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Study Guide Contents 3.) Production Information 4.) Introduction 5.) Letter from the Education Director 6.) About L. Frank Baum 7.) Music and Lyrics 8.) Synopsis 9.) Characters 10.) Oz on Stage 11.) Oz on Screens Big and Small 12.) The Wizard of Oz on Television 13.) L. Frank Baum in Central NY 14.) Questions for Discussion & Projects 16.) Elements of Teaching Theatre 18.) Sources & References

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Interim Director of Education Kate Laissle (315) 442-7755

Group Sales & Student Matinees Tracey White (315) 443-9844

Box Office (315) 443-3275


Robert Hupp Artistic Director Jill A. Anderson Managing Director

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Kyle Bass Associate Artistic Director

PRODUCTION OF

Ralph Zito Chair, Department of Drama BY

L. Frank Baum

PRESENTING SPONSORS

W I T H M U S I C A N D LY R I C S B Y

Harold Arlen and E. Y. Harburg BACKGROUND MUSIC BY

Herbert Stothart

SPONSORS

DANCE AND VOCAL ARRANGEMENTS BY

Peter Howard O R C H E S T R AT I O N B Y

Larry Wilcox ADAPTED BY

SENSORY FRIENDLY SPONSOR

John Kane for the Royal Shakespeare Company BASED UPON THE CLASSIC MOTION PICTURE OWNED BY

MEDIA SPONSORS

Turner Entertainment Co. and distributed in all media by Warner Bros. DIRECTED BY

Donna Drake

OPENING NIGHT CHAMPAGNE TOAST SPONSOR

SEASON SPONSORS

MUSIC DIRECTOR

CHOREOGRAPY

Brian Cimmet

2 Ring Circus

SCENIC DESIGNER

COSTUME DESIGNER

LIGHTING DESIGNER

SOUND DESIGNER

Linda Buchanan

Jessica Ford

Herrick Goldman

Jonathan Herter

PROJECTION DESIGNER

WIG DESIGNER

A S S O C I AT E MUSIC DIRECTOR

ANIMAL TRAINER

PRODUCTION S TA G E M A N A G E R

Katherine Freer

Dave Bova

Jacob Stebly

William Berloni

Stuart Plymesser*

The Wizard of Oz is presented by arrangement with Tams-Witmark Music Library, Inc., 560 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10022 November 29, 2017 - January 7, 2018

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Welcome!

A few reminders...

audience etiquette BE PROMPT Give your students plenty of time to arrive, find their seats, and get situated. Have them visit the restrooms before the show begins. RESPECT OTHERS Please remind your students that their behavior and responses affect the quality of the performance and the enjoyment of the production for the entire audience. Live theatre means the actors and the audience are in the same room, and just as the audience can see and hear the performers, the performers can see and hear the audience. Please ask your students to avoid disturbing those around them. Please no talking or unnecessary or disruptive movement during the performance. Also, please remind students that cellphones should be switched off completely. No texting or tweeting, please. When students give their full attention to the action on the stage, they will be rewarded with the best performance possible.

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As you take your students on the exciting journey into the world of live theatre we hope that you’ll take a moment to help prepare them to make the most of their experience. Unlike movies or television, live theatre offers the thrill of unpredictability.

GOOD NOISE, BAD NOISE Instead of instructing students to remain totally silent, please discuss the difference between appropriate responses (laughter, applause, participation when requested) and inappropriate noise (talking, cell phones, etc).

With the actors present on stage, the audience response becomes an integral part of the performance and the overall experience: the more involved and attentive the audience, the better the show. Please remind your students that they play an important part in the success of the performance.

STAY WITH US Please do not leave or allow students to leave during the performance except in absolute emergencies. Again, reminding them to use the restrooms before the performance will help eliminate unnecessary disruption.

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Dear Educator, Live theatre is a place for people to gather and experience the joys, triumphs, and sorrows life has to offer. The Syracuse Stage education department is committed to providing the tools to make learning in and through the arts possible to address varied learning styles and to make connections to curricula and life itself. It is our goal in the education department to maximize the theatre experience for our education partners with experiential learning and in-depth arts programming. Thank you for your interest and support. Sincerely,

Lauren Unbekant Director of Educational Outreach

2017/2018 EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH SPONSORS Syracuse Stage is committed to providing students with rich theatre experiences that explore and examine what it is to be human. Research shows that children who participate in or are exposed to the arts show higher academic achievement, stronger self-esteem, and improved ability to plan and work toward a future goal. Many students in our community have their first taste of live theatre through Syracuse Stage’s outreach programs. Last season more than 15,500 students from across New York State attended or participated in the Bank of America Children’s Tour, artsEmerging, the Young Playwrights Festival, Word to the World, Backstory, Young Adult Council, and our Student Matinee Program. We gratefully acknowledge the corporations and foundations who support our commitment to in-depth arts education for our comunity.

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L. Frank Baum - Author

The man who set us off to see the Wizard was born the son of a wealthy barrel factory owner in Chittenango, New York, on May 15, 1856. Named “Lyman” after an uncle, he hated the name and called himself Frank. At the age of 12, he attended the Peekskill Military Academy, which he left after two years due to a heart condition, which is now thought to have been psychosomatic. Young Frank was not suited to a military life. At this point, his family lived in Syracuse, where he attended high school. School did not agree with him, and he didn’t graduate. From an early age, he showed an interest in acting and writing for the stage. In 1881, his musical The Maid of Arran had a successful premiere in Syracuse and he went on tour with the company. The following year, he married Maude Gage, the daughter of important suffragette

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Matilde Joslyn Gage, and she accompanied him on the tour. Eventually, however, he left the stage and pursued a career as a businessman. Leaving Central New York in 1888, Baum and his young family settled in Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he starts a dry goods store called Baum’s Bazaar.

Oz was “written solely to pleasure children today. It aspires to being a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained and the heart-aches and nightmares are left out.”

Oz was so successful that Baum was able to turn the book into a Broadway musical primarily for adults withHis first book for children, Mother Goose in Prose, fea- in two years. He continued writing books about the land tured pictures by the famous illustrator Maxfield Par- of Oz, and even penned other children’s books and stoish. In 1899, Father Goose, His Book, with art by W.W. ries under a series of pseudonyms. In 1910, he moved Denslow, was a bestseller, setting the stage for his great- his family to Hollywood, where he produced a series of est success.The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was published in short silent films about the Land of Oz. L. Frank Baum 1900, also with art by Denslow, who owned half of the died in California on May 6,1919. His last words were, royalties. “Now we can cross the shifting sands,” referring to the desert that separates our world from Oz. In the introduction to the book that would become our American fairy tale, Baum said that The Wizard of


Music and Lyrics

Yip Harburg (Lyrics) Edgar “Yip” Harburg, born Isidore Hochberg on the lower east side of New York in 1896, was known for his social conscience. He wrote for Broadway revues in the 1930s, and his song “Brother Can You Spare a Dime,” penned with Jay Gorney for the 1932 show Americana, became an anthem of the Depression. Recruited for Hollywood, he worked with Harold Arlen, Jule Styne, Burton Lane, Jerome Kern, and Vernon Duke. Blacklisted by the infamous House Un-American Activities Committee in 1950 for his social views, he was unable to work in movies or radio for 10 years. Harburg’s Broadway shows include lyrics for Bloomer Girl (1944) about women’s rights and Finian’s Rainbow (1947), which gave us the standards “How Are Things in Glocca Morra” and “Old Devil Moon.” Finian’s Rainbow, for which he also co-wrote the book, featured the first racially integrated chorus on Broadway. With Harold Arlen, he also wrote songs for the animated Gay Purree (1962). Yip Harburg, who the wrote the lyrics to over 600 songs, died in 1981. In 2005, the United States Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp honoring his work.

Harold Arlen (Music) Harold Arlen, the son of a cantor, was born Hymen Arluck in Buffalo in 1905. After a stint writing music for Tin Pan Alley, he moved on to Hollywood and Broadway. Arlen is responsible for many entries in the American songbook, composing dozens of standards including “Stormy Weather,” “Get Happy,” “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” “I’ve Got the World on a String,” “Blues in the Night,” and “Old Black Magic.” Arlen wrote the two songs that Wizard of Oz star Judy Garland was associated with, “Over the Rainbow” and “The Man that Got Away.” In 1940, he and Yip Harburg shared the Oscar for Best Song for “Over the Rainbow” from The Wizard of Oz. Harold Arlen died in 1986.

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SYNOPSIS Young Dorothy Gale runs away from her farm home with her dog Toto because mean old Miss Gulch has threatened to have the dog destroyed. After meeting Professor Marvel, who tells her how sad this will make Aunt Em, she heads home. Just as she gets there, a cyclone carries her, Toto, and her house into a magical world with munchkins, where she makes many great friends and one very powerful enemy, the Wicked Witch of the West. Dorothy, the Scarecrow, Tinman, Cowardly Lion (and Toto too) head down the yellow brick road to the Emerald City and the Wizard of Oz.

The Oz Books - L. Frank Baum wrote 14 books and several stories about the citizens of Oz as “Royal Historian.” When he died, the series was continued by other writers. Oz continues to fascinate writers of fantasy. Some of the books that continue the saga hew closely to the world described by its creator. Others, like Gregory Maguire’s Wicked trilogy, create an alternate psychology-driven and feminist history of Oz. The Oz books by L. Frank Baum include: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) Ozma of Oz (1907) Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) The Road to Oz (1909) The Emerald City of Oz (1910)

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The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) Rinkitink of Oz (1916) The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) The Magic of Oz (1919) Glinda of Oz (published posthumously in1920)


Characters

Dorothy Gale, a small and plucky girl from Kansas. Aunt Em (Emily Gale), her loving aunt, harried and worn from farm life. Uncle Henry (Henry Gale), her hard working farmer uncle. Zeke, a farmhand who strongly resembles the Lion Dorothy meets on her journey. Hickory, a farmhand who is a dead ringer for the Tinman.

Professor Chester Marvel, a phony fortuneteller, not very much of a wizard at it.

The Wizard of Oz appears “Great and Powerful,” but is he really?

Munchkins, the citizens of Munchkinland.

The Ozians, happy citizens of the Emerald City.

Glinda, the Good Witch of the North.

Winkies, the enslaved army guarding the Witch of the West.

Wicked Witch of the West, bent on revenge and getting the Ruby Slippers. Scarecrow, who knows he’d be fine if he only had a brain. He hopes the Wizard will give him one.

Hunk, a farmhand who looks just like the Scarecrow.

Tinman, sentimental although he’s lacking a heart. He’s also off to see the Wizard.

Miss Almira Gulch, a miserable woman who wants to have Dorothy’s dog Toto destroyed. A real wicked witch.

Cowardly Lion needs courage. Maybe the Wizard can provide it.

Winkie General, their commander. Nikko, commander of the flying monkeys. Jitterbugs, Crows,Trees, and various other magical creatures.

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Oz on Stage

L. Frank Baum parlayed the success of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz into a hit Broadway musical version he wrote and produced in 1902. However, this first stage version bore little resemblance to the tale of a plucky little girl from Kansas. The Broadway Dorothy was a grown woman, and her companion was not the tiny Toto, but a cow named Imogene! In 1942, The St. Louis Municipal Opera produced a version by Frank Gabrielsen that uses some of the music from the 1939 movie, but veers from it in characters and action. For example, the Witch doesn’t melt, but is shrunk in a magic cauldron. At the end, the Wizard heads home in a rocket ship. The next important stage adaptation was 1975’s musical The Wiz, which was billed as the “super soul musical Wonderful Wizard of Oz.” This all-black production stuck closely to the book and remains very popular. A hit movie version starred Diana Ross and Michael Jackson. An NBC live television version in 2015 drew more than 11 million viewers. The musical version of Wicked, a prequel telling the earlier story of the Wicked Witch of the West (named Elphaba after the creator of Oz) has been running on Broadway since 2003. The Royal Shakespeare Company version of The Wizard of Oz was created as a Christmas show in 1987. It incorporates every word from the 1939 film and all the songs, with added dialogue, some of it from the book. This is the version Syracuse Stage is presenting. The production re-instates two pieces that were cut from the movie. The famous lost Jitterbug sequence in which the witch sends bugs to torment Dorothy and her friends was cut from the release print. The song and dance number was cut from the film and is restored in the RSC version. Also restored is a reprise of “Over the Rainbow” sung after Dorothy has been captured by the Wicked Witch of the West and a version of “Ding Dong the Witch is Dead” sung by the Winkies.

It’s hard to imagine The Wizard of Oz without “Over the Rainbow,” but the song was repeatedly edited from the movie by studio honchos who found the song depressing and wondered why young Judy Garland was singing a sad song in a barnyard. Luckily, the song was championed by its writers, associate producer Arthur Freed and Garland’s vocal coach, Roger Edens. After a campaign to keep it in, “Over the Rainbow” finally made it into the film and became one of the most famous American movie songs. It was named the number one “Songs of the Century” by the Recording Industry Association of America and National Endowment for the Arts. Also AFI deemed it the “Greatest Movie Song of All Times” in its “100 Songs…100 years” list. Garland’s recording of “Over the Rainbow has been preserved by National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress, and the U.S. stamp commemorating Yip Harburg features its opening lyric.

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Oz on Screens Big and Small

Of course, the 1939 MGM movie starring Judy Garland is what most of us think of as the original screen version of The Wizard of Oz, but there were several earlier versions. Baum himself produced several short silent film versions of the Oz books, and 1925 saw a full-length Wonderful Wizard of Oz produced by the author’s son. Like the earlier stage production, it strayed far from the book. There have been scores of films and television series based on or inspired by Baum’s Oz series. Some are close adaptations of the books, while others move off into other directions. Some of the more interesting entries include: Film Journey Back to Oz (1972) an animated film, troubled in production, which finally ended up as a television Christmas special. It features an all-star cast, with Liza Minelli as Dorothy, the role her mother Judy Garland played in 1939. The Wiz, (1978) A screen version of the Broadway hit, it turned Dorothy into a spinster urban school teacher played by Diana Ross. Return to Oz (1985) A Disney film with a decidedly dark tone, it was a loose adaptation of two Oz novels. The Muppets’ Wizard of Oz (2005) Kermit and Miss Piggy, along with Queen Latifah walk the yellow brick road. Oz the Great and Powerful (2013) a prequel starring James Franco as the man who becomes the Wizard.

Television Rainbow Road to Oz (1957) a segment of the Disneyland series was meant to be a preview of a Disney film in the works starring the Mouseketeers. The film was cancelled, but this novelty remains online. The Land of Oz (1960) the opening episode of The Shirley Temple Show. The now adult Shirley Temple starred as Ozma, princess of Oz. Tales of the Wizard of Oz (1961) an animated series. Tin Man (2007) a Sci Fi Channel miniseries with Zoey Deschanel as CG, a diner waitress transported to a fantastical land. Emerald City (2015) a 10 episode series airing on NBC with a distinctly dark edge.

2 Ring Circus, a four-person group of entertainers known for their high-flying circus skills, have brought their high-flying talent to productions of Godspell, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Peter Pan, Annie Get Your Gun, The Little Mermaid, The Ghosts of Versailles, Seussi-cal the Musical, and of course, The Wizard of Oz. When not on the road performing in a musical, opera, or one of their own productions, 2 Ring Circus runs the circus school Aerial Arts NYC in mid-town Manhattan.

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The Wizard of Oz On Television: A Family Tradition MGM’s lavish version of The Wizard of Oz starring the young Judy Garland was a major hit in 1939. However, it was so expensive to make that that it didn’t move into the black until a re-release in 1949. What really brought The Wizard of Oz enduring popularity was the annual holiday television broadcasts beginning in 1956, which introduced generations of kids to the story and made the movie incarnations of its characters iconic. Much of what we love about The Wizard Oz comes directly from that film, which is the blueprint for the current production, rather than the novel. That movie distilled the story to its essence and ramped up the drama. Where the book charmed with whimsy, the movie made the danger to Dorothy and her friends very real and sometimes very scary. In the biggest change from the novel, the movie frames Dorothy’s journey to Oz as a dream. In the book, it really happened. In fact, in subsequent books, Dorothy returns to Oz several times, finally moving there with Uncle Henry and Aunt Em. above: Mary Martin as Peter Pan Below: Allison Williams & Christopher Walken as Peter Pan AND Hook

While in the film Dorothy sees Miss Gulch (a character not in the book) turn into the witch as they are lifted by the twister, in Baum’s novel, the cyclone borne trip to Oz is so uneventful that Dorothy and Toto actually take a nap on her bed before the house lands on the witch. Also, the Wicked Witch of the West doesn’t make a threatening appearance in Munchkinland after the house has landed on her sister. In fact, Dorothy is met there not by throngs of grateful Munchkins, but three or four diminutive citizens and the Good Witch of the North, who is not Glinda, but an old lady who balances a magic slate on her nose telling Dorothy to follow the Yellow Brick Road. Much of the visual excitement in the MGM production came from the choice to use the now perfected Technicolor process. Starting in sepia for the farm scene may seem to be a nod to Baum’s assertion that everything was gray in Kansas, but it also made the special effects for the twister much easier. In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy receives magical silver slippers at the death of the Witch of the East. At the end of the book, the silver slippers fall off as Dorothy flies back over the desert that separates Oz from the world as we know it. In the iconic film, the slippers are ruby red to make them more exciting in Technicolor.

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L. Frank Baum in Central NY Although Dorothy Gale was from Kansas, the roots of her adventures can be found all over Central New York, where Baum spent his formative years. The Baum Barrel Factory, owned by his father and uncles, was on Route 13 in Chittenango, the town where he was born. When he was four and a half, the family moved to a home at 1 Rust Street, now Midland Avenue, in Syracuse. In Syracuse, the Baums owned a dry goods store and other businesses around what is now Armory Square. In 1866, they built a country estate they called Rose Lawn on Brewerton Road in what is now Mattydale. Then it was Centerville Road, the first plank road in the country, and a segment of its 16 miles of gold-colored hemlock planks ran in front of their home, perhaps inspiring the yellow brick road. The plank road, like Rose Lawn and so many of the Baum family homes in the region, is now gone. Other local Baum landmarks include the home of Harriet Baum Neal, Frank Baum’s sister, at 678 West Onondaga Street in Syracuse, where Frank Baum met Maud Gage, and the Matilda Joslyn Gage House, the Fayetteville home of her parents where they married.

For further exploration into L.Frank Baum in Central New York : The Matilde Joslyn Gage Home, 210 East Genesee Street, Fayetteville is a valuable resource for information on women’s suffrage, the underground railroad, and religious freedom. The family parlor, where Frank Baum married Maude Gage is designated the Oz room. http://www.matildajoslyngage.org, (315) 637-9511. Oz-Stravaganza, a festival celebrating Baum and Oz takes place annually the first weekend in June in Chittenango. The organization runs the All things Oz Museum there. http://www.oz-stravaganza.com

The Lyman Frank Baum Foundation can be found on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Lyman-Frank-Baum-Foundation-Inc-ofSyracuse-182342648464587/ The Neal-Baum House, 678 West Onondaga St. in Syracuse, has been purchased by the Chittenango-based International L. Frank Baum and All things Oz Historical Foundation and is at the beginning stages of restoration. http://www.oz-stravaganza.com/home/history-of-l-frank-baum/historical-foundation

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Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland are distinctly English fairy tales and tell us something about British life and values. What makes The Wizard of Oz a particularly American Fairytale? What does it say about American life and values? In his introduction to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum says that he doesn’t like the way traditional fairy tales are used to teach lessons or morals. Are there lessons taught in The Wizard of Oz? Baum’s mother-in-law was Matilda Joslyn Gage, a well-known feminist and suffragette from here in Central New York. Can you detect feminist thought in The Wizard of Oz? Dorothy wants to get home to Kansas. What makes a place home? Is it a specific place, people, or an atmosphere? In L. Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Dorothy appears to be about nine-years-old. In the M-G-M film and its stage adaptation, she’s a little older. How does this change the meaning of the story? In the book, Dorothy’s adventures are real. In the movie and onstage it was all a dream. What do you feel about the dream frame of the movie and stage version? Which is more effective? When his deception is discovered, the Wizard says “I’m a very good man, just a very bad wizard.” Is he correct? Why or why not? The Wizard of Oz is sometimes seen as an example of a hero’s journey in which a character goes on a dangerous journey and is transformed by it. Is someone transformed in the show? Does anyone learn things that changes his or her life? What does it mean to have heart? What do we mean when we say someone has brains? How would you define courage? 14

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Newspaper headlines tell us an entire story in one sentence and entice us to read the whole article. Sometimes, however, a headline can contain facts but slant the story in a deceptive way. For example, one headline for The Wizard of Oz might be “Kansas Girl Survives Twister, Struggles to Get Home.” However, another take on that might be: “Teenage Runaway Squashes an Old Woman, Takes Shoes!” What are some other factual but misleading headlines you might write based on The Wizard of Oz? A story often changes from different points of view. Consider how the story of The Wizard of Oz changes when seen through different eyes. To explore this, create an interview for “The Land of Oz News” with one of the following characters: a Munchkin who saw the house come down a Winkie before the Witch is killed a Winkie after the Witch is killed The Wicked Witch when she sees her sister’s feet sticking out from under Dorothy’s house The Wizard before he takes off in his balloon The Lion waiting for his audience with the Wizard The Scarecrow waiting for his audience with the Wizard Tin Man waiting for his audience with the Wizard

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elements of drama PLOT

What is the story line? What happened before the play started? What do the characters want? What do they do to achieve their goals? What do they stand to gain/lose? THEME

What ideas are wrestled with in the play? What questions does the play pose? Does it present an opinion? CHARACTER

Who are the people in the story? What are their relationships? Why do they do what they do? How does age/status/etc. affect them? LANGUAGE

What do the characters say? How do they say it? When do they say it? MUSIC

How do music and sound help to tell the story? SPECTACLE

How do the elements come together to create the whole performance?

Other Elements: Conflict/Resolution, Action, Improvisation, Non-verbal communication, Staging, Humor, Realism and other styles, Metaphor, Language, Tone, Pattern & Repetition, Emotion, Point of view.

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Any piece of theatre comprises multiple art forms. As you explore this production with your students, examine the use of:

WRITING VISUAL ART/DESIGN MUSIC/SOUND DANCE/MOVEMENT

activity

At its core, drama is about characters working toward goals and overcoming obstacles. Ask students to use their bodies and voices to create characters who are: very old, very young, very strong, very weak, very tired, very energetic, very cold, very warm. Have their characters interact with others. Give them an objective to fulfill despite environmental obstacles. Later, recap by asking how these obstacles affected their characters and the pursuit of their objectives.

INQUIRY

How are each of these art forms used in this production? Why are they used? How do they help to tell the story?


elements of design LINE can have length, width, texture, direction, and

curve. There are five basic varieties: vertical, horizontal, diagonal, curved, and zig-zag.

SHAPE is two-dimensional and encloses space.

It can be geometric (e.g. squares and circles), man-made, or free-form.

FORM is three-dimensional. It encloses space

and fills space. It can be geometric (e.g. cubes and cylinders), man-made, or free-form.

COLOR has three basic properties:

HUE is the name of the color (e.g. red, blue, green), INTENSITY is the strength of the color (bright or dull), VALUE is the range of lightness to darkness.

TEXTURE refers to the “feel” of an

object’s surface. It can be smooth, rough, soft, etc. Textures may be ACTUAL (able to be felt) or IMPLIED (suggested visually through the artist’s technique).

SPACE is defined and determined

by shapes and forms. Positive space is enclosed by shapes and forms, while negative space exists around them.

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Sources and Resources: Baum, L. Frank. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Dover Evergreen Classics, 1996. Biographies L. Frank Baum biography.com. Accessed July 30, 2017. https://www.biography.com/people/frank-baum-9202328 McGasko, Joe. “The Wizard Behind the Curtain,” biography.com, May 12, 2016. Accessed August 1, 2017. https://www.biography.com/news/l-frank-baum-wizard-of-oz-facts. Schama, Chloe. “Frank Baum, the Man Behind the Curtain,” Smithsonianian.com, June 25, 2009. Accessed June 30, 2017. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/frank-baum-the-man-behind-the-curtain-32476330/ Hutchinson, Lydia. “Harold Arlen,” Performing songwriter.com. February 15, 2015. Accessed Au-gust 2, 2017. http://performingsongwriter.com/harold-arlen/ The Official Harold Arlen Website.. Accessed August 2, 2017. http://www.haroldarlen.com/bio.html E. Y “Yip” Harburg. Broadway, the American Musical. PBS. Org. Accessed August 2, 2017. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/broadway/stars/e-y-yip-harburg/ Yip Harburg, wikipedia. com. Accessed August 2, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yip_Harburg Oz Books and Adaptations List of Oz Books. wikipedia.org. Last edited June 24, 2017. Accessed July 25, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Oz_books List of Oz Books. The Wonderful Wiki of Oz. Last edited November 30, 2014. Accessed August 2, 2017. http://oz.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_Oz_books Kissell, Rick. “‘The Wiz Live’ Ratings Strong; NBC Musical Draws 11.5 Million Viewers,” Variety, December 4, 2015. http://variety.com/2015/tv/news/the-wiz-live-ratings-nbc-musical-1201653402/ Adaptations of The Wizard of Oz. Wikipedia. com. Accessed July 25, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adaptations_of_The_Wizard_of_Oz The Central New York Connection Ferrara, Sue. “Living in Oz’s Many Settings,” Syracuse Post-Standard. June 5, 2003. http://syracusethenandnow.org/History/LFBaum/WizardOfSyr.htm

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The Matilda Jocelyn Gage Foundation. Accessed August 4, 2017. http://www.matildajoslyngage.org Tulloch, Katrina. “New Oz film’s popularity puts spotlight on L. Frank Baum’s hometown of Chit-tenango,” syracuse.com, March 15, 2013. http://www.syracuse.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2013/03/oz_chittenango_baum_pride.html “Over the Rainbow” “Over the Rainbow” wikipedia.org. Accessed August 1, 2017. Ihttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Over_the_Rainbow. Lyons, Brendan. “11 Fun Facts About “Somewhere Over the Rainbow and The Wizard of Oz,” Cued In, the J. W. Pepper Blog, August 22, 2014. http://blogs.jwpepper.com/index.php/11-fun-facts-about-somewhere-over-the-rainbow-and-the-wizard-of-oz/ Stanberg, Susan. ““Remembering Harold Arlen, the Mystery Man Behind ‘Over the Rainbow,’” NPR.org, November 7, 2015. http://www.npr.org/2015/11/07/455017504/remembering-harold-arlen-the-mystery-man-behind-over-the-rainbow 2Ring Circus 2 Ring Circus. http://www.2ringcircus.com. Accessed August 7, 2017. Pyper, Estelle. “2 Ring Circus Has Gotten its Act Together and Taken it on the Road,” American Theater, June 14, 2017. http://www.americantheatre.org/2017/06/14/2-ring-circus-has-gotten-its-act-together-and-taken-it-on-the-road/ Fun Video This look at the cut Wizard of Oz, reprises of “Over the Rainbow” and “Ding Dong the Witch is Dead” is an interesting look at the changes that occur before a film is released. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXK4cxlBMS0 Baum’s short version of The Wizard of Oz, on film, made in 1910, keeps the outline of the novel, but is now difficult to watch. It looks like some crucial scenes are missing from the version we have. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWQ5-UBU22M Baum’s version of The Patchwork Girl of Oz, made in 1914, is much more sophisticated, but still more of a curiosity than an entertainment. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_o3T6seq7A This 1925 version of The Wizard of Oz, directed by and starring comedian Larry Semon strays far from the book. It features Oliver Hardy, later of Laurel and Hardy fame. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nX5g0AOy53U An fascinating look at an abandoned Disney film called The Rainbow Road to Oz. As a tryout, he presented this short preview starring the original Mouseketeers on his Disneyland television show. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJjhqBb3qGI

SYRACUSE STAGE EDUCATION

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THE THREE MUSKETEERS ADAPTED FROM THE NOVEL BY ALEXANDRE DUMAS | BY CATHERINE BUSH | DIRECTED BY ROBERT HUPP CO-PRODUCED WITH THE SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA

NEXT TO NORMAL MUSIC BY TOM KITT | BOOK AND LYRICS BY BRIAN YORKEY | DIRECTED BY ROBERT HUPP | CHOREOGRAPHY BY ANTHONY SALATINO | MUSICAL DIRECTION BY BRIAN CIMMET

JANUARY 24 - FEBRUARY 11

SEPTEMBER 20 – OCTOBER 8

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME BY SIMON STEPHENS | ADAPTED FROM THE NOVEL BY MARK HADDON DIRECTED BY RISA BRAININ CO-PRODUCED WITH INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE

OCTOBER 25 – NOVEMBER 12

THE WIZARD OF OZ BY L. FRANK BAUM | WITH MUSIC AND LYRICS FROM THE MGM MOTION PICTURE SCORE BY HAROLD ARLEN AND E. Y. HARBURG WITH BACKGROUND MUSIC BY HERBERT STOTHART | BOOK ADAPTATION BY JOHN KANE FROM THE MOTION PICTURE SCREENPLAY | DIRECTED BY DONNA DRAKE CHOREOGRAPHY BY 2 RING CIRCUS MUSICAL DIRECTION BY BRIAN CIMMET CO-PRODUCED WITH THE SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF DRAMA

A RAISIN IN THE SUN BY LORRAINE HANSBERRY | DIRECTED BY TIMOTHY DOUGLAS | CO-PRODUCED WITH INDIANA REPERTORY THEATRE

FEBRUARY 21 – MARCH 11

NEW FOR 17/18

COLD READ: A FESTIVAL OF HOT NEW PLAYS APRIL 5 - 8

THE MAGIC PLAY BY ANDREW HINDERAKER | DIRECTED BY HALENA KAYS | CO-PRODUCED WITH THE ACTORS THEATRE OF LOUISVILLE & PORTLAND CENTER STAGE

APRIL 25 – MAY 13

NOVEMBER 29 – JANUARY 7

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The Wizard of Oz Study Guide