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Fashion Journal Aleksandra Szymanska                          

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Table of  Contents   ENTRY  #1  WOMEN’S  WEAR  DAILY-­‐OCTOBER  2,  2013   Oscar  de  la  Renta  at  Peninsula  Hotels………………………………………………………  3   ENTRY  #2:  NEW  YORK  TIMES  –  DECEMBER  6,  2013    

Business Students  Turn  to  Fashion………………………………………………………………5  

ENTRY #3:  VOGUE  –  JUNE  11,  2013    

London Brings  90s  Back………………………………………………………………………………6  

ENTRY #4:  FASHION  OBSERVATION     Booties………………………………………………………………………………………………………...8   ENTRY  #5:  TRENDS         Across  Anthropologie……………………………………………………………………………………8     ENTRY  #6:  WGSN  TREND  REPORT     Silver  Blue…………………………………………………………………………………………….……10     ENTRY  #7:  FABRIC  TRENDS     Knits  and  Plad……………………………………………………………………………………………11     ENTRY  #8:  COLOR  TRENDS     Emerald,  Samba  and  More…………………………………………………………………………13     ENTRY  #9:  GLOBAL  TRENDS     Japan  and  France………………………………………………………………………………………..16     ENTRY  #10:  VISUAL  DISPLAYS     Tory  Burch  and  All  Saints………………………………………………………………………….18     ENTRY  #11:  FASHION  ON  THE  BIG  SCREEN     Men  in  Suits………………………………………………………………………………………………19     ENTRY  #12:  DESIGNER  COLLECTION     Alexis  Mabille…………………………………………………………………………………………….20     ENTRY  #13:  CAREER  DESCRIPTIONS……………………………………………………….……….21     ENTRY  #14:  FASHION  DON’TS………………………………………………………………………….21     ENTRY  #  15:    CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES  ………………………………………………..…………22      

     

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ENTRY #1: WOMEN’S WEAR DAILY-OCTOBER 2, 2013 Oscar de la Renta Creates Amenities for the Peninsula Hotel By Belisa Silva

POWER OF  SUGGESTION:  Oscar   de  la  Renta  is  looking  to  the   amenities  business  to  keep  his  name   top  of  mind  with  the  one  million   guests  bunking  at  any  of  The   Peninsula  Hotel’s  more  than  2,000   rooms  worldwide.  “We’re  trying  to   get  our  customers,  the  people  who   are  logical  shoppers  for  Oscar  de  la   Renta  clothes,  who    happen  to  be  spending  the  night  at  the  Peninsula  Hotel  to  think  about  us  when  they   march  up  or  down  the  street  of  Fifth  Avenue,”  said  Alex  Bolen,  chief  executive  officer.      De  la  Renta,  who  was  in  town  Monday  evening  to  celebrate  the  Peninsula  New  York’s   25th  anniversary  as  well  as  his  first  partnership  with  an  outside  brand,  said  he  was   inspired  to  enter  the  amenities  business  because  of  his  own  habit  of  taking  products   home  with  him  after  a  hotel  stay.    “People  at  the  hotel  use  the  soap,  [but]  if  someone   doesn’t  use  all  the  products  most  people  take  it  away.  I  do,”  said  De  la  Renta.      The  line,   comprised  of  two  bar  soaps,  as  well  as  shampoo,  conditioner,  shower  gel  and  body   lotion,  was  produced  by  Gilchrist  &  Soames,  The  Peninsula  Hotels’  amenities  supplier.   Firmenich  created  the  unisex  tea-­based  “citrus  aromatic  floral  musk”  scent.  De  la   Renta’s  namesake  amenities  range,  with  the  addition  of  scented  bath  salts,  are  also  on   hand  at  his  Tortuga  Bay  resort  in  the  Domincan  Republic.      The  range  launched   Monday  into  the  current  lineup  of  nine  Peninsula  Hotels  worldwide,  with  the  10th  set   to  open  in  Paris  next  summer.  “We  think  the  hospitality  business  has  many  interesting   points  for  our  brand  when  you  think  about  home  products,  furniture,  bridal,”  said   Bolen,  hinting  at  a  possible  De  la  Renta-­inspired  bridal  suite  at  the  Peninsula  as  a   future  option.    

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As reported  by  Women’s  Wear  Daily  on  October  2nd,  2013  Oscar  de  la  Renta   developed  an  amenities  line  for  Peninsula  Hotels.  This  high  end  hospitality  business   is  sure  to  attract  top  of  the  line  travelers  at  the  thousands  of  rooms  they  have   available  worldwide.  It  is  not  a  shock  that  a  brand  like  Oscar  de  la  Renta  would  want   to  cater  to  those  individuals  and  stay  on  their  minds  so  that  they  can  swiftly  visit  his   near  by  store  locations  and  shop  away  for  his  pricey  products!  The  Peninsula  Hotel   just  recently  celebrated  their  25th  anniversary,  and  is  one  of  the  first  outside   companies  that  De  la  Renta  chose  to  partner  with.  As  sources  state,  he  is  really   excited  about  the  venture  and  is  dreaming  big  about  growing  within  the  hospitality   business,  perhaps  even  with  a  Oscar  de  la  Renta  inspired  bridal  suite  in  the  future!  

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ENTRY #2:  NEW  YORK  TIMES  –  DECEMBER  6,  2013   Enterprising  Business  Students  Turn  to  Fashion  by  Cathy  Horyn   This  week  I’m  on  the  road,  traveling   between  Palo  Alto,  Calif.,  where  I  did  a  talk   with  Ron  Johnson,  the  former  J.C.  Penney   chief  executive,  at  Stanford  University,  and   Dallas,  where  Karl  Lagerfeld  will  put  on  a   Texas-­size  extravaganza  for  Chanel.  That’s   more  contrast  than  you  normally  get  in  a   week.  And  maybe  that’s  a  good  argument   for  getting  out  of  the  office.My     conversation  with  Mr.  Johnson  was  the  first  in  a  series  I’m  doing  at  the  university,   called  “Fashion  at  Stanford.”  In  the  coming  months,  I’ll  be  talking  to  Pascal  Dangin  and   Annie  Leibovitz  about  image-­making,  Antoine  Arnault  of  LVMH  about  luxury  and   Alexander  Wang  about  designing  for  his  label  and  Balenciaga.  One  thing  I’ve  learned   after  two  lengthy  visits  to  Stanford  in  the  last  three  years  is  that  students  are  focused   on  the  business  of  fashion.  During  my  first  visit,  several  seniors  said  their  dream  job   was  to  work  for  Mickey  Drexler  of  J.  Crew  or  Natalie  Massenet,  the  founder  of  Net-­a-­ Porter.  Not  a  hot  designer  in  London?  Nope.  They  identified  two  chief  executives  who   defined  success  in  their  retail  categories.  Stanford  is  a  creative  place,  despite  the   casual  style  on  campus,  and  brands  should  be  interested  in  its  students  because  many   are  entrepreneurial.  During  our  talk,  Mr.  Johnson,  a  Stanford  graduate  who  went  to   Harvard  Business  School  before  starting  his  career  at  the  Mervyns  chain,  mentioned   Bonobos,  a  web  company  founded  in  2007  by  two  Stanford  business  school  students,   Andy  Dunn  and  Brian  Spaly.  Their  idea  was  better  fitting  pants.  He  also  brought  up   Warby  Parker,  the  eyewear  company  started  by  four  classmates  at  the  Wharton   School.  I  sensed  that  the  audience  found  Mr.  Johnson’s  words  inspiring,  especially   about  his  years  at  Target,  when  he  developed  the  line  with  Michael  Graves  —  one  of   the  very  first  of  the  high-­low  collaborations  —  and  then  opening  Apple’s  first  stores.  So   much  of  Apple’s  retail  success,  he  said,  had  to  do  with  the  culture  of  creativity  that   Steve  Jobs  encouraged,  which  included  seeking  simple  solutions.  And  Mr.  Johnson  spoke   candidly  about  his  time  at  Penney’s,  the  first  time  he  has  done  so  publicly.  In  essence,   he  said  he  did  too  much  too  quickly.  Before  our  talk,  he  and  I  met  informally  with   students,  mainly  from  the  Graduate  School  of  Business.  One  thing  that  was  on  their   minds  was  luxury.  A  group  of  students  had  just  returned  from  Paris,  where  they  met   with  Alber  Elbaz  of  Lanvin,  and  executives  at  Chanel,  Hermès  and  Kering,  which  owns   brands  like  Saint  Laurent  and  Gucci.  Considering  the  appeal  of  start-­ups  like  Bonobos,   I  was  curious  to  know  what  attracted  them  to  the  luxury  business.  After  all,  it’s  old-­ school  and,  as  several  students  noted,  very  reluctant  to  use  e-­commerce.  Later,  I   exchanged  email  with  two  students,  Hannah  Hale,  an  organizer  of  the  trip,  and  Kevin   Kelleher.  “I  loved  the  consistent  message  from  all  these  brands  that  you  are  only  as   strong  as  the  quality  of  your  product,”  wrote  Mr.  Kelleher,  who  worked  at  Bonobos   before  enrolling  at  Stanford.  “I  think  many  nonluxury  brands  believe  they  can  heighten  

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the perceived  quality  through  messaging,  while  a  brand  like  Hermès  is  very  clear  that   the  quality  can  never  be  compromised.”  I  wondered  how  interested  French  companies   are  in  recruiting  American  M.B.A.’s.  Ms.  Hale  replied:  “I  believe  it  depends  on  the  type   of  company  and  ownership  structure.  For  example,  holding  companies  such  as  Kering   seem  to  understand  the  importance  of  business  acumen  to  the  success  of  their  portfolio   companies.  However,  if  you  look  more  broadly  at  the  luxury  apparel  category,  there  is   less  of  a  desire  to  recruit  M.B.A.’s.  I  believe  the  onus  is  on  M.B.A.’s  who  are  self-­ motivated  and  willing  to  start  in  more  junior  positions  and  move  their  way  through   the  ranks.”  That  was  Mr.  Johnson’s  advice,  too.  Both  Mr.  Kelleher  and  Ms.  Hale,  a   former  investment  banker,  seem  motivated  to  challenge  conventional  thinking.  As  Ms.   Hale  noted,  there  is,  except  for  Ralph  Lauren,  a  lack  of  luxury  companies  based  in  the   United  States,  though  North  America  contributes  to  luxury  growth.  “My  take  is  that   there’s  a  sentiment  in  Europe  that  Americans  are  too  ‘rational’  or  lack  the  creativity   for  luxury,  and  I  don’t  agree  with  this  notion,”  she  wrote.  “In  light  of  the  growing   demand  for  upscale  casual  clothing  in  the  U.S.,  I  believe  there’s  an  opportunity  for   M.B.A.  students  who  are  creatively  inclined  to  start  luxury  companies  in  this  space.”   Obviously,  she  added,  it’s  an  undertaking  of  many  years.  But  note  her  emphasis  on   creative  thinking,  not  to  mention  “upscale  casual.”  That’s  what  the  industry  needs   more  of,  not  just  clever  designs.                                            

________________________________

One of  the  writers  for  the  New  York  Times,  Cathy  Horyn  is  currently  working  on  a   series  called  “Fashion  at  Stanford”,  she  will  have  the  pleasure  of  speaking  to   influential  individuals  such  as  Pascal  Dangin,  Annie  Leibovitz,  Antoine  Arnault  and   Alexander  Wang.  In  the  first  article  for  the  NYT  about  this  project,  she  stated  that   her  first  realization  about  students  at  Stanford  is  that  they  are  very  focused  on   fashion  business.  She  states  that  some  of  the  students  she  interviewed  expressed   their  desire  to  work  at  some  of  the  biggest  fashion  companies  in  the  country.     There  are  several  Stanford  graduates  that  have  already  made  their  mark  in  the   fashion  business  world  after  graduating  from  this  prestigious  school.  Two  business   school  graduates  Andy  Dunn  and  Brian  Spaly  started  Bonobos  an  online  pants   company.  There  is  also  an  eyewear  company  started  by  Warby  Parker  that  also  has   had  its  share  of  success.     There  seems  to  be  a  common  theme  floating  around  the  heads’  of  business  school   graduates  and  that’s  luxury.  It  seems  that  what  attracts  young  business  minded   people  the  most  is  the  quality  of  the  product.  A  lot  of  those  young  future  leaders   want  to  change  the  mindset  of  many  Europeans  and  prove  that  Americans  do  not   lack  creativity  and  can  maintain  being  challenged  and  motivated.     Horyn  summarizes  her  article  by  stating  that  the  emphasis  needs  to  remain  on   creative  thinking,  the  “upscale  casual”  which  is  what  the  fashion  business  industry   really  needs.      

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ENTRY #3:  VOGUE  –  JUNE  11,  2013   London  Colling:  Dressing  to  the  Nineties  by  Sarah  Mower   In   her   Tuesday   column   about   all   things   stylish   and   British,   Sarah   Mower   spots   the   trend   that’s   looking  ahead  while  simultaneously   looking   back   .   .   .   to   the   nineties.   As   fashion   barometers,   both   the   London   resort   collections   and   the   class   of   2013   graduation   shows   can’t   help   registering   what’s   in   the   air.  When  I  put  together  the  clothes   I’ve   been   seeing   and   the   conversations  I’ve  been  having  with   designers   in   the   past   couple   of   weeks   and   then   cross-­check   them   with   the   popular   vote   in   the   form   of   best-­sellers  flying  off  the  Topshop     and   Asos   websites,   I   detect   something  going  on.  The  list  of  emerging  London  desirables  includes  camisole  tops,   bias-­cut   slip   dresses,   baggy   bib   overalls,   sloppy   hoodies,   fraying   edges,   and   what   Christopher   Kane   calls   “Jesus   sandals”   and   Justin   Thornton   of   Preen   terms   “festival   flats”—i.e.,  any  close  relation  to  a  Birkenstock.  It  is  all  heading  one  way.  .  .  .      When  I    saw  Stella  Tennant  out  and     about  in  a  pair  of  Céline     mink-­lined  Birkenstock-­ish     sandals  with  a  loose,  boyish     pantsuit  the  other  week,  that    was  it,  in  a  flash:  the  ultimate    model  of  the  nineties,  standing    there  looking  as  if  she’d  barely    strayed  out  of  the  decade.    Trust     Phoebe  Philo  to  be  in  there  first    with  a  reference  that  sets  off    a  crashing  wave  of  reminiscences    for  her  own  generation—Brits    who  all  happened  to  misspend    their  youths  in  the  nineties  are    now  at  the  top  of  their  game.    The  likes  of  Christopher  Bailey,    Jonathan  Saunders,  and  Thea     Bregazzi  and  Justin  Thornton  of    Preen  are  of  an  age—late  30s,  turning  40—who  have  every  reference  from  the  decade   at   their   fingertips.   No   need   to   scour   the   Internet   for   research—they   lived   it.  

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Christopher Kane  was  only  ten  in  1992—but  he  was  glued  to  it  all  on  satellite  TV  after   school.  But  was  Phoebe  Philo  really  first  to  pinpoint  the  nineties  feeling?  In  London,  the   young  designers  Marques’  Almeida  sent  out  their  raw-­edged,  nineties-­inflected       summer   2013   collection   ten   days   before   the   Céline   show   in   Paris   last   September.   Marta   Marques   and   Paulo   Almeida  (who  are  Portuguese  graduates  of  Central  Saint   Martins)  are  of  the  generation  that  looks  back  and  wishes   it  were  part  of  the  time  when  Kate  Moss  was  a  waif  and   Corinne   Day,   Juergen   Teller,   David   Sims,   and   Glen   Luchford   were   photographing   in   squats   and   fields;   a   British-­fueled   phenomenon   that   went   to   New   York   and   zoomed   to   the   top   of   fashion   in   the   space   of   the   seven   years  between  1992  and  1999.  And  now,  even  the  babies   appear   to   be   thinking   about   it.   Assuming   the   British   bachelor’s   students   graduating   this   summer   are   around   23,   they   were   only   born   in   1990,   when   grunge   and   rave   culture   were   on   the   rise.   To   them,   layered,   rough-­edged   shapes  and  grungy  hair  and  makeup  are  a  fresh  discovery     and   fuel   to   the   imagination—as   these   graduates   from   the   University   of   Westminster   just  proved.  That  has  to  be  why  the  most  on-­it  British  teenagers  and  20-­year-­olds  are   simultaneously  swarming  all  over  the  dungarees  and  spaghetti-­strap  camisoles  in  the   British   high   street   store.   But   the   story   of   nineties   fashion   contained   far   more   than   grunge.  There  was  the  cleaned-­up  street  elegance  of  Helmut  Lang—and  the  explosion   of  sex  and  glamour  from  Tom  Ford  when  he  appeared  at  Gucci.  Something  about  these   dresses   from   Burberry   resort   rings   bells.   .   .   Meanwhile,   J.W.   Anderson   has   already   shown   his   outright   admiration   for   Donatella   Versace’s   Versus   collections   of   the   late   nineties.  And  the  attitude  of  the  young  girls  in  the  show  on  their  joint  runway  in  the   New  York  Lexington  Avenue  Armory  last  month  said  they  were  absolutely  loving  it.                                                                                ___________________________________       Sarah  Mower,  of  Vogue  has  seen  an  increasing  demand  on  popular  90s  pieces  such   as   camisole   tops,   bias-­‐cut   slip   dresses,   baggy   bib   overalls,   sloppy   hoodies,   fraying   edges  and  “Jesus  Sandals”.  The  Brits  seem  to  be  on  top  of  their  game  with  those  new   comeback  trends.  The  writers  is  raving  about  the  designer  Phoebe  Philo  and  model   Stella  Tennant-­‐a  90s  model  wearing  Celine  design  that  made  her  look  like  she’s  been   teleported   from   the   other   decade.   She   notices   that   even   the   young   designers   who   were  nearly  born  in  the  90s  are  incorporating  some  of  the  forgotten  elements  into   their   designs.   She   highlights   that   this   decades   trends   were   not   only   about   the   grouchy   looks   but   also   about   clean   lines   and   finished   elegance   along   with   a   very   distinct   type   of   attitude   coming   from   the   models   on   the   runway-­‐   which   the   critics   seem  to  absolutely  love  again!        

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ENTRY #4:  FASHION  OBSERVATION    

Booties were   really   popular   in   Fall   2012   but   you   can   really   see   them   making   a   real   statement  in  Fall  2013.  Those  fashionable   ankle   boots   now   come   in   all   different   styles,   with   ranging   heel   heights   and   detailing.   You   can   go   completely   boho   with   a   funky   knitted   patter   or   very   dressy   with   black   leather   and   a   taller   heel.   There   are  no  limits  when  it  comes  to  taking  this   fabulous   shoes   and   making   it   the   ultimate   piece   to   complete   your   outfit.   They   go   perfectly   with   a   tailored   dress,   or   even   something   more   casual   like   a   flare   outfit   or  skinny  jeans!      

ENTRY  #5:  TRENDS  ACROSS  ANTHROPOLOGIE     Anthropologie  stores  serve  for  great  inspiration!  Their  unique  homes  carry  not  only   apparel   but   also   home   goods.   Not   only   are   they   all   very   unique,   but   they   are   also   crafted   to   perfection   leaving   no   doubt   that   you’re   getting   an   exceptional   product.   One  thing  Anthropologie  does  great  is  getting  their  vision  and  design  concept  across   all   mediums   in   their   store.   Trends   are   easily   transitioned   from   bedding   and   colorful   mugs  to  necklaceses  and  blouses.                       A  trend  that  I  spotted  at                   Anthopologie  was  the  use  of  silver                   blue  detailing  in  a  lot  of  their                   pieces.  Mostly  the  detailing                   referred  to  pearl  like  shapes  but  I                   also  saw  a  lot  of  items  with                   detailing  of  that  color.    I  really                  enjoyed  the  refreshing  and                   delicate  look  of  this  vase  and                   started  browing  the  store  for  more                 items  that  incorporate  that.  To  my                 surprise  in  spite  of                   Anthropologie’s  bohemian  like                   style,  I  was  able  to  find  a  lot  more   items  that  displayed  this  simple  elegance.          

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What I  really  seemed  to  enjoy  is  the  use  of  that  in  shoes.  Metallics  are  very  in  this   season  but  to  come  up  with  a  new  variation  of  it  that  is  not  completely  silver  or  gold   is  absolutely  adorable  and  unique.                     My   favorite   however,   was   the   use   of   similar   blue   tint   pearl   like   elements   in   this   exceptional   necklace.   It   is   absolutely   gorgeous   and   it   fits   perfectly   with   the   upcoming  winter  season.  It  has  the  classic   elements  of  pearls  and  the  so  in  right  now   gold  but  also  incorporates  the  silver  blue   decorative  detailing  that  brings  us  back  to   the  first  piece  that  I  discovered.          

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ENTRY #6:  WGSN  TREND  REPORT    

      The  WGSN  reported  some  images   of  the  silver  grey  pallet  on  the   runway,  one  of  them  was  this   clutch  on  September  19th,  2013  at   Milan  Fashion  Week.  It  is  Ready-­‐ to-­‐Wear  by  Fendi  for   spring/summer  20014.  The  color   has  some  tones  of  blues  and   silvers.  It  is  leather  made  and  has   some  metallic  and  chain  like   detailing.                   Although  much  sportier,  some  silver  grey  shoes  were  also  spotted  on  the  runway  in   October  2013.  Along  the  side  of  much  more  elegant  silver  grey  jewelry  that  any   women  would  die  for!    

         

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ENTRY #7:  FABRIC  TRENDS    

         

              One  of  the  fabric  trends  for  this  winter   season  is  the  thick  track  like  knit.  The  one   above  was  spotted  at  one  of  the  trade   shows  in  New  York  City  and  is  a  mid   gauge,  cable  knit  in  green  with  some  mid-­‐ tones.    An  example  of  that  would  be  this   Cable-­‐  Knit  Wool  Sweater  by  Marc  Jacobs.              

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Another winter  fabric  trend  would  be  the  distressed  sweater  fabric.  On  the  left  we   see  an  example  of  it  from  the  WGSN  catalog,  spotted  for  the  2013/2014  winter   season.  On  the  right  we  have  the  Silk  Trim  Distressed  Wool  Sweater  by  Alexander   McQueen-­‐  he  was  far  ahead  of  the  trend  making  it  in  2010.      

  Making  its  comeback  is  also  plad  presented  in  big  scale  by  the  Baker  design  group   on  the  runway  for  the  Fall  2013  trends.        

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ENTRY #8:  COLOR  TRENDS    

  Mykonos  Blue  and  Emerald  by  Gucci,  Monique  Lhuller,  Michael  Kors  and  Stella   McCartney  

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Deep Lichen  Green  by  Armine  Karapetyan  

Samba  by  Carolina  Herrera  Fall  2013  Runway    

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ENTRY #9:  GLOBAL  TRENDS                        

 

   

Japan  Fall  2013  Trends         Seadrake  at  JFW  International  Fashion   Fair  autumn/winter  2013/14  is  one  of   the  items  from  Japanese  trade  shows  for   the  upcoming  season.  IT  is  a  color  block  of   pastels  with  scoop  neck  and  long  sleeves,   this  kind  of  grey  mixed  with  pale  pastels   combination  is  one  of  the  top  trends  of   the  Japanese  Ready-­‐to-­‐Wear  fashion  right   now  and  I  can  definitely  see  it  hitting  the   U.S.  market  as  well  since  it  is  so  functional   and  easy  to  process.            

                This  low  crotch  trend  has  also  been   around  for  quite  some  months  now  in   other  countries  and  has  been  only  picked   up  by  the  bravest.  I’m  not  sure  if  this  look   will  make  for  an  absolute  trend  in  the  U.S.   due  to  the  fact  that  you  need  a  very   slender  physique  to  pull  this  off  in  order   for  it  to  look  right  and  not  like  you  just  got   out  of  bed  with  your  pants  hanging  on  too   low.                    

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France Fall  Trends  2013               The  following  is  from  Oscar  Carvallo   autumn/winter  2013/14  at  the  Paris   Fashion  Week.  It  is  a  couture  that   includes  blues  and  neutrals,  sequins  and   glitters  and  a  coat  that  resembles  a  dress.   I  can  definitely  see  this  being  an  influence   on  Americas  Ready-­‐to-­‐Wear  especially   with  the  cut  and  color  of  the  outfit.   Although  the  head  peace  is  over   exaggerated,  I  already  see  a  baseball  cap   making  it’s  comeback  in  a  very   fashionable  way,  even  in  combination   with  a  very  dressy  coat.                    

Another  Oscar  Carvallo  piece   introduces  us  to  puffy  shoulder   pads  and  over  the  knee  skirts.  I   have  already  seen  the  trend  of   over  the  knee  skirts  being  present   on  the  American  scene  however,   the  shoulder  pads  will  have  to  wait   to  make  it’s  come  back,  I  don’t   think  it’s  a  very  flattering  look  for   an  average  American  female.                   16  


ENTRY #10:  VISUAL  DISPLAYS    

     TORY  BURCH  

    ALL  SAINTS  

  The  visual  display  of  both  Tory  Burch  stores  and  All  Saints  is  very  unique  and   completely  represents  the  style  of  clothing  you  are  about  to  find  inside.  Both  visual   displays  remain  true  to  the  brand  and  engage  the  client  to  feel  the  way  the  designers   of  the  company  thing.  What  I  really  enjoyed  about  the  Tory  Burch  store  is  the  bright   colors  and  glamorous  use  of  mirrors  and  lighting,  it  really  represents  what  the   brand  stands  for.  I  was  really  appreciative  of  the  decorative  elements  that   incorporated  geometric  shapes  that  directly  correlate  to  the  company  logo.  What  I   enjoyed  about  All  Saints  is  their  rusty,  industrial  look  and  feel.  There  is  no  doubt  it  is   all  about  the  clothing  and  about  making  a  statement  when  you  start  browsing   through  their  fabulous  cuts  and  rich  fabrics.  I  really  enjoyed  the  skulls  being  a  part   of  their  decorative  displays  as  it  translates  well  to  their  logo  as  well.  Both  stores  are   a  true  representation  of  what  great  interior  design  job  can  do  for  your  brand.      

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ENTRY #11:  FASHION  ON  THE  BIG  SCREEN     MEN  IN  SUITS     After  spending  some  time  watching  some  of  the  latest  Fall  2013  TV  shows,  there   was  only  one  thing  in  common  that  I  could  grasp  and  make  a  prediction  for…  men   are  sure  to  take  example  off  the  screen  and  start  dressing  up  really  nice!  Almost   every  Fall  TV  show  features  men  that  are  very  well  groomed  and  dressing  up  on  the   daily  basis.  T-­‐shirts  and  hoodies  are  no  longer  acceptable  even  during  a  casual  night   out.  Men  are  paying  much  more  attention  to  what  they  are  wearing  and  without  a   doubt  some  of  them  are  doing  it  quite  well!        

   

     

                                 

                     The  Crazy  Ones  

         Two  and  a  Half  Men  

The Mindy  Project  

Revenge

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ENTRY #12:  DESIGNER  COLLECTION     ALEXIS  MABILLE  –  HAUTE  COUTURE  –  SPRING/SUMMER  2013      

The collection  that  caught  my   attention  is  the  Alexis  Mabille   Haute  Couture  from   Spring/Summer  2013  that  made   it’s  debut  in  Paris.  My  absolute   favorite  of  the  designs  included  is   the  black  and  white  dress  with   ruffles  (second  image  in  top  row).  I   absolutely  love  the  use  of  structure   in  those  pieces  and  the  way  they   highlight  femininity  and  women’s   slender  physique.  I  adore  the   combination  of  light  and  dark   colors  and  the  monochromatic   approach  to  those  pieces.  Although   the  whole  lookbook  included  some   reds  and  yellows,  I  really  enjoyed   those  particular  designs  for  their   simplicity  and  for  the  emphasis   that’s  but  on  actual  cut  and  detail.    

                                   

       

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ENTRY #13:  CAREER  DESCRIPTIONS     FASHION  DESIGNER  is  the  ultimate  talent.  Fashion  designers  can  work   independently,  for  a  bigger  company,  as  a  senior  designer’s  second  hand,  as  the   voice  of  the  creative  process  or  as  the  creator  him/her  self.  They  are  the  ones  who   have  a  particular  vision  and  excuse  it  according  to  their  own  or  company  standards.   They  can  have  very  little  to  say  about  the  upcoming  trends  or  they  can  be   determining  what  will  be  popular  next  depending  on  their  status  in  the  fashion   world.  They  are  the  ones  who  use  the  fabric  and  other  medium  to  the  best  of  their   ability  to  create  new  garments  that  are  strictly  haute  couture  or  ready-­‐to-­‐wear.       BUYERS  are  essential  to  every  fashion  business  as  they  are  the  ones  purchasing  the   product  in  order  to  create  the  necessary  inventory.  Buyers  can  be  involved  in  many   stages  depending  on  the  company  needs.  Some  buyers  might  deal  exclusively  with   fabric  purchases  for  the  designer  to  use  while  he  crafts  his  creations.  Buyers  for   bigger  retailers  however,  would  be  responsible  for  purchasing  the  actual  pieces   from  trades  shows  and  other  manufacturers.     PRODUCT  MANAGER  is  the  person  responsible  for  a  smooth  transition  of  the  product   from  start  to  finish.  They  are  usually  the  ones  who  monitor  the  progress  and   calculate  all  the  restrictions  and  deadlines  necessary  for  a  proper  product  rollout   that  can  be  successful.  Product  managers  are  not  necessarily  designers,  but  they  can   contribute  to  the  design  process  and  offer  feedback  as  they  are  responsible  for  the   functionality  of  the  product.             ENTRY  #14:  FASHION  DON’TS         Halloween  costume  or  just  a  bad  outfit?   Or  maybe  you  got  out  of  bed  too  late  and   forgot  to  take  off  your  stockings  from  the   previous  night  on  town?  There  is   absolutely  nothing  fashionable  about  this   outfit,  it  looks  like  you  throw  something   together  just  not  to  look  naked.  There  is   no  color  pallet  that’s  transitioning,  lack  of   any  structure  or  intent.              

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In this  outfit  our    Twilight  star  really   outdid  herself  by  showing  us  how  little   she  cares  about  fashion.  The  pattern  on   pattern  looks  horrible  especially  when   combined  with  two  very  close  shades  of   green,  turquoise  or  blue.  The  outfit  is  not   even  tailored  well  and  it  does  not  show   off  her  body  in  a  just  way.  It  looks  like   something  a  12  year  old  colorblind   person  would  throw  on  when  on  her  way   to  the  mall  to  buy  something  new  and   reasonable  to  wear.                 ENTRY  #  15:    CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES         FASHION  MAGAZINE  SALES  MANAGER  would  be  a  great  opportunity  to  utilize  my   sales  experience  and  combine  it  with  a  venue  that  is  of  interest  to  me.  As  a  magazine   sales  manager  you  are  responsible  for  maintaining  magazine  sales  and  maintaining   all  the  contracts  with  clients  that  purchase  the  magazine.       VISUAL  MANAGER  is  a  person  responsible  for  the  overall  display  of  the  store.  It  is  a   very  strenuous  job  that  requires  you  to  be  constantly  on  the  move  and  keeping  a   close  tab  on  everything  that’s  going  on  in  the  store  to  make  sure  that  the  displays   are  up  to  standards  and  new  product  is  displayed  in  a  way  desired  by  the  company.  I   would  enjoy  this  position  because  it  carries  a  lot  of  responsibility  and  requires  you   to  perform  well  under  pressure,  which  I  deal  very  well  with.       RETAIL  MANAGER  is  one  of  the  hardest  positions  in  the  fashion  world  as  it  requires   you  to  work  nearly  non  stop  and  be  on  top  of  all  the  elements  that  come  together  in   order  to  make  a  successful  retail  environment.  I  would  love  to  challenge  myself  with   a  position  like  this  one  because  it  requires  a  lot  of  dedication  and  hard  work  which   tests  your  abilities  and  character.    

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