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Selling 40 Red & Black ~ Two Year Old Angus Bulls Red Angus Bulls sired by Red Lazy MC Smash 7S and Red Nordal Card Player

Black Angus Bulls sired by

Selling 30 Two Year Old Red & Black Polled Limousin Bulls sired by

Locust Grove Networth and Seize the Day, Landmine Tuxedo Nordal Supreme 17W and the Unfathomable (Kodiak Son) The Limousin Division are The Angus Division have low birthweight, calving ease, strong heavy muscled, full of volume performance and high maternal traits. and performance, with built in Large selection of low birth calving ease bulls. calving ease

Also Selling 50 Red/Black Angus X Simm Heifers bred Red Angus for April calving

www.nordallimousin.com

View the catalogue at www.nordallimousin.com

Box 85, Simpson, SK S0G 4M0 Rob Garner: 306-836-2035 Cell: 306-946-7946 E: nordallimousin@sasktel.net

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Publisher & Advertising Sales: Todays Publishing # 4 3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Ph: 306-934-9696 E-mail: info@tbarc.com

Editor: Bryan Kostiuk Ph: 306-934-9696 Fax: 306-934-0744 E-mail: bryan@tbarc.com

The Herd Bull Issue 2013  Vol. 9 No. 1 Official Publication of the Canadian Limousin Association

Features

Advertising Rates:

(All ads will be in full color) One Page One Half Page One Quarter Page Annual Card Rate Inside Front and Inside Back Cover Outside Back Cover All Prices Plus GST

$855.00 $495.00 $315.00 $250.00 $950.00 $1050.00

Yearly contract discount 10% (Card Ads Exempt)

Publication Deadline Dates: Winter (Herd Bull Issue) Ad bookings by Ad copy by Summer (Early Sale Issue) Ad bookings by Ad copy by

January 15 January 25 July 25 August 5

Fall (Show Preview/Late Sale Issue) Ad bookings by October 1 Ad copy by October 10 Christmas (Herd Bull Issue) Ad bookings by Ad copy by

December 1 December 10

Cover photo: Anchor B Usher 49U roaming the Cherway Limousin pastures in Sanford, Manitoba and reminding us that green grass is just around the corner!

Manitoba Commercial Producer of the Year Randy Bollum Talks About RFI, Data and Dollars Finnish Beef Producers Tour Saskatchewan Herds Excelling in the Real World Masterfeeds’ Bull Management for the “Off Season” The Verbeeks - A Tradition of Purebred Genetics and Family Involvement Springwater Colony Sold on the Hereford/Limousin Cross Grading Shifts and What They Mean Elite Herds & Dam Winners 2012 Fall Sales Results Spotlight on Limousin Masterfeeds Cattle Of The Year Awards

24 26 32 36 38 40-41 43-45 46-47 56-57 50 52-55 58

In Every Issue CLA Office Update Breed Improvement A Breeder’s… Vet Perspective Ontario News The Real World The View Through My Windshield Quebec News Manitoba News Subscription Card Coming Events Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  4

16 28 30 33 42 48 51 58 61 64


Genetics by: TMF Napoleon, Richmond Wyatt, AHCC West Wind, Lakeridge Wando, RPY Paynes Marathon and Greenwood PLD Xtra Charge

Bryce & Nathan Allen RR 4 Box 189 Warkworth, ON K0K 3K0 Phone: 705-924-2583 Fax: 705-924-3385 Nathan’s Cell: 705-761-9426 email: brycea@alleninsurance.ca Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  5


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SRD 164Y

SRD 233Y

TSR 11Z

SRD 56Y

SRD 4Z

Friday

March 8 at the Ranch

Over 20 Waldo sons sell Selling 75 bulls (35 yealings & 40 grass born 2 yr olds) and 30 40 Open Heifers Limousin (Red & Black) Limflex and Angus

SRD 8Z

SRD 9Z

SRD 15Z

SRD 57Z

Wulfs Waldo T928W

Call for Videos! Jim: 403/368-2103 Cell: 403/323-8433 SRD 24Z

www.richmondranch.com

SRD 183Y

SRD 106Y

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  9

SRD 216Z

SRD 105Y


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LAZY S LIMOUSIN

& CHAROLAIS BULL SALE 45 Bulls on Offer 2 Year Olds & Yearlings

Saturday, March 23, 2013 7:00 pm Rimbey Agriplex Guest Consignor

Stan & Ty Skeels Vykki Johns 403-704-0288

Runaway Ranch Kurt Wilkie Arlene Butler 403-318-3579

lazyslimousin@gmail.com Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  12


ROMN Tuff Enuff Ken-Doc Lover Boy in the Grand Champion Bull at Canadian Western Agribition 2011 Sons Sell

March 29, 2013 Saskatoon Livestock Sales Saskatoon, SK

KGS 24Z By Lover Boy

KGS 7Z By Lover Boy

KGS 17Z By Lover Boy

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Ken-Doc Lover Boy Grand Champion Limousin Bull at Agribition 2011 Many Sons Sell

35 Red & Black Limousin Yearlings

Consignors KEN-DOC Limousin Ken Gillies (306) 382-2390 or (306) 221-1159

Edwards Limousin

Stoneyview Zack Sire: Stoneyview U-Call Dam: Lakeridge Whoppi He Sells

Rob or Laird Edwards Ph: (306) 734-2624 Cell: (306) 567-7456 Fax: (306) 734-2621 lredwards@sasktel.net

Stoneyview Limousin

Dale Turner: (306) 374-6585 Bob Turner: (306) 528-4510 meaganturner@yourlink.ca

Sale Consultants

Harvey Welter: (306) 227-8684 Scott Bohrson: (403) 370-3010

Insurance Available Through Stockmens Insurance Marjorie Blacklock: (306) 931-0088

The catalogue can be viewed online at www.buyagro.com

Ken-Doc Zoink Sire: Ken-Doc Lover Boy Dam: Ken Doc Maid Marion He Sells

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HELP US, HELP YOU.

ON PEUT VOUS AIDER

As we just completed a direct mail out of our new breed brochure to everyone who has purchased Limousin genetics in the past three years, you will notice the final message; Help Us, Help You! This promotional endeavor came as a direct result of the Spotlight on Limousin round table discussions that took place in December. The content of the brochure is meant to arm Limousin users with some strong facts and figures that can help them market their product. The Canadian Limousin Association (CLA) is also offering to take a proactive approach as liaison between the commercial producers and the purchasers of Limousin feeder cattle. Therefore, by coordinating communication between segments of the value chain, we can assist all involved. A full report of the Spotlight days is included in this issue of the Voice for your information. It is also posted, along with video clips of our speakers, on the “research and development” section of www.limousin.com

L es groupes de discussion qui ont eu lieu en décembre, nous ont permis de mieux comprendre les attentes des gens des différents secteurs de l’industrie. D’une part, les producteurs vachesveaux comptent sur nous pour leur donner un coup de pouce avec la mise en marché de leurs veaux d’embouche. Les parcs d’engraissement ont aussi manifesté le désir de communiquer avec l’association lorsqu’ils sont à la recherche de veaux ou de bovillons semi-finis.

Let’s start by helping our members with their bull sale promotion. Don’t keep your event a secret, take advantage of the many items we can assist you with. Here is a check list of what the Canadian Limousin Association offers; • • • •

Mailing list of previous bull buyers (available to purchase) Website advertising options: breeding stock for sale listing or search page banner flash ads (available to purchase) Complimentary listing of your event on the CLA website (interactive events calendar) Complimentary posting of a link to your catalogue on the CLA Facebook page, and a

Le premier effort de liaison fut l’envoie de notre nouvelles brochure de promotion de la race Limousin à tous ceux qui ont acheté de la génétique Limousin au cours des trois dernières années. La brochure fait d’une pierre deux coups. Dun premier temps elle fournie des statistiques pertinentes pour ceux ont besoin de s’armer d’information pour la meilleure mise en marché possible. D’un autre temps, elle invite les lecteurs à informer l’association de leurs produits à vendre ou leur besoins d’animaux. Pour l’instant, la brochure n’est qu’en anglais, mais nous prévoyons la traduire dans les semaines à venir et ainsi rejoindre les producteurs francophones aussi. Pour ce qui est de nos membres, qui ont des animaux à vendre, nous vous rappelons qu’il existe des outils pour maximiser la vitre de vos produits. Parmi les options disponibles à nos membres : • •

Il est possible de se procurer la liste de tous les acheteurs de génétique Limousin des années passées (coût de $150). Vous pouvez ainsi prendre contacte avec eux par voix de courrier régulier ou courriel. Le site web de l’association offre des petites

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• • •

repeat sale announcement closer to the date Complimentary print material to have on display: breed brochures, additional copies of the Limousin Voice and posters Complimentary Styrofoam coffee cups Complimentary information to include in your catalogue such as Limousin facts, figures and research results, Limousin promotional ads, etc.

REMINDING ALL BULL BUYERS If you are in the market to purchase Limousin bulls, you will love the options that are available to you. This issue of the Voice showcases a great sample of what is available in Canada. Make sure to visit www.limousin.com for the complete listing of events as well as cattle for sale privately. If you use EPD’s to help you with your decisions, I strongly encourage you to not only look at the animal’s number for a particular trait or group of traits, but also at the accuracy percentage. Accuracies are a big a part of the story. What’s the point of having an estimated breeding value if there is so little information available that the reliability of that number is barely above zero? When breeders submit performance information on their herd the EPD accuracy of their cattle increases significantly. You will find in this issue of the Limousin Voice a list of Elite herds, categorized according to the records they submit on their cattle. It may be a great guide for your decisions. We invite you to keep in touch with the CLA when your commercial Limousin calves or feeder cattle are ready to be marketed. As mentioned previously, our goal is to take on a proactive role in bridging the gap between the players of the industry. DNA TRANSITION We have mentioned on several occasions that the CLA is transitioning from microsatellite to SNP technology for DNA testing. The transition is progressing well in general, but some particular cases have created delays. We have proceeded (proactively) with the transition of animals in our registry who are active parents. Meaning, the hair samples that were in storage in

annonces d’animaux à vendre (coût de $50) • Les pages de recherches du site (plus de 5000 visiteurs par mois) offre l’opportunité de mettre une publicité qui dirigera les visiteurs à votre propre site web. (coût de $150 par mois) • La liste des évènements à venir est un service gratuit qui vous permet d’annoncer votre vente ou portes ouvertes. Nous répétons votre message aussi deux fois sur notre page Facebook. • Lors de votre évènement, nous pouvons vous fournir des tasses à café en Styrofoam, des items de promotion et des posters. LA TRANSITION DE MÉTHODE D’ADN Nous avons fait mention plusieurs fois des changements au niveau du type de testage d’ADN. L’Association Canadienne Limousin est en transition envers la méthode SNP qui est plus précise et plus avant-garde. Pour la plupart des cas, le changement se fait sans problème et sans délais. Les animaux dont nous avions un échantillon de poils en entreposage, ont été refait sans complication ni de coûts additionnels pour les propriétaires. Il reste qu’il se trouve des obstacles au niveau des animaux dont le père est un taureau américain. L’association américaine ne prend pas la même approche proactive que nous envers le changement de microsatellite à SNP. Donc seule une petite partie de leurs animaux ont subis la transition, laissant plusieurs taureaux d’insémination incompatibles avec les animaux canadiens au niveau de l’ADN. La solution est de les re-tester au Canada avec une dose de semence sous la méthode SNP. L’ACL se charge des frais de testage, mais la semence nous doit être fournie par un éleveur ou par le distributeur de semence. Nous avons pris le devant en contactant les deux centres d’insémination principaux et il restera certains géniteurs, toujours actifs en insémination qui devront être testées avec une dose de semence. En bref, si vous faite une demande d’ADN et que le père de votre animal est un taureau américain, il est possible que nous aillons besoin d’une dose de semence pour répondre a votre demande.

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Saskatoon, were pulled out, and the animals that were done in the past, were redone under the SNP method. The main reason for delays is in cases where animals are sired by American bulls. American animals in our herdbook, are usually already DNA’ed in the United States before becoming active here. We simply import their genotype (a map of their markers), but we do not re-test them at GenServe. NALF is also converting to SNP, but they are taking a different approach, meaning many of the American AI sires, whose SNP genotype is needed here, are not done yet in the U.S. Because we do not have a hair sample on these particular animals in our bank storage, we cannot convert them proactively. The options are to wait for NALF to process them or test them in Canada with a dose of semen. While the CLA is covering all the DNA costs related to background animal conversion, the semen must be supplied to us. So, if you are waiting on DNA under this particular scenario and you are willing to sacrifice a dose of semen, please let us know. If you purchased that semen, perhaps your semen supplier should be helping out by giving a dose that will benefit everyone awaiting DNA results!

ASSEMBLÉE GÉNÉRALE ANNUELLE ET LA CONFÉRENCE JUNIOR Le rassemblement Limousin annuel de la saison estivale sera à Neepawa au Manitoba du 2 au 4 août 2013. L’assemblée générale annuelle de l’association aura lieu le 3 août à 13hrs et le jugement des animaux le 4 août. Les détails seront publiés dans les bulletins d’information à venir.

If your DNA needs are extremely urgent and you cannot take the risk of delays, mention it to our registry staff when you request the form that accompanies the hair sample. In some cases, we can process the sample under the old microsatellite method and postpone the conversion to a later day. As already mentioned, CLA members are only responsible for the DNA fees for new requests. All costs related to the conversion of background animals are covered by the CLA and grant funds that we were awarded. UPCOMING ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND NATIONAL JUNIOR LIMOUSIN CONFERENCE The annual summer Limousin gathering will take place in Neepawa, Manitoba, August 2-4. The AGM is scheduled for August 3rd at 1:00 pm and the junior conformation show on the 4th. Details to come in monthly newsletters and will be posted on the CLA website. Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  18


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Sired by Anchor B Tibon

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2012 Manitoba Commercial Producer Of The Year Marr Ranch – Craig & Lorna Marr, Silver Ridge, MB When we married in 1980 it was our dream that we would someday quit our jobs in Winnipeg and ranch for a living. We started out small with twenty cows and two quarters of land and basically ranched on the week-ends and holidays. During the week Craig worked as much overtime as possible and Lorna worked two jobs. In 1987 we started our family and in 1989 our second was born. In a little over a decade our dream finally became a reality – we were ranching full time. We now had sixty cows and a bit more land. It was in 1989 when we purchased our first Purebred Limousin Bull “Xeno” from a good friend and neighbour. Since that day, Limo has been our main herd sire. Our herd is made up of mainly Simmental cross cows and we have found that the Limo/ Simmental cross works very well for us in both calf size and in heifer production. We are now home to 250 cows, 9 Limousin bulls (one of which is a Limo/ Angus Hybrid) and 2 Black Angus bulls which are used on the heifers. Through the years we have been striving to conquer our biggest challenge – how to get the cow herd to graze all year round. We have worked with the agriculture reps in our area on many issues and have hosted more than ten farm tours. Everything from bale silage to bale grazing. There have been two demonstration sites set up on our ranch, one being the Alfalfa Longevity Plot and the other being Brush Control using Intensive Management Grazing. In 2005 our ranching practises changed and this was largely due to the Environmental Farm Plan Workshop. This workshop was so great for our ranch that after Craig finished it in 2005 Lorna took it in 2006. Now we were both on the same page and met our 365 day grazing challenge head on. We started cross fencing pastures, intensive pasture management, solar powered summer and winter watering, leader-follower program, extended fall grazing and pasture bale grazing in the spring. In 2008, we were recognized by our peers and honoured as Manitoba Graziers of the Year for our area. We had the majority of the cows grazing 220 days of the year now. In 2009, we added corn grazing to our operation and feel that we have finally accomplished our goal of grazing almost 365 days of the year. Guess now we might have to start the Limousin bulls at the other end of the corn patch and have them meet the cows in the middle when breeding season starts.

Bill Campbell, on behalf of The Manitoba Limousin Association presented Craig and Lorna Marr with the award on January 5 in Brandon. Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  24


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“If you don’t know where your herd is at, how can you gauge where you need it to go?” asks Randy Bollum, whose 240-head Angus-based Limousin herd is located near Airdrie, Alberta. “I knew all along cattlemen needed to improve feed efficiency to compete with swine, poultry and fish. It’s the elephant in the room that nobody has wanted to address for decades.” The objectives of R&R Acres’ breeding program are to combine the best of the Angus and Limousin breeds into one product and eliminate the bad traits of both. Most R&R cows are homozygous polled, and the blacks are largely homozygous black. They calve in June and July on grass to eliminate housing costs and risk of bad weather, and to reduce labour. All long yearling bulls sold annually in February are accompanied by a mountain of data. They or their dams have been tested for 18 traits (see sidebar) and all R&R bull calves have been tested for feed efficiency and RFI (residual feed intake) since 2004—a feat that is probably unique in the beef business. As well, all replacement heifers have been tested for feed efficiency since 2007.

too big); stacking generations of superior genetics to intensify predictability, gaining cumulative benefits and eliminating the outliers on the bottom end. “Again,” he insists, “the more data you have, the better decisions you can make.” Randy hasn’t found a specific body type when selecting for better feed efficiency. His mantra is, after all, that you can’t tell feed efficiency genetics just by looking—you need to test. Yet he faces a wall of indifference and ignorance in the industry. “My commercial bull buyers and breeders need education on RFI and feed efficiency,” he says. “Some cattlemen are trying to learn more. Others want to, and others don’t seem to care. Many just want to carry on doing what they’ve done for years.” That attitude might be fine in the days of cheap feed. With corn at $8 and barley at $6, it’s a different story, even if calves are sold at weaning. The main feed costs still remain with the cow herd, making those costs highly relevant for the pocketbook, whatever the price.

The Bollums started testing individual cattle for feed efficiency to understand what their product could do, the variation within the herd and how R&R cattle compared with others. In the early years, R&R ran a warm-up period followed by a 100 to 116-day test. Results for straight feed conversion (feed to gain ratio) were 4.22 to 7.42; for RFI were -9.75 to 6.0; (lower score indicates that many lbs less feed are needed to achieve the average rate of gain for the test group); and for ADG (average daily gain) were 4.72 – 2.47 lbs/day. Today, the test has been reduced to warm up plus 70 days. The straight feed conversion range and RFI have narrowed to 2.72 to 5.48 lbs feed per lb of gain and from -2.00 to 2.36 respectively. Similarly, ADG also continues to improve (6.63 to 2.70 lbs/day). R&R concentrates on animals that test as superior for feed efficiency while removing those animals that do poorly from the herd to continue to improve future generations.

Randy is categorical about how the math on RFI adds up. Since feed efficiency and RFI are known to be moderately or highly heritable, producers can make significant genetic progress by selecting for them. Even a 10 percent improvement in feed efficiency can add up big time. By using superior sires and superior females for their 10-15 year lifespans, plus their superior progeny and grand-progeny, “you can quickly get the value of a free pickup truck every year in feed cost savings from only a moderate-sized herd by doing nothing different than making wiser choices in selecting genetics.”

R&R Mr. Jock 9W is a handsome example of what data and testing can produce. He ranked first and second respectively for RFI (-1.57) and feed-to-gain ratio (3.06) while still placing second in ADG (5.31 lbs/day) within his bull group.

“The goal in today’s and tomorrow’s beef production is not necessarily to produce more, but to increase net profits with what we do produce. That’s where superior, proven, predictable genetics can help,” concludes Randy.

He can prove it, too. In the 2011 bull sale, R&R’s RFI-tested bulls that ranked in the top half represented an $865 advantage each over the bottom half of the sale offering. (This was the result looking only at RFI. R&R doesn’t single-trait select in its program.)

To make his selection choices, Randy looks at all these statistics and then determines what best meets his needs. For example, R&R has some superior RFI cattle that have lower ADG, so a great RFI bull isn’t necessarily the best thing if he is just a picky eater and not gaining enough to match industry standards. Randy recommends tempering feed-to-gain with body-type preferences or restrictions (for example, if the frame is getting (side bar)

R&R Acres’ calves or their dams are tested for 18 traits 1. Gestation length 2. Birth weight 3. Calving ease 4. Weaning weight

5. Yearling weight 6. Post-weaning gain 7. Disposition 8. Scrotal size / Semen quality 9. Ribeye area 10. Backfat 11. Percent lean meat yield

12. Marbling 13. Straight feed conversion 14. Residual feed intake (RFI) 15. Dam’s udder / Teat scores 16. Cow weight at weaning 17. Cow condition score 18. Bull libido

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ple 9W is an exam R&R Mr. Jock animal that puts of finding the th superior feed it all together wi-to-gain ration), efficiency (feed I and exceptional ly be top-of-group RF rmation can on ADG. This infosting individuals for obtained by te efficiency. feed


Box 92, Minto, MB R0K 1M0

Bill & Lauren: 204.776.2322 Email: cam.limousin@xplornet.com

Bulls Offered • Red & Black Polled • Sired by: R&R BEEF MAKER, IVY XTERMINATOR, AMAGLEN XTRA, WULFS SUDOKU, CAM POLL TORQUE • All Bulls Igenity and BVD Tested View Bulls At www.wrightauction.ca Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  27


What you need to know about Myostatin: the gene that is commonly associated with double

muscling in beef cattle ~ By Sean McGrath

Genes are the parts of an animal’s DNA that control how an animal grows and develops and expresses certain traits. They are also the part of the animal that is passed on to offspring and impacts how those offspring grow and develop. Genes are what we are really focused on when we are trying to breed the “best to the best”. Many traits are controlled or influenced by more than one gene, and we generally do our best to describe the overall effects of these “groups of genes” through performance testing and the calculation and presentation of EPD. These basically sum up the overall effects of an animal’s group of genes. As the science of DNA has progressed we still worry about groups of genes, and this is what a lot of the newer tests that we may hear about are focused on. DNA panels such as a ‘50K’ are typically giving a broad scale assessment of DNA present in the animal. These types of tests usually need to be combined with pedigree and performance data and incorporated into an EPD to provide consistent and reliable feedback. There are however, some cases a single gene may be identified in which the variants of the gene have a significant effect on a specific trait. These are examples such as horned/polled and red/black. Myostatin is such a gene and it is the gene that is commonly associated with double muscling in beef cattle. While double muscling is generally considered a less than desirable trait in beef cattle, the Limousin breed is blessed with a friendlier variant of this gene, called F94L. F94L was discovered in Australia and the impacts of the gene include improved feed efficiency and greater retail product yield. The major advantage of F94L is that it does not result in double muscling and associated calving difficulties. The Australian research indicated an increase in rib-eye size of roughly 10.5% and a 4% increase in total retail yield. They also reported a decrease of 16.5% in overall fat and an 8.2% reduction in intramuscular fat (marbling) on a weight basis when animals add copies of the variant. One of the other apparent benefits of the gene in an article published in a Journal of Animal Science article in October 2012 was enhanced tenderness through smaller muscle fibre diameter and reduced collagen content. One of the major issues in any breed looking at the use of single gene tests is the frequency of the gene in population. A good example to help our understanding would be the horn gene. If we are dealing with a population that is 100% horned, there are no polled genes in the population and thus testing for the polled gene is not useful as we cannot select to change it anyway. While we don’t have a good gene frequency number for Canada as limited testing has been done here, work in the US shows roughly 52% of animals carry 2 copies of the F94L allele, 42% carry one copy and around 6% do not carry any copies of F94L. Australian work shows a much higher incidence of F94L with 91% carrying 2 copies of the gene and 8% carrying only 1 copy. This may be due to a higher incidence of fullblood type/ heavier muscled Limousin cattle as a proportion of the Australian Limousin population. It is likely that the Canadian incidence is somewhere close to the US with a slightly higher incidence of animals carrying 2 copies (we have a higher fullblood population as a percentage of total population). What this really means is that there is opportunity to select for one or two copies of the myostatin gene variant depending goals and market targets. In a mainstream market terminal sire situation, two copies of the F94L allele may provide favourable benefits when used on cows with higher percentage British breeding. A single copy may be more useful when used on cows with lesser degrees of marbling. For cattle entering a lean market context, the additional copy of F94L has favourable effects. It is very important to ensure that any selection for/against myostatin is done in balance using available EPD and visual assessment. Testing is available in Canada through SRC Genserve as a $15 addition to their Igenity panel (total cost $55) and also through various labs in the United States.

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Both Owned with Wulfs Limousin

Homo Polled • BW 88 lbs. Sire: Wulfs Ransom 3059R

Homo Black • Homo Polled BW 98 lbs. Sire: Auto Dollar General 122R

GEST: -2.7 BW: -0.9 WW: 41.2 YW: 80.6 M: 22.8 SC: 0.2 DOC: 37.6

GEST: 0.2 BW: 5.9 WW: 68.1 YW: 106.4 M: 34.9 SC: 1.4 DOC: 11.3

LYNN COMBEST Box 127 Ph: 403-742-5211 Erskine, AB Cell: 403-740-7621 T0C 1G0 combestclf@yahoo.ca

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Biography: Dr. Colin Palmer is an Associate Professor of Theriogenology (Animal Reproduction) at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. Originally from Nova Scotia, Dr. Palmer worked in mixed practices in Ontario and British Columbia and has owned/operated a practice in Saskatchewan. Dr. Palmer along with his wife Kim and children Lauren, Emily and Carter run a herd of purebred Red Angus cattle under the KC Cattle Co. name.

Warts on Your Bull’s ____ A Nasty Little Problem

Penile warts on a bull should never be anything to lose sleep over - they are really nothing more than a nasty little problem or a minor inconvenience. Trouble is - if your bull sale is next week there really is not enough time to deal with the warts and you may be forced to remove him from the sale or risk selling a Decision Deferred bull. Fortunately, cattle warts are not contagious to humans and with minor surgical intervention and a tincture of time even the ugliest mess of penile warts can be resolved allowing you to save an otherwise valuable bull. Warts (papillomas) are caused by a virus called papillomavirus (PV). Papillomaviruses are specific to each animal species – humans, cattle, even rabbits; with almost no cross-species infection. In cattle there are at least 6 distinct types. Most cause benign infections of skin cells; however, one – bovine PV type 4 (BPV-4), infects the cells of the upper gastrointentinal tract and may lead to the development of cancer in cattle consuming bracken fern. Human PVs (HPVs) vary in their presentation too. The vast majority are nothing more but nuisance growths on the skin yet a few have been linked to the development of cancer. Most notable is the now solidly proven link between HPV-16 and 18 in the development of cervical and other genital cancers. The only crossspecies infection that is known of is that of equids (horses, donkeys, zebras) with BPV- 1 and BPV-2 shown to have a causal link to the most common skin tumour of horses – sarcoids: a non-malignant, scar-like growth on the skin. The bovine virus will not replicate in the horse, but causes changes within cells deeper within the horse’s skin which may lead to the development of a sarcoid. Penile warts in bulls are exclusively caused by BPV-1. Bovine PV-1 also causes warts on the nose and teats which probably plays a role in the spread as skin to skin contact, or skin contact with contaminated facilities and equipment is the primary means of disease transmission. Bulls, especially young ones, spend a lot of time riding, promoting the spread of the virus from bull to bull. Bovine PV-1 infection is not associated with cancer, sperm death or abortion and in nearly 20 years as a reproductive specialist I cannot find evidence that it will cause warts in the vagina or on the vulva of female cattle. Some believe that young bulls with warts will be reluctant to breed cows due to pain. In most cases, it is unlikely that bulls with normal libido will be deterred by minor pain associated with warts; more severe cases – perhaps pain could be an issue. Mounting and intromission can irritate and disrupt warts resulting in bleeding. Blood in the ejaculate will kill sperm. Warts are most common in young animals less than 2 years of age and are very contagious. Finding warts

on yearling bulls undergoing a breeding soundness examination is a frequent occurrence. Over the last couple of decades our industry has changed from the sale of 2-year olds to yearlings; therefore, the prevalence of warts may at first glance appear to be on the rise. If penile warts are a new problem in your young bulls then you should look to the potential for contact with young bulls from other outfits. Many herds will have no affected bulls, whereas some may have an occurrence rate as high as 15 - 20%. My own estimates of the prevalence of warts in bulls gathered from several sources and housed at test centres would be 1 to 2% in 2-year olds and 5 to 7% in yearling bulls. The immune system is slow to respond to the papillomavirus despite the presence of very large warts producing large quantities of virus. This is because the entire lifecycle of all BPVs is restricted to the most superficial cells with little to no contact with immune cells. Animals with disrupted or bleeding tumours have a more substantial immune response as do animals undergoing natural regression of the warts. When animals are vaccinated with BPV proteins harvested from their own warts (autogenous vaccination) the immune system responds quickly and remains active for a long time. Preparing autogenous vaccines is not practiced nowadays because of the cost and risk of severe reactions in comparison to the benefit. In other words, given time the immune system will handle the warts, and at a much lower cost. Small warts are easily removed chuteside by the veterinarian performing the breeding soundness evaluation. Larger masses or multiple tumours require much more time, but usually can be removed with patience. Most large and confluent penile warts appear worse than they are. Penile warts typically have a broad head and a much narrower stalk like a cauliflower. Warts around the urethra are more troublesome and may require catheterization so as to avoid significant damage. The blood supply to larger warts can be substantial so bleeding must be controlled. Vets try to remove as much wart as possible because recurrence may occur; however, it is likely that damaging warts and causing bleeding probably stimulates the immune system and leads to a more rapid resolution than if nothing were done at all. Once warts are removed sexual rest for 2 to 3 weeks is a good idea. Severe cases where numerous warts have been removed should be rechecked and any regrowth removed. I would never, ever recommend slaughter of a young bull based solely on the presence of warts. Even the worst looking mess can be resolved even if it takes a couple of tries.

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  30


Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  31


This is just a sample of the many bulls we have on offer at the Manitoba Bull Test Station. Including one bull that is gaining 5.04 lbs/day (HNH 17Z Lot #753).

Manitoba Bull Test Station Sale Day - April 6, 2013

BW: 1.6 WW: 46.4 YW: 76.4 MM: 21.3 SC: 0.3 Doc: 22.2

BW: 3.7 WW: 52.7 YW: 87.7 MM: 20.0 SC: 0.7 Doc: 23.5

He is black and double polled. We bred a L7 Lucky Me cow to Ivy’s Smirnoff and just look at the results! He had no creep at home, so that says performance. He’s a powerful bull with a great pedigree. He weighed 1228 lbs on the January 2nd weigh day, with an ADG of 4.32 lbs.

He is red and double polled out of Amaglen Red Realtor and a super thick daughter of Amaglen Prime Cut HNH 53P (going back to Dakota). He’s loaded with performance and has outcross breeding. He is gaining 4.08 lbs per day at the Manitoba Bull Test Station and on January 2nd weighed 1168 lbs.

Ian and Bonnie Hamilton Box 55, Darlingford, Manitoba ROG 0L0

Home: 204-246-2312 Cell: 204-823-1240 amaglen@inetlink.ca

Check out our website www.amaglenlimousin.ca or check out the bull test at www.manitobabulltest.com

Finnish Beef Producers Tour Saskatchewan Herds

A group of 18 breeders attended Canadian Western Agribition for three days and continued on an extensive tour of cattle operations in Saskatchewan. The purpose of the trip was multi-faceted, but the main focus was education. The purebred breeders in the group were pleased with the genetics available in Canada, while the commercial breeders gained extensive knowledge in different feeding practises, handling systems and farm management. The producers visited, Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite; White Cap Charolais, Moose Jaw; Peak Dot Ranch, Wood Mountain; J Yorga Farms, Flintoft; Crittenden Bros. Polled Herefords, Imperial; Nordal Limousin & Angus, Simpson; Western Beef Development Centre, Lanigan; Pound-Maker Feedlot, Lanigan; Saskatoon Livestock Sale; Wilbar Angus, Dundurn; Sask Made Marketplace and A. Sparrow Farms, Vanscoy. Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  32


SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2013 @ 1:00 PM CST MADISON LIVESTOCK SALES. MADISON, SOUTH DAKOTA Check out our website for picture updates of the sale offering.

Order ROMN Made to Full Brother to

Bull Consultant: Herman Symens 605.698.3087

TO REQUEST A CATALOGUE CONTACT: ROM’N Limousin Arlington, South Dakota 57212 romnlimo@msn.com www.romnlimousin.com

Adam, Michelle & Greyson Nielson 605.203.0733 605.203.0732 Robert “Cookie” & Mary Nielson 605.203.0903 605.203.0904

We have had a busy fall here in Ontario with excellent Limousin shows at our Provincial Show in Brampton (40 head) and the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto (70 head). The highlight of the Royal Show was the 2nd Annual Future Royalty Classic sponsored by Norwich Packer – Norpac Beef. Breeders were invited to enter 2012 heifer or bull calves which are judged by a panel of judges from across the beef industry. This year’s winner was RLF Zaara 725Z – owned and shown by Rail Line Farms. Another highlight for the year in Ontario was a Limousin heifer being all-breeds champion at the National Junior Beef Heifer Show at the RAWF. Our congratulations to Melissa MacIntyre on her win with TMF Miss Lily 11Y. Melissa is a very active member of our Ontario Junior Limousin Association.

ROMN Zodiac 126Z

Birthdate: April 16, 2012 Double Polled ROMN Justice x Miss Thick Set 34K BW: 2.8 WW: 46 YW: 87 MA: 20 CEM: 9 SC: 0.7 ST: 20 DOC: 28 CW: 35 REA: 0.87 YG: -0.20 Marb: -0.08

or contact us via our website www.ontariolimousin.com. Thank you to the breeders who have supported this project. Our Ontario Annual Meeting will be held on Saturday, February 23rd at the Alma Community Centre, in Alma starting at 10:00am. Details are available on our website or by contacting Sheila Smart at 519-538-4877 or smartlimo@bmts.com. Our guest speaker will be Mr. Dan Darling, Ontario Cattlemen’s Association President and Limousin breeder. 2013 promises to be an exciting year for Limousin in Ontario. Watch for upcoming Bull Open Houses across the province and participation in bull sales this spring. Please check back to www.ontariolimousin.com for upcoming events.

The 2013 Ontario Limousin Dayplanner is now available. Sheila Smart If you would like a copy please contact an OLA director President, Ontario Limousin Association Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  33


Genotype Selection More Accurately Predicts Cattle Market Characteristics than Phenotype Selection

A simple yet powerful technology assists commercial breeders By: Grant Woronuk, PhD

By now most cattlemen have heard of the leptin gene. Leptin affects appetite and metabolism, therefore, the different genotypes fatten at different rates. Fat accumulation is expensive. Growth traits are associated with fat accumulation. Carcass fat is a factor in determining yield and quality grade. Genotyping is a powerful tool in shaping modern livestock management programmes, as a detailed understanding of cattle DNA facilitates practical breeding and feedlot resource allocation strategies. As keen feedlot producers are becoming increasingly aware of the reliability of genetic profiling when making purchasing decisions, cattle genotyping is an excellent tool to assist breeders in selecting animal traits because such techniques provide an objective measure of livestock market potential. Traditionally, commercial cattle are selected for breeding based on a phenotypic evaluation of animals, with breeders subjectively selecting on the basis of a single desirable trait. One major drawback to phenotype-based selection is that phenotypic traits result from the action of multiple genes, genes which may also give rise to other undesirable phenotypes. To illustrate this concept with an example, it was common practise to select cattle on the basis of largest frame, which indeed resulted in production of large-framed cattle. However, this increased size came with a potential series of undesirable traits, such as hocks and pasterns becoming too straight, resulting in impaired locomotion. With selections based on phenotype, it is often unknown what genes are being carried along with the phenotypic trait, resulting in reduced efficiency in the cattle selection methodology. In contrast, genotyping offers an objective evaluation of a cattle’s predisposition for certain market characteristics at the DNA level. Genotyping provides commercial cattle breeders with precise and detailed information about the animal’s DNA, enabling the discreet selection of animals on a gene-by-gene basis. For instance, multiple studies have shown that genotyping for the status of one such gene, coding for leptin, consistently predicts key cattle market characteristics. In particular, cattle possessing the two-thymine genotype (TT) have been shown to accumulate backfat more rapidly than other genotypes, saving several days of feeding costs to reach desirable market readiness. It is sometimes the case that a single gene may also influence multiple traits, as beef cows with the “TT” leptin genotype have been observed to wean calves that were on average 31 lbs heavier than the other genotypes. Furthermore, in dairy cattle, “TT” genotypes have been shown to not only produce significantly more milk in the 1st 15 weeks of lactation, they maintain a higher body condition score over dairy cows with the other genotypes. These results underscore the powerful applications of genotyping in the shaping and optimization of the modern cattle industry.

genes. If selections are based on a single phenotypic trait, many genes are carried forward in the breeding program, and each of those genes may contribute to the potential expression undesirable of phenotypes. Proven genotype-based selections, even for a single gene, give breeders more control over the range of phenotypes being selectively carried forward. Therefore, genotyping represents a considerable improvement in cattle selection methodology, not only because fewer genes are being selected in an objective manner, but also because more is known about the impact selected genes have on phenotype. Application of genotyping technology is vital to the advancement of commercial cattle performance. Research update A recent trial was completed at Cactus Feeders Research in Texas. The objective was to: 1. Determine what the leptin genotypes and carcass characteristics are when the cattle are killed on the same day. 2. Is there a leptin genotyped interaction on carcass characteristics when fed Zilpaterol (B-adrenergic agonist), also known as “Zilmax”, (a feed additive that increases carcass weight)? 4179 head of cattle were randomized and sorted into 48 pens of approximately 90 head per pen. The eight blocks had three pens of each genotype. Three pens were fed Zilmax and three pens were fed without Zilmax. This was repeated eight times. In total, twentyfour pens were fed Zilmax and 24 pens had no Zilmax. The data showed, on a one day kill, the “TT” genotype had approximately 20% more AAA or Choice than the “CC” genotype (P<0.01). The “TT” genotype also had higher dry matter intake (P<0.012). However, the AAA or Choice reduced by 20% on the “TT” genotype when fed Zilmax. The “CC” population only decreased Choice by 1.5%. Similarly “TT” steers responded to Zilmax with a decrease in dry matter intake of 1.84 pounds per day while the “CC” steers remained unchanged. Managing the genotypes that are fed Zilmax improves quality grade. The “CC” genotype population respond better on Zilmax because they don’t lose Quality Grade and Dry Matter intake. Not all feedlots use Zilmax as some packers won’t accept cattle fed Zilmax. The focus for breeders should be on the trial cattle that were not fed Zilmax. Feedlots knowing the leptin genotype find the “TT” population reaches market readiness approximately 30 days sooner than the “CC” population. The “TT” population are more profitable by reducing days on feed. Breeders looking to improve their herds for carcass quality and efficiency can select for “TT” sires. A “TT” sire can remove the “CC” population in one calf crop. For more information on this trial and others or breed alliances please contact Jim Palmer, Quantum Genetix at 403.660.0643

Each gene contributes to a range of phenotypes, and each phenotype arises from the action of many Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  34


Wednesday, March 27, 2013 Veteran, AB at 1:30 PM Sale live on TEAM Auctions - www.drylandcattle.com and follow the links Heifer Bull

BHA 99Y

Herd Sire

TT

NSF 19X

993

WWT Olbs

ct 19

NSF 32Z

es rlings n and AI sir a e e v y o r n p r o m b o fr ry ck • Progeny • 30 Janua lds o r a e , red & bla y d e o n w r t o h in , g d ir • Polle • 20 V • All bulls DNA marker tested for Leptin

Hudson Limousin

Bob & Dorothy Hudson Hardisty, AB 780-879-2105 glendh@telusplanet.net

Complete EPDs and Leptin info on website

North Slope Farms

Eugene & Sylvia Axley Czar, AB 780-857-2094 (ph/fax) www.northslopefarms.ca

GUTEK LIMOUSIN

Range Ready Bull Sale Saturday, March 9, 2013 1:00 pm Heartland Livestock Yorkton,SK

Consigning 5 Two year Old Bulls The Guteks Box 47 Hendon, SK S0E 0X0

306 338 2112 Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  35


Excelling in the Real World

By Piper Whelan

If you ask Jeff Yorga why he wants to raise Limousin cattle, he’ll respond with a list of reasons so strong and convincing you’ll think he’s a professional breed promoter. His passion and knowledge is the result of a solid family background in the breed. “Our family has been in the Limousin business for 45 years,” he explains. Yorga grew up on his family’s Limousin operation, J. Yorga Farms Ltd. (JYF) at Flintoft, Saskatchewan. With degrees in Business Administration and Economics at the University of Regina, Yorga has worked away from the family farm while remaining a part of their program. Yorga’s decision to remain a part of his family’s Limousin operation into his adult years is based on a number of opportunities currently being presented to Limousin breeders. “The Limousin breed offers significant advantages to the commercial producer,” Yorga states, highlighting the breed’s increased ability to produce market animals with the yield desired by packers. In this respect, “that’s where the Limo breed really shines,” according to this young cattle producer. “You can crossbreed with British based cows, get your hybrid vigour, and get a carcass that yields and marbles. Right now, you’re seeing people that use drugs [on cattle for increased yield], and Limousin can do it naturally,” Yorga explains. The access to information provided by the new BIXS program (www.BIXS.com), where carcass data is shared through the beef value chain is another major opportunity that Yorga advocates and is working to take advantage of. “Right now, it’s the first time in the history of the business where data is flowing from the packers, and the feeders, back to the commercial breeders,” Yorga explains. “Because we have these opportunities, we can actually affect positive change on our market— that’s incredibly exciting, something that the beef industry has never had.” This opportunity, Yorga states, is one that energizes his efforts to find success in the cattle business. “So the Limousin breed is perfectly positioned to take advantage of all the data that’s now being traded between the packers and the commercial breeders.” One of Yorga’s most recent accomplishments is being chosen to participate in the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) Development Program. This program matches young beef producers from ages 18 to 35 with mentors to jumpstart the careers of students and those just starting out and to help active beef producers harness their leadership potential. According to the CYL website, this program allows “the candidates [to] build upon their knowledge base and become highly capable individuals to represent and lead the beef industry into the future.” This endeavour holds great promise for its participants, as Yorga points out. “To be a seedstock producer, you have to understand where you fit within the industry. You have to have some idea of where the industry is moving so you can make sure you’re producing the product that the industry wants,” Yorga explains. Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  36


“Part of the CYL program is getting to know the different facets of the industry and different people that are part of it, so that when you go home, you can be sure you’re producing something that they want ... What the CYL program does is it puts you in front of the industry’s policy makers and decision makers, people that are active and leading the beef industry.” The amazing learning opportunities in these mentorships, Yorga explains, have the power to give participants a better overall understanding of the beef industry and how they can make it work for themselves. Yorga’s goals for the future of his own beef operation are all about expansion. “We’re in growth mode. Our goals are onward and upward. We’re interested in increasing the demand for Limousin seedstock. We hear every year from our commercial producers that they need more, more, more, and we’re doing our best to satisfy that.” With this growth and change, however, Yorga remains focused on the qualities that led him to choose Limousin cattle in the first place. “There are some things that we can’t sacrifice,” he states. “Calving ease, performance, docility and fertility will always be important, and so we have to make sure we make our selections based on that.” As an advocate of taking advantage of new opportunities, a promoter of the Limousin breed and a beef producer working with a CYL mentor to learn more, Jeff Yorga is on a path to success in the cattle world and moving towards future opportunities.

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  37


BULL MANAGEMENT FOR THE “OFF SEASON” It’s easy for cow-calf producers to put their bulls on the “backburner” of the feeding program during the winter, “nutritionally forgotten” can lead to potential problems the next breeding season. Proper care and nutritional management of bulls post breeding season and during the “rest and relaxation” period is critical to a herd’s success. The fertility of a single bull is actually of considerably greater consequence than the fertility of an “individual cow”. Conditioning prior to the breeding season is equally as important as the development phase. Growing bulls, a.k.a yearlings, generally have gone thru a development phase which consisted of a concentrated diet to address the lower feed intakes and higher requirements of the developing physical and genetic potential of these young bulls. As such, these young bulls need to be cycled down from that higher plane of nutrition. The transition to a higher forage based diet period can occur over a 60-90 day period, allowing adequate time for bulls to adjust to their new diet, “harden up” and moderate their fat cover. Additionally, the minimum 60 day time frame provides adequate time for sperm population to turnover and quality sperm to develop prior to the bull entering service. A target body condition score of 5.5-6.5 (on a 9 point scale). Part and parcel of the conditioning program needs to be supported by a solid mineral and vitamin nutritional therapy. Nutrition during the breeding season is near always the same as the cow herd, therefore special nutritional attention for bulls is nearly impossible. As a result, the conditioning period prior to and after breeding season becomes all the more important. Age, condition, length of breeding season, level of activity and available nutrition will all have an influence on weight/circulatory losses for the season. Nutrition after the breeding season needs attention to restore body weight/condition and mineral status. As is indicative, young bulls usually will lose more body weight. The greater the loss, the greater the nutritional replacement demand will be to regain body weight and circulatory reserves. However, as managers, the advantage of identifying this requirement early, will allow a moderate, safe and cost effective feeding program to regain lost body reserves for optimum health and reproduction (1 BCS = to 100lbs of bodyweight). A moderate quality high forage, mineral, vitamin and low grain diet fed over a longer period of “rest and relaxation” will achieve the desired outcome without the negative effect of trying to play “catchup” a few weeks before breeding season starts with buckets of grain starch that insults the bull’s digestive and circulatory system, and of showing the negative results coming out in their feet and legs. A little planned nutritional and environmental management planning can pay big returns in getting the most out of your “walking genetic investment”, with more successful matings, bull longevity and a breeder’s reputation for the future. Gary Grubb Beef Technical Sales, Masterfeeds LP

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  38


HAGER CATTLE CO. We breed bulls that work for the commercial industry. They’re sound, functional, real-world cattle designed to excel up and down the production chain. We welcome you to check out our bull pen this spring!

7th ANNUAL BULL SALE

Monday, March 25, 2013 | 5pm Kist Livestock, Mandan, ND

65

Powerful Bulls

Limousin & Lim-Flex Yearlings and Fall Bulls

AHCC Zero In Z505 2/25/12 - DBL BLK - DBL PLD - PB S: MAGS WAZOWSKI - MGS: JCL LODESTAR 27L CE:9 BW:2.2 WW:60 YW:108 MA:27 CM:6 SC:0.6 DC:20 CW:35 RE:0.29 YG:0.14 MS:0.08 $MI:50

Bill & Mary Gates • Gary & Brandi Gates 250 Stillwater River Rd. • Absarokee, MT 59001 www.gateslimousin.com • 406.328.4393 mary@gateslimousin.com • gary@gateslimousin.com Check our website for a complete list of bulls available or give us a call for more info

AHCC Zero Design Z838 2/26/12 - DBL BLK - DBL PLD - LF S: AHCC WESTWIND 544W - MGS: COLEMAN PRODUCTION 608 CE:8 BW:0.8 WW:61 YW:115 MA:24 CM:4 SC:0.6 DC:16 CW:47 RE:0.24 YG:0.25 MS:0.13 $MI:51

SALE DAY PHONES

Austin Hager 701.626.2345 Limousin World Kiley McKinna 402.350.3447 Grass Roots Genetics Mark Smith 515.229.5227 Kist Livestock 800.732.1163

YOUR SOURCE OF

POWERFUL,

PERFORMANCE PACKED,

PRODUCTION

DRIVEN CATTLE

AHCC Zero Turns Z85

2/18/12 - DBL BLK - DBL PLD - PB S: AHCC WESTWIND 544W - MGS: LVLS DOUBLEDOWN 3615K CE:10 BW:1.4 WW:47 YW:90 MA:26 CM:8 SC:0.7 DC:11 CW:36 RE:0.33 YG:0.06 MS:0.00 $MI:44

AHCC Zero Time Z595 3/15/12 - BLK - DBL PLD - PB S: AHCC WESTWIND 544W - MGS: AUTO BLACK DAKOTA 129J CE:7 BW:3.2 WW:61 YW:113 MA:30 CM:6 SC:0.6 DC:20 CW:46 RE:0.63 YG:0.00 MS:-0.06 $MI:46

We have made it our mission to create the best possible Limousin and Lim-Flex herd bulls for commercial and purebred producers alike. When you’re in the market for a performance loaded, durable, mainstream sire, come check out our annual bull sale offering.

Contact us for a sale catalogue or more information. Karlsruhe, North Dakota 701/525-6363 701-626-2345 mobile

www.HagerCattleCompany.com Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  39


A Tradition of Purebred Genetics and Family Involvement By Piper Whelan

With binders of pedigrees, advertisements, performance evaluations and photos, Raymond and Corine Verbeek of Hillview Farms Limousin at Morinville, Alberta have thirty years of history and genetic information spread upon their kitchen table on a December afternoon. They reminisce about their favourite cows and herd bulls they have raised over the years, and by looking back at the papers from their very first Limousins they trace these fullblood genetics back to France. Their farm is a busy, friendly place where family is always at the heart of everything and neighbours act as an extended family. The Verbeeks reflect on all the work they have done to make their purebred Limousin operation a success, and talk about their involvement in community activities that keep them busy beyond the farm. Raymond was raised on the Verbeek family farm at Morinville, which is approaching its one hundredth anniversary. Before raising beef cattle, the Verbeek family ran a mixed farm, growing grain and raising hogs and dairy cattle. It was in the early days of the Limousin breed in Canada that Raymond and his family were drawn to the idea of raising beef cattle for the first time. His cousin Leo Verbeek owned a number of continentals in the early 1970s, and, as Raymond explained, he felt that “Limos had a future ... They were nice, heavily muscled cattle, and still had the calving ease of the British breeds ... We wanted to farm, and we never really had any beef cattle, and we decided that we would give it a try.” Raymond and his brother Gordon ventured into the world of Limousin cattle by leasing 14 head from Leo in 1974, and then the three of them went on to create a family partnership, Verbeek Limousin, in 1975. In 1977 the brothers bought thirty-one head to try it on their own. Looking back at their start in the cattle business, Raymond recalled “we got into it pretty fast and hard.” The Verbeeks were attracted to the characteristics displayed by the early fullblood Limousin bulls available in Canada, cementing their decision to base their herd on fullblood and later purebred genetics. Raymond and Corine were married in 1983, and their four children— Marissa, Jessica, Sarena and Colin— all played a role on the farm. “They were all interested,” they explain as they sort through photos of the kids with their 4-H projects. As a family, the Verbeeks were very busy with 4-H for many years, with the children exhibiting many projects, including beef and horse. Corine has been involved with the Rivere Qui Barre 4-H club for thirty years, and they continue to sell many calves to young 4-H members in the area. Raymond and Corine split off from the Verbeek family partnership in 1995 to create Hillview Farms Limousin, and continued to build their purebred herd. The 1990s found them doing well with bulls at the National Limousin Bull Test, and they also flushed embryos to be shipped to Australia during this decade. In 2004, the Verbeeks were chosen as the recipient of Farmfair International Farm Family award. Today they own about 150 head of purebred Limousin, and their farm remains a family operation, with grain, hay and pasture land. Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  40


When discussing their memories and achievements in raising Limousin cattle, Raymond and Corine cite the Prime Limousin Club as an important part of their experience in the beef industry. The Prime Limousin Club, founded in 1985, calls itself “North-Central Alberta’s source for quality purebred Limousin genetics,” and the Verbeeks have been with the club from the start. Raymond and Corine were founding members of the club, which had its first sale in 1986 and is still operating today with five breeder members. The club was founded as Limousin breeders in the region wanted increased promotion of their cattle. “There was nothing up here to promote Limo cattle (at the time), and there were six of us, at first, who had the idea,” Corine explained. When the club started up, Raymond was on the selection committee and Corine was the secretary and treasurer; Raymond is currently the club’s president. The Prime Limousin sale, held each March in Westlock, Alberta, is the main focus of the club, whose mandate is to promote the Limousin breed and the breeder members. Hillview Farms Limousin sells yearling and two year old bulls there, and they’ve had the Peoples’ Choice Bull a number of times. Their motivation for continuing on in the beef industry and looking positively towards the future is simple - “I guess having quality purebred cattle for further generations,” Raymond answered. The Verbeeks state that the beef producers are emerging from some tough years and the Canadian cattle industry is finally looking up. “It sure is a good feeling that everybody is positive again,” he stated. When looking back at what they have accomplished in the past thirty years, Corine stated that “the years all run together,” and explained that they have plans to utilize some beef reproduction technologies in the near future. They have artificial insemination lined up for this upcoming years’ breeding, which was vital to their breeding program at the start when fullblood bulls were less accessible. As well, they are interested in Genomics technology, and said that there is a lot to learn in regards to the new technologies available in beef production. The Verbeeks have exhibited cattle at many shows and consigned at a number of sales in the past, and most recently at the Olds Fall Classic and Farmfair International. In addition to their participation in the Prime Limousin Club sale, they sell thirty to forty bulls off the farm each year to purebred and commercial breeders. The Verbeeks state that the interest of the next generation also keeps them going, with son Colin planning on exhibiting cattle at upcoming shows, including the next National Limousin show. Colin is currently attending Olds College, studying agricultural management, and plans on using his education to make a difference in the industry while carrying on his family’s Limousin tradition. “I always enjoyed being a part of my parent’s Limousin operations and I appreciated the passion that they had for the Limousin breed and the many years of hard work that went into gaining the best genetics and maintaining a large herd of purebred cattle,” he explained. “I plan on utilizing the quality genetics my parents have developed in my own herd of purebred Limousin cattle.” Colin sees a bright future for the Limousin breed, thanks to its carcass qualities and desirable performance. “I feel that the Limousin breed will become more prominent and positively recognized throughout the industry if we as purebred breeders can continue to strive for excellence in our herds and market the many benefits of the Limousin breed.” The traits the Verbeeks desire for their own cattle are the traits they believe will aid the Limousin breed in the future of the Canadian beef industry— overall performance, rate of gain, thickness, sound feet and udders, docility and calving ease. By selecting cattle for these traits, they work to cater to what commercial producers are looking for. Raymond praises the docility of the breed that allows them to work safely around their animals. “We try to keep them docile and easy calving, while still having performance,” he explained. “In these thirty years, I can honestly say I never owned a bull that put me over a fence.” Limos, they believe, are what beef producers will find useful in the upcoming years. “They’re after a bull who can go out there and do the job,” Corine stated. While recognizing that there is a place for both purebred and influence Limousin cattle, the Verbeeks have found that by sticking with what works for them, which is purebred genetic, they have a market of bull buyers who are looking for what they are producing. With this attitude and their many years of experience in the Limousin breed, Hillview Farms Limousin is primed to add future achievements to their binders full of memories and successes. Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  41


By: Chris Poley

Over the past year or so we have entered a new era as farmers and ranchers. For the first time in my life, producers are getting recognized and starting to get paid for their importance in feeding the world. There is a huge push within the urban population to know where their food comes from. Which I think is a good thing; it draws attention to the primary producers and awareness to the agriculture industry and its needs. This movement of knowing where your food comes from especially favors beef production, as the cow calf sector always has and always will have a strong family farm/ranch influence. It is the hardest production model for corporations to have any success at, due to the amount of land and hands on management required. There is also no way to take the environmental challenges away. Beef cow/calf production is very natural and wholesome and can be easily looked upon by those several generations removed from the land, as the best choice for protein. Many of these consumers today are less influenced by price than they are by making choices based on emotion. If they feel they can relate to those images of a family working out on a ranch together, they are buying more beef.

recently closed one of its plants in Texas due to the shortage of available cattle. All the cattle on feed reports show yet another decrease this year over last. Some of you will argue that our cattle markets have not totally shown this and I would agree with you. However, they are better than a couple of years ago and will continue to get better; all the factors point to it.

So what is the point of all this rambling? Be confident in your operation, things are good and will only get better and better. The bulls you purchase this spring will be the single most influential decision you make, impacting your operation two years from now. Do some research on the bulls you are looking at and select sires that will improve the things that need improving, without sacrificing the fundamentals, which are ultimately what puts money in your pocket. All of you have a great resource at your disposal, the breeders who produce the bulls. Ask them questions and tell them about your herd and what you want Everywhere you look these days, you will find articles from your next herd sire. They spend their lives written on the concerns of future food production. In researching genetics and watching them perform our industry, every media source in North America is against each other and know where their strengths talking about the size of the beef cow herd and how are. After all it is a partnership; he needs you the it has shrunk to lows not seen in half a century. Yet bull buyer, the same as you need him the seedstock any government census statistic will report growths producer. in population through the same time period. Cargill Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013â&#x20AC;&#x192; 42


Springwater Colony Sold on the Robust Hereford/ Limousin Cross ~ By Lee Hart

The colony had a well established cross-bred beef herd for many years says Stahl, who is beef herd manager at Springwater, but during a series of drought years they sold the cattle. The colony has been rebuilding the herd over the past six years.

Saskatchewan producer Mike Stahl says after many years of experience they find it hard to beat the Hereford/Limousin-cross cow that has a little more body length and good milk production for raising a lively, vigorous calf.

“What we are after is that Hereford/Limousin cross cow, that worked so well for my dad,” says Stahl. “They have a little more size, a little more length, they are easy calving animals that produce an excellent calf.”

It has been a excellent cross that worked well for his father, Sol Stahl, for more than 20 years, and now as they rebuild the beef herd on their Springwater Hutterite Colony west of Biggar, Mike says they are seeing the same “aggressive newborn calves” that are up and nursing a few minutes after they are born.

The colony started back into the beef business with 200 head of straight Hereford, and later added about 100 head of Black Angus cows. Today, with a total herd of 500 head of cows, about 200 are the Hereford/Limousin cross.

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Particularly with the red white face cattle, coloring is important too. The Limousin influence usually produces a red udder and teats that aren’t affected by wind and sun burn, and usually the cows have red coloring around the eyes that reduces the risk of pink eye.

“It’s really a work in progress, and we’re just planning to continue with the Limousin cross-breeding program,” says Stahl. “We’ve got good moisture here and plenty of grass, so we’re hoping to keep building to about 1000 head of crossbred cows.” Along with the cow/calf herd and, as long as the combination of tame and native pasture remains productive, they plan to also run about 1000 head of grassers this summer.

Stahl and his father still work together to decide which of Payne’s bulls they buy for their breeding program. They use Limousin on both Hereford and Angus cows, and select higher birth-weight bulls for the mature cows and lower birth-weight bulls for first-calf heifers. “We’ve got no problem with the mature cows handling a 100 pound calf, and the heifers are usually producing calves in the 70 to 80 pound range,” he says. “Out of 500 head we may have to go out with the horses and bring in five or six head in the spring that need some assistance. The rest do it all on their own.”

s...

cros nsi ou m Li d/ or ef er H e th at be to ...find it hard

With a long-standing relationship in buying Limousin sires from Rocky Payne of Payne Livestock at Lloydminster, Stahl says they really like what the Limousin breed adds to the British breeds. “The cows are about a foot longer, so there is a little more stretch in the body, and a little more size,” he says. “And the crossbred cows have a nice udder. There are no swing bags, they are tucked up under the cow nicely, are uniform in size, and have nice sized teats that are easy for the calf to suck. And yet they produce lots of milk.”

Stahl has four quarter sections of pasture designated for the calving season. The herd starts calving April 15, with the bulk born over a 60-day calving season into May and early June. Every two or three days they collect about 30 head of cows and newborn calves from one pasture and distribute them over the other three quarters that includes native and tame pasture, hills and plenty of bush for shelter. “Everything has plenty of room and good shelter, and even when we get those miserable cold, wet days in early spring the calves are healthy,” he says. “We have no disease and we don’t even vaccinate anymore against scours. They are born

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“We background about 1000 head a year, so along with about 400 of our own we buy about 600 head of British/exotic crossbred calves for the feed yard,” says Stahl. They are fed a ration of hay, silage and supplement, gaining up to 3.5 pounds per day before being marketed at 950 pounds before they are marketed in February through Saskatoon Livestock Sales. The cowherd is over-wintered with bale grazing on two quarters of oat stubble, but also have access to bush area affording plenty of shelter. healthy, get off to a good start and don’t look back. About the only losses we have are due to coyotes and we’ll have to deal with that.” As the calving season ends, the cattle are moved out onto summer pasture and these calving pastures are rested for the rest of the year. The cow/calf herd remains on pasture until fall. After crops are harvested they are distributed over stubble fields that cover a 10-mile radius. About three weeks before weaning, the herd is collected and all calves are vaccinated to reduce weaning stress. Calves are weaned in early to mid-November. “Those Hereford/Limousin cross cows have plenty of grass and produce lots of milk,” he says. “Most of our calves are born in May and this past year the steers had an average 631 pound weaning weight in November.”

“We select for cattle, both in the Limousin and Hereford breeds, that also have a little more hair coat so they can handle even the coldest temperatures,” says Stahl. “The two breeds make an excellent combination that is hardy, and produce these aggressive calves, that have excellent rates of gain.”

Lee Hart is a long-time agricultural writer based in Calgary, AB.

After weaning, about 70 head of the top crossbred heifer calves are kept as replacements and everything else goes into a colony feedyard for backgrounding.

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Grading Shifts and What They Mean We are Trading Yield for Quality - and we don’t need to. By C.A. Gracey

A look at the two tables below shows several significant shifts in beef carcass grading results since the end of 2010. These shifts, as I will later explain, continue a longer term trend but first let’s see what the recent shifts are. On the Quality side -• There has been a noticeable increase in AAA carcasses • An associated decline in AA • A continued decline to near disappearance of A carcasses On the yield side there has been a decline in the highest yield (Y1) category and an associated increase in the lowest yielding (Y3) category. Grade and Yield Distribution 2012 Jan - June Prime AAA AA A Y1 0.2% 20.0% 27.0% 1.6% 48.8% Y2 0.4% 24.1% 9.9% 0.1% 34.5% Y3 0.6% 13.2% 2.9% 0.0% 16.7% 1.2% 57.2% 39.8% 1.7% 100.0% Grade and Yield Distribution 2010 Jan -Dec Prime AAA AA A Y1 0.2% 19.2% 30.0% 2.5% 51.8% Y2 0.5% 22.5% 11.0% 0.0% 34.0% Y3 0.6% 11.0% 2.6% 0.0% 14.2% 1.2% 52.7% 43.6% 2.5% 99.9% Are these changes just blips or is there a longer term trend? Let’s see by taking a look at the year end results in 2000. Grade and Yield Distribution 2000 Prime AAA AA A Y1 0.21% 21.30% 37.06% 4.12% 63% Y2 0.37% 17.45% 10.75% 0.24% 29% Y3 0.32% 6.25% 1.90% 0.02% 8% 0.90% 45.00% 49.72% 4.38% 100% Now we can see that the changes noted between 2010 and 2012 are continuations of a longer term trend. In 2002, there were actually more AA than AAA carcasses and the A carcasses were twice as numerous as they are now. On the yield side almost two out of three carcasses were Yield Class 1. So we have the classic “Good News-Bad News” tale, at least for those who believe that the trend to higher marbling is the right direction. The market place offers a premium for, “AAA and better”carcasses and cattle feeders have clearly responded, increasing the proportion of triple A’s from 45 to 57% . But the proportion of Y1 carcasses has declined all the way from 63% to 49% while the proportion of poorest yielding Y3 carcasses has doubled from 8 to almost 17%.

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What is going on here is what happens when one selects and feeds for one trait, in this case marbling, and largely ignores another, in this case Yield. This is not surprising. One of the easiest ways to increase the level of marbling, and therefore the proportion of AAA or better carcasses, is to make the cattle fatter. (i.e. feed them longer). And this is, by the same token, the surest way to reduce the yield or proportion of lean meat in the carcass. It is known that marbling score and yield score are somewhat antagonistic and this is obviously the case because, as the proportion of fat in the carcass increases the proportion of lean necessarily must decline. Fortunately this does not need to be the case. One can select for cattle that marble well but that do not lay on so much external fat. I proved this in a very practical way during my work with Natural Valley Packers a few years ago. The proof is shown in the chart below where I plotted external fat thickness of some 660 AAA carcasses. That array of AAA carcasses ranged from grossly fat to very lean. Almost exactly half of the carcasses had over 7.5 mm of fat cover at the grading site while the other half had less than 7.5 mm. So this shows that outside fat and marbling are not inseparable. It is entirely possible to breed, select for and feed cattle that produce a high yielding, well marbled carcasses. The practical aspect of this is that there are huge value variations between high and lower yielding carcasses. Since at least 2002 we have been reducing the value of the average carcass as average yield has declined while increasing the value by increasing the proportion of AAA carcasses. On balance, I am certain that the decline in real value due to declining average yield far outweighs the increase in value attributed to increased AAA carcasses. But we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to keep doing that. With the new instrument grading system we are going to get more accurate estimates of yield and, if we are smart and make sure that grade and yield information somehow gets back to the cow calf producer and if we can start paying for carcasses on the basis of both yield and quality we will, in less than a decade, transform the industry.

Some say the information on carcass quality and yield is of little value to the cow calf producer because that producer rarely knows how the cattle were handled, fed and managed after they were sold. All we need to say about that is that the final carcass is the result of the breeding, feeding and the management of the animal and the cow calf producer had everything to do with the breeding side as well as the management and care of the calf up to weaning. To claim that the producer had nothing to do with the final product is to deny any role at all for the genetic make up of the animal. Good, even superior carcasses can be created haphazardly when the right genetic background combines with excellent feeding and management. What is now apparent is that with good information flow we can plan for excellent carcasses on a reliable and repeatable basis.

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. . . reaches further than my natural vision...it foresees an exciting future for the industry. Reviewing the results of the recent “Spotlight on Limousin” tells me that packers’ highest priority are yield, frame, consistency and most importantly ... be Limousin. In the upcoming years, with a shortage of beef product, the packer will require a larger carcass with higher yield. We must realize that in the packing industry, a hook can hold a 900 lb. carcass just as well as it holds a 600 pounder. It takes the same amount of labor to process either carcass but there is a difference...300 lbs. Then, add in 3 to 4% yield and cutability and we are talking about quite a bit of net profit per nose or hook. Therefore, produce what this breed is noted for and quit trying to mimic the black competition. The spread between choice cuts and ground beef has narrowed on the supermarket shelf, lean ground beef even higher. Actually, in Mesa, Arizona last week, I could purchase a New York Strip for the same price per pound as lean ground beef and it had moisture added. Retailers are rapidly training the customer that beef will cost much more and fast food restaurants have been increasing their window prices to compensate product price increases without consumer protest. You get paid the same for the brisket as you do for the loin on the hook. Now what the packer does with it is different ... he can cut it, grind it, etc., whatever the supplier requires. The shortage will be ground beef, based on the Asian and Middle Eastern growth of fast foods, which is articled several paragraphs later. This fits the Limousin breed to a tee, as they are higher in yield, have a greater degree of cutability with less fat and bone. And let’s not forget about the huge rib-eye that every Limousin can produce. As the supply wanes, demand for the type of carcass the Limousin produces will have greater requirement, and necessity will cause re-invention. The year 2013 could well be called “The Year of the Bull!” .... the next decade will, most definitely, be extremely bullish in the industry of beef production. As supply tightens due to a shrinking North American cow herd and changing consumption patterns in the Middle East and Far East, coupled with a slower rebuilding/restocking process, demand for beef will reach all-time levels. Since the United States is the largest producer and consumer of beef in the world, much of the direction of beef prices is based on their supply scenario and The United States produces more than nine times the amount of beef than Canada. Canada ranks eleventh in the world for inventory, production and consumption. Drought conditions in Texas and the Mid-west states over the past two years and an aging producer population has driven U.S. cattle inventories to the lowest in sixty years. The last USDA cattle on feed report said there were six percent fewer cattle on feed as of last year and analysts are predicting a five percent decline in beef production in 2013. In global inventory, India has the most cattle in the world, (nearly thirty-two percent) and is the number one exporter in the world; poor production methods and religious beliefs place them fifth in the world in beef production. Brazil ranks second for inventory, consumption and production while being the third largest exporter in the world. China accounts for nearly half of the world’s hog production and ranks third in cattle inventory with over ten percent of the world population and is the fourth largest consumer of beef. The U.S is fourth in inventory, first in production, the second largest importer and the fourth largest exporter. Australia is the world’s second largest exporter; Russia who is tenth in production is the leading importer of beef and just for conversation, Pakistan ranks ninth in world production.

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The rapidly changing consumption trend will be one of the main supply shortage factors. China today has the second largest middle class in the world of one hundred and fifty-seven million, which will surpass the U.S. middle class in the next decade; therefore China’s demand for agricultural commodities will continue to grow. In addition, China will be the primary driver of global economic growth. Westernization has hit the Far East. Levi jeans, cowboy boots, North American music, movies and clothing are changing their culture and along with this, change of eating habits. Fast food restaurants serving western cultured burgers and fries are common place and virtually growing daily. The world’s two largest fast food restaurant companies have seen enormous growth in the past five years despite the so-called global crisis as they expand chains throughout the Middle and Far East. McDonalds have twentyeight thousand franchises spread throughout the globe and sixty-five hundred McDonalds wholly-owned restaurants showed an amazing earning per share growth of 20.17% in the last five years. Their competition, YUM Brands, the largest fast food company with thirty-eight thousand restaurants in over one-hundred and twenty countries in the world, posted a five year growth rate at 13.29%. YUM Brands’ franchises include Taco Bell, KFC, Pizza Hut and Wingstreet restaurants. Annual income spent on food throughout the world shows some very interesting facts. In Pakistan over 45% is spent on food, India 35.8% and China 33.9% as compared to Canada at 9.1%, the United Kingdom at 8.9% and the United States, the lowest at just under 7%. For the coming year, global analysts predict North American beef consumption to wane; while countries like China and India having some of the world’s largest population, will increase per capita consumption. These figures bode well for the future and the beef exporting countries. For every glowing picture, there is always a dark side. Although there appears to be a strengthening of global economy, the world’s largest beef producer’s government show signs of instability. Its huge trade deficit is daunting with no easy solution. The U.S. cannot afford to shut processing facilities, laying off thousands in a shaky economy, due to lack of supply. This scenario could well-be good trade news for its bordering countries. No doubt the issue of food safety will be on-going, but the market remains bullish despite the X-L fiasco and Brazil’s BSE masking. The decade ahead offers exciting times and opportunities...we will see investments by foreign parties enter the production and marketing of our domestic product. The ever changing social media and communications will affect this rapidly changing era. Change is endless, healthy and requires a young fresh attitude and enthusiasm.

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Solid Gold Limousin Sale

2012 Western Select Sale

Canadian Western Agribition November 23, 2012 Regina, SK Auctioneer: Steve Dorran Sale Management: Bohrson Marketing Services Sale Results 4 Herd Sire/Semen 9 Open Heifers 5 Bred Females

Averaged Averaged Averaged

$8,475.00 $5,550.00 $5,140.00

18 Lots Grossed $109,550.00, and Averaged $6,086.00 1 2

Flush Embryos

Averaged Averaged

$2,500.00 $2,250.00

Total Sale Grossed $116,500.00 High Selling Bull Lot 351A - RPY Paynes Bud 27Z sired by Greenwood PLD Xtra Charge was purchased by Symens Land & Cattle Co., Claresholm, AB for $6,400.00. High Selling Bred Yearling Lot 357 - Richmond Your Too Sweet sired by RPY Paynes Marathon 47U was purchased by Windy Gables Limousin, Warkworth, ON for $7,000.00. High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 362 - RPY Paynes Carolina 13Z sired by CFLX Wild Card was purchased by Eden Meadows Farm, Zehner, SK for $9,800.00.

November 30, 2012 Lloydminster, SK Auctioneer: Dan Skeels Sale Management: Bohrson Marketing Services Sale Results 1 Bull 6 Open Heifers 26 Bred Heifers

Average $30,500.00 $4,316.67 $3,646.15

33 Lots Grossed $151,200.00, and Averaged $4,581.82 High Selling Open Heifer Lot 40 - RPY Paynes Cheyenne 23Z sired by Kajo Responder 120R was purchased by Art Thompson, Alliston, ON for $6,000.00. High Selling Bred Heifer Lot 357 - Richmond Your Too Sweet sired by RPY Paynes Marathon 47U was purchased by Windy Gables Limousin, Warkworth, ON for $7,000.00. High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 7 - EDW Your Sensational sired by Wulf’s Urban Cowboy 2149U was purchased by North Plains Limousin, Bethune, SK for $18,100.00. High Selling Bull Lot 1 - Greenwood PLD Zambuka sired by Greenwood PLD Xtra Charge was purchased by Fouillard Limousin, Thorsby, AB and Zambuka Syndicate for $30,500.00.

High Selling Pick Lot 354 - Pick of the Anchor B Limousin 2010 Choice of Pair was purchased by South Victoria Limousin, Innisfil, ON for $4,100.00.

ALA Pacestetter Sale

Posthaven Limousin & Guests Production Sale

December 11, 2012 Olds, AB Auctioneer: Chris Poley Sale Management:T Bar C Cattle Co. Ltd.

December 5, 2012 Listowel, ON Auctioneer: Dave Carson

Sale Results Averaged 1 Cow $15,200.00 1.75 Bull Calves $30,458.00 15 Heifers Calves $3,324.00 4 Bred Heifers $3,332.35 21.75 Lots Grossed $138,650.00 and Live Lots Averaged $6,374.00 High Selling Cow Lot 4 - SBZ Polled Unlike Another SBZ 41U sired by 1- Way Just Gorgeous purchased by Greenwood Limousin, Lloydminster, SK for $15,2000.00 High Selling Bull Calf Lot 3B- Ivy’s Marksman HTZ 10Z sired by ROMN Tuff Enuff 103T was purchased by Richmond Ranch, Rumsey, AB for $25,000.00 High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 19- Greenwood PLD Zinderella JXP 12Z sired by Wulf’s Revolver 1219R was purchased by RCN Livestock, Paradise Hill,SK for $10,000.00 High Selling Bred Heifer Lot 25- Excel One Way XKR 132Y sired by TMF Westwood 505W was purchased by Runaway Ranch, Bentley, AB for $6,500.00

2nd Annual Royal Elite All Breed Sale November 3, 2012 Toronto, ON Auctioneer: Ryan Dorran Sale Management: Bohrson Marketing Services

Sale Results 4 Open Heifers

Averaged

$4,237.50

26 Lots Grossed $143,250.00 and Averaged $5,509.00 High Selling Limousin Lot 19 - Koyle ZSA-ZSA 28Z sired by CJSL Windfall 9072W was purchased by Darci Lundquist, Alsen, ND for $6,750.00.

Sale Results 6 Bulls 5 Open Heifers 20 Cows 15 Bred Heifers 1 Embryo Lot 3 Cow/Calf Pairs

Averaged Averaged Averaged Averaged Averaged Averaged

$3,483.00 $2,090.00 $1,855.00 $2,063.00 $6,500.00 $2,483.00

50 Lots Grossed $113,350.00 and Averaged $2,267 High Selling Embryo Lot Lot 1 - 4 Groups of Exportable Embryos - Polled Tristan X Perfect Fleur embryos for $6500.00 1 A - 6 @ 325 - B. Wirtz - Germany 1 B - 6 @ 300 - Counsil Family Limousin - Texas 1 C - 6 @ 250 - James Lucas - Olklahoma 1 D - 6 @ 250 - Venture Livestock - Carstairs Alberta High Selling Bull Calves Lot 2 - Posthaven Yagger sired by SVL Polled Exclusive 412T was purchased by Bardale Limousin, Erskine , AB for $5,400.00 Lot 15 - Posthaven P Zansibar sired by CFSV Polled Excel 315S was purchased by Semex Beef, Guelph ,ON for $4,100.00 High Selling Heifer Calf Lot 43 - Denison Poll Ziggy sired by Koyle Super Test was purchased by Darcy Klodt, Lynden, ON for $3,700.00 High Selling Bred Heifer Lot 50 - WGL Xquisite 17X sired by RPY Paynes Trilogy 26T was purchased by Brian Ayres, Stroud , ON for $3,400.00 High Selling Cow Lot 4 - Posthaven Polled Whitney sired by TMF Polled Rawhide 761R was purchased by Smart Limousin, Meaford, ON for $3,000.00

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We would like to invite all members of the Quebec Limousin Association to attend the upcoming Annual General Meeting in mid April. The meeting will take place after the all breed sale. A notice of meeting with all the details will be mailed to you soon. -----Since the acceptable range of birthdates for bulls at the Limousin Test Station will remain the same February 1 to April 30, now is the time to start planning for your AI season. -----Make sure to mark February 16 (St-Martin Station) and April 13 (Limousin Station) on your calendar for the two Limousin bull sales in Quebec. The Quebec Limousin Station sale will be on the internet at www.liveauctions.tv Please register ahead of time in order to be allowed to bid on-line. ----We congratulate the Quebec breeders who have made the CLA Elite Herd list. The program recognizes herds who contribute the most performance information, which makes a great difference in the advancement of the Limousin breed. Special mention to Ferme JPER and Ferme SDJ Polled Limousin for reaching the Platinum level and Ferme Luc Forcier, now a Gold Elite Herd. I look forward to seeing you at the upcoming events. Diane Joly, secretary (450) 454-6456

Tous les membres de l’Association Limousin du Québec sont invités à l’assemblée générale annuelle qui se tiendra à la mi-avril, après la tenue des encans des centres d’élevage bovins (CEB)-multi-sources (stations). Un avis de convocation parviendra à chacun précisant la date, l’heure et le lieu de l’assemblée. Comme les dates de naissance des taurillons acceptés à la Station Unique Limousin resteront les mêmes, soit du 1er février au 30 avril, il est donc temps de penser à commander vos semences de taureaux. Dates importantes à retenir : 16 février 2013 : Encan Station St-Martin. 13 avril 2013 : Encan Station Unique Limousin N’oubliez pas que l’encan de la Station Unique sera diffusé en direct sur www.liveauctions.tv. Pour ceux qui ne pourront se rendre à l’encan et qui désireraient acheter par internet, prévoir de vous inscrire sur le site avant l’encan. Félicitations aux éleveurs qui participent au programme HERD ELITE de l’Association canadienne. Ce programme vise à identifier les troupeaux qui fournissent le total des informations concernant leurs animaux pour ainsi, véritablement contribuer à l’avancement de la race limousine. Soulignons les efforts de la Ferme JPER et de la Ferme SDJ Polled Limousin qui se classent dans la catégorie Platinium ainsi que la Ferme Luc Forcier dans la catégorie Or. Vous retrouverez l’explication des quatre catégories ainsi que le nom des éleveurs participants sur le site de la Canadienne. Nous avons reçu une demande de stage d’une jeune française qui étudie en génétique et qui aimerait venir au Québec pour une période de neuf semaines. Elle serait prête à diviser son stage sur différentes fermes, par exemple visiter quatre fermes pour une durée de deux semaines environ . Les éleveurs intéressés peuvent communiquer avec moi pour informations. Bonne saison de vêlage,Limousinement vôtre, Diane Joly, secrétaire (450) 454-6456

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The Canadian Limousin Elite Herd Program aims at rewarding and recognizing herds that submit performance data and are supporters of the Whole Herd Enrolment. It identifies herds that do total reporting of information for their animals and truly contribute to the advancement of the Limousin breed.

Elite Herd Awards are divided in 4 categories:

• Platinum: herds that submit their BW, CE, WW, Docility on every calf weaned, YW, SC, Ultra sound or carcass • Gold: herds that submit their BW, CE, WW, YW and docility • Silver: herds that submit BW, CE and WW • Bronze: herd on Whole Herd Enrolment

Based on information submitted in 2012, this year’s Elite Herds are:

2012 Platinum Elite Herds (listed by CLA # and by province) 5328 BLUEBERRY FARMS TRUST FORT ST. JOHN BC 5102 SOUTHBRIDGE LIMOUSINS LETHBRIDGE AB 6865 IVY LIVESTOCK DUCHESS AB 23132 R & R ACRES AIRDRIE AB 28253 BRANDON HERTZ DUCHESS AB 28254 TYSON HERTZ DUCHESS AB 5689 J. YORGA FARMS LTD FLINTOFT SK 3723 CAMPBELL LIMOUSIN MINTO MB 4318 L&S LIMOUSIN ACRES KENTON MB 5615 DIAMOND T LIMOUSIN KENTON MB 7429 AMAGLEN LIMOUSIN DARLINGFORD MB 16772 POSTHAVEN LIMOUSIN ALMA ON 26513 TOP MEADOW FARMS CLARKSBURG ON 28756 BENNVILLE FARM HAGERSVILLE ON 137792 RAIL LINE FARMS LUCKNOW ON 139043 FERME J.P.E.R. L’ILE-AUX-NOIX QC 139978 FERME SDJ POLLED LIMO NAPIERVILLE QC

2012 Gold Elite Herds (listed by CLA # and by province) 16187 HI-VALLEY LIMOUSIN 100 MILE HOUSE BC 1087 HIGHLAND STOCK FARMS BRAGG CREEK AB 5370 MARK SUGIMOTO LETHBRIDGE AB 1452 ANDREW RANCHES TILLEY AB 5941 RICHMOND RANCH LTD RUMSEY AB 10402 NORTH SLOPE FARMS CZAR AB 13535 EXCEL RANCHES WESTLOCK AB 17863 FOUILLARD LIMOUSIN THORSBY AB 20270 VENTURE LIVESTOCK ENT. CARSTAIRS AB 25241 GOLDEN HARVEST RANCHES SHERWOOD PARK AB 28119 AMANDA MATTHEWS BRAGG CREEK AB 28120 LAURA K. MATTHEWS BRAGG CREEK AB 28960 RUNAWAY RANCH BENTLEY AB 133371 BRIAN MURPHY CAROLINE AB 133408 DIAMOND C RANCH PONOKA AB 133596 MURPHY RANCH ALTARIO AB 133986 TIFFANY & SAMANTHA RICHMOND RUMSEY AB 136635 DAKOTA LIMOUSIN THORSBY AB 139335 KINGS AND QUEENS LIMOUSIN THORSBY AB 140042 CHASE HIGH AIRDRIE AB 3617 EDEN MEADOWS FARM ZEHNER SK 4009 NORDAL LIMOUSIN SIMPSON SK 7456 B BAR CATTLE LUCKY LAKE SK 7990 CINDY & ROBBIE GARNER SIMPSON SK 26623 JONES CATTLE CO MORSE SK 2331 COCHRANE STOCK FARMS ALEXANDER MB 6467 TWIN OAK STABLES TREHERNE MB 7383 HOCKRIDGE FARMS DAUPHIN MB 28338 JAY-DEAN & TODD SMYTH ROBLIN MB 29019 WRIGHT WAY LIMOUSIN BOISSEVAIN MB 139920 ANGUS SMYTH ROBLIN MB 139925 JULES SMYTH ROBLIN MB 7200 KOYLE FARMS IONA STATION ON 8556 PINCH HILL LIMOUSIN STITTSVILLE ON 18678 HOLLEE LIMOUSIN JANETVILLE ON

24174 ALLAN & DOROTHY MARTIN LISTOWEL ON 28654 FERME J.L. & S. MAINVILLE FARM CURRAN ON 136141 BOULDER LAND & CATTLE CO. OMEMEE ON 136650 EMILY GIBSON RIPLEY ON 138328 CARLSRUHE CATTLE COMPANY HANOVER ON 13379 LUC FORCIER YAMASKA QC 7928 FRITZ & SANDRA OTHBERG SUMMER FIELD NB 11583 BLUE DIAMOND LIMOUSIN MCKAY SIDING NS

2012 Silver Elite Herds (listed by CLA # and by province) 19557 PINNACLE VIEW LIMOUSIN QUESNEL BC 134157 ERIN KISHKAN QUESNEL BC 1083 STEWART FARMING LTD STETTLER AB 1848 DALE & CAROLE BARCLAY ERSKINE AB 2413 COMBEST LIMOUSIN FARM ERSKINE AB 3880 HANSEN’S LIMOUSIN ENTWISTLE AB 4435 DARREN HIGH AIRDRIE AB 5493 TERRY BARCLAY ERSKINE AB 6156 RICKY BARCLAY ERSKINE AB 7716 ALTABARR FARMS VERMILION AB 10177 D C FARMS BARRHEAD AB 11032 HUDSON LIMOUSIN HARDISTY AB 15864 WILLOWCREST LIMOUSINS LAC LA BICHE AB 16455 SCOTT BARR VERMILLION AB 16948 PRAIRIE PRIDE STOCK FARM VEGREVILLE AB 25285 ALEXIS BARR VERMILION AB 25311 ADELE & SHAUN WALSH BON ACCORD AB 26667 DARREN JOHNSON BARRHEAD AB 26737 CONNIE JOHNSON BARRHEAD AB 28135 TIMOTHY C. MATTHEWS OLDS AB 28294 CARRIANN JOHNSON BARRHEAD AB 133412 KRISTINE PAUL-BARCLAY ERSKINE AB 138272 HORIZON LIMOUSIN ROCKYVIEW AB 138846 JACOB DE JAGER ROLLING HILLS AB 139240 ROCKY VIEW LIVESTOCK ROCKY VIEW AB 139502 CASSIDY MATTHEWS OLDS AB 139608 KEVLON LAND & CATTLE TABER AB 140581 TRIPLE HERD LIMOUSIN BENTLEY AB 1079 E M TEDFORD & SONS ESTEVAN SK 4749 PAYNE LIVESTOCK LLOYDMINSTER SK 6661 BAR 3R LIMOUSIN MARENGO SK 8056 DALE E. TURNER SASKATOON SK 10103 SHORT GRASS LIMOUSIN SWIFT CURRENT SK 12094 JAY R. & BEVERLY BOHRSON HANLEY SK 13561 KEN-DOC LIMOUSIN SASKATOON SK 13962 ANNE DYCK SWIFT CURRENT SK 133748 LAZY A LIMOUSIN CANDO SK 136560 CARPENTER CATTLE CO. HANLEY SK 137807 DANA CARPENTER HANLEY SK 8445 JAYMARANDY LIMOUSIN ROBLIN MB 15179 CHERWAY LIMOUSIN SANFORD MB 135117 MITCHELL FARMS VIRDEN MB 138655 TWIN MEADOW LIVESTOCK FARMS TREHERNE MB 138917 ASHLEE MITCHELL VIRDEN MB 2773 CEDAR PATCH ACRES LISTOWEL ON 3000 BELLDOON FARMS LTD. IONA STATION ON

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  56


5327 TRIPLE D FARM ENTERPRISE THORNDALE ON 5580 RIVERBANK FARMS WOODSTOCK ON 24350 DENISON LIMOUSIN KINGSTON ON 27889 ELM GROVE LIMOUSIN ELORA ON 28850 J-STAR LIVESTOCK BEACHBURG ON 3438 RUNNYMEDE FARMS MATAPEDIA QC 7052 FERME MCDUFF ET FILS SENC MANSONVILLE QC 9473 FERME A.T.J.C.L.A. ST-HYACINTHE QC

2012 Bronze Elite Herds (listed by CLA # and by province)

4697 LAURKEL LIMOUSIN PRINCE GEORGE BC 8518 DRY CREEK RANCH CECIL LAKE BC 8539 LISA ANN REAY TELKWA BC 8543 DARVIN KERR TELKWA BC 26375 ZAMORA RANCH ROCK CREEK BC 29207 LINDA SUE KERR TELKWA BC 135971 KURT & ERIN ROSSMANN QUESNEL BC 1756 NORTH SLOPE FARMS INC. BAWLF AB 5594 HILLVIEW FARMS MORINVILLE AB 5700 GER-RIS LIMOUSIN FALUN AB 7061 BUCK CREEK LIMOUSIN DRAYTON VALLEY AB 8192 LAKE ROAD LIMOUSIN WORSLEY AB 8571 COTTAGE LAKE LIVESTOCK STONY PLAIN AB 8577 LAKESIDE LIMOUSIN YELLOW HEAD COUNTY AB 9640 EMPIRE LIMOUSIN BLUFFTON AB 10896 SHOOTING STAR LIMOUSIN BLUFFTON AB 13116 LAZY S LIMOUSIN RIMBEY AB 13868 JAMES & WANDA LABIUK KITSCOTY AB 18460 MARK & DORIS PAYNE LLOYDMINSTER AB 21522 MOUNTAIN PARK RANCH TURNER VALLEY AB 23029 LOST POINT LIMOUSIN GIBBONS AB 26619 BRITTANY ANN PAPENHUYZEN STONY PLAIN AB 26620 JOEY & MARCI LABIUK KITSCOTY AB 27193 JANELLE E. LABIUK KITSCOTY AB 27888 CHOICE CATTLE COMPANY STETTLER AB 28793 KATRINA PAPENHUYZEN STONY PLAIN AB 29353 ROBERT NEEFE VIKING AB 133399 PLAINS LIMOUSIN WAINWRIGHT AB 133832 CRESTHILL CATTLE CO. PROVOST AB 136121 ARCTIC VALLEY FARM VALLEYVIEW AB 136586 KODY ROWE WORSLEY AB 137114 IVY RANCH DUCHESS AB 137696 WILL-JAY LIMOUSIN HALKIRK AB 138880 TYLER KAMPJES STURGEON AB 139275 CHEYENNE PORTER WAINWRIGHT AB 139362 ZACKARY A BINTZ KITSCOTY AB 139564 VYKKI JOHNS RIMBEY AB 139803 COLBY JAMES GERALD LABIUK KITSCOTY AB 140250 ROCKIN 2D LAND & CATTLE LLOYDMINSTER AB 140446 NITH VALLEY LIMOUSIN AIRDRIE AB 1896 WILLIAM KARWANDY PENNANT SK 3293 SPRINGER BROS. LESLIE SK 3526 GREENWOOD LIMOUSIN LLOYDMINSTER SK 5497 SCOTT & JACQUELINE PAYNE LLOYDMINSTER SK 5792 EDWARDS LIMOUSIN CRAIK SK 7343 HEWSON LIMOUSIN LASHBURN SK 8057 LEACH FARMS WADENA SK 8530 LEONE KARWANDY-HAGEL CABRI SK 10343 KRIS & BRENDA SPRINGER LESLIE SK 15023 HI-WAY LIMOUSIN BETHUNE SK 17152 RAYMOND GUTEK HENDON SK 18741 ALVIN QUALLY ROSE VALLEY SK 19197 JEFFREY GUTEK HENDON SK 20339 MATTHEW GUTEK HENDON SK 22603 CARLTON TRAIL LIMOUSIN DUCK LAKE SK 23229 MERV & DIANE SPRINGER LESLIE SK 23329 GERRY VILLENEAU KELLIHER SK 133940 LAIRD EDWARDS CRAIK SK 134678 4B RANCHING LTD LLOYDMINSTER SK 136548 DJS LIMOUSIN ESTERHAZY SK 138531 JAYDEN PAYNE LLOYDMINSTER SK 138772 JAXON PAYNE LLOYDMINSTER SK 139032 ERIC MARTENS STRASBOURG SK 139212 CALLIN COUNTRY LIMOUSINS YORKTON SK 139423 NORTH PLAINS LIMOUSIN BETHUNE SK 6657 HIDDEN VALLEY LIMOUSIN ALEXANDER MB 7390 PINE CREEK LIMOUSIN KENTON MB 12144 TRIPLE R LIMOUSIN MACGREGOR MB 20580 JAKO FARMS ELKHORN MB 21825 OAK RIDGE LIMOUSIN MORDEN MB 24491 ELLEN MCPHERSON SANFORD MB 24928 JLB LIMOUSIN ASHERN MB 26451 MARK ANGUS ROBLIN MB 134389 AMANDA HAMILTON-SEWARD DARLINGFORD MB 135305 LG LIMOUSIN VIRDEN MB

136441 ROARING RIVER LIMOUSIN SWAN RIVER MB 137929 FORT ELLICE LIMOUSIN ST-LAZARE MB 140299 SHANNILAND CATTLE CO MINITONAS MB 3039 DOUBLE D FARMS LTD. WATERLOO ON 3138 JOHN F. MCKEE & SONS LISTOWEL ON 4384 MERLIN J. REDMOND HARTINGTON ON 4847 SMART LIMOUSIN MEAFORD ON 6028 GLEN IRVINE SMITHS FALLS ON 6102 RAYMOND & KATHLEEN SMART MEAFORD ON 6592 AFTER HOURS LIMOUSINS TARA ON 6847 ALBERTVIEW LIMOUSIN FARMS MOUNT ALBERT ON 8310 STONERIDGE MEADOW ORO STATION ON 8829 ALLEN R. DOUGLAS PETROLIA ON 9267 CORAD FARMS PAKENHAM ON 9720 BOOTHVILLE FARMS MARKDALE ON 10695 ENRIGHT FARMS RENFREW ON 11704 LESLIE & DEB FALCONER CLINTON ON 13747 G.SMART & T.ALEXANDER MEAFORD ON 14834 JR’S LIMOUSIN PLYMPTON-WYOMING ON 14973 PATCHELL LIVESTOCK HANOVER ON 15218 W.R. BLACK STITTSVILLE ON 16151 TRIPLE A FARMS ARNPRIOR ON 16839 MAPLE KEY FARMS (EMBRO) INC EMBRO ON 16891 PINE HAVEN FARM CARP ON 17100 MARIAN HOLBEIN ARNPRIOR ON 18424 BEE ZEE ACRES GLENCOE ON 20365 GIBSON FARMS RIPLEY ON 20368 Y2K LAND AND CATTLE CO. CALEDON EAST ON 21934 BEAR CREEK FARM MOORETOWN ON 22098 LAKERIDGE LIMOUSIN ROSENEATH ON 23096 ORBIT VALLEY LIMOUSIN INVERARY ON 24190 ALEXANDER DAVENPORT MELBOURNE ON 25367 CHAD HUNT PAKENHAM ON 25558 DKC LIMOUSIN PORT HOPE ON 25602 FOUR MAC FARM BEACHBURG ON 25630 NEIL BROWN LITTLE BRITAIN ON 26211 LOYAL LINE LIMOUSIN GODERICH ON 27292 CORY & GLENNA HUNT PAKENHAM ON 28896 NEW LIFE LIMOUSIN HANOVER ON 133337 RED WING CATTLE COMPANY ARNPRIOR ON 134745 LONELM FARM NEW HAMBURG ON 135779 JADE LIMOUSIN GUELPH ON 135862 CJC CATTLE COMPANY ALMONTE ON 136050 PRESTON ACRES LIMOUSIN PONTYPOOL ON 136176 HAL BOOKER SHUNIAH ON 137337 WILD WAY FARM CARP ON 138301 ARRANHILLS FARMS TARA ON 138312 RED MAPLE FARMS ORONO ON 138499 ZWAMBAG CATTLE COMPANY GLENCOE ON 138538 KAREN & BETHANY STOREY NAPANEE ON 138623 RAILWAYCREEK FARMS MADOC ON 138642 WINDY GABLES LIMOUSIN WARKWORTH ON 138754 STOREYLAND CATTLE CO SELBY ON 138764 NEW FRONTIER LIMOUSIN AILSA CRAIG ON 138884 DENVER CASSIDY TWEED ON 138893 JOEDY AITCHISON THORNLOE ON 138895 A-J’S ACRES NEW LISKEARD ON 138924 ROANNA LIMOUSIN JANETVILLE ON 139052 SUNSET FARMS PICTON ON 139603 BIT BY BIT FARM INVERARY ON 139987 ANNAMARIE & ELISABET STUDER CLIFFORD ON 140007 DARLING FARMS CASTLETON ON 140196 HAYSTACK ACRES HARROW ON 6432 FERME DES PEUPLIERS SENC ST-GABRIEL QC 10820 ANDRE DAVIAU ST-VALERIEN QC 12135 RICHARD PLANTE ST-BARTHELEMY QC 13193 FERME BOUVILLON ST-HONORE QC 16969 WOODSTOCK LIMOUSIN ST-FELIX DE KINGSEY QC 18299 NORMAND GARNEAU BOUCHETTE QC 18659 MCNEIL LIMOUSIN ST-MARC FIGURY QC 19192 MARIO SIMARD STE-SOPHIE-DE-LEVRAR QC 24164 FERME GISY FERME-NEUVE QC 25391 FERME TI-NOEL COLOMBOURG ABITIBI QC 27263 FERME EDPA INC. DE NAPIERVILLE QC 27495 NOBLE LIMOUSIN ST-BASILE DE PORTNEU QC 28204 ALAIN VILLIARD ST-ROBERT QC 133978 JEAN-PIERRE CHARLEBOIS MONTEBELLO QC 138381 YVES TREMBLAY ST-CHRYSOSTOME QC 139958 FERME JEAN PELLETIER NOTRE DAME-DE-STANBR QC 140563 DENIS GRAVEL VAL DES MONTS QC 13421 L. & S. CRAIG & FAMILY NORTH TYRON PE 91447 BALAMORE FARM LIMITED GREAT VILLAGE NS 138790 BLACK RIVER LIMOUSIN SCOTSBURN NS

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  57


The Manitoba Limousin Association had a successful past year. We hosted the 2012 National Show in Brandon, Manitoba and it was a great time. Thank you to all who sponsored the show and activities at the Manitoba Livestock Expo. Some of our big name sponsors were the CLA, Ivomec/Merial and Cochrane Stock Farms. Thank you to everyone who entered animals, showed, and attended the show. We held our annual meeting on January 5th in Brandon. It was well attended and we had some people leave the board and one new member added to the board. Thank you to Anne Brunet-Burgess for attending the MLA Annual Meeting. Commercial Breeder of the Year was presented by Bill Campbell to Craig and Lorna Marr, Marr Ranch, Silver Ridge, MB. Cindy Jack was also awarded a $250 show package for showing Limousin influenced animals in 2012. This award is a draw the MJLA makes at the end of each year to a junior who has shown a Limousin influenced animal at their local 4-H show, Royal Winter Fair, Provincial Summer Show and/or MLE. Congratulations to Darby Cochrane for being chosen to be one of the Royal Bank Cup Supreme judges.

Seated l to r: Leonard Gertz, Bill Campbell, Mark Angus, Kyle Wright Standing l to r: Travis Hunter, Sherry Daniels, Art Rodgers, Ashlee Mitchell, Jay-Dean Smyth, Darby Cochrane

MASTERFEEDS SHOW CATTLE OF THE YEAR AWARDS

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013â&#x20AC;&#x192; 58


Breeder Section IAN, BONNIE AND GLEN HAMILTON CLINT AND AMANDA SEWARD Box 55 Ph: 204-246-2312 Darlingford , MB Cell: 204-823-1240 R0G 0L0 Email: amaglen@inetlink.ca www.amaglenlimousin.ca

MANITOBA

Specializing in Polled Fullbloods and Purebreds

Box 127, Erskine, Alberta T0C 1G0 Ph: (403) 742-5211 Fax: (403) 742-6139 Cell: (403) 740-7621

Lionel & Sharon, Alicia, Riché, Melanie Patrick, Brody & Diane Fouillard

P.O. Box 3, St. Lazare, MB R0M 1Y0 Home/Fax: (204) 683-2353 Cell: (780) 719-3894 Email: lionelfouillard@yahoo.ca

Fouillard Limousin Kevin Rea 306/463-7950 The Rea Family Ken Rea 306/968-2923 Marengo, SK S0L 2K0 r3bar@hotmail.com

Dale & Carole Barclay Box 21, Erskine, Alta. Canada T0C 1G0 (403) 742-4825 DALE

(403) 742-3882 RICK

(403) 742-5916 TERRY

eden meadows card_updatedJAN10:Layout 1

Bill & Mary Anne Zwambag Nick, Andrew & Matt

41410 Glendon Dr., Glenco, ON N0L 1M0 Res. (519) 287-3219 Fax: (519) 287-5248 www.beezeeacres.ca email:bzwambag@execulink.com

Terry & Lynette Hepper Sara and Erin General Delivery, Zehner, SK S0G 5K0 306/781-4628 thepper@yourlink.ca

Stan & Pat

204-855-2214 204-729-1772 204-855-2633 204-724-0892 Darby & Kelly 204-855-2191 204-573-6529

Kyle & Erin

Raising Limousin for over 30 years RR#1, Alexander, MB R0K 0A0 Fax: 204-855-2472 • Email: csf@westman.wave.ca Website: cochranestockfarms.com

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  59

Use a GOOD Limousin – Purebred & Fullblood

GERRY & RUTH GOOD R.R. #1 Ph: (403) 337-2212 Carstairs, AB T0M 0N0 Fax: (403) 337-3278 email: goodlimo@wildroseinternet.ca


Pine Haven Card_spring09:Layout 1

4250 King Rd. King City, ON L7B 1K4 Ray, Stacie, Will Meg & Liz Stanton Mobile: (416) 505-0707 rays@londonproperty.ca

Wanted: Harvest Olympus, Pub, Punch, Orion or Goldnview Krugerrand semen and embryos.

Rob & Cheryl Swaan Erin & Eric Kishkan & Family Jeff & Amber Swaan & Family 4344 Hwy 97 S. Quesnel, B.C. V2J 6P4

Mike Henry 017209 Grey Bruce Line R.R. #4 Tara, ON N0H 2N0 Ph: (519) 934-2023

Tel: (250) 747-3836 • Fax: (250) 747-0436 mail: swaany@quesnelbc.com www.pvlimousin.com

POPLAR VIEW S T O C K F A R M

Lloyd & Joan Trevor Atchison Atchison 204•854•2947 204•854•2510 Box 4 • Group 20 • R.R. #1 • Pipestone • MB pvsf@rfnow.com

Box 450, Roblin, MB R0L 1P0 email: lrangus@xplornet.ca Len, Ruth & Mark Angus: 204-937-4980 Todd, Jay-Dean, Jules & Angus Smyth: 204-937-4384

www.jaymarandy.com

H LIMOUSIN W The “Fuchs” Family A Bethune, Saskatchewan S0G 0H0 Y Purebred Red & Black Limousin Cattle Visitors Welcome Ed & Doreen (306) 638-4422 Warren (306) 789-8863 Darcy (306) 638-4800 Email: wfuchs@sasktel.net

Lisle Limousin - card_newMAY09:Layout 1

KEVIN PRESTON & FAMILY 705-277-1032 705-344-7438 (Cell)

www.hockridgefarms.ca

613 Hwy 35 Pontypool ON L0A 1K0

FULLBLOOD LIMOUSIN BREEDERS MAPLE KEY FARMS

780-879-2105 glendh@telusplanet.net Bob, Dorothy, Colin and Glenda RR #1, Hardisty, Alberta T0B 1V0

Jim & Susan Butt 436394 43rd Line, RR #2 Embro, Ontario N0J 1J0 Phone/Fax: 519-475-4375 email: maplekey@sympatico.ca

MAPLE KEY FARMS

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  60

Lonny McKague Box 171, Ogema, SK SOC 1YO

(306) 459-2788 • (306) 459-7801

(306) 459-2202 (Fax) email: lonnymckague@hotmail.com

22/04


Mark Sugimoto & Family 2713 33 Ave. South Lethbridge, AB T1K 1J8 (403) 327 9327 (H) (403) 308 6171 (C) southbridgelimousin@theboss.net

Murray & Bev Stewart Box 1326 Tel: (403) 742-5226 Stettler, AB T0C 2L0 Fax: (403) 742-5242 Imperial Ranch Ltd. E-mail: irl@telusplanet.net

HARVEY & DONNA CADIEUX

Box 1352 Ph: (780) 623-2468 Lac La Biche, AB Fax: (780) 623-4169 T0A 2C0 Fullblood Black or Red Polled4 06/11/2007 1366 Windy&Gables:Layout

Breeders of polled purebred and fullblood Limousin

Bryce & Nathan Allen P.O. Box 189 Warkworth, Ontario K0K 3K0 Tel: (705) 924-2583 Fax: (705) 924-3385

Limousin Voice #13, 4101, 19th Street, NE Calgary, AB  T2E 7C4 P: 403.253.7309  F: 403.253.1704 advert@limousinvoice.com Official publication of the Canadian Limousin Association Please check one of the following:  Canadian 1 year $35.00 plus GST   United States $50.00 USD   International $50.00 USD Make cheques payable to Canadian Limousin Association

Farm Name: _______________________________________

Name: _______________________________________

Address: _________________________________________

City: _________________________________________

Province/State: ____________________________________

Country: ____________  Postal Code:_____________

Phone: __________________________________________

Email: _______________________________________

 We would like to advertise in your next issue please contact me.  Renewal

Credit Card Payment  MasterCard   Visa  Expiry Date: ________ Card Number: _____________________________ Name: _____________________________________

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  61

S UBS CRI BE

Subscription Card


Services Section Craig Flewelling Consulting • Ring Service • Order Buying Craig Flewelling Box 428 Bowden, AB T0M 0K0 Phone (403) 556-0515 cell Email: flewcc@xplornet.com www.flewellingcattleco.com

Chris Poley Auctioneer Box 252 Waldheim, SK, S0K 4R0

Cell (306) 220-5006

Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd.

Phone: (403) 337-0052 Cell: (780) 853-7067 Fax: (403) 337-0052 Head Office: (780)447-3276

HEATHER BARR Suite 302, 13220 St. Albert Trail, Edmonton, Alberta T5L 4W1 hbarr@cdnfarmins.com www.cdnfarmins.com Transit

Livestock Mortality

Equine

Davis-Rairdan International P.O. Box 590 Crossfield, Alberta Canada T0M 0S0 Phone (403) 946-4551 Fax (403) 946-5093 Website: www.davis-rairdan.com E-mail: embryos@davis-rairdan.com services offered: - On-farm freezing & collection - Donor care facility - Recipient herd - Licensed facility for embryo exports - Genetic marketing & selection

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  62


Advertisers Index Amaglen Limousin Anchor B

32, 59 6,7

B Bar Cattle Co. Bar 3R Limousin Bar-Dale Limousin Bee Zee Acres Bercol Limousin Bova-Tech Ltd. Bow Valley Genetics Ltd.

6,7 29, 59 59 22, 59 23 62 62

Campbell Limousin Canadian Farm Insurance Corp. Carpenter Cattle Cherway Limousin Clark Cattle Cochrane Stock Farms Combest Limousin Farm

27 62 6, 7 59 20 59 29, 59

Davis-Rairdan Embryo Transplants Ltd. 62 DC Farms 23 deJager Limousin Cattle Co. 31, 59 Diamond C Ranch Limousin 11, 59 Dodge 3 East Country Limousin Eden Meadows Limousin Edwards Limousin Enright Farms Limousin Excel Ranches Flewelling, Craig Fort Ellice Limousin Fouillard Limousin

35 59 14, 15 59 23 62 59 59

Gardiner Limousin 59 Gates Limousin 39 Good Limousin Ranch 59 Grant Rolston Photography Ltd. 62 Greenwood Limousin 59 Gutek Limousin 35 Hager Cattle Co. 39 Haystack Acres 59 Highland Stock Farm IFC Hillside Farm 60 Hillview Farms 22, 23, 60 Hi-Valley Limousin 31, 60 Hiway Limousin 60 Hockridge Farms 60 Hudson Limousin 60 Ivy Livestock Limousin

10, 60

J. Yorga Farms IBC Jan-Star Farms 60 Jaymarandy Limousin 25, 60 Jones Cattle Co. 27 Karwandy Limousin 60 Ken-Doc Limousin 13 Lazy S Limousin & Charolais 12 Lisle Limousin 21, 60 Maple Key Farms

Nordal Limousin & Angus

Ostervale Farms Limousin 21 Payne Livestock BC Pfizer 19 Pine Haven Farm 60 Pinnacle View Limousin 8, 60 Poley, Chris 62 Poplar View Stockfarm 60 Posthaven Limousin 60 Preston Acres Limousin 60 Red Coat Cattle Station Red Maple Farms Richmond Ranch Rocky View Livestock ROM’N Limousin Runaway Ranch

60 20 9, 61 61 33 12

Short Grass Limousin 22 Skeels, Dan 62 Smart Limousin 18, 61 Southbridge Limousin 61 Stewart Limousin 61 Stockmens Insurance 62 Stoneyview Limousin 14 Triple “R” Limousin

61

61 61 5, 61

1

60

Wild Way Farm Willowcrest Limousin Windy Gables Limousin

2

Y2K Land & Cattle

CLA Directors

# 13 - 4101, 19th Street N.E. Calgary, Alberta T2E 7C4 Phone: 1-866-886-1605 or (403) 253-7309 Fax: (403) 253-1704

www.limousin.com

VICE-PRESIDENT Brian Lee Phone: (705) 340-5944 Cell: (905) 447-5173 Email: hmacsand@hotmail.com PAST-PRESIDENT Mary Hertz Phone: (403) 378-4190 Fax: (403) 378-3959 Email: rhertz@eidnet.org

CLA Staff GENERAL MANAGER Anne Brunet-Burgess Email: aburgess@limousin.com

Lynn Combest Phone: (403) 742-5211 Fax: (403) 742-6139 Cell: (403) 740-7621 Jim Richmond Phone: (403)368-2103 Cell: (403) 323-8433 Email: bulls@richmondranch.com Tim Andrew Phone: (403) 779-2273 Email: tlandrew@netago.ca

Provincial Association Presidents

CLA Executive Committee PRESIDENT Bill Campbell Phone: (204) 776-2322 Fax: (204) 776-2105 Email: blcampbell@xplornet.com TREASURER Terry Hepper Phone: (306) 781-4628 Email: thepper@yourlink.ca

Kelly Yorga Phone: (306) 263-4432 Cell: (306) 642-7023 Email: norma_yorga@yahoo.ca Luc Forcier Phone: (450) 789-2166 Fax: (450) 789-0332 Email: lforcier9@sympatico.ca Dale Turner Phone: (306) 374-6585 Email: meaganturner@sasktel.net

MARITIMES Michael Byrne Phone: (902) 485-6731 QUEBEC Serge Dethier Phone: (450) 454-6456 MANITOBA Jay-Deen Smyth Phone: (204) 937-4384 Email: ne262527@gmail.com SASKATCHEWAN Kevin Rea Phone: (306) 463-7950 Email: r3bar@hotmail.com

REGISTRY/MEMBER SERVICES Dallas Wise & Devra Leavitt Email: limousin@limousin.com Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  63

ALBERTA Carriann Johnson Phone: (780) 674-7063 Email: carriannjohnson@hotmail.com BRITISH COLUMBIA Erin Kishkan Phone: (250) 747-3836 Email: kishkan@quesnelbc.com ONTARIO Sheila Smart Phone: (519 ) 538-4877 Email: Smartlimo@bmts.com


Plan to be a part of these coming events: February

16 17 19 20-22 21 23 25

Published by: Today’s Publishing #4-3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 7G9 Phone: (306) 934-9696 Fax: (306) 934-0744 info@tbarc.com www.buyagro.com

March

3-4 Pride of the Prairies Bull Sale, Lloydminster, SK 8 16th Annual Richmond Ranch Grass Country Bull Sale, Rumsey, AB 9 Gutek Limousin Range Ready Bull Sale, Yorkton, SK 9 Hollee Limousin Open House, Janetville, ON 9-10 Regina Bull Sale, Regina, SK 11 Diamond C Ranch 12th Annual Limousin Bull Sale, Ponoka, AB 13 Murphy Ranch Limousin Bull Sale, Provost, AB 16 Highland Stock Farms Bull Sale, High River, AB 16 Prime Club Limousin Bull Sale, Westlock, AB 21 Anchor B/B Bar/ Carpenter Limousin 12th Annual Bull Sale, Saskatoon, SK 21 18th Annual Bar 3R Bull Sale, Oyen, AB 22-24 Jaymarandy Limousin 22nd Annual Private Treaty Sale, Roblin, MB 21 de Jager Limousin Bull Sale, Brooks, AB 23 Lazy S Limousin & Charolais Bull Sale, Rimbey, AB 25 Hager Cattle Company 7th Annual Bull Sale, Mandan, ND 27 East Country Limousin 9th Annual Bull Sale, Veteran, AB 29 27th Annual Prairie Gold Sale, Saskatoon, SK

Our Staff Bryan Kostiuk - Editor Ted Serhienko - Marketing Chris Poley - Marketing Mina Serhienko - Controller Debbie Thiessen - Circulation Luke Fisher - Design Tiffany Peters - Design Jamie Van Cleemput - Design Kelley Poley - Design Treena Ballantyne - Accounting

April

Published 4 times/year Winter, Summer, Fall & Christmas Careful consideration has been placed on production of this magazine and we are responsible for the value of the advertisement; however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions.

2 8th Annual Home Grown Bull Sale, Minto, MB 4 Peace Country Limousin Breeders Bull Sale, Dawson Creek, BC 6 Manitoba Bull Test Station Sale, Douglas, MB 6 Smart Limousin Private Treaty Bull & Heifer Sale, Meaford, ON 8 Homegrown Bull Sale, Minto, MB 13 ROM’N Limousin Annual Bull Sale, Madison, SD 13 Windy Gables Open House and Private Treaty Sale, Warkworth, ON 13 Quebec Bull Test Station Sale, St-Hyacinthe, QC 18-19 76th Annual Williams Lake Bull Show & Sale, Williams Lake, BC 20 Posthaven Limousin Open House, Alma, ON 20 Olds Spring Classic, Olds, AB

May

Printed in Canada by: Houghton Boston Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

5 Business Development Manager ACAMP, Lake Louise, AB

June

Publication Mail Agreement: 40021107

12 BIF Annual Convention, Oklahoma City, OK 25-26 T Bar Invitational Golf Tournament

Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to: Today’s Publishing Circulation Dept. #4 3342 Millar Avenue Saskatoon, SK S7K 7G9 Email: info@tbarc.com

Encan Station St-Martin, St-Martin, QC R&R Acres’ 12th Annual “Beefmaker” Limousin Bull Sale, Airdrie, AB Symens Land & Cattle Bull Sale, Claresholm, AB Alberta Beef Industry Conference, Banff, AB Nordal Limousin Bull & Female Sale, Saskatoon, SK Ontario Limousin Association AGM, Alma, ON J. Yorga Farms Production Sale, Flintoft, SK

August

2-4 National Junior Conference, Neepawa, MB 3 CLA Annual General Meeting, Neepawa, MB

Limousin Voice The Bull Issue 2013  64


Canadian Publication Agreement #40021107 lvwinter13covers.indd 1

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Limousin Voice Winter 2013  

Limousin Voice Winter 2013

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