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Study Guide Contents 3.) Production Information 4.) Introduction 5.) Letter from the Director 6.) About the Playwright & Musical Authors 7.) Characters 8.) Synopsis 9.) The Genesis of Peter Pan 10.) Peter Pan, The Musical 11.) A Boy as Peter? 12.) Elements of Teaching Theatre 14.) Topics for Discussion and Resources 16.) References

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SYRACUSE STAGE EDUCATION

Director of Educational Outreach Lauren Unbekant (315) 443-1150

Manager of Educational Outreach Kate Laissle (315) 442-7755

Group Sales & Student Matinees Tracey White (315) 443-9844

Box Office (315) 443-3275


PETER PAN A MUSICAL BASED ON THE PLAY BY

Sir J.M. Barrie Timothy Bond Producing Artistic Director Diana C. Coles Interim Managing Director

LYRICS BY

MUSIC BY

Carolyn Leigh

Morris (Moose) Charlap

ADDITIONAL LYRICS BY

ADDITIONAL MUSIC BY

Betty Comden & Adolph Green

Jule Styne

Ralph Zito Chair, Department of Drama

ORIGINALLY DIRECTED, CHOREOGRAPHED, AND ADAPTED BY

Jerome Robbins FLYING EFFECTS PROVIDED BY ZFX, INC.

PRESENTING SPONSORS

DIRECTED BY

Paul Barnes‡ The John Ben Snow Memorial Trust

CO-PRODUCED WITH

Syracuse University Department of Drama

SPONSORS

CHOREOGRAPHER/ MUSICAL DIRECTOR

Brian Cimmet SCENIC DESIGNER

Linda Buchanan• MEDIA SPONSOR

FLIGHT DIRECTOR

Russell Morgan

SEASON SPONSOR

FIGHT DIRECTOR

Anthony Salatino

COSTUME DESIGNER

LIGHTING DESIGNER

SOUND DESIGNER

Susan Branch Towne•

Lonnie Rafael Alcaraz•

Jonathan R. Herter•

DIALECT COACH

STAGE MANAGER

CASTING

Celia Madeoy

Stuart Plymesser*

Harriet Bass

PRODUCTION

This production is part of Sir J.M. Barrie's bequest to the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, which has benefited thousands of children in the years since his death. The producers are proud and happy that everyone who has bought a ticket for today's performance of Peter Pan is helping a sick child get well. Peter Pan (1954 Broadway Version) is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684, Fax: 212-397-4684, www.MTIShows.com November 28, 2015 - January 3, 2016

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welcome!

A FEW REMINDERS...

audience etiquette BE PROMPT Give your students plenty of time to arrive, find their seats, and get situated. Have them visit the restrooms before the show begins. RESPECT OTHERS Please remind your students that their behavior and responses affect the quality of the performance and the enjoyment of the production for the entire audience. Live theatre means the actors and the audience are in the same room, and just as the audience can see and hear the performers, the performers can see and hear the audience. Please ask your students to avoid disturbing those around them. Please no talking or unnecessary or disruptive movement during the performance. Also, please remind students that cellphones should be switched off completely. No texting or tweeting, please. When students give their full attention to the action on the stage, they will be rewarded with the best performance possible.

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As you take your students on the exciting journey into the world of live theatre we hope that you’ll take a moment to help prepare them to make the most of their experience. Unlike movies or television, live theatre offers the thrill of unpredictability.

GOOD NOISE, BAD NOISE Instead of instructing students to remain totally silent, please discuss the difference between appropriate responses (laughter, applause, participation when requested) and inappropriate noise (talking, cell phones, etc).

With the actors present on stage, the audience response becomes an integral part of the performance and the overall experience: the more involved and attentive the audience, the better the show. Please remind your students that they play an important part in the success of the performance.

STAY WITH US Please do not leave or allow students to leave during the performance except in absolute emergencies. Again, reminding them to use the restrooms before the performance will help eliminate unnecessary disruption.

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Dear Educator, Live theatre is a place for people to gather and experience the joys, triumphs, and sorrows life has to offer. The Syracuse Stage education department is committed to providing the tools to make learning in and through the arts possible to address varied learning styles and to make connections to curricula and life itself. It is our goal in the education department to maximize the theatre experience for our education partners with experiential learning and in-depth arts programming. Thank you for your interest and support. Sincerely,

Lauren Unbekant Director of Educational Outreach

2015/2016 EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH SPONSORS Syracuse Stage is committed to providing students with rich theatre experiences that explore and examine what it is to be human. Research shows that children who participate in or are exposed to the arts show higher academic achievement, stronger self-esteem, and improved ability to plan and work toward a future goal. Many students in our community have their first taste of live theatre through Syracuse Stage’s outreach programs. Last season more than 15,500 students from across New York State attended or participated in the Bank of America Children’s Tour, artsEmerging, the Young Playwrights Festival, the Franklin Project, Young Adult Council, and our Student Matinee Program. We gratefully acknowledge the corporations and foundations who support our commitment to in-depth arts education for our comunity.

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ABOUT THE PLAYWRIGHT

J. M. BARRIE

James Matthew Barrie was born in Kirriemuir, Angus, Scotland, the son of a successful weaver. When he was six, his older brother died, and young James was scarred by the effect the death had on his mother. To comfort her, he virtually became his dead brother, even answering to his name. This tragedy may have begun his fascination with a story of a boy who never grows up. Barrie received an M.A. from the University of Edinburgh, and while living in that city, he wrote theatre reviews for the Edinburgh Evening Courant. He later wrote Scottish-themed stories for the London newspaper St. James’s Gazette, before he moved first into novels and then into writing for the stage. Barrie married actress Mary Ansell in 1894. By all accounts, their fifteen-year union was a dismal failure. The diminutive Barrie was a childlike husband, more boy than man. His wife took comfort in an affair and the now famous author divorced her in 1909. Barrie found solace in his friendship with the Llewelyn-Davies family, with whom he became friendly through their children. When the father, Arthur Llewelyn-Davies, died at a young age, Barrie became a surrogate father to the couple’s five boys. When shortly afterward his dear Sylvia Llewelyn-Davies also passed away, he became their legal guardian. J.M. Barrie was made a baronet by George V in 1913. He died on June 19, 1937. His plays include Quality Street (1901), The Admirable Crichton (1902), What Every Woman Knows (1908), The Twelve Pound Look (1910), Half An Hour (1913), Dear Brutus, and The Boy David (1936).

THE MUSICAL’S AUTHORS Mark “Moose” Charlap (1928 -1974) composer. Born Morris Isaac Charlip. His first Broadway musical, Peter Pan, was his only major success. He also composed music for the short-lived productions Whoop-Up,The Conquering Hero, and Kelly.

and “The Best is Yet to Come.” Peter Pan was her Broadway debut.

Betty Comden ( 1917-2006) and Adolphe Green (1914-2002), additional lyrics. Provided the scripts for films Good News,The Barkleys of Broadway, Singin’ In the Carolyn Leigh (1926-1983 ) lyricist. Leigh’s Broadway Rain ,The Band Wagon, It’s Always Fair Weather. Lyrics and productions include the musicals Wildcat, Little Me, and book for On the Town,Two on the Aisle,Wonderful Town, How Now Dow Jones, which was created from her ideas Bells Are Ringing, Do Re Mi, Hallelujah Baby, On the Twenabout Wall Street. Her collaborators included Cy Cole- tieth Century, and Will Rogers Follies, and the book for Apman, Marvin Hamlisch, Jule Styne and Elmer Bernstein. plause. They are seven-time Tony winners. Among their She also wrote songs for the films The Cardinal and many hits are “Just In Time,” and “The Party’s Over.” Father Goose. Her work includes the lyrics for the hits with music by Jule Styne. “Hey Look Me Over,” “Witchcraft,” “Young at Heart,”

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Jule Styne (1905-1994) additional music. Born in London to Jewish immigrant parents, he moved with his family to Chicago at the age of eight. His many Broadway credits include Gentlemen Prefer Blondes , Gypsy, Funny Girl, Bells Are Ringing, High Button Shoes, and Hallelujah Baby. His many pop hits include “Three Coins in the Fountain,” “Everything’s Coming Up Roses,” “People,” and “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend.” Jule Styne was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1972 ,The American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981. Styne was a Kennedy Center Honoree in 1990.


What about the “Indians”?

characters Peter Pan: A boy who refuses to grow up, he lives Wendy: The eldest Darling child, she is loving, in Neverland with his companions, the Lost Boys. He sweet, and determined. She tells her siblings fairy has all the qualities of a little boy. He’s adventurous, tales. selfish, and mischievous. He can fly. John: The middle child, he has a strong sense of Tinker Bell: Peter’s fairy companion, she is tiny and adventure. jealous. She appears as a tinkling ball of light. Michael: The youngest Darling child. Mr. Darling: Wendy, John and Michael’s father who appears almost like a big kid himself. He pouts and is Liza: The Darlings’ maid. easily angered, but loves his family. The Lost Boys: Peter’s companions in Neverland. Mrs. Darling: The children’s devoted mother. They are boys who had fallen out of their prams (baby carriages) and were never claimed. They are Nana: A huge Newfoundland dog who is the DarSlightly Soiled, Tootles, Curly, Nibs, and the Twins. ling children’s nurse, their nanny.

Peter Pan’s treatment of Native Americans, springing from colonialist fantasies mixed in with children’s adventure play, is troubling to contemporary audiences sensitive to the racist depiction of Native Americans. At Syracuse Stage we have completely removed all “Indian” ideas, caricatures, stereotypes and insinuations from our production. Now Tiger Lily's "tribe" with and all-female band of warriors has become Tiger Lily's "troupe" of fantastical forest-dwellers.The lyrics to the offensive "Ugg-a Wugg" number have also been adjusted. Captain Hook: The ferocious leader of the pirates, he lost his hand when Peter cut it off and fed it to the crocodile who has been pursuing him ever since. Mr. Smee: Captain Hook’s first mate. Tiger Lily: The leader of a playful all-female troupe of warriors in Neverland. The Crocodile: Hook’s pursuer, he has swallowed a clock, so we know when he’s coming. Jane: Wendy’s daughter, who we meet when Wendy has grown up. SYRACUSE STAGE EDUCATION

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SYNOPSIS

The Darling children, Wendy, Michael, and John are getting ready for bed as their parents prepare to go to a ball. They are to be left with Nana, a huge dog who acts as a nursemaid for the children, but Mr. Darling thinks it’s time for Nana to be put outside. This alarms Mrs. Darling who tells her husband that a week earlier, while sitting by the fire in the nursery she saw a boy in the room. He escaped out the window, but his shadow didn’t make it out. She rolled it up and put it in a drawer. Nana once again runs afoul of Mr. Darling and despite loud protestations from the children is put outside. After the parents leave and the children are in bed, Peter Pan, accompanied by the fairy Tinker Bell , comes to the nursery looking for his shadow. Wendy wakes up to find him trying to stick his rebellious shadow to him with soap. He tells her he refuses to group up and lives in Neverland with the Lost Boys, children who fell out of their prams as babies and were never claimed. He teaches Wendy and her brothers to fly and they’re of to Neverland, where they will face pirates led by Captain Hook, who lost a hand to a crocodile. WENDY: Where do you live? PETER: Second star to the right and straight on till morning. - Peter Pan

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The genesis of peter pan

The origin of Peter Pan traces to when J. M.Barrie encountered the five Llewelyn-Davies boys with their nanny in Kensington Gardens. He became close to the family, and when the father Arthur Llewelyn-Davies died, he cemented a close friendship with mother Sylvia Llewelyn-Davies, daughter of popular playwright and novelist George DuMaurier. When she died at the age of forty-four, he became the boys’ guardian (The film Finding Neverland and its current Broadway musical incarnation are highly fictionalized versions of Barrie’s relationship with the family). The character of Peter Pan was invented in stories he told to amuse the older boys, with Barrie telling them that their baby brother Peter could fly. Pan first formally appeared in Barrie’s novel, The White Bird, which he dedicated to the Llewelyn-Davies boys. The chapter in which the boy who wouldn’t grow up is introduced was later published as a slim stand alone volume called “Peter Pan in Kensington Garden.”

PHOTO: J.M. Barrie playing with Michael Llewelyn Davies, 1906.

In 1904, the play Peter Pan debuted, introducing the world to the cast of supporting characters and taking us to the Neverland for the first time. Wendy, her brothers, Captain Hook, Smee, and Tinkerbell all appear for the first time onstage. Following the enormous popularity of the play, Barrie re-wrote it and expanded the story as a novel Peter and Wendy. Later he added scenes from the novel into the play.

Peter Pan has had as many variations onstage as any Shakespearean play. Barrie tinkered with the play for years and many leading ladies changed the script and the personality of the boy who wouldn’t grow up to fit their own onstage personas. Traditionally, the same actor plays Mr. Darling and Captain Hook, adding a little dark psychology to the fantasy. Although he was very successful playwright even without Peter Pan, Barrie often returned to the story. His work about The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up included The Little White Bird (1902), the play Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up (1904), Peter Pan in Kensington Garden (the White Bird Pan chapter published alone, 1906) and the novel Peter and Wendy (1911). In 1929 J.M. Barrie bequeathed the royalties from Peter Pan to the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital. In 2006, the hospital authorized a sequel, Peter Pan in Scarlet, by Geraldine McCaughrean. PHOTO: Great Ormond Street Hospital today.

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Peter Pan, The Musical

Music has been a part of productions of Peter Pan from the beginning. Barrie himself indicated places where songs might be added and in the pantomime tradition there were some songs and a choreographed pillow fight dance in the first production.

ABOVE: MARY MARTIN AS PETER PAN BELOW: ALLISON WILLIAMS & CHRISTOPHER WALKEN AS PETER PAN AND HOOK

In 1950, Leonard Bernstein composed a musical Peter Pan,with Boris Karloff as Hook. However, his score was scaled back to a few songs and incidental music because its Peter, movie star Jean Arthur, was uncomfortable with singing. Three years later, Broadway megastar Mary Martin, together with her producer husband, Richard Halliday, decided to bring a true musical Peter Pan to Broadway. The original production was directed and shaped by legendary choreographer/director Jerome Robbins, who ironically had been scheduled to direct the Bernstein version before it had been de-musicalized. After a West Coast run when the show was revised and songs re-written and replaced, the show opened on Broadway on October 20, 1954. Mary Martin’s Peter Pan had a shortened Broadway run because of an obligation to perform the show live on NBC television in the new technicolor TV process. Starting in 1955, the production was broadcast three times, with slightly different casts (children grow!) and proved to be very popular, cementing the musical’s reputation. The final staging with Martin was aired in 1960 and survives on videotape. Besides Mary Martin, famous Peter Pans in this musical version include Sandy Dennis, Cathy Rigby, and most recently Allison Williams in the NBC live production. A second musical version with a new score was broadcast in 1976. It starred Mia Farrow as Peter and Danny Kaye as Hook. It was not successful and was never repeated.

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A Boy as Peter Pan?

Although the role has been traditionally played by a woman as traditional to the pantomime convention, there have been several notable productions using men in the title role. In 1984, the Royal Shakespeare Company cast Mark Rylance in a Peter Pan thatused all adults and incorporated Barrie’s beautiful stage directions read by a narrator. In Peter and the Star-Catcher, an origin story play based on a book by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson, the character is played by a young man. On film, he was voiced by Bobby Driscoll in the 1953 Disney version. Robin Williams played an adult Peter in Steven Spielberg’s Hook. Age appropriate Jeremy Sumpter played him in the faithful 2003 film Peter Pan.Young Levi Miller plays Peter in the recent origin story film, Pan, starring Hugh Jackman.

English Pantomime

Peter Pan was written to fit into the English pantomime tradition. In England, pantomime or ‘Panto’ refers to a family-oriented play performed around Christmas time. The plays, usually based on fairytales, are filled with slapstick sequences, audience participation, magic tricks, singalongs and chase sequences. The lead character, “the principal boy” is often played played by a young woman in breeches. A middle-aged man often plays witches or the hero’s mother.

An example of an English “Panto” can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=usoGRi8mz4s

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elements of drama PLOT

What is the story line? What happened before the play started? What do the characters want? What do they do to achieve their goals? What do they stand to gain/lose? THEME

What ideas are wrestled with in the play? What questions does the play pose? Does it present an opinion? CHARACTER

Who are the people in the story? What are their relationships? Why do they do what they do? How does age/status/etc. affect them? LANGUAGE

What do the characters say? How do they say it? When do they say it? MUSIC

How do music and sound help to tell the story? SPECTACLE

How do the elements come together to create the whole performance?

Other Elements: Conflict/Resolution, Action, Improvisation, Non-verbal communication, Staging, Humor, Realism and other styles, Metaphor, Language, Tone, Pattern & Repetition, Emotion, Point of view.

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Any piece of theatre comprises multiple art forms. As you explore this production with your students, examine the use of:

WRITING VISUAL ART/DESIGN MUSIC/SOUND DANCE/MOVEMENT

ACTIVITY

At its core, drama is about characters working toward goals and overcoming obstacles. Ask students to use their bodies and voices to create characters who are: very old, very young, very strong, very weak, very tired, very energetic, very cold, very warm. Have their characters interact with others. Give them an objective to fulfill despite environmental obstacles. Later, recap by asking how these obstacles affected their characters and the pursuit of their objectives.

INQUIRY

How are each of these art forms used in this production? Why are they used? How do they help to tell the story?


elements of design LINE can have length, width, texture, direction, and

curve. There are 5 basic varieties: vertical, horizontal, diagonal, curved, and zig-zag.

SHAPE is two-dimensional and encloses space.

It can be geometric (e.g. squares and circles), man-made, or free-form.

FORM is three-dimensional. It encloses space

and fills space. It can be geometric (e.g. cubes and cylinders), man-made, or free-form.

COLOR has three basic properties:

HUE is the name of the color (e.g. red, blue, green), INTENSITY is the strength of the color (bright or dull), VALUE is the range of lightness to darkness.

TEXTURE refers to the “feel” of an

object’s surface. It can be smooth, rough, soft, etc. Textures may be ACTUAL (able to be felt) or IMPLIED (suggested visually through the artist’s technique).

SPACE is defined and determined

by shapes and forms. Positive space is enclosed by shapes and forms, while negative space exists around them.

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Peter Pan has been popular since it first appeared as a play in 1904. What is its appeal for children? What is its appeal for adults? We are in the middle of a Peter Pan boom right now with a new television production, a new film exploring origins (Pan), the musical Finding Neverland, and the comic origin story Peter and the Starcatcher onstage. Why is Peter Pan so popular right now? We can say that Peter Pan is like an alien who comes to the Darlings’ window to hear Wendy’s stories. If you could share one story with an alien visitor, what would you choose? What does this story tell the visitor about our world? How does Tinker Bell fit into traditional ideas about fairies? Why do you think that the characters of Mr. Darling and Captain Hook are often played by the same actor? Although in this production, Peter Pan is played by a young man, the role is usually played by a woman. How does this change the play? What are the pros and cons for each casting choice? The traditional way that Peter and the children fly onstage is through a series of pulleys. What are some other ways to simulate flying onstage?

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When Peter Pan comes to the nursery in Act I, he is searching for his shadow. Have you ever thought about what your shadow looks like? How can you make pictures with your shadow? Making shadow pictures can be great fun. See the instructions and illustrations in the videos cited here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDF5ddeswfM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fo_pU6GUPHE Peter Pan’s Neverland has areas populated by many different groups and has all sorts of opportunities for adventure. What would your Neverland look like? Draw a map of YOUR Neverland. What does Peter Pan have in common with other classic fantasy journeys like The Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, The Wizard of Oz, and the Harry Potter series? What makes it different?

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REFERENCES: Books: Birkin, Andrew. J.M. Barrie and the Lost Boys. Yale University Press, New Haven: 2003. Hanson, Bruce K. The Peter Pan Chronicles. Birch Lane Press, New York: 1993. Internet: J.M. Barrie. (2015). The Biography.com website. Retrieved 10:48, Jun 30, 2015, from http://www. biography.com/people/jm-barrie-9200058. http://www.nytimes.com/1983/11/21/obituaries/carolyn-leigh-lyricist-for-peter-pan-dies.html http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/25/obituaries/25GREE.html?pagewanted=1 http://www.julestyne.com/Biography.php http://www.gosh.org/about-us/peter-pan/history-peter-pan-and-gosh/jm-barrie -A page of the Great Ormond Hospital website dedicated to Barrie and his gift. http://neverpedia.com/pan/Main_Page -An unauthorized, but thorough Peter Pan database. http://www.jmbarrie.co.uk/ -A database of all things Barrie and Peter Pan. http://monstaah.angelfire.com/woldnewtonbeyond/captain-hook-at-eton.html -An original story for Captain Hook, composed by Barrie for a speech.

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There have been many adaptations ands sequels to Peter Pan. Of special interest are: Barry, Dave and Ridley Pearson. Peter and the Starcatchers. Hyperion Books: 2004. The first in the Starcatchers series, an unauthorized and hilarious prequel to Peter Pan. McCaughrean, Geraldine. Peter Pan in Scarlet. Oxford University Press, Oxford: 2006. The authorized sequel to Peter Pan brings the Darling children and the Lost Boys back to Neverland after World War I. Notable film versions: Peter Pan (1924) directed by Herbert Brenon, starring Betty Bronson as Pan. A silent film, it’s the only film produced during Barrie’s lifetime. Long thought lost, it’s now available free online: https://archive.org/details/PeterPan1924. Peter Pan, animated from Walt Disney 1953, featuring the voice of Bobby Driscoll. Notable for its stereotypical version of the Indians. Peter Pan, The 1960 color recording of the Mary Martin stage version is available on video. Hook, (1991) directed by Stephen Spielberg, with Dustin Hoffman as Hook and Robin Williams as a grown-up Pan. Available on video. Peter Pan (2003) directed by P.J.Hogan, with Jeremy Sumpter as Peter. Available on video. Pan (2015) directed by Joe Wright, an origin story with Levi Miller as Peter, Garrett Hedlund as Hook, and Hugh Jackman as Blackbeard. SYRACUSE STAGE EDUCATION

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There have been many adaptations ands sequels to Peter Pan. Of special interest are: Barry, Dave and Ridley Pearson. Peter and the Starcatchers. Hyperion Books: 2004. The first in the Starcatchers series, an unauthorized and hilarious prequel to Peter Pan. McCaughrean, Geraldine. Peter Pan in Scarlet. Oxford University Press, Oxford: 2006. The authorized sequel to Peter Pan brings the Darling children and the Lost Boys back to Neverland after World War I. Notable film versions: Peter Pan (1924) directed by Herbert Brenon, starring Betty Bronson as Pan. A silent film, it’s the only film produced during Barrie’s lifetime. Long thought lost, it’s now available free online: https://archive.org/details/PeterPan1924. Peter Pan, animated from Walt Disney 1953, featuring the voice of Bobby Driscoll. Notable for its stereotypical version of the Indians. Peter Pan, The 1960 color recording of the Mary Martin stage version is available on video. Hook, (1991) directed by Stephen Spielberg, with Dustin Hoffman as Hook and Robin Williams as a grown-up Pan. Available on video. Peter Pan (2003) directed by P.J.Hogan, with Jeremy Sumpter as Peter. Available on video. Pan (2015) directed by Joe Wright, an origin story with Levi Miller as Peter, Garrett Hedlund as Hook, and Hugh Jackman as Blackbeard.

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SEASON

15.16 THE UNDERPANTS

STUPID F***ING BIRD

OCTOBER 21 – NOVEMBER 8

JANUARY 20 – FEBRUARY 7

PETER PAN

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

STEVE MARTIN’S BY STEVE MARTIN ADAPTED FROM CARL STERNHEIM

LYRICS BY CAROLYN LEIGH MUSIC BY MORRIS "MOOSE" CHARLAP ADDITIONAL LYRICS BY BETTY COMDEN AND ADOLPH GREEN ADDITIONAL MUSIC BY JULE STYNE BASED ON THE PLAY BY SIR JAMES M. BARRIE FLYING EFFECTS PROVIDED BY ZFX, INC. CO-PRODUCED WITH SU DRAMA

NOVEMBER 28 – JANUARY 3

THE SANTALAND DIARIES BY DAVID SEDARIS ADAPTED BY JOE MANTELLO

BY AARON POSNER SORT OF ADAPTED FROM CHEKHOV’S THE SEAGULL

ADAPTED BY CHRISTOPHER SERGEL FROM THE NOVEL BY HARPER LEE

FEBRUARY 24 – MARCH 26

THE CHRISTIANS BY LUCAS HNATH

APRIL 6 – 24

KEN LUDWIG’S

BASKERVILLE: A SHERLOCK HOLMES MYSTERY

BASED ON A NOVEL BY ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

DECEMBER 9 – JANUARY 3

MAY 11 – 29

Lila Coogan, Aurelia Williams, and Mary DiGangi in Hairspray. Marc Safran Photography.

SE AS ON SPONS OR:

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