applications dans notre industrie. Pour terminer la soirée, les délégués ont par la suite effectué une croisière en bateau, laquelle a permis à tous de faire connaissance et de discuter dans un cadre moins formel. Plusieurs activités étaient au programme de la journée de samedi, en débutant avec une réunion du conseil d’administration. Tandis que les directeurs s’occupaient des affaires de l’association, les autres délégués avaient la chance de visiter les troupeaux de quelques éleveurs de la région. L’assemblée générale annuelle de l’ASC s’est ensuite tenue en aprèsmidi, avec une présence record depuis plusieurs années et des échanges animés lors de la présentation des divers rapports. On a constaté que la situation financière de l’association demeurait très bonne, avec un léger profit d’opération en 2013, ce qui reflète bien la situation enviable de la race Simmental sur le marché de même que la vigilance du conseil d’administration à maintenir un budget équilibré. Trois directeurs furent

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proclamés lors des élections, notamment M. Kelly Ashworth qui acceptait un second mandat de trois ans, ainsi que l’arrivée de deux nouveaux directeurs à leur premier terme, soit MM. Blair McRae et Lee McMillen. Des remerciements d’usage ont été transmis au Président sortant, M. Fraser Redpath, ainsi qu’à Mme Deanne Young, pour leur dévouement envers leur race et leur implication au sein du conseil d’administration. Le nouveau conseil exécutif de l’ASC fut ensuite élu après la réunion annuelle, lequel est maintenant formé de M. Kelly Ashworth, comme Président, M. John Sullivan, 1er vice-président et Mme Lacey Fisher au poste de 2e viceprésidente. De plus, mentionnons les nouveaux responsables des comités : Mme Lacey Fisher (promotion), M. Wes Mack (amélioration de la race) et Mme Maureen Mappin-Smith (finances). Le rapport annuel complet de l’ASC peut être consulté au : www.simmental.com L’encan au profit des amis de la Fondation Simmental Canadienne fut l’un des faits marquants de la fin de semaine. Il s’agissait d’une première levée de fonds effectuée via la nouvelle structure de notre Fondation, laquelle a permis d’amasser un montant de $ 89 656 qui sera dirigé vers des activités liées à la recherche, aux jeunes éleveurs et pour des bourses d’études. Ce résultat est parmi les meilleurs obtenus jusqu’à maintenant et nous désirons remercier toutes les personnes impliquées, en particulier le comité de l’encan et ses deux responsables, Deanne Young et Fraser Redpath. Des remerciements vont également envers tous ceux qui ont donné généreusement des items pour l’encan, de même qu’aux acheteurs et aux personnes ayant misé lors de l’encan. Les résultats complets de la vente sont disponibles au : www.simmental.com . La journée de dimanche a débuté avec une réunion du conseil d’administration de la Fondation, puis tous sont allés assister aux classes de présentation animale et de jugement de conformation des Jeunes éleveurs Simmental canadiens (JESC). Ces confrontations constituaient le point culminant des activités des JESC tenues durant la fin de semaine, marquée de diverses compétitions et de l’Assemblée générale annuelle des JESC. Bien que la participation ait été moindre qu’espérée en raison surtout des très mauvaises conditions climatiques affectant alors le Manitoba et l’est de la Saskatchewan, des représentants d’un peu partout au Canada étaient présents, alors que les animaux amenés sur place provenaient de l’Alberta, de la Saskatchewan et du Manitoba. Des membres de l’ASC et des supporteurs de la race Simmental à travers le Canada se sont rendus sur place et ils ont pu apprécier toute l’hospitalité de nos confrères du Manitoba. L’implication et l’enthousiasme de chacun envers notre race est digne de mention. La planification du Congrès Simmental 2015 est déjà bien amorcée, lequel se tiendra au début du mois d’août en Ontario. Faites vous un devoir d’y être et de vous joindre à l’enthousiasme entourant la race Simmental!


October 16 to October 20, 2014 More Info Online @

www.wlblivestock.com

10 purebred females sell! Including; 8 elite heifer calves & 2 special bred heifers.

Watch For Catalog And Videos Online

WLB 377B - MRL El Tiger 52Z/MJ Blk Arapahoe Roughneck’s maternal sister. A MUST SEE! Born - Mar 7 2014

WLB 3550B - CMS Trademark /MRL Hurricane Born - Feb 20, 2014

You can view these gems anytime before the sale.

WLB 360B - WLB Obsidian Blk 391Y/Wheatland Hummer Born - Feb 10, 2014

WLB 405B - Kopp 254Z/WLB Oil Patch 366R Born - Feb 22, 2014

Offering Cow Makers & Competitive Show Heifers

WLB 450B - Wheaty 462P/Hart Good Time 233W Born - Feb 7, 2014

WLB 434A - Hart Good Time 223W/WLB Blowout 381T Born - Feb 15, 2013 -

Find Out More About This Sale Offering and The Sale Process

Sale staff Wilf Davis - 204 841 0211 U.S. - Tom Biglieni - 417 827 8482

204 763 4697 204 729 7925 wlblivestock@inetlink.ca REMEMBER! - WLB 11TH ANNUAL BULL SALE - MARCH 24, 2015

This Sale Hosted By

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Responsable du projet de génomique de l’ACS – Sandy Russell

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u cours des trois dernières années, nous avons publié plusieurs articles concernant les importants travaux de recherche mis en place et réalisés par l’ASC. Alors que la plupart des travaux de la première phase de recherche seront complétés vers la fin de 2014, il est opportun de discuter davantage des résultats obtenus et des retombées plus concrètes pour les producteurs et les éleveurs, en vue de mettre en application ces avancées au niveau des technologies liées à la génomique. Pour se faire, en plus de vous communiquer les résultats, nous allons aussi renseigner davantage les producteurs sur les principes de cette technologie, tout en leur expliquant comment cela pourrait être incorporé à leur programme et venir éventuellement améliorer la rentabilité de leur entreprise. La question suivante est souvent posée concernant le projet de recherche des Innovations Simmental : Qu’avez-vous accompli ? Bien que l’analyse des résultats et les bénéfices concrets pour les éleveurs Simmental canadiens n’en sont qu’au stade initial, il faut tout de même mentionner certaines avancées bien tangibles au niveau de ces recherches en génomique, lesquelles contribuent au rayonnement de l’ASC tant au Canada que partout sur la planète. Voici alors quelques uns des principaux faits saillants des recherches conduites depuis trois ans par l’ASC et des retombées pour l’industrie bovine canadienne. • Près de 15 800 analyses génotypiques ont été complétées, selon des densités variables, allant d’un niveau plus faible (6000 marqueurs) à un niveau plus élevé (770 000 marqueurs), en plus d’obtenir un séquençage complet chez 70 sujets-clé à l’intérieur de la race Simmental. De plus, la grande majorité de ces génotypes ont été complétés chez d’importants sujets souche ayant toujours une influence dans la population actuelle de la race Simmental au Canada. Cela représente une immense source de données de référence, alors qu’on s’apprête à développer des équations de prédiction génétique plus précises pour le bénéfice des éleveurs canadiens. D’ailleurs, notre base de données peut rivaliser avec n’importe quelle race dans le monde. • Deuxièmement, un nouvel EPD de la stabilité a été développé et, en collaboration avec l’ASA, il sera incorporé prochainement aux évaluations génétiques afin d’améliorer l’EPD de la stabilité actuellement disponible. • Des données concernant l’efficacité alimentaire résiduelle ont été recueillies chez 1650 sujets de race Simmental, lesquelles nous servent à mieux comprendre les performances en phase d’engraissement des bovins de race Simmental. Cela constitue une base de données importante touchant un tel caractère pour lequel il est très couteux d’obtenir des mesures. En plus d’être analysées dans le cadre de nos travaux de recherche, ces données ont également été employées pour d’autres analyses concernant des travaux de recherche multi-races. • Enfin, il faut préciser que des données complètes sur les caractéristiques et les qualités de la viande ont été accumulées sur 2600 têtes de bovins Simmental. Cette dernière base de données nous permet de faire le lien entre la composition génétique de ces animaux et les effets qu’ont ces lignées génétiques au niveau du produit final. Alors que les producteurs de bœuf du Canada travaillent à l’amélioration de la constance et de la prédictibilité de la viande de bœuf achetée par les consommateurs, il est absolument essentiel qu’on puisse bien comprendre l’influence du bagage génétique d’un animal sur la production et la qualité de la viande produite. On peut donc clairement constater qu’une imposante somme d’informations a été assemblée jusqu’à maintenant à partir des travaux de

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recherche complétés et qu’elles sont déjà utilisées à divers niveaux au sein de l’industrie bovine. Toutefois, en tant qu’éleveur, vous pourriez dire que tout cela est bien beau mais, au fait, quels sont les bénéfices pour moi ou encore, qu’est-ce que je devrais faire si je veux bénéficier de ces résultats et des avancées obtenus dans le projet de recherche des Innovations Simmental ? Voici les cinq principaux éléments que chaque éleveur devrait considérer s’il veut retirer des bénéfices touchant la technologie de la génomique: 1. Prendre un échantillon sur chacun de vos sujets d’élevage, en vue d’obtenir le profil ADN. Au minimum, la prochaine fois que vous aurez à traiter vos animaux, recueillez des échantillons de poils, assurez-vous de les conserver individuellement dans des enveloppes bien identifiées et proprement classées, au cas où vous auriez besoin d’obtenir le génotype d’animaux donnés. L’ASC vous offre d’importants rabais jusqu’au 15 octobre 2014 via son Programme incitatif pour les tests génotypiques. Nous vous invitons à effectuer le plus de tests possible tandis que le programme est disponible. Si vous désirez obtenir plus d’informations au sujet du Programme incitatif pour les tests génotypiques, veuillez consulter le site de l’ASC au : www.simmental.com ou bien communiquez avec le personnel du bureau au : 1-866-860-6051. 2. Effectuer des tests génotypiques de haute densité (HD) chez les sujets ayant eu le plus d’influence dans votre programme d’élevage (c’est-à-dire des taureaux et des vaches d’élite qui constituent les lignées génétiques souche de votre cheptel actuel). Rappelez-vous que, selon les politiques de l’ASC, tous les taureaux offerts en insémination artificielle ainsi que les vaches donneuses d’embryons doivent avoir obtenu une analyse génotypique de haute densité. 3. Effectuer des tests génotypiques de basse densité (BD) chez vos autres sujets ou, du moins, chez les jeunes sujets qui devraient être utilisés dans le futur. Des tests BD devraient idéalement être effectués sur le troupeau complet. Toutefois, comme il pourrait s’agir d’un investissement considérable, les éleveurs pourraient faire tester annuellement les sujets qu’ils retiennent pour l’élevage et, à terme, cela leur permettrait d’obtenir les données génotypiques de tout leur troupeau. Rappelez-vous que les taureaux utilisés en monte naturelle doivent avoir obtenu une analyse génotypique de basse densité. 4. Poursuivez votre cueillette de données de performance et transmettez-les à l’ASC. Bien que la nouvelle technologie de la génomique retienne dorénavant notre intérêt, celle-ci apportera très peu de valeurs si on ne continue pas de transmettre des données phénotypiques à l’ASC via le Programme de l’enregistrement du troupeau complet (ETC). 5. Informez-vous! Apprenez davantage en ce qui a trait à la technologie de la génomique et comment l’industrie bovine en fait usage, de même qu’un niveau des efforts déployés par l’Association Simmental et qui pourraient vous permettre de produire de meilleurs taureaux destinés à vos clients producteurs commerciaux. Ces nouvelles technologies sont adoptées graduellement dans tous les domaines de l’agriculture, ne faites pas en sorte d’être laissé derrière. Veuillez consulter le site www.simmentalinnovations.com afin d’obtenir plus d’informations et des références touchant la génomique au sein de l’industrie bovine. Si vous désirez obtenir davantage d’informations au sujet des projets de recherche de l’ASC, veuillez communiquer avec le DG de l’ASC, M. Bruce Holmquist @ 403.988.8676 or bholmquist@simmental.com.


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Ranching industry helps to keep STARS flying

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t was about a year ago now, Kelly and Janice Ashworth and family were keeping a daily vigil beside their son Owen’s hospital bed in Regina, Sask. waiting, wondering and praying for the young man to recover from a serious head injury suffered earlier in a seemingly innocent motorbike accident on their southeast Saskatchewan farm.

And the boy made it. He spent two months in hospital then, and now a year later, Owen, 18, has gone on to make nearly a full recovery, and get back to his school and farm life on the family’s Ashworth Farm & Ranch near Oungre, Sask. The motorbike, however, has remained stored in a barn on the ranch. It hasn’t been needed.

One of the key elements that allowed that August 2013 accident to have a happy ending was the timely arrival that fateful day of a red STARS air ambulance helicopter in a canola field

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just a few metres from where Owen was injured. The local first responders on the scene recognized immediately that Owen was in serious trouble and needed help now. Timing was critical. Within about 35 minutes of its arrival at the farm, the STARS helicopter had the young man in the care of head trauma specialists in a Regina hospital. A few months earlier and the only way to have gotten Owen to that hospital would have been a two hour ride by ground ambulance…and by all accounts there was a very good chance he wouldn’t have made it. A few months before Owen’s accident, another Saskatchewan rancher Marlin Leblanc woke up one morning in early April 2013 with a terrible pain in one leg. Leblanc, who along with family members operates R+ Simmentals, managed to get to the hospital in nearby Estevan where it was diagnosed a blood clot had developed that needed to be dealt with immediately by specialists at a Regina hospital. It was a two hour and 15 minute trip by ground ambulance, and there was a high risk that even if Leblanc survived the trip, he might lose the leg. Again, the STARS air ambulance arrived on a landing pad next to the Estevan hospital and transported Leblanc in about 40 minutes to waiting surgeons in Regina where the blood clot was cleared. Four days later Leblanc was home again on his way to full recovery. There are several connecting threads in these two stories — rural ranching families who just happen to be Simmental breeders, emergency situations, STARS was available, happy endings. The reality is, if either of these events had happened a year or more earlier they may have had totally different outcomes. The STARS air ambulance service wasn’t available in Saskatchewan until 2012. It has been the vision of STARS founders and extensive fund raising efforts over the years that have now made the services of STARS (Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society) available across the three Prairie Provinces. The service was started in Calgary in 1985, expanded to Edmonton in 1991, and then Grande Prairie, AB in 2006. STARS

services were launched in Winnipeg in 2011 and a year later in Regina and Saskatoon. “The STARS air ambulance service has over the years proven to be such an important part of the life of so many rural families in general, but also specifically has touched the lives of so many within the Simmental community,” says Bruce Holmquist, General Manager of the Canadian Simmental Association. “It is a very powerful human interest story of how rural families have used the services, and of the support they in turn have provided to maintain and expand the service.” You don’t look too far into the early history of the STARS air ambulance service without running into the name of another long-time rancher — Stan Grad, who along with his family operate Soderglen Ranches in Alberta — long time Simmental breeders. The actual STARS program was launched by Calgary physician Dr. Greg Powell in 1985. Working with a limited budget it was only able to service the Calgary area in those days. As fate it would have it, it was a tragedy that struck the Grad family in 1990 that launched what has become an ever-strengthening 24-year relationship of support and funding raising initiatives.

It was on a February morning in 1990, Grad’s 16-year-old daughter Kristine was seriously injured in two-vehicle crash on a rural road not far from


their home north of Calgary. Although STARS air ambulance was able to get the injured girl to the trauma unit at the Foothills Hospital in Calgary within a few minutes, her injuries were too severe. Kristine didn’t make it.

But Grad, who owns Soderglen Ranches along with other business interests, made a commitment in his daughter’s memory. He wanted to thank the emergency workers who had tried so valiantly that day to save his daughter, and he made a commitment to use his resources where possible to “keep STARS in the sky” so it would be available to help other rural families in time of need, and hopefully with happier results. Over the years Grad’s commitment through his leadership, fund raising skills, and personal donations to the air ambulance service has helped STARS not only survive but expand its lifesaving service across Western Canada. “When I first got involved in 1990 it was a struggling organization,” says Grad. “Dr. Powell had launched it and there were a few doctors behind it, but they had no way of raising money.” The society relied on private donations and the provincial government kicked in money to pay for fuel, which represented about 15 to 20 per cent of operating costs. “That first year I put a team together, and I had an antique car I donated to the cause and we raised $135,000 which was quite a bit in those days,” says Grad. “The money was important, but perhaps the more critical thing was public awareness. The service was available on a limited basis, but we had to let people know about it. That first year I think we attended 48 fairs and rodeos to make people aware of STARS — and people were interested.” Grad became chairman of the STARS board in 1991 and was instrumental over the next dozen years in helping the organization launch effective fund raising campaigns. “In 1991 we expanded the service to Edmonton, but what was killing us were the leasing fees for these helicopters,” says Grad. “So we had to develop a capital acquisition program to reduce costs.” In 1997 STARS launched a capital fund raising campaign with a goal of raising $7.5 million. The campaign raised $8.3 million. “By then the oil patch was starting to kick in,” says Grad. “The whole concept of STARS was gaining momentum. Shell Oil was very involved along with a number of other companies. They saw the value of STARS to rural communities.” At that point STARS was providing emergency services only in Alberta and Grad believed it was an ideal service for Saskatchewan as well. And it was wintertime conversations with his long-time friend Dallas Howe, chairman of Potash Corporation, during annual vacations in Mexico that helped to get Saskatchewan industry behind STARS. “I told Dallas that Saskatchewan was perfect for STARS,” says Grad. “With their population base there was no way there every small town hospital could afford to have a trauma doctor on staff…they needed STARS.”

So that message got the ball rolling with a number of companies getting involved and collectively raising $27 million in support of STARS. “And today Saskatchewan, along with other parts of Western Canada are really enjoying the value of STARS,” says Grad. “We started out with one or two trauma doctors, now I think we have 105. Of course, one of the inherent problems with STARS…you only need them if there is some serious injury or illness in your life.” Still actively involved with STARS, Grad and his wife Jane in 2013 made a personal contribution of $5 million to the STARS foundation, it was the largest single gift of its kind in the history of the air ambulance service. But Grad, loves to hear stories like those of Owen Ashworth and Marlin Leblanc— not because they needed STARS in the first place, but the fact the service was there and produced a positive result. “It is a service you hope you’ll never need, but then you are so thankful that it is available,” says Owen’s father Kelly Ashworth. “Owen had been riding his bike in that area 100 times without event, and always wearing his helmet. And that day, he didn’t have his helmet and the bike went over. We were just thankful we were close by and then thankful as well that STARS was able to get him to hospital. His recovery, really the whole event was nothing short of a miracle. It could have a been a whole different story.” To show their appreciation, the Ashworths, who were recognized as the 2012 Saskatchewan Simmental Breeders of the year, turned part of their annual spring bull sale in 2013 into a STARS fund raiser. Proceeds from the sale of semen from a top bull raised $30,000 for STARS. Ticket sales from a quilt also sold the same day raised another $4,000. “We always had bought STARS lottery tickets and never thought much of it,” says Ashworth. “But after the accident we wanted to do more, so we were pleased to be able to hand over $34,000 that day.” And that wasn’t the only fundraiser inspired by Owen’s recovery. The Friends of Simmental also had it’s own fundraising event, says Brian Bouchard of Bouchard Livestock, a sales management and marketing company at Crossfield, just north of Calgary. “You can’t live in Alberta and be around the Simmental industry and not know about STARS and about Stan Grad,” says Bouchard. “I was born in Saskatchewan, but I didn’t know that it has only been recently that STARS began operating in Saskatchewan.” The Canadian Simmental foundation auctioned off a football jersey of Saskatchewan Rough Rider Keith Shologan which was purchased by Bouchard Livestock and Lewis Farms, who then planned to auction it at the 2013 Canadian Western Agribition as a fundraiser for the junior Simmental association or some other charity. “But after we heard about Owen Ashworth’s accident and in talking with Kelly we decided the only good cause we wanted to support that year was STARS,” says Bouchard. So the Shologan Rough Rider jersey was auctioned at the November 2013 Canadian Western Agribition in Regina, and bought by a group of livestock producers and livestock companies for $12,600 with all that money going to STARS. “It was nice to be able to raise that kind of money for such a great cause,” says Bouchard. “It is amazing as you go through business and life just how many people you run into who have been touched by the STARS service. You hope you never need it, but so grateful that it is available. And it’s great to be able to support that service.”

A few STARS facts

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he founder of one of the most successful air ambulance services in the world, says it has been the moral and financial support of ranching families and rural communities that have played a vital role in making the service a success. Dr. Greg Powell, who founded STARS — Shock Trauma Air Rescue Service — in 1985 in Calgary, says the farming and ranching community has really been the key in helping the service expand across Western Canada. “Many ranching business leaders have been incredibly supportive of the STARS program,” says Powell. “STARS provides access to rapid emergency care in rural areas, offering value in terms of safety for agricultural employees and their families.” An example of the tremendous contributions from leaders in the agricultural sector is a $5 million gift to STARS from Stan and Jane Grad, of Soderglen Ranches, announced in 2013 for the Doctors on Board program. That contribution will strengthen the unique role that physicians have with the STARS organization. “One of the distinguishing features of the STARS program is the role of physicians who are involved with every flight,” says Powell. “The STARS physicians are available 24 hours a day guiding and coordinating missions, either over the phone or directly within the helicopter.” Some facts about STARS: • As a charitable non-profit organization, the STARS continues relying on individual and business donations to continue flying our prairie skies. Hundreds of volunteers support of our efforts through an amazing variety of grassroots fundraising activities, including community barbeques, raffles, and a wide variety of special events. Some in the farming community have even auctioned off bull semen with thousands of dollars going to support STARS. In addition, STARS conducts major fundraising activities, including the annual STARS calendars campaign and STARS Lottery. • Thanks to ongoing community support, STARS has helped thousands of Canadians, flying over 27,000 missions. There were 2,686 emergency missions in 2013 alone. • STARS emergency physicians, paramedics and nurses provide specialized critical care, bringing what is essentially a flying intensive care unit direct to rural patients. Approximately half of missions involve those experiencing a serious illness - such as a heart attack or stroke, with the remainder having a traumatic injury resulting from events such as road collisions, agricultural work related incidents, and recreational activities. • Taking the emergency room to the patient allows them to receive medical care more quickly and throughout the transport, while flying them to a major hospital. • STARS helicopters often land at or near rural hospitals, or directly at the scene where an injury has occurred - including farms, industry worksites, and family acreages. Two experienced pilots flight on every mission for added safety, and each is trained in the use of night visions goggles.

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DON’T MISS OUT ON THIS OPPORTUNITY!

IMPORTANT NOTICE For a limited time the CSA is offering a reduced price on genotyping tests for CSA members enrolled in the Total Herd Enrollment (THE) program: $25 per sample for GGP-LD Profile **Savings of $20** $45 per sample for GGP-HD Profile **Savings of $45**

DNA kits must be ordered by October 15, 2014 with DNA samples submitted no later than November 30, 2014. Funds will be allocated on a first-come, first serve basis. This incentive may expire early if funding is fully utilized. A second way to save! Any genotyped animal that has an ultrasound record submitted by April 30, 2015 will qualify for an additional $5 credit to the members account! To qualify data must be collected under the same criteria as the previous Ultrasound Rebate Program. For more information contact the CSA office: (403)250-7979 or cansim@simmental.com. Don’t miss out on this opportunity!

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Don't you deserve a few...

Friday November 14, 2014 • 1:00 PM Ponoka Ag Events Center • Ponoka, AB

Consignors B Bar C Simmentals 403-224-2594 Cameo Farms 604-823-6385 Double J Ranches 403-813-4490 Elliott Simmentals 780-696-2124 F5 Simmentals 587-891-8148 Keato Meadow Simmentals 780-997-0369

New World Simmentals 780-696-3655 Parview Stock Farms 403-652-1234 Simmeron Ranch 780-939-3248 Trendsetter Ranches 403-740-5223 Wyvern Cattle Co. Ltd. 780-914-3843

Sale Management 4 3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Ph: 306-933-4200 Fax: 306-934-0744 info@tbarc.com www.buyagro.com Chris Poley: 306-220-5006 Ted Serhienko: 306-221-2711 Shane Michelson: 403-363-9973

Selling

Fleckvieh, Fullblood Red & Black Simmental Bred Females Open Heifer Calves Select Herdsire Prospects Semen

View the catalogue online at

www.BuyAgro.com 29


Wolfe Farms

10th Annual Bull & Female Production Sale Saturday, 4:00 p.m.

December 6, 2014

Note!! New Time

at Wolfe Farms, Valleyview, AB

Offering:

40 Fleckvieh Simmental 18 month old bulls

TWWW 624Z

sold to Rocky & Linda Johnson

TWWW 667Z sold to Bob Viravec

All bulls can stay on the farm through the winter and be fed free of charge if they are insured. For bull purchases, at least 50% down is required sale day and the remainder can be paid in the spring when the bulls are delivered.

15 Registered bred heifers

Thank you to the last year’s buyers (*multiple purchases)

Alix Farming* Wade Birkett* Cody Chapman* Ed & Terry Lynn Cook* Gary Jassman Rocky & Linda Johnson Klassen Ranching* Many Creeks Farm* Rolling View Ranch* Bernie Schellanberg*

Henry Roy* Jim Peel* Darrel Reed Bill Smith* Dayle Turley* Bob Viravec* Arnold Wirstuk* John Wolfe Edwin Yuha

For catalogs or further information contact:

Wolfe Farms

Directions to Farm

Box 2074, Valleyview, AB T0H 3N0 780-524-3939 cell: 780-524-9322 email: wolfefarms8@gmail.com website: www.wolfefarms.ca

From Valleyview go S on Hwy 43 to Twp 681 to Rge Rd 232, S to Twp 674 & W to farm. From Little Smoky go N on HWY 43 to Twp 673A (Anderson Rd), W to Rge Rd 225, N to Twp 674 & W to farm.

Tony Wolfe

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December 6, 2014 Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB

Selling Approximately... 40 proven cows & 75 bred heifers Reds & Blacks

MBJ 50T

MBJ 10R

MBJ 25T

MBJ 27T

MBJ 29R

MBJ 72S

MBJ 77S

MBJ 147S

MBJ 100T

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December 9, 2014 - 1:00 PM Camrose Regional exhibition grounds Maxwell Simmentals Glen & Leigh Maxwell 780.385.5552 Kevin & Pru Maxwell 780.385.5626

Spring Lake Simmentals

Doug & Larene Zimmer 780.374.2138

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South Seven Farms

South Holden Simmental

SKOR Simmentals

WJ Simmentals

Robert Stuart 780.632.6877

Terry and Debbie Skoretz 780.384.2189

Garth & James Fleming 780.688.2234

Wyatt, Byron & Berni Johnson 780.856.2175


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Carcass Grading

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he grading of beef carcasses is an important step in delivering consistent beef products to consumers. Grading places carcasses into uniform groups of similar quality. The information collected through the grading process is used in making marketing and production decisions. Producers receive premiums for carcasses with a high grade. While the grading system is voluntary, virtually all fed beef carcasses processed commercially in Canada are graded.

How is Canadian Beef Graded?

The Canadian beef grading system follows standards set by the Government of Canada based on industry and government recommendations. The Canadian Beef Grading Agency (CBGA), a private, non-profit corporation, is accredited by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to deliver grading services for beef in Canada. Trained graders visually assess the whole carcass based on several criteria and assign a grade. All carcasses graded Canada A or higher receive both a quality grade and a yield grade.

‘A’ Grades Canada ‘A’ grades (A, AA, AAA) are also high quality grades, representing increasing degrees of marbling from Canada A to AAA respectively. The segregation into different marbling ranges permits consumers, retail, and food service options in fat content. In 2012, the Canada A, AA and AAA grades together represented 97.1% of all graded beef from fed slaughter cattle in Canada. ‘B’ Grades The ‘B’ grades are for youthful carcasses that fail to meet one or more of the quality requirements of the ‘A’ grades. In 2012, ‘B’ grades represented 1.8% of all graded beef from fed slaughter cattle in Canada. Beef with ‘B’ grades may be prevalent in fast food service. Carcasses graded as ‘B4’ are called dark cutters. They are visually unappealing and have a higher pH than typical beef. Beef from dark cutters is often used in further processed products. ‘D’ Grades The ‘D’ grades are applied to carcasses which are not youthful. They are typically given to carcasses from cows and represented 13.2% of the total graded cattle in Canada in 2012. Beef given a ‘D’ grade is typically used for ground beef and further processed products with the exception of the D1 grade, where whole muscle cuts may be used in low cost food service enterprises. ‘E’ Grades The ‘E’ grade is reserved for mature bulls or youthful bull carcasses showing pronounced masculinity. This grade represented 0.5% of the total graded cattle population in Canada in 2012. These carcasses typically go into further processed products. Because grading is voluntary, cows and bulls are often not graded and are referred to as “ungraded” beef when sold. QUALITY GRADES Canadian Grade

Quality Grade

The quality grade measures numerous characteristics, which reflect meat quality. A carcass may only be graded after it has been inspected and approved for health and safety standards and bears a federal or provincial meat inspection legend or stamp. Characteristic Maturity Sex Conformation (muscling) Fat (colour, texture and cover) Meat (colour, texture and marbling)

Influence On Quality The age of an animal affects the tenderness. Carcasses are categorized as youthful or mature. Pronounced masculinity in animals affects meat colour and palatability. Meat yield is influenced by the degree of muscling. Fat colour and texture influence consumer acceptability. Fat cover affects yield. Meat marbling affects eating quality for juiciness and tenderness. Colour and texture influence consumer acceptability.

Canada Prime The highest marbled quality carcasses are given the ‘Canada Prime’ grade. Canada Prime represents carcasses with at least “slightly abundant” marbling. In 2012, the Canada Prime grade represented 1.1% of all graded beef from fed slaughter cattle in Canada.

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Muscling

Rib Eye Muscle

Marbling*

Fat Colour & Texture

Fat Measure

Canada Prime

Good to excellent with some deficiencies

Firm, bright red

Slightly abundant

Firm, white or amber

2 mm or more

Canada A, AA, AAA

Good to excellent with some deficiencies

Firm, bright red

A - Trace AA - slight AAA - small

Firm, white or amber

2 mm or more

Good to excellent with some deficiencies

Firm, bright red

No requirement

Firm, white or amber

Less than 2 mm

B2

Deficient to excellent

Bright red

No requirement

Yellow

No requirement

B3

Deficient to good

Bright red

No requirement

White or amber

No requirement

B4

Deficient to excellent

Dark red

No requirement

No requirement

No requirement

D1

Excellent

No requirement

No requirement

Firm, white or amber

Less than 15 mm

D2

Medium to excellent

No requirement

No requirement

White to yellow

Less than 15 mm

Deficient

No requirement

No requirement

No requirement

Less than 15 mm

Deficient to excellent

No requirement

No requirement

No requirement

15 mm or more

B1

D3

Maturity (Age)

Youthful

Mature

D4 E

Youthful or mature

Pronounced masculinity (enlarged: hump, neck, crest, pizzle eye)


Yield Grade

When a carcass qualifies for Canada Prime or any of the Canada ‘A’ grades, a prediction of carcass lean yield is also made. Yield grade Canada 1, Canada 2 or Canada 3 is an estimation of the percentage of the carcass that is red meat. Yield Grade Canada 1(Y1) Canada 2(Y2) Canada 3(Y3)

YIELD GRADES Estimated Yield (%) 59 or more 54 to 58 53 or less

A ruler, developed by the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Lacombe Research Station, is used to measure the fat depth and ribeye length and width. These measures of fat and lean are then used to predict an overall carcass lean yield.

U.S. Grade Equivalency

The U.S. equivalent grade for Canada Prime is USDA Prime. Canada AAA, AA and A are equivalent to USDA Choice, Select and Standard respectively. U.S. Yeild grade 1 to 5 is also largely based on fat and REA (Hot Carcass Weight + Kidney Pelvic Heart fat). It does not reflect total lean percent, but a prediction of cutability for closely trimmed, boneless retail cuts from the round, loin, rib and chuck.

Beef Grading Advancements

Evaluating and developing grading tools and sharing information are necessary in order to improve the grading process for the delivery of a consistent beef product and sending signals back to producers for livestock production.

e+v Technology

One of the most recent developments is the computer vision grading system e+v Technology GmbH Beef Instrument Technology. It marks the first major advancement in the Canadian system since the Computer Vision System (CVS) camera was introduced in 1999. The e+v technology is approved for use as a grading aid by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and enables improved grading accuracy under current grading regulations. The e+v grading instrument is a stationary machine that photographs and analyses the rib eye area between the 12th and 13th ribs of both sides of each carcass as it passes by on a moving rail. At present, the computer grading camera measures grade fat, rib eye width, rib eye length, and calculates a lean yield percentage, providing a lean yield grade and a marbling score. In some situations, such as where it is difficult for the camera to get an accurate reading, a grader can provide an overall assessment or override the camera’s grading. The technology is objective and assesses marbling under the same light and at the same distance from the rib eye based on minute calculations of red and white pixels within the traced muscle. This reduces the variability inherent with human assessment. The information captured can be stored, shared and further analyzed.

Beef InfoXchange System (BIXS)

The Beef InfoXchange System (BIXS) enables the individual carcass data to be shared back down the supply chain with all previous owners of the animal if those owners are enrolled in BIXS. Therefore, cow/calf producers participating in BIXS can use carcass information to aid in genetic improvements and bolster marketing efforts, feedlots can fine-tune their operations and packing plants can better sort their product in order to meet customer demands. Over time, this is likely to contribute to enhancing the quality and yield of Canadian beef. Thank you to the Beef Cattle Research Council for supplying the article for this issue of the Commercial Country. For more information on the BCRC, please visit www.beefresearch.ca

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The Maritime Simmental Association & The Maritime YCSA Annual Salt Water Classic Sale NEW LOCATION AND DATE When: October 25, 2014 Where: Maritime Beef Test Station Nappan, NS Time: Sale Starts at 12:30 pm Sale Offering: Simmental, Angus, Hereford & Shorthorn Questions or if you would like to consign: 1-902-388-1613

Maritime Simmental Social

When: September 14, 2014 Where: Andre & Geraline VanAgten Ă‚ Glarro Farm, 190 Fawcett Hill Road Petitcodac, NB What: Beef on a bun, side dishes, dessert and cold beverages. Events: Wagon rides & tour of the farm Questions - 1-506-756-2550

Maritime YCSA Classic

The Maritime YCSA would like to personally thank each and every one of their 2014 sponsors. Without your continued support to our program, it would not be one of the leading youth shows in the Maritimes. Thank you again!

Maritime Association Contacts: President: Donald Godfrey, 48 Hyde Point Rd, Meadow Bank, PE 902-566-3613 Vice-President: James MacKenzie Secretary: Ralph Taylor Treasurer: Bill McLeod Directors: Richard Armstrong, NS; Pater Gaunce, NB; Geraline VanAgten, NB; Don Jenkins, PE; Jennie Mutch, PE YCSA Rep: Heather Creamer CSA Director: Lacey Fisher

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FOCUS ON GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES Evaluating the Benefits for Beef Producers

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he Canadian Simmental Association has now been involved with numerous genomics research projects, many with Livestock Gentec at the University of Alberta and the University of Guelph. While the science of genomic technologies can be difficult to translate, the financial benefits are clear, and are beginning to be recognized. Livestock Gentec is dedicated to helping Alberta and Canada maintain their position as global leaders in beef production. Gentec researchers study the uses of genomics as it relates to livestock production in terms of improving efficiency, health, product quality, and traceability. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF GENOMICS Last year, Livestock Gentec, in collaboration with the Canadian Simmental Association, and with consultation services provided by Abacus Bio Ltd of New Zealand, examined the cost-benefit trade-offs of breeding selection tools1 . The analysis included increased phenotypic trait recordings and genomic testing in the Alberta beef industry. The study examined the impact of investment in genomic technologies in the beef sector on profitability at the cow and industry levels. The value of technology adoption is disaggregated by sector, including breeder, cow-calf producer, backgrounder, and feedlot/packer. The breeding objective is expressed in dollars per cow mated per year at an industry level, and is developed using trait weightings, selection index modelling for genetic superiority, and finally as predictions of genetic gain using economic weights. The final value is the benefit of genomics adoption less additional production costs incurred. Beef industry costs and genetic parameter models are specific to Alberta in the analysis. To assess the impact of genetic improvement with technology adoption the study used 3 most commonly measured traits: birth weight (BW), weaning weight (WW) and post wean gain (PWG), to create a baseline for comparing the addition of maternal and feedlot trait2 recording and selection, as well as genomic tests for all the traits. Cumulating the three categories results in a comprehensive grouping (Table 1). Genomic technology adoption is included in the analysis as genomic breeding values (GBVs)3 with results obtained for increasing accuracies to 0.25 and 0.5. THE RESULTS The financial gains from genomic technology adoption in the Alberta beef industry are specific to participants in the value chain. It is estimated that commercial cow-calf producers, if they are buying bulls with the right information will receive 40% of the benefit in genetic improvements, the feedlot/packer sector will gain 17%, while the beneficiaries of the remaining 43% are up for grabs, depending on who owns the offspring at a certain time in the supply chain. If producers buy bulls with only recorded BW, WW, and PWG EPD’s (no genomic profile), it is estimated that the additional value per cow mated per year is $3.90 for the entire industry. By selecting for the base traits plus maternal and feedlot/packer traits while also using current best practices, the value increases to $4.81 per cow mated per year (Table 1). The addition of genomic technologies with genomically enhanced EPD (geEPD) accuracies of 25% increases the benefits to $6.37 and $6.58 per cow mated per year for the base and comprehensive traits, respectively. If an accuracy of 50% can be achieved, then the benefits increase to $8.78 and $9.43 per cow mated per year for base and comprehensive trait recordings, respectively (Table 1).

The benefits provided so far represent the benefit per cow mated per year. So, if a producer buys a bull with maternal and terminal geEPD’s and the average trait accuracy is 50% or greater, we can expect a benefit per cow mated of $9.43 in genetic progress. This may not seem like much, but this value will build on itself year to year. So in year 10, we can expect our cows to be worth $94.30 more than they are today. It’s also important to realize that the cost-benefit analysis used only a few traits. Currently the Simmental Association offers EPD’s on many more traits, and will soon be offering geEPD’s to their breeders. Therefore, $9.43 per cow mated per year would be the minimum amount we can expect for the value of genetic improvement. WHAT ELSE IS NEEDED? To the bull breeder, this shows the importance of accurate phenotypic recording, complemented with genomic profiles, to add value to bulls for sale. These bulls should be worth more to commercial producers than bulls without any recorded EPD’s and/or geEPD’s at all. Remember, commercial producers should expect a bull to give around 100 calves (25 calves/year for 4 years). If the bull has these traits recorded, selected for, and genomically profiled, that bull should be worth a minimum of $943 over a bull with no information at all or picked randomly. The importance of information flow through the supply chain is also highlighted in this study. To achieve the above results, it is assumed that information is shared between sectors in the industry. For example, if selection for carcass quality is not recognized (through premiums), then the annual value per cow mated per year decreases by $2.56 to the producer, because the value in carcass improvement is flowing back in the supply chain. In this case it would be more profitable to focus efforts on attributes that are beneficial to the cow-calf producer, such as maternal traits. To achieve increased adoption of genomics in the industry it is essential that benefits be translated in a manner that is clear to stakeholders. The use of geEPD’s and indexes will result in improved profits in the industry, due to transparency of information through the supply chain; this is one of several knowledge transfer initiatives that Gentec and CSA are working on. WHAT IT MEANS FOR THE CANADIAN SIMMENTAL ASSOCIATION Used appropriately, the Canadian beef industry can use genomics tools to position itself to be a competitive player in the global beef market. Genomic technologies have the potential for improving consumer perceptions of food safety as an application for traceability in the supply chain. Positioning beef as a safe and economical choice among consumers would result in growth opportunities for the increasing global demand for livestock protein. The financial benefit of genomics is realized when combined with the basics of livestock breeding, including collecting phenotypes, defining clear breeding objectives, and with data collection, sharing, and management within the industry. Knowledge transfer and open access of information is essential to growth and success of this technology application. Adapting to change requires innovation, and genomics may be one economical answer for the beef industry. Genomics and the application of genomics is a very new science, and we are just at the tip of the iceberg. As the science grows, samples are genotyped, and information is shared, the accuracy and benefits will only grow. The time is now to start using EPD’s, trait selection, and genomics in your breeding plan. The sooner you start, the sooner you will see.

Dawn Trautman is a technology translator and Tom Lynch-Staunton is Director of Industry Relations, both with Livestock Gentec at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

Figure 1: The additional economic value in genetic improvement for Simmental calves could reach $9.43/year with the use of genomic tools; for the entire Alberta beef industry this amounts to over $300 million per year.

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Footnotes: 1 - This study was made possible with funding from Alberta Livestock and Meat Agency (ALMA). Industry expertise provided by the Beef Cattle Research Council, Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Alberta Beef Producers, Canfax, Canadian Beef Breeds Council, Beefbooster, and Canadian Limousin, Angus, Simmental, Gelbvieh, Charolais, and Hereford Associations. 2 - Maternal traits used in the study: Cow Mature Weight, WWT(maternal), Heifer conception, cow fertility, Cow BCS, RFI-cow. Feedlot/Packer traits: Carcass Value, RFI growing animal, Feedlot survival 3 - Remember: Estimated Breeding Values (EBV’s) are simply double an EPD. Therefore a GBV is double a GEPD.


THE BREED BUILDER SALE Offering FOundations for the future

Wheatland Circuit Breaker 325A Feature Service Sire

Dam of Tombstone IPU 67T

STF Royal Affair Z44M Feature Service Sire with Daughters sell Decemeber 17, 2014

TNT Bootlegger Z268 Service Sire with Daughters sell December 17, 2014

DAUGHTERS OF THESE GREATS SELL AT THE... Swan lake farms & JOhnson Stock farms Breed builder female sale December 17, 2014 - Whitewood, SK

Chris Poley: 306-220-5006 Ted Serhienko: 306-221-2711 Shane Michelson: 403-363-9973

Thank You to our buyers for your support at the 2014 Bull & Female Sale

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On offer will be a select group of bred females, red, black purebreds, full fleckvieh and fullbloods bred to our walking herd bulls and top A.I sires in the industry.

Stop in any time where the coffee is on, beer is cold and the perogies are homemade!

For more information please contact:

Dave 204-773-0467 • Wayne: 204-796-0004 • Amy: 204-773-6140

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www.bonchukfarms.com


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V

ery often we get called out or a cow is brought in with an unrelenting lameness the producer has treated two or three times for “footrot” but to no avail. The cow is often bearing almost no weight on the leg. This article will describe the clinical findings and the treatment options available to you the producer for a septic arthritis. The outcome can quite often be very favorable. These usually have classic clinical signs. Besides being fracture lame from the pain one claw will be affected and it will be considerably more swollen than the other. A telltale sign is the infection will have broken out and be draining just above the coronary band on the affected side. Older cattle may have a bad crack or recovered from severe footrot but that is not always the case. Infection has gotten into the last joint on the claw and because this infection is in an enclosed space the pain is very intense. Little to no weight bearing occurs on the entire foot. A crack in the hoof, deep foot rot or sole abscess, or a penetrating wound can all lead to infection being introduced into the joint. Rarely a blood born infection (septicemia) will localize here but generally it occurs in the higher joints such as the stifle or carpus. These infections are more commonly seen in the outside front claw and secondly in the inside rear claw. There are four possible courses of action with a septic arthritis. 1. If the cow or bull is older shipping is a possibility provided no antibiotics have been given. 2. Long term antibiotics can on occasion allow the joint to fuse. This basically means the infection eats away the cartilage and the two bones fuse together much like you would have with a fracture repair. Calcium is deposited and when the fusion occurs, pain is relieved and weight bearing reoccurs. The toes will appear club like but function is maintained. 3. The third scenario involves freezing the foot and actually drilling out the joint. This area is flushed with antibiotics or betadine and is also allowed to fuse. There is quite a bit of pain with the treatment so painkillers are often administered. 4. The fourth action involves a claw amputation. This gives quick relief from the pain, has a good long term outcome and is fairly easy for most veterinarians to perform. I will describe a claw amputation so you will know what to expect if one is required on your cattle. If a decision is made to perform a claw amputation they are either done tranquilized and down or lightly sedated standing in a squeeze chute or on a tilt table. The affected

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claw is scrubbed and the whole foot is frozen with what we call a regional I.V. block. A tourniquet is placed around the foot to keep the lidocaine in the area but also to control bleeding while the procedure is done. Once we have good anesthesia the claw is amputated at an angle to insure we remove above the infection. This leaves a larger open wound which is bandaged tightly with an antibiotic ointment and the tourniquet is removed. I like to leave the patient in the chute a minute or so to insure blood is not leaking through the bandage as sometimes certain areas have to be more tightly wrapped. I often cover with long acting antibiotics and have the producer change the bandage once after four days, repeat the antibiotics and that is about all. The stump will have a bit of local infection which is just washed off. Most of the time they recover uneventfully and the stump gets closed over. With claw amputations there are a few precautions. Breeding bulls I advise not amputating the back claws. The breeding pressure will cause the other claw to break down so shipping might be advised here. Cows will last several years before the other claw may start to show tendon stretching. The cow may need a trim on the good claw a little more often than her herd mates but that is about all. The chronic pain may be detrimental to pregnancy so I don’t hesitate doing them in almost any stage of pregnancy. If she was really close it may be wise to let her calve and then do the amputation. Our clinic does a few on calves but they are less common. More commonly in calves an osteomyelitis (bone infection) may accompany the septic arthritis and antibiotics may be needed longer than with cows. If flies are an issue fly tags or pour-ons such as cylence may be a good idea. Heifer calves often would not be kept as replacements but I know of several occasions where they were kept and produced many calves. Most cows once recovered from claw amputations you have to look twice to be able to spot them in the herd. Cows can bear all their weight easily on the one claw so consider this procedure next time you have a cow diagnosed with a septic arthritis. You will be pleased with the results and it will save you from shipping an otherwise productive cow. You may get several years more productive life. If left too long the pain will of course cause weight loss so by removing the claw weight gain will reoccur. If in doubt about having one done talk to a neighbour that has experience with claw amputations for their opinion. With cows worth lots these days and replacements getting more expensive to raise this is a surgical procedure that can extend the productive life of a good cow.


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BGS Colossal Combination 21Z

Look for his bull calves in the inaugural Lockhart Valley/ Beagle Simmentals Bull Sale

We would like to thank the hard working Simmental Bull Customers from our last and previous sales Leedale Colony* Randy Robb Klassen Ranching* Garth Parker Chris Simpson Brad Olson* Bob Grinde Kevin Marcinek* Wild Bronco Ranch Kim Lubbers Murry Sorenson John Sever* Jerry Kuzio J&H Land & Cattle* Katie Michaelchuk Dwayne Patterson MWC Investments* Ed Bajema* Sargeant Farms* Gord Scarlett* Dale Andrews* *denotes repeat buyer

LHVS Ms Lockhart 9W

Look for her 6 bull calves in the inaugural Lockhart Valley/Beagle Simmentals Bull Sale.

REMEMBER NEW SALE NAME & NEW SALE LOCATION! 45


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Hi I'm Willie

I was born in Canada and am a full-fledged Canadian citizen with all its rights and privileges. Both my parents are in South Africa though, and my ancestors go way back to German heritage, that makes me a 100% fullblood Fleckveih. Now that's German blood!! Extremely few closer relatives here yet, my boss must be a bull whisperer. He's always taking pictures of me and there's a real nice picture floating out there of me somewhere already, but "imagine that" he asked me for a bad picture. I don't take bad pictures, but to satisfy him to show his friends, here goes. I twisted my handsome self to show off my wares. I'm a bit bashful doing this (tell by the look on my face). I turned my tail out of the way to show off my big butt (they call it a roaster, I thought roasters were for turkeys???) How about the length of my hip? They say I may have an extra rib? And also a smooth shoulder - real calving ease, hey? (hey, that's Canadian) Look at my straight wide back - serious cowpokes that have the braves, like my boss does, could lay down on it and pull a few zzzzz's. Now look at my legs, notice the strong bone and rippling muscles down to my ankles!!!! My hip height is a hair bigger than perfect and is pigmented a dark cherry red like the rest of me. They say my semen count is like rush hour traffic in New York City. Heard tell that I would be a smachin’-crashin’ hit on Broadway, a shinin’ star. Like to go there, but no one (David Letterman?) would bother to take me. The boss for sure not. I never seen my mom, don't think I ever will but I'll dedicate this little jiggle to her. Her name is Marda. She must be a pretty one, after all look at the fine specimen she turned me into. Thanks mom!! So move over Terminator and get out of the way. This bad picture beats you up. I'm glad Bar 5 put me up for sale, Keato Meadow Simmentals made me one of the high sellers. I'm 2 years old now and I like it here on the meadow; nice grass and green trees, and oh yeah mom, you have some really cute grandsons and granddaughters; they really take after me and look like me. Thanks again mom!!

“Genetically Envied Fleckvieh, Where Functionality and Profitability Converge” Special Thank you to all our buyers over this past year!!!! Bar 5 Stock Farms, Markdale ON Berwest Farms, Bittern Lake AB Duane Robinson, Ft. Assiniboine AB Eagle Ridge Simmentals, Olds AB Hairy Hill Colony, Hairy Hill AB JNR Farms, Willingdon AB Jason Boon, Bruderheim AB

Loren Krukowski, Warburg AB Leonard & Brenda Knight, Alix AB Rasmussen Family, Delburne AB Rocky View Farms, Condor AB Schulte Brothers, Strome AB Starwest Farms, Chilliwack BC Virginia Ranch, Cremona AB

For all inquiries on your next replacement heifer or herd sire purchase, please contact Jonathan & Ebony Kittlitz with Keato Meadow Simmentals located just East of Fort Saskatchewan, AB Home #: 780.997.0369 Cell #: 780.920.7589 Keatomeadowsimms@live.com

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“Forage Focus”

January 22 – 24, 2015 EVRAZ Place, Regina SK

Conference SASKATCHEWAN’S PREMIER BEEF EVENT

Beef & Forage Symposium Industry Meetings Business Networking Conference room blocks at: Ramada Plaza Doubletree Inn Shuttle service available

For more information and to register visit: www.saskbeefconference.com 3845 SBIC Colour Ad 8 5 x 5 5.indd 1

2014�08�19 3:15 PM

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If you would like a Simmental Country Sale Representative at your event, it will take one of the following:

a. 1 Year Ad Contract; or b. 4 Month Ad Contract; or c. 2 Page Ad About Your Event

Included With The Above, The Advertiser Will Receive: a. A Sale Report In The Simmental Country b. A Disk Of Sale Pictures

Kelly Richardson

Contact: Jane Crawford

Margo Cartwright

Western Sales Representative 403-559-6595 krichardson@simmental.com

Eastern Sales Consultant 519-317-5263 jane.cattle@gmail.com

403-250-5255 mcartwright@simmental.com www.simmentalcountry.com

SUBSCRIPTION FORM

Simmental Country is the official publication of the Canadian Simmental Association. We endeavor to bring you up-to-date information and articles that are of interest to both the Purebred and Commercial Cattlemen. Canada 2nd Class Mailing – Cheque or Visa/MC only $4000 - per year $7500 - 2 years U.S. 1st Class Mailing – Cheque or Visa/MC only (US Funds) $6500 - per year

Applicable Taxes for Canadian Subscribers AB, SK, MB & PQ - add 5% to fees for GST BC - add 12% to fees for HST ON, NB & NFLD - add 13% to fees for HST NS - add 15% to fees for HST

Foreign 1st Class Mailing - Visa/MC only (CDN Funds) $13000 - per year PLEASE CHECK ONE OF THE ABOVE To Purchase your subscription, please forward payment to: #13 - 4101 19th St. NE, Calgary, Alberta Canada T2E 7C4 Fax/Email your Visa/MC number and expiry date. Cheques payable to the Canadian Simmental Association

Farm Name: _____________________________________________ CSA# ______________________________ Name: ______________________________________________________________________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________________ City: ___________________________________________________ Province/State: _______________________ Country: ________________________________________________ Postal Code/Zip: ______________________ Cheque Visa M/C Card #: _____________________________________________________________________________________ Expiry: _________________________________ Signature: ___________________________________________

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Simmeron Ranch Martin Skaret 1-56021 RGE. RD. 261 Sturgeon County Alberta, T8R 0V9 Ph: 780-939-3248 Cell: 780 913 7963 mskaret@xplornet.com www.simmeronranch.ca

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23401 Big Bend Rd. Newbury, ON N0L 1Z0 Ron & Linda 519.695.6124 Mike & Melissa 226.268.0520

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BARRY & BRENDA LABATTE Dave and Krista Erixon 306-270-2893

erixonsimmentals@sasktel.net www.erixonsimmentals.com Box 156 Clavet, SK S0K 0Y0 Red & Black Simmentals

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Box 72 Gladmar, Sask. S0C 1A0 www.labattesimmentals.com Ph: (306)969-4820 labatte.simm@sasktel.net Cell: (306) 815-7900


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Auctioneer/Ringman

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Industry Events

Photographers

Insurance

Trucking


Semen/Embryos

Marketing

Bussiness Card Double 2014_Layout 1 2014-07-09

Box 1409 Crossfield, AB T0M 0S0 Office: 403.946.4999 Brian Bouchard: 403.813.7999 Mark Shologan: 780.699.5082 Chad Lorenz: 403.896.9585 Brent Stewart: 204.773.6392 Doug Domolewski: 403.635.1840 Email: info@bouchardlivestock.com

Brian

Mark

ing Option Your Full Service Market Sale Managment • Consulting • Order Buying Export Approved Semen & Embryo Storage Facility Sale Video Production Services • DLMS Internet Agent

WWW.BOUCHARDLIVESTOCK.COM

Semen/Embryos

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ADVERTISER’S INDEX 3D Simmentals.............................................59 ABC Cattle Co..............................................59 Adair Ranch..................................................53 Afri-Can Simmentals.....................................56 Alameda Agencies Ltd...................................62 Alliance Simmental Farms.............................57 Alta Genetics................................................63 American Simmental Association...................61 Anchor D Ranch............................................53 AppleCross Cattle.........................................53 Ashworth Farm & Ranch...............................59 Aumack Simmentals......................................59 B Bar C Simmentals......................................29 Bar 5 Farms Ltd...................................... 13, 57 Beagle Simmentals.................................. 45,53 Beechinor Bros. Simmentals.........................53 Big Rock Simmentals....................................56 Black River Farms.........................................57 Black Sand Cattle Company.................... 10, 56 Blushrose Simmental Farm...........................59 Bohrson Marketing Services.............. 2, 8, 9, 13 ....................................... 14, 15, 17, 25, 31, 63 Boisvert Simmentals.....................................12 Bonchuk Farms....................................... 40, 56 Bouchard Livestock International..... 2, 5, 25, 63 Bova-Tech Ltd...............................................63 Bow Valley Genetics.....................................63 Boynecrest Stock Farms......................... 56, 67 BS Ranch.....................................................53 C C Simmental Ranch...................................53 Cameo Farms...............................................29 Canadian Bull Congress................................62 Canadian Cattlemen.....................................62 Canadian Farm Insurance Corp.....................62 Canadian Red Angus Promotion Society........50 Carey, Brent.................................................62 Car-Laur Simmentals....................................57 Circle 3 Genetics..........................................57 Circle G Simmental & Angus.........................53 City View Simmentals....................................59 Crimson Tide Fleckvieh.................................58 Crossroad Farms.................................... 43, 60 Czech-Mate Livestock................................... 11 Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd..........63 Deeg Simmental...........................................53 Destiny Simmentals......................................58 Diamond T Simmentals.................................53 Dodge.. .........................................................66 Don Heggie Simmentals................................53 Donovandale Simmentals..............................58 Dora Lee Genetics........................................58 Dorran Marketing Inc.....................................62 Dorran, Steve...............................................62 Double Bar D Farms........................... 2, 25, 60 Double G Simmentals...................................60 Double J Ranches.........................................29 Downey Farms..............................................56 DP Sales Management........................ 2, 25, 63 Dunc’s Cattle Co...........................................58 DV Auction................................................2, 25 Dwayann Simmentals.............................. 13, 58 Eagle-Ridge Simmentals...............................53 East Popular Simmentals..............................60 Edge, Dean...................................................62 EDN Simmentals...........................................60 Elliott Simmentals.........................................29 Elm Tree Farms............................................58 Erixon Simmentals........................................60 F5 Simmentals..............................................29

64

Fallen Timber Farms.....................................56 Farm Fair International. . ................................51 Ferme BMS.. .................................................12 Ferme Gagnon Farm. . ...................................59 Ferme Saro .. ................................................59 Ferme Sibelle Fleck......................................12 Flying N Cattle & Feed..................................62 Genex Cooperative, Inc... ..............................63 Get-A-Long Stock Farm................................62 Gibbons Farms.............................................13 GJR Simmentals...........................................60 Grant Rolston Photography Ltd.....................62 Gravandale Simmentals................................58 Grinalta Farms. . ............................................53 H.S. Knill Company Limited. . .........................62 Hairy Hill Cattle Co.......................................53 Hallridge Simmentals....................................58 Hannah Simmentals......................................53 Harvie Ranching...........................................53 High Bluff Stock Farm...................................56 High Country Cattle Services........................53 Hi-Tech Farms..............................................58 Hoegl Farms.................................................60 Indian River Cattle Company. . .......................58 Janzen Brogan Embryo Services Ltd.............63 Janzen Ranches...........................................54 Jetstream Livestock......................................58 JNR Farms...................................................54 Keato Meadow Simmentals............... 29, 47, 54 Kin Kin Cattle Co..........................................54 Kopp Farms .................................................56 Kuntz Simmental Farm. . ................................60 LaBatte Simmentals......................................60 Lazy Bar-B Simmentals. . ...............................60 Lazy S Ranch Inc.. . .......................................54 Lewis Farms........................................... 54, 68 Little Willow Creek Ranch.............................60 Lobster Point Farms. . ....................................57 Lockhart Valley Simmentals..........................45 Lone Stone Farms........................................54 M&J Farms............................................. 41, 57 MacKenzie Cattle Company..........................54 Mader Ranches.. ............................... 22, 23, 54 Majestic Cattle Company..............................37 Maple Key Farm.. ..........................................58 Mappin Simmentals. . .....................................54 Mar Mac Farms. . ...........................................57 Masterfeeds. . .......................................... 21, 61 Maxwell Simmentals............................... 32, 54 McCormack Family Ranch. . ...........................60 MCG Simmentals..........................................54 McIntosh Livestock.......................................60 McManus Simmentals...................................57 McMillen Ranching Ltd............................ 33, 60 Meadow Acres Farms. . ............................ 36, 60 MI Simmentals..............................................54 Mitchell Cattle Co.. ........................................56 Muellers Nossa Terra....................................59 Muirhead Cattle Co.......................................61 New Holland...................................................3 New World Simmentals.................................29 North Hill Simmentals.. ..................................54 O Double E Simmentals................................54 O’Brien Farms.. .............................................58 O’Grady Steel...............................................61 Okotoks Fleckvieh Embryo Group.................54 Oslanski Simmental Farms. . ..........................54 Parkhill Ranches. . .........................................54 Parview Stock Farms.............................. 29, 55

Pearson Simmentals.....................................55 Pheasantdale Simmentals.............................61 Phillips Farms...............................................61 Porter Ranches. . ...........................................55 Pro Rich Seeds. . ...........................................57 Prospect Hill Simmentals.................. 14, 15, 58 Rainalta Simmentals & Charolais..................55 Rancier Farms..............................................55 Rattray Livestock..........................................55 Rendezvous Farms.......................................57 River Point Cattle Co.............................. 17, 58 Riverbank Farm............................................57 Robb Farms. . ................................................61 Robson Acres...............................................58 Rust Mountain View Ranch.............................9 SAJ Simmentals.. ..........................................61 Saskatchewan Beef Industry Conference.......51 Saugeen Acres.............................................55 Schatz Simmentals.......................................55 Silvertop Simmentals....................................45 Simmeron Fleckvieh Simmentals.............. 29,55 Skeels, Dan..................................................62 Skor Simmentals. . ................................... 32, 55 South Seven Farms......................................32 Southpaw Cattle Company............................55 Spring Creek Land & Cattle ..........................63 Spring Creek Simmentals........................ 31, 61 Spring Lake Simmentals......................... 32, 55 Spruce Grove Cattle Company......................61 Starwest Farms. . ..................................... 11, 56 Steen Agencies. . ...........................................62 Stewart Simmentals......................................59 Stock, Mark..................................................62 Stockmans Insurance....................................62 Stone Simmentals. . .......................................55 Stoughton Farms..........................................61 Sullivan Simmentals......................................59 Sun Rise Simmentals....................................61 Sun Star Simmentals....................................55 Sunny Valley Simmentals..............................61 Swan Lake Farms................................... 39, 61 Swantewitt Simmentals.................................55 T Bar C Cattle Co Ltd................2, 25, 29 39, 63 Timberland Auctions......................................62 Todd Simmentals..........................................59 Transcon Livestock Corp................... 11, 63, 67 Trendsetter Ranches.....................................29 Trevor’s Cowpix............................................62 Triple Rose Simmentals................................59 Tryon Simmentals.........................................57 TSN Livestock..............................................57 Twin Brae Simmentals...................................57 Twin Butte Simmentals..................................55 Tymarc Livestock.................................... 11, 55 Virginia Ranch........................................ 11, 55 W2 Farms.....................................................61 Weldehaven Farms.......................................59 Wells’ Crossing Cattle Company ....................56 Westway Farms Ltd......................................56 Wild Oak Farms............................................59 Windy Knoll Farm.. ........................................57 WJ Simmentals....................................... 32, 56 WLB Livestock..............................................19 Wolfe Farms .......................................... 30, 56 Wolfe’s Fleckvieh..........................................56 Wyvern Cattle Co Ltd....................................29 Xcel Livestock.. .............................................59


What’s Happening September Sep. 13 - Ontario Autumn Classic Sale, Hanover, ON Sep. 27 - Pacific Invitation All Breeds Female Sale, Williams Lake, BC Sep. 27 - Ferme Gagnon 18th Annual Production Sale, Cheneville, PQ

October

Oct. 2-5 - River Point Cattle Co. Internet Sale, Liveauction.tv Oct. 4 - Bar 5 Stock Farm Extravaganza Sale, Markdale, ON Oct. 4 - Prospect Hill Simmentals Final Finale Complete Dispersal, Markdale, ON Oct. 16 - WLB Livestock’s 2nd Annual Internet Simmental Female Sale, Liveauction.tv Oct. 25 - Partners for Progress Vol. III Sale, Waterloo, PQ Oct. 25 - Annual Salt Water Classic Sale, Nappan, NS Oct. 25 - Boynecrest Stock Farm Complete Simmental Herd Dispersal, Virden, MB Oct. 25-26-Edam Fall Fair, Edam, SK Oct. 27 - Rust Mountain View Ranch’s “Queens of the Pasture” Female Sale, Turtle lake, ND Oct. 31-Nov. 1 - Lloydminster Stockade Roundup, Lloydminster, SK

November

Nov. 5-8 - Yorkton Harvest Show Down, Yorkton, SK Nov. 6 - Farmfair International Simmental Show & Draft, Edmonton, AB Nov. 6-8 - Manitoba Livestock Expo, Brandon, MB Nov. 7 - Royal Elite All Breed Sale, Toronto, ON Nov. 7 - Farmfair’s Headliner All Breeds Sale, Edmonton, AB Nov. 8 - Farmfair’s Pen of 5 or 10 Commercial Bred Sale, Edmonton, AB Nov. 8 - RAWF National Simmental Show, Toronto, ON Nov. 8 - YCSA Ontario Trillium Classic, Toronto, ON Nov. 13 - Western Harvest Simmental Heifer Sale, Innisfail, AB Nov. 14 - Jewels & Diamonds Simmental Production Sale, Ponoka, AB Nov. 15 - Pembina Triangle Simmental Association, 34th Annual Sale, Cypress River, MB Nov. 16 - Hudson Pines Living Legacy Sale, Campbellsburg, KY Nov. 16 - Central Invitational Simmental Sale,Woodville, ON Nov. 19 - North American Select Sale, Louisville, KY Nov. 21 - Westgold Farms Female Production Sale,Vermilion, AB Nov. 22 - Transcon’s Cow-A-Rama XV, Innisfail, AB Nov. 26 - Canadian Western Agribition Simmental Select Show and Sale, Regina, SK Nov. 29 - Marywood Classic Bull and Female Sale 2014, Listowel, ON

December

Dec. 1 - The Harvest Hoedown Simmental Heifer Sale, Neepawa, MB Dec. 4 - Lewis Farms Leading Ladies Female Sale, Spruce Grove, AB Dec. 6 - Spring Creek 41st Annual Sale, Virden, MB Dec. 6 - Wolfe Farms 10th Annual Bull & Female Production Sale, Valleyview, AB Dec. 6 - Majestic Cattle Co. Commercial Production Sale, Lethbridge, AB Dec. 8 - The Source of Elite Simmental Genetics Sale, Lloydminster, SK Dec. 9 - 36th Annual Keystone Konnection Simmental Sale, Brandon, MB Dec. 9 - Annual Camrose Country Classic, Camrose, AB Dec. 10 - Double Bar D “She’s Got the Look” Female Sale, Grenfell, SK Dec. 11 - Transcon’s 37th Annual Simmsational Simmental Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Dec. 12 - MRL Herdbuilder 2014 Female Sale, Carievale, SK Dec. 13 - Westway Female Sale, Olds AB Dec. 13 - Southern Alberta Simmental Roundup Group Bull Sale, High River, AB Dec. 15 - Shades of the Prairies Simmental Sale, Brandon, MB Dec. 16 - Bonchuk Farms Fall Female Production Sale, Virden, MB Dec. 17 - Swan Lake Farms & Johnson Stock Farms Breed Builder Female Sale, Whitewood, SK Dec. 19 - 3rd Annual Friday Night Lights Simmental Sale, Olds, AB Dec. 20 - Checkers & Fullblood Perfection Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB Dec. 20 - Transcon’s National Trust “On Ice” Simmental Semen and Embryo Sale, Red Deer, AB Dec. 21 - Transcon’s Fleckvieh Equation, Fullblood Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB Dec. 21 - Transcon’s Ultimate Red & Black XVII Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB Dec. 22 - Black Sand Complete Dispersal Sale, Virden, MB Dec. 31 - New Years Resolution Frozen Genetics Sale Volume III, Red Deer, AB

January

Jan. 31 - Lazy S Ranch Annual Bull Sale, Mayerthorpe, AB

February Feb. 8 - Feb. 10 - Feb. 12 -

Diamond M Ranch 4th Annual Bull Sale, Estevan, SK Bata Bros./Olafson Bros, Joint Simmental Production Sale, Rugby, ND Janzen Ranches 22nd Annual Simmental and Red Angus Bull Sale, Rosemary, AB

Feb. 13 - Feb. 13 - Feb. 14 - Feb. 15 - Feb. 16 - Feb. 17 - Feb. 18 - Feb. 19 - Feb. 20 - Feb. 21 - Feb. 23 - Feb. 25 - Feb. 26 - Feb. 27 - Feb. 27 - Feb. 28 - Feb. 28 -

16th Annual Genetic Edge Bull Sale, Rimbey, AB 26th Edition of Mader Ranches Bull Power Sale, Carstairs, AB Kenner Simmental 18th Annual Production Sale, Leeds, ND Bonchuk Farms Annual Bull Sale, Virden, MB Rendezvous Farms “Holiday Monday” 11th Annual Simmental Bull and Female Sale, Ste. Rose du Lac, MB Nu Horizons Bull Sale, Innisfail, AB Young Guns & Guests Simmental Bull & Female Sale,Wainwright, AB M&J Farms Simmental & Angus Bull & Female Sale, Russell, MB 26th Mader Ranches Bull and Female Sale, Carstairs, AB Double Bar D “Best of Both Worlds” Simmental and Red Angus Bull and Female Sale, Grenfell, SK Select Opportunity Simmental Bull and Female Sale, Olds, AB 9th Annual Crossroad Farms Bull Sale, Shell Lake, SK 10th Annual Robb Hoegl Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK Lone Stone Farms Simmental and Red Angus Bull & Female Sale, Westlock, AB Early Sunset Bull and Female Sale, Edam, SK Lewis Farms 30th Annual Bull Sale, Spruce Grove, AB Bar 5 Online Bull Sale, cattleinmotion.com

March

Mar. 2 - Simmental Summit 3rd Annual Bull and Female Sale, Bentley, AB Mar. 2 - 13th Annual Muirhead Cattle Co. Simmental Bull Sale, Shellbrook, SK Mar. 3 - Rainalta and Guest Charolais and Smmental Bull Sale, Brooks, AB Mar. 4 - 20th Anniversary Herd Master Bull Sale, Camrose, AB Mar. 4 - Erixon Simmentals Bull and Female Sale, Saskatoon, SK Mar. 5 - 11th Annual Pheasantdale Bull and Female Sale, Balcarres, SK Mar. 6 - LaBatte Simmentals with Guests Meadow Acres Farm, 35th Annual Bull and Female Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Mar. 7 - MCG Simmentals and Rach Red Angus Bull & Female Sale, Stavely, AB Mar. 7 - 21st Annual McMillen Ranching Production Sale, Carievale, SK Mar. 7 - Lockhart Valley/Beagle Simmentals Bull Sale, Rimbey, AB Mar. 8 - 15th Annual R Plus Bull Sale, Estevan, SK Mar. 9 - Ashworth Farm and Ranch Simmental Sale, Oungre, SK Mar. 11 - Mar Mac Farms and Guests Annual Bull Sale, Brandon, MB Mar. 11 - Skor Simmentals Red and Black Bull Sale, Camrose, AB Mar. 11 - 25th Anniversary Sunny Valley Simmentals Bull and Female Sale, Saskatoon, SK Mar. 12 - In Pursuit of Perfection Simmental and Angus Bull Sale, Moosomin, SK Mar. 12 - 12th Annual Westway and Deeg Annual Bull Sale, Olds, AB Mar. 13 - Northern Classic Charolais & Simmental Bull Sale, Grande Prairie, AB Mar. 14 - Ranchlands Simmental and Red Angus Bull Sale, Stavely, AB Mar. 14 - Next Generation Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK Mar. 14 - 4th Annual Synergie Bull Sale, Ste-Sophie de Levrard, PQ Mar. 15 - Rebels of The West Angus & Simmental Sale, Virden, MB Mar. 16 - Genetic Source Simmental Bull Sale, Brandon, MB Mar. 17 - Kuntz-Stoughton-McIntosh-SAJ Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK Mar. 17 - Prairie Partners Bull & Female Sale, Killarney, MB Mar. 18 - Transcon’s Premium Beef Simmental Bull Sale, Neepawa, MB Mar. 18 - South-Sask Simmental Bull and Female Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Mar. 19 - Rocky Mountain Simmental Bull Sale, Olds, AB Mar. 19 - Get-A-Grip Angus and Simmental Sale, Forestburg, AB Mar. 20 - Family Tradition Charolais and Simmental Bull Sale, Dropmore, MB Mar. 20 - Porter Ranches Bull Sale, Stony Plain, AB Mar. 21 - 12th Annual Highland Stock Farms Bull Sale, High River, AB Mar. 21 - 9th Annual Proudly Western Bull Sale, Whitewood, SK Mar. 23 - Transcon’s Red Deer Simmental Bull Sale, Red Deer, AB Mar. 23 - 11th Annual Butts, Guts & Nuts Simmental Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK Mar. 24 - WLB Livestock 11th Simmental and Hereford Bull Sale, Douglas, MB Mar. 25 - Transcon’s Mountainview Bull Sale, Turtle Lake, ND Mar. 26 - Wheatland Cattle Co. Bull Sale, Bienfait, SK Mar. 27 - Rust Mountain View Ranch “Ace in the Hole”, Turtle Lake, ND Mar. 29 - The Best of the Breeds Bull Sale, Leross, SK Mar. 30 - Transcon’s Peace Country Simmental Bull Sale, Beaverlodge, AB Mar. 30 - Southwest Showcase Simmental Bull Sale, Swift Current, SK Mar. 31 - 19th Annual U2 Ranch Bull and Female Sale, High River, AB Mar. 31 - McCormack Family Ranch Genetic Destination Bull Sale, Grenfell, SK TBA Bull Spectrum Simmental Sale, Innisfail, AB

April Apr. 9 - Apr. 9 - Apr. 11 - Apr. 11 -

Winnipeg Simmental Bull Sale, Winnipeg, MB Daines All Black Bull Sale, Innisfail, AB Transon’s Cattle Country Charolais and Simmental Bull Sale, Neepawa, MB 40th Annual Six Mile Ranch Bull Sale, Fir Mountain, SK

August

Aug. 6-9 - Canadian Simmental Association Conference, Lindsay, ON

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Fall 2014 Dates Saturday, September 27

Ferme Gagnon & Guests 18th Annual Simmental Production Sale, Cheneville, PQ

Saturday, October 25

Boynecrest Stock Farm Complete Simmental Herd Dispersal, Virden, MB

Thursday, November 13 Saturday, November 15 Saturday, November 22

Western Harvest Simmental Heifer Sale, Innisfail, AB Pembina Triangle Simmental Association 34th Annual Sale, Cypress River, MB Transcon’s Cow-A-Rama XV, Innisfail, AB

Monday, December 1 Thursday, December 11 Saturday, December 13 Saturday, December 20 Sunday, December 21 Sunday, December 21

Harvest Hoedown Simmental Heifer Sale, Neepawa, MB Transcon’s 37th Annual Simmsational Simmental Sale, Moose Jaw, SK Southern Alberta Simmental Roundup Group Bull Sale, High River, AB Transcon’s National Trust “On Ice” Simmental Semen & Embryo Sale, Chapter VII, Red Deer, AB Transcon’s Fleckvieh Equation, Fullblood Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB Transcon’s Ultimate Red & Black XVII Simmental Sale, Red Deer, AB

To see our 2015 sale listings, please visit... WWW.TRANSCONLIVESTOCK.COM

Jay Good (403) 556-5563

Glenn Norton (780) 542-0634

Darren Paget (403) 323-3985


Commercial Country September 2014  

Commercial Country September 2014

Commercial Country September 2014  

Commercial Country September 2014