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l e t t e r f r o m t h e p r o d u c i n g a r t i s t i c d i r e c to r

Dear Friends, Welcome to The Glass Menagerie, the final show in a season dedicated to Arthur Storch. I hope you’ve enjoyed it. It’s a season that I’m very proud of. Rehearsing The Glass Menagerie, I was astounded and thrilled to rediscover the brilliance of Tennessee Williams. Yes, he was an insightful and poetic writer—a master at capturing and revealing the complexities of our humanity—but he was also a theatrical innovator. Like Anton Chekhov, whom Williams often cited as an influence, he was more concerned with relationships and the inner truth of his characters than whether actual water flowed from the kitchen faucet. With The Glass Menagerie especially, Williams pushed the American theatre in a new and less realistic direction. His original vision for the play called for projections of words and images, elements rarely if ever used in productions of the play, and for the use of music. For this production, I’ve embraced and have been inspired by Williams’ original vision.

himself for Tom (Tennessee’s real name). The absent father is based on Williams’ emotionally distant father. In the tiny St. Louis apartment of Tom’s memory, the characters feel trapped by the limiting circumstances of their lives, and from time to time they escape into their own fantasy worlds. The Gentleman Caller is a kind of living talisman, a visitor from the outside world who represents a bringer of hope for the desperate Wingfields.

The Glass Menagerie is Williams’ most autobiographical play and he of course had great sympathy for the characters, the Wingfields—all are based on his own family: his beloved and troubled sister Rose served as the inspiration for Laura; his daughter-of-the-South mother Edwina for Amanda; and he

“The play is memory,” and memory, as Tom also tells us, can play tricks. The tricks memory plays can, like theatre, surprise us with the truth. I know no more fascinating, mysterious, beautiful, and challenging theatre than the theatre of memory, the wellspring of artistic expression. 7

The Glass Menagerie is Tennessee Williams’ gorgeous expression of longed-for freedom, wished-for hope, truth, honesty, and compassion. It is a play I have truly come to love. Thank you for joining us today, and for supporting us throughout this season. I hope you enjoy the show and I sincerely hope that you will join us for our 2014/2015 season, beginning in September.

warm regards,

Timothy Bond Producing Artistic Director


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presents

by

Tennessee Williams directed by

Timothy Bond scenic Designer

costume Designer

Lighting Designer

composer

William Bloodgood

Jessica Ford

Dawn Chiang

Michael G. Keck

projection designer

d r a m at u r g

Dialect Coach

Kate Freer

Kyle Bass

Celia Madeoy

production s ta g e m a n a g e r

casting

Stuart Plymesser

Harriet Bass

Timothy Bond

Jeffrey Woodward

Producing Artistic Director

Managing Director

Syracuse Stage dedicates the 2013 – 2014 season to Arthur Storch, 1925 – 2013: founding artistic director of Syracuse Stage and chair of Syracuse University Department of Drama 1974 – 1992. sponsors

Dr. Paul Phillips & Ms. Sharon Sullivan media sponsors

season sponsor

The Glass Menagerie is presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. The video and/or audio recording of this performance by any means whatsoever are strictly prohibited. April 2 - April 27, 2014

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cast (in alphabetical order)

Adriana Gaviria.............................................................Laura Elizabeth Hess...........................................................Amanda Michael Kirby.....................................The Gentleman Caller Joseph Midyett...............................................................Tom setting

Tom’s memory.

There will be one fifteen-minute intermission.

play Sponsorship

Dr. & Mrs. Louis G. Marcoccia, Opening Night, April 4 William & Rosemary Pooler, Opening Night, April 4 Bill & Nancy Byrne, Opening Night, April 4 Bill & Nancy Byrne, April 11 Helene & Neil Gold, April 12, 8 pm Dr. & Mrs. Louis G. Marcoccia, April 18

a dd i t i o n a l c r e d i t s

Student Assistant Director: Rachel Towne† Waltz: Anthony Salatino Stage Management Apprentice: Erin C Brett Stage Management Intern: Stephanie Lane† Sound Apprentice: George Hart Electrics Apprentice: Sarah Olsen Wardrobe Supervisor: Danielle Waterman Dresser: Christine McBurney Official Hotels for Guest Artists: The Genesee Grande Hotel, Parkview Hotel

The Glass Menagerie is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The actors and stage manager in this production are members of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States. † Student, Syracuse University Department of Drama

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Before it was A Classic by joseph whelan It was an inauspicious beginning for a play that became an American classic and a good reminder that all classics start out as new plays. Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie opened in Chicago on December 26, 1944. Blizzard-like conditions gripped the city as gale force winds whipped off Lake Michigan. The meteorological storm raging in the streets might have seemed tame, though, compared with the turbulent tempest that had been blowing through the Civic

Theatre since December 17 and the arrival from New York of the playwright, actors, and producers. The fading stage star Laurette Taylor, cast as Amanda, had everyone in a whirl with her odd behavior during rehearsal and her unfortunate thirst for strong drink. With less than a week until the opening, she seemed to know only a fraction of her lines and her Southern accent left much to be desired for the playwright. On the day of the dress rehearsal, a janitor found her passed out behind the furnace in the basement of the theatre.

right: Laurette Taylor as Amanda Wingfield in the original 1945 production of The Glass Menagerie.

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“...a lovely thing and an original thing. It has the courage of true poetry couched in colloquial prose. It is eerie and earthy in the same breath.” The opening had to be postponed a day. “That woman is crucifying me,” muttered the show’s director Eddie Dowling at one point. Dowling’s agitation had an extra measure of provocation. In addition to directing the show, the 49-year-old Dowling had cast himself as Tom. Taylor insisted Dowling was far too old to play her son, and belittled his performance as inadequate, a practice she continued even after the production’s successful transfer to Broadway.

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Producer Louis J. Singer (“Eddie! Eddie! You’re ruining me.”), worried about his investment, lit upon an idea that may well have altered not only Williams’ career but a substantial portion of American Theatre history. The Glass Menagerie, he told Williams and Dowling, should have a happy ending: Jim and Laura should get married. Fortunately, Williams’ friend Margo Jones, who was serving as the play’s assistant director, intervened and squelched the idea. Such was the atmosphere leading up to the stormyy opening night when the cast took the stage and an American classic was revealed. Critical response was overwhelmingly positive, and when poor box office receipts during the first two weeks threatened closure, critics Claudia Cassidy and Ashton Stevens exhorted their readers to support the play. Their efforts were joined by fellow critic Henry T. Murdock and several influential columnists. By the third week, ticket sales dramatically increased, and soon the talk was not of closing the show but whether it should stay for an extended run in Chicago or move to New York. While much of the praise focused on Laurette Taylor’s “magically electrical” per-

formance, critics also took notice of the young playwright’s extraordinary gift. Ashton Stevens called the play “a lovely thing and an original thing. It has the courage of true poetry couched in colloquial prose. It is eerie and earthy in the same breath.” Claudia Cassidy added: “If it is your play, as it is mine, it reaches out tentacles, first tentative, then gripping, and you are caught in its spell.” Seventy years later that spell is still strong. Recent revivals attest to the play’s appeal with contemporary audiences and its ability to inspire theatre artists. The characters’ struggles with the difficult passage into adulthood and the emotional strains of family life and family ties resonate across generations. These issues, of course, were very close to Williams who fashioned the play out of the circumstances of his own life and modeled the Wingfields after his own family. In 1918, Williams’ father, Cornelius Coffin Williams, was promoted to a managerial position with the International Shoe Company, precipitating a move to St. Louis. Previously, Williams, (then called Tom having been christened Thomas Lanier Williams III), his mother Edwina, and his sis16

ter Rose had lived with his maternal grandparents in the rectory of St George’s Episcopal Church in the town of Clarksville, Mississippi. Cornelius, a salesman during that time, was often on the road, so he and Edwina had never really lived together as man and wife for any extended time. Their attempt to do so in St. Louis proved unhappy for all involved. Cornelius felt trapped by his desk job and his social and family responsibilities. His bullying and outbursts of temper estranged him from the family, and while he never deserted the family to abject poverty, as he sometimes threatened, he was emotionally removed from his children. In many ways, he was as absent as the “phone man who fell in love with long distance,” the description the character Tom applies to his father in the play. For her part, Edwina was trapped in a loveless match. She did not love Cornelius the way he loved her, and worse, he knew it. Their relationship was constantly strained and punctuated by boisterous marital battles. City life, too, was hard for her, and while she tried to make the best of it, her genteel Southern past seemed idyllic in comparison. Much like Amanda, Edwina would tell young Tom stories of cotillions,


far left: Tennessee Williams (right) with his mother, Edwina (center), and sister, Rose (left). left: Rose Isabel Williams

garden parties, and gentlemen callers. Many of these he could recite by rote. Yet, while the parents perpetually squabbled, Tom and his sister Rose grew increasingly devoted to each other. Two years older than Tom (brother Dakin was the youngest), she became one of his life’s chief devotions–the other being writing. She also became the model for the painfully shy Laura of The Glass Menagerie, only unlike Laura whose infirmity is physical, Rose’s affliction was mental illness. Slipping from depression to delusion, Rose was diagnosed with a form of schizophrenia and eventually committed to a series of sanitariums and state hospitals. On January 13, 1943, a bilateral prefrontal lobotomy was performed on Rose. Completing the family por-

trait is the writer himself who lent his name to the narrator of The Glass Menagerie. Caught in the tug between family responsibilities and the desire to break free and pursue a literary career, the young writer and his alter ego share what emerges as the central dilemma of the play. Of course, The Glass Menagerie is much more than an exploration of the playwright’s young life. As former New York Times drama critic Frank Rich once observed: “anyone can write an autobiography, but only an artist knows how to remake his past so completely, by refracting it through a different aesthetic lens.” The aesthetic lens through which Williams refracted his life included what was at the time a revolutionary theatrical style for American theatre. This “memory play,” as it was called, included some techniques borrowed from 17

German Expressionist theatre, as well as innovative use of music and lighting. Underlying all, however, is the rich poetry of Williams’ dialogue, and the extraordinary depth of his characters, who are truthful and complex. Seventy years ago a young aspiring playwright named William Inge saw the original production of The Glass Menagerie during that first weekend in Chicago. He recognized instantly the magnitude of Williams’ achievement. “The play itself was written so beautifully, like carved crystal and so it was a stunning experience for me,” Inge once recalled. “I sat in a half-filled theatre but I watched the most thrilling performance of the most beautiful American play I felt I had ever seen. I had the feeling at the time that what I was seeing would become an American classic.”


From the Dramaturg’s Noteook

The Playwright & The Poet by kyle Bass “I’m a poet. And then I put the poetry in drama…I put it in the plays. Poetry’s poetry. It doesn’t have to be called a poem…” –Tennessee Williams When asked, Tennessee Williams named three writers who had most influenced him: Anton Chekhov, D. H. Lawrence, and Hart Crane—a dramatist, a novelist, and a poet. But it’s Crane, the poet, who emerges as Williams’ most influential and inspiring muse. American poet Harold Hart Crane (1899-1932) was a modernist poet. While many critics have hailed Crane as one of the most influential poets of the 20th century, many others have decried his poetical aesthetic as gaudy, insistent, selfindulgent, and obscure, dismissing Crane’s poetic difficulty as little

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more than hyperbolic style. Williams first encountered Crane’s Collected Poems in 1935 while living in St. Louis, introduced to the work by his Washington University classmate, poet Clark Mills McBurney. “It was Clark who warned me of the existence of people like Hart Crane and Rimbaud and Rilke,” Williams wrote in 1944. Gradually Williams began to read Crane’s challenging verse with greater comprehension. His admiration for the poet deepened and he soon regarded Crane as among “the purer voices in poetry.” Seduced by what he called the “organic purity and sheer breathtaking power” of Crane’s poetics, Williams’ relationship with Crane’s poetry became something of a religion, a process of literary canonization, beatification, and deification. First


Williams’ relationship with Crane’s poetry became something of a religion, a process of literary canonization, beatification, and deification.

Williams placed Crane among the poetry gods—“I feel that he stands with Keats and Shakespeare and Whitman”— but in time he would set him apart. Symbolically at least, all other poets fell away for Williams, “till finally there was only one volume with me, the book of Hart Crane… my only library and all of it.” Beyond Crane’s poetry, Williams also identified with Hart Crane the man. In Crane, a young Tennessee Williams found a ghost companion and, perhaps naively, a model for living the emotionally dramatic life of a sensitive artist. A wandering poet, a depressive alcoholic, a semi-public homosexual (at a time when homosexuality was considered criminal) who fell in love with a merchant marine named Emil Opffer—Crane could have been a character in a Tennessee Williams’ play and was certainly the template

left: Playwright Tennessee Williams

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above: Hart Crane. Photo: Walker Evans right: Emil Opffer, Hart Crane’s lover.

for a number of them— sensitive, suffering, eloquent characters to whom the world seems a particularly unwelcoming place. And Crane died young, and dramatically, at the age of 32, throwing himself from the deck of a steamship and into the Gulf of Mexico, after a night of heavy drinking and after being beaten for making unwanted sexual advances to a male crew member. His body was never recovered. As much as his poetry, Crane’s life and death appealed to Williams’ romantic notion of the

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writer who suffers for his art, for the truth of his life. They were, in many ways, kindred spirits. “Hart Crane’s life was very similar to mine,” William said in a TV interview. “His father was involved in the manufacture of candy, mine in shoes. And we had very similar backgrounds: he was overly devoted to his mother, as I was to mine. And we both wrote out of an intense personal need…And he shocked people a great deal…But I don’t think he gave a damn whether he shocked people. And I’ve never cared if I shock people because people who are shocked by the truth are not deserving of the truth.” The playwright shared many truths with the poet. Like Crane, Williams had a trying


and complicated relationship with his mother. Like Crane, Williams endured his emotionally-distant father’s contempt and disappointment. And Crane, like Williams, desired and loved men. “And he made absolutely no disguise of the fact,” Williams said. To the young Williams, Crane must have seemed a rare and brave creature: a homosexual in the 1920s and 30s who made no distinction between his sexuality and his poetry and who embraced his status as a social pariah as necessary to his creative work. While Crane’s influence— in the form of titles, epigraphs, and allusions—can be seen across Williams’ dramaturgy, it’s The Glass Menagerie, Williams’ first great artistic and commercial success, which bears the richest and most pervasive evidence of Crane’s influence. As the want-to-be poet trapped as a worker in a shoe warehouse longing for the freedom of a merchant marine’s life at sea, Tom Wingfield, the play’s narrator, is as much a portrait of Hart Crane as he is a self-portrait of a young Tennessee Williams.

Excerpt from “Voyages” by Hart Crane I Above the fresh ruffles of the surf Bright striped urchins flay each other with sand. They have contrived a conquest for shell shucks, And their fingers crumble fragments of baked weed Gaily digging and scattering. And in answer to their treble interjections The sun beats lightning on the waves, The waves fold thunder on the sand; And could they hear me I would tell them: O brilliant kids, frisk with your dog, Fondle your shells and sticks, bleached By time and the elements; but there is a line You must not cross nor ever trust beyond it Spry cordage of your bodies to caresses Too lichen-faithful from too wide a breast. The bottom of the sea is cruel. II -And yet this great wink of eternity, Of rimless floods, unfettered leewardings, Samite sheeted and processioned where Her undinal vast belly moonward bends, Laughing the wrapt inflections of our love; Take this Sea, whose diapason knells On scrolls of silver snowy sentences, The sceptred terror of whose sessions rends As her demeanors motion well or ill, All but the pieties of lovers’ hands.

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Crane could have been a character in a Tennessee Williams’ play and was certainly the template for a number of them—sensitive, suffering, eloquent characters to whom the world seems a particularly unwelcoming place. In stage directions, Williams tells us that Tom, leaning over the fire escape railing, now an imaginary ship, “looks like a voyager.” It’s a clear reference to Crane’s sequence of erotic poems “Voyages,” composed while the poet was falling in love with Opffer, the merchant marine. From Crane’s short poem “Chaplinesque” the lines “The moon in lonely alleys make / A grail of laughter of an empty ash can” can be seen as the source for the alley behind the Wingfield’s apartment building and for the image for the moon, a poetic and heartbreaking symbol of longing and hope present in the play. These two examples suggest the many instances of Crane’s influ-

ence in Williams’ semiautobiographical play. A close reading of Crane’s poems and Williams’ play reveals more examples of the poet’s influence than can be highlighted here. Williams’ devotion to and championing of Hart Crane’s poetry was lifelong. All his major plays bear some echo of the poet. In 1947 Williams used the fifth stanza from Crane’s poem “The Broken Tower,” written just months before the poet’s suicide, as the epigraph for A Streetcar Named Desire, a prelude to the introduction of Blanche Dubois, the play’s poetic, tragic figure: And so it was I entered the broken world / To trace the visionary company of love, its voice / An

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instant in the wind (I know not whither hurled) / But not for long to hold each desperate choice. In 1966, Caedmon Records released an LP titled Tennessee Williams Reads Hart Crane. Though no longer in print, excerpts from the album can be heard on the Internet. In his extravagant readings of Crane’s poetry, one hears a devoted Williams finding and tracing again the shape of his own soul in the words of his muse. In 1980, Williams published a short play, amongst his last, titled “Steps Must be Gentle.” In it he reunites Hart Crane and his mother in the afterlife. Late in the play there’s this exchange,


which can be read as an imagined exchange between the playwright and his poet muse, with Williams speaking through the character of Grace, Hart’s mother: Grace: Hart, if only you could know how desperately I have defended your poetry with my life, because— Hart: Because? Grace: It was mine, too. Williams wrote that upon his death he wished to be “given back to the sea”… “sewn up in a clean white sack and dropped overboard 12 hours north of Havana,” at the “point most nearly determined as the point at which Hart Crane gave himself back.” Williams is buried in Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis. His epitaph reads: Tennessee Williams 1911-1983 Poet Playwright “The violets in the mountains have broken the rocks”

And onward, as bells off San Salvador Salute the crocus lustres of the stars, In these poinsettia meadows of her tides, Adagios of islands, O my Prodigal, Complete the dark confessions her veins spell. Mark how her turning shoulders wind the hours, And hasten while her penniless rich palms Pass superscription of bent foam and wave, Hasten, while they are true,-sleep, death, desire, Close round one instant in one floating flower. Bind us in time, O Seasons clear, and awe. O minstrel galleons of Carib fire, Bequeath us to no earthly shore until Is answered in the vortex of our grave The seal’s wide spindrift gaze toward paradise.

III Infinite consanguinity it bears This tendered theme of you that light Retrieves from sea plains where the sky Resigns a breast that every wave enthrones; While ribboned water lanes I wind Are laved and scattered with no stroke Wide from your side, whereto this hour The sea lifts, also, reliquary hands. And so, admitted through black swollen gates That must arrest all distance otherwise, Past whirling pillars and lithe pediments, Light wrestling there incessantly with light, Star kissing star through wave on wave unto Your body rocking! and where death, if shed, Presumes no carnage, but this single change,Upon the steep floor flung from dawn to dawn The silken skilled transmemberment of song; Permit me voyage, love, into your hands . . .

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cast Adriana Gaviria (Laura) is thrilled to be making her Syracuse Stage debut, especially with such a beautiful play. New York theatre credits include projects with Immigrants’ Theatre Project, Working Theater, Lark, Pregones, Repertorio Español, Young Playwrights Inc., 52nd Street Project and New York Stage & Film. Regional credits include the world premiere of Just Like Us and September Shoes (Denver Center); West Coast premiere of Lydia (Marin Theatre Company); Romeo and Juliet, The Count of Monte Cristo (Alabama Shakespeare Festival); Anna in the Tropics (Dallas Theater Center, Arizona Theatre Company, Pasadena Playhouse); and The Birds (Yale Rep). Television/Film: Law & Order: CI, Person of Interest, Sueños. Training: BFA, Florida International University; MFA, Yale School of Drama. Gracias to Tim and the wonderful cast and crew. Shout-out to KT and my RRD/MS colleagues back in New York. Love and thank you to mom and dad, bro, mi familia, mis amigos, and Carol, Rachel, Jeannie and Fidel for your amazing support and inspiration.

ty (Manhattan Theatre Club), Nothing But Bukowski (Samuel Beckett), A Modest Proposal (UBU Rep), Jack (New York Theatre Workshop), The Frances Farmer Story (Chareeva Playhouse). Solo performer/playwright: Dust to Dust: New York (Stage Left Studio, LPTW New Play Festival, New World Stages, UN Conference), Stockholm (WPIC), Bucharest (Teatril Luni), Kiel (Thespis Festival), Pristina (MonoAKT); Living Openly & Notoriously, a solo trilogy—Part 1, Birth Rite: New York (Harold Clurman), Hartford (RealArtWays), Edinburgh (Festival Fringe), Barcelona (Project Vaca), Kiel (Thespis Festival), Berlin (The Friends) and Toronto (Hysteria Festival); Part 2, Decent: Edinburgh (Festival Fringe) and Yerevan (Armmono); Part 3, AT/ONE: New York (McGinn/Cazale). Rotating rep: Baltimore (Theatre Project), New York (Robert Moss Theater). Regional: Honour (Gulfshore Playhouse), Grapes of Wrath (STNJ), Ah, Wilderness (CenterStage), Romeo & Juliet (ART), The Seagull (Cleveland Playhouse), Wintertime and Perfect Pie (Wilma Theater), Dinner with Friends (Capitol Rep), Molly Sweeney (Theater Works), Other People’s Money (Royal George), Sweet Bird of Youth (Royal Alexandra), Splitting Infinity and Italian-American Reconciliation (Geva Theatre Center), A Wedding and The Mandrake (Seattle Repertory Theatre), A Streetcar Named Desire (Stage West), The Dark Sonnets (McCarter Theatre Center), Peter Pan (Denver Center), and Dare Not Speak It’s Name (Seven Angels). TV: Law & Order, Guiding Light; All

Elizabeth Hess (Amanda). Broadway: M. Butterfly. Off-Broadway: Critical Darling (The New Group), Notes (McGinn/Cazale), Our Place in Time (Women’s Project and Prods), Liverpool Fantasy (Irish Arts Center), Beggars in the House of Plen-

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cast My Children, Another World, and five seasons starring on Clarissa Explains it All. Film: Handsome Harry, Soldier’s Heart, A Bedtime Story, Italian Lessons, Buddy & Grace. Playwright: A Decalogue, Dust to Dust, Nomads, No Evil: Perfect Curiosity, Meltdown, Salvaged, Living Openly & Notoriously: Birth Rite, Decent, At/One. Education: LAMDA. Professor: Undergraduate Acting at NYU, Playwrights Horizons Theatre School, The O’Neill: National Theatre Institute, New York Theater Intensives.

(East Lynne Theatre); Spite for Spite, Don Juan (Andak Stage Company, Founding Member). Film: Hells Heart, Connected, Passing Normal, Chase The Slut, Benevolence. Television: Admiral Rickover the Father of Nuclear Power (PBS), Boston Public, MTV. MFA from The Old Globe/ USD. This is dedicated to the memory of Grumpy Grandpa. Joseph Midyett (Tom). Off-Broadway: Of Mice and Men, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, The Comedy of Errors (The Acting Company); Twelfth Night (The Pearl Theater);  Enjoy (59E59 Theaters, American premiere); National Playwrights Festival (Rattlestick Theater). Regional: Much Ado About Nothing (Shakespeare DC); Dracula (The Actor’s Theatre of Louisville); Picasso at the Lapin Agile (Syracuse Stage);  The Clay Cart (Oregon Shakespeare Festival); The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Delaware Theatre Company);  Amadeus, and Peter in Peter Pan directed by Mark Lamos (Texas Shakespeare); Savages and Christians and Other Homo Sapiens directed by Adrian Hall (Misalliance). Film:  Penance for the Slain, Hope Café, Kick Ball.  TV:  Homeland, The Following. For Nain.

Michael Kirby (The Gentleman Caller) is thrilled to be making his Syracuse Stage debut! Off Broadway: Richard III, Othello. Other NY: The Merry Wives of Windsor, Epicene or the Silent Woman, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Jester’s Dead. Regional Theatre: School of Night and The Goat or Who is Sylvia (Mark Taper Forum); Tickled Pink (Laguna Playhouse); The American Plan, Romeo and Juliet, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, All’s Well That Ends Well, and Othello (The Old Globe); A Tale of Charles Dickens (LA Theatre Works); Chekhov x 4 (Antaeus Theatre Company); Berkeley Square

A r t i s t i c S ta f f William Bloodgood (Scenic Designer) previously designed at Syracuse Stage for The Whipping Man, An Iliad, August Wilson’s Two Trains Run-

ning, Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, Red, Caroline, or Change, Radio Golf, Picasso at the Lapin Agile, Fences, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Broad-

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A r t i s t i c S ta f f way Bound and  The Sisters Rosensweig.  Well known at American regional theatres, he has worked with Arena Stage in Washington DC, Arizona Theatre Company, the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Alley Theatre in Houston, Chicago Shakespeare Theatre, the Children’s Theatre Company in Minneapolis, Denver Center Theatre Company, Hong Kong Repertory Theatre, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Intiman Theatre in Seattle, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, Portland Center Stage, Seattle Repertory Theatre, San Jose Repertory Theatre, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, Oregon where he has designed scenery for 150 productions. He had the honor of designing the US national exhibit for the 2011 Prague Quadrennial exposition of theatre design, and is the recipient of many awards for his work, including the Oregon Governor’s Award for the Arts in 2002. He is a professor of scenic design at the University of Texas at Austin.

in Houston, TX, Arena Stage, Baltimore CENTERSTAGE, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Portland Center Stage, Folger Theatre, Yale Repertory Theatre, Shakespeare & Company, Two River Theatre Company, People’s Light and Theatre Company, and Actor’s Theatre of Louisville. Select New York credits: Atlantic Theatre Company, P73, The Play Company, Second Stage, Rattlestick Playwright’s Theatre, Pearl Theatre. MFA: Yale University School of Drama. Awards: 2007-09 Recipient of the NEA/TCG Fellowship for Designers. Dawn Chiang (Lighting Design) designed lighting for the Syracuse Stage productions of Blithe Spirit, August Wilson’s Two Trains Running, The Boys Next Door, Rent, Little Women, Fiddler on the Roof, A Christmas Carol, Hamlet, M. Butterfly and The Dybbuk. She has designed the lighting at numerous regional theatres including Arena Stage, Denver Center Theatre Company, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Arizona Theatre Company, Alliance Theatre, Mark Taper Forum, Guthrie Theatre, San Jose Repertory Theatre and Geva Theatre Center. On Broadway, Dawn designed the lighting for Zoot Suit, was co-designer for Tango Pasion, and associate lighting designer for Show Boat, The Life, and the original production of La Cage Aux Folles. OffBroadway, she has designed for the Roundabout Theatre, Manhattan Theatre Club, and co-designed the first two seasons of the Encores! con-

Jessica Ford (Costume Designer). Previous Syracuse Stage credits include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Brothers Size (set and costumes), The Boys Next Door, Rent, Fiddler on the Roof, BUG, Big River (co-design) and The Santaland Diaries (set and costumes). At the Long Wharf Theatre: A Doll’s House, The Fantasticks, the world premiere of Athol Fugard’s Coming Home, The Price, The Santaland Diaries (set design) and It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. Regional credits: Alley Theatre

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A r t i s t i c S ta f f cert musical series at City Center. Dawn was resident lighting designer for New York City Opera, where she designed for A Little Night Music and Fanciulla del West. She is the lighting designer for the award winning FDNY Fire Zone at Rockefeller Center. For the Whitney Museum of American Art, Dawn created a lighting performance piece, “delights: Art on 5 Outlets”. She designed the lighting for a large touring show for Disney, Disney Fair, and has worked on concert tours for Paul Anka, The Carpenters, Diana Ross, and Loggins and Messina. Awards include two Drama-Logue awards, a THEA Award (Themed Entertainment Association) and nominations for the American Theatre Wing’s Maharam Design Award, Los Angeles Drama Critics’ Award and San Francisco Bay Area Critics’ Award.

Theatre of Croatia, The Barbican Theatre Center, and Bristol Old Vic. As an actor, he has performed at McCarter Theatre Center, Alliance Theatre, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Portland Center Stage, La MaMa Experimental Theatre and Primary Stages in NYC, and many others. He received three Barrymore Award nominations, the AATE Distinguished Play Award, and has served as panelist for the NEA, the NY State Arts Council, and Meet the Composer. He is a member of AEA, SAG-AFTRA, ASCAP, PEN and The Dramatists Guild. Kate Freer (Projection Designer) is a multimedia designer and video artist for theatre, film, and installation. Off-Broadway and Downtown: Sunset Baby (Labyrinth Theater); Love Machine (Incubator Arts Project); Around the World in 80 Days (The New Theater at 45th Street); PS Jones and the Frozen City (The New Ohio); Cry for Peace: Voices from the Congo (La MaMa, Undesirable Elements Festival);  Bullet for Adolph  (New World Stages); Chimera (HERE, Under the Radar 2012). Regional: Interior Designs (NJPAC, Jersey Moves); Pinkolandia (Two River Theater); Fahrenheit 451 (Aquila Theatre); Stuck Elevator (American Conservatory Theater); The Mountaintop (CenterStage); The Clean House (Syracuse Stage). Her installation work has been exhibited at the National Building Museum, The Hammond Museum, 3LD, Front Room Gallery, and the World Wide Words Festival (Denmark). She has taught master

Michael G. Keck (Composer). Previously at Syracuse Stage, Michael was the music director/composer for The Whipping Man, August Wilson’s Fences,  Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom,  and  The Brothers Size,  all directed by Timothy Bond, as well as  Gem of the Ocean  directed by Timothy Douglas. Michael’s music has been featured at The Kennedy Center, Mark Taper Forum, Arena Stage, Guthrie Theatre, Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Alliance Theatre, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Great Lakes Theatres Festival, Cincinnati Playhouse, Portland Center Stage, and internationally at The National

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A r t i s t i c S ta f f classes at Harvard University, Syracuse University, Wesleyan, and New York University. Kate is a founding member of Imaginary Media Artists (www.imartists.com).

and at Marin, North Carolina and Virginia Shakespeare Festivals. She spent a year at the American Shakespeare Center performing with the resident troupe in the Blackfriars Playhouse as Lady Macbeth, Emilia in Othello, Gonzolo in The Tempest, and Phoebe in As You Like It. She also played Katherina in The Taming of the Shrew at Shakespeare & Company for which she was named most outstanding actress of the Berkshires that season. Her classical training in Shakespeare performance includes voice work alongside Andrew Wade, Giles Block, Patsy Rodenburg and other distinguished directors and voice teachers of the Royal Shakespeare Company, British American Drama Academy, National Institute of Dramatic Art in Australia, and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London. Celia is a proud MFA acting graduate of The Theatre School Conservatory at DePaul University in Chicago.

Stuart Plymesser (Production Stage Manager) is back for his eighteenth season at Syracuse Stage where he has stage managed more than 60 plays, musicals, and special events, working with such talents as Tony Award-winners Frank Langella, Elizabeth Franz, Phylicia Rashad, and Academy Award-winner Olympia Dukakis. Stuart has worked at numerous regional theatres around the country and in Cape Town, South Africa and has toured nationally. In addition, Stuart is adjunct faculty for Syracuse University’s Department of Drama.  Stuart is a proud member of Actors’ Equity Association, the union of professional actors and stage managers, as well as the Unites States Aikido Federation. www.stuartplymesser.com.

Kyle Bass (Dramaturg) is resident dramaturg for Syracuse Stage where he has served as production dramaturg for 16 shows, including this season’s The Whipping Man and Scorched. As script dramaturg, Kyle collaborated closely with writers Ping Chong and Sara Zatz in the creation of Tales from the Salt City and also served as script dramaturg on Lauren Unbekant’s plays Woman in the Blue Dress and Annabel Drudge…and the Second Day of School. Among other works, Kyle is the author of Carver at Tuskegee, a one-man play about George Washington Carver which toured as part of

Celia Madeoy (Dialect Coach) is on Voice and Performance Faculty with Syracuse University Department of Drama. Recent Syracuse Stage acting credits include Mrs. Fezziwig in A Christmas Carol, Frances Flute in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Aunt Ev in The Miracle Worker. Prior to arriving in Syracuse, Celia appeared at many regional theatres including Folger Theatre, The Shakespeare Theatre Company, Theatre J, Round House Theatre, Shakespeare & Company, Rogue Theatre, Arizona Repertory Theatre,

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Care for children & adults Complimentary Consultation Advanced SureSmile Technology 速

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Clear braces Invisalign 速 Reduced treatment times


A r t i s t i c S ta f f Syracuse Stage’s Backstory! program. With Ping Chong, Kyle is co-writer of Cry for Peace: Voices from the Congo, which had its world premiere at Syracuse Stage last September and was produced at La MaMa Experimental Theatre in New York City, and he has been commissioned by the Onondaga Historical Association to write a play about a fugitive enslaved woman in Syracuse. Kyle is on the faculty at Goddard College in Vermont, where he teaches in the MFA Creative Writing program. He also teaches playwriting in Syracuse University’s Department of Drama, at Colgate University and is Drama Editor for the journal Stone Canoe. Kyle is a two-time recipient of the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Fellowship including the 2010 fellowship in playwriting. He holds an MFA in Playwriting from Goddard College.

Theatre, The Women’s Project, La MaMa, E.T.C., New York Women in Film and Television, and The Jewish Repertory Theatre. She has cast the last three of the late August Wilson’s ten part play series: the original and touring productions of Radio Golf, the Broadway production of Gem of the Ocean, and the Off-Broadway production of Jitney. Selected regional casting credits include: Syracuse Stage, Mark Taper Forum, Hartford Stage, Arena Stage, Trinity Repertory Theatre, San Jose Repertory Theatre, Geva Theatre Center,  Indiana Repertory Theatre, Pittsburgh Public, Merrimack Repertory Theatre, Longwharf Theatre, Alliance Theatre Company, The Goodman Theatre, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Baltimore Center Stage, Huntington Theatre Company, Virginia Stage Company, Dallas Theatre Company, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Portland Center Stage, and Playmaker’s Repertory Theatre. Feature film credits include: Pushing Hands directed by Ang Lee, Underheat, starring Lee Grant, First We Take Manhattan, produced by Golden Harvest Inc., and Graves End, directed by Sal Stabile.

Harriet Bass (Casting Director) has been an independent New York casting director since 1989, casting for theatre, film, and television. In New York City Harriet has cast for ABC/TV, Fox Television Studios, Joseph Papp’s Public Theatre: NEW WORK NOW, The Minetta Lane

p l ay w r i g h t Tennessee Williams (1911-1983) was brilliant and prolific, breathing life and passion into such memorable characters as Blanche DuBois and Stanley Kowalski in his critically acclaimed A Streetcar Named Desire. He was awarded four Drama Critic

Circle Awards, two Pulitzer Prizes and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. His first critical acclaim came in 1944 when The Glass Menagerie opened in Chicago and went to Broadway. It won a New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award and, as a film,

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p l ay w r i g h t the New York Film Critics’ Circle Award. At the height of his career in the late 1940s and 1950s, Williams worked with the premier artists of the time, most notably Elia Kazan, the director for stage and screen productions of A Streetcar Named Desire, and the stage productions of Camino Real, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Sweet Bird of Youth. Kazan also

directed Williams’ film Baby Doll. In the 1970s, Williams wrote plays, a memoir, poems, short stories and a novel. In 1975 he published Memoirs, which detailed his life and discussed his addiction to drugs and alcohol, as well as his homosexuality. In 1980 Williams wrote Clothes for a Summer Hotel, based on the lives of Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

director/Producing Artistic Director Timothy Bond is in his seventh season as producing artistic director of Syracuse Stage and the Syracuse University Department of Drama. For Syracuse Stage he has directed The Whipping Man, August Wilson’s Two Trains Running, The Brothers Size, The Boys Next Door, Radio Golf, No Child..., Fences, The Price, The Diary of Anne Frank and Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom. He has 26 years experience in leading regional theatres throughout the country. Previously, he served for 11 years as associate artistic director of the famed Oregon Shakespeare Festival where he directed 12 productions, including works by Shakespeare, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Edward Albee, Lorraine Hansberry, Lynn Nottage, Octavio Soliz and Pearl Cleage. Prior to that, Bond spent 13 years with the Seattle Group Theatre, serving as artistic director from 1991 – 1996. While there he directed more

than 20 plays including a number of world and West Coast premieres, and he oversaw the largest capital campaign in the company’s history, culminating in the completion of a new theatre complex in the Seattle Center. Bond has also directed at such prestigious theatres as The Guthrie, Arena Stage, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, The Cleveland Play House, A Contemporary Theatre, Indiana Repertory Theatre and Geva Theatre. Bond received a Theatre Communications Group/ National Endowment for the Arts Directing Fellowship Award and has twice won Backstage West’s Garland Award for Outstanding Direction for Les Blancs (1998) and Blues for an Alabama Sky (1997). He served on the board of directors of the Theatre Communications Group from 1993 to 1997. Bond holds a BFA from Howard University and an MFA in directing from the University of Washington.

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managing Director Jeffrey Woodward became the managing director of Syracuse Stage in 2008. For 17 years he served as the managing director for the McCarter Theatre Center in Princeton, NJ. During his tenure, McCarter was honored with the Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theatre. Woodward is a member of the board of the University Hill Corporation, the East Genesee Regent Association and CNY Arts. He has served on

the Board of Trustees of Theatre Communications Group and as President of ArtPride New Jersey. He has also served as a panel chairman, panelist, and on-site evaluator for the National Endowment for the Arts. He has worked for Hartford Stage, the Mark Taper Forum, Northlight Theatre and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, and served as a consultant to a number of organizations. He holds a BA from Pomona College and a MBA from New York University.

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mission/vision Mission: Syracuse Stage is a global village

turous, and entertaining productions of new plays, classics and musicals, and offer interactive education and outreach programs in Central New York.

square where renowned artists and audiences of all ages gather to celebrate our cultural richness, witness the many truths of our common humanity, and explore the transformative power of live theatre. Celebrating our 41st season as a professional theatre in residence at Syracuse University, we create innovative, adven-

Vision: Syracuse Stage illuminates the

many truths of our common humanity through the transformative power of live theatre.

A b o u t S y r a c u s e S ta g e Syracuse Stage is Central New York’s

Chong. These visiting artists are supported by a staff of artisans, technicians, educators and administrators who are responsible for all facets of the theatre from building sets, props and costumes to marketing, development and box office. A solid core of subscribers and supporters helps keep Syracuse Stage a vibrant artistic presence in Central New York.  Year after year their support and patronage contribute to the success of the theatre.  Additional support from government, foundations, corporations and Syracuse University helps to ensure the continued role of Syracuse Stage as a valued cultural resource for the community.  Syracuse Stage is a constituent of the Theatre Communications Group (TCG), the national organization for the American theatre, and a member of the Arts and Cultural Leadership Alliance (ACLA), the University Hill Corporation and the East Genesee Regent Association.

premier professional theatre. Founded in 1974, Stage has produced more than 300 plays in 40 seasons including a number of world, American, and East Coast premieres. Each season 90,000 patrons enjoy an adventurous mix of new plays and bold interpretations of classics and musicals featuring the finest theatre artists. In addition, Stage maintains a vital educational outreach program that annually serves over 20,000 students from 24 counties. Syracuse Stage is a member of  The League of Resident Theatres (LORT), the largest professional theatre association in the country. America’s leading actors, directors and designers work and/or have worked at Stage including: Tony Award-winners Lillias White, Chuck Cooper and Elizabeth Franz, Emmy recipient Jean Stapleton, Sam Waterston, John Cullum, James Whitmore, Ben Gazzara and Ping

in The Community An important aspect of the Syracuse

The Burton Blatt Institute, ARISE, IRC’s Community Wide Dialogue to End Racism, Hospice of CNY, SUNY Upstate Medical/St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Onondaga County, The Learning Place, AIDS Community Resources, Syracuse Homes, The Chadwick Residence, The Child Care Council of Onondaga County, and Vera House, among others.

Stage mission is to be an active partner and resource in the Central New York community. Each season Syracuse Stage is pleased to partner with a diverse group of community organizations in sponsoring and facilitating various programs, benefits and events. Ongoing and past partnerships include Arc of Onondaga,

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2 0 1 4 Fa l l c h i l d r e n ’ s to u r

2 0 1 4 s ta g e G a l a

An Evening With Jesse Cook & His Band

Annabel Drudge... and the Second Day of School

Syracuse Stage Gala 2014 Schine Student Center Saturday, June 7 6 - 7:30 pm Cocktails & Silent Auction 7:30 - 9 pm Dinner 9:15 Performance

The Bank of America Children’s Tour By Lauren Unbekant Directed by Lauren Unbekant September 23 - December 11

Annabel Drudge had a very bad first day at her new school... and she’s not going back. “Not with another 179 days left to go.” Her ever positive parents Phillip and Ima Drudge try to convince Annabel that she is special and will find friends who won’t care that she wears a leg brace. Annabel doesn’t want to be “special,” she just wants to fit in. With help from her Nana, a midnight journey to Istanbul, and a pair of magical slippers, Annabel discovers just how special she is.

Widely considered one of the most influential figures in nuevo flamenco music, Cook and his band incorporate elements of flamenco rumba, jazz & many forms of world music. For reservations and information, contact Katherine Keeney (315.443.2709, kakeeney@syr.edu) or Barbara Beckos (315.443.3931, bbeckos@syr.edu).

Information and Booking: Kate Laissle 315.442.7755, kmlaissl@syr.edu

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n e x t at SU d r a m a

The Good Woman of Setzuan

Spring Awakening

By Bertolt Brecht Directed by Felix Ivanov Performed in the Loft Theatre March 28 – April 13

Book and Lyrics by Steven Sater Music by Duncan Sheik Based on the play by Frank Wedekind Directed by Michael Barakiva Musical Direction by Brian Cimmet Choreographed by Andrea Leigh-Smith April 25 – May 10

Bertolt Brecht had a way with accepted social convention: turn it upside down, give it a good shake, and expose its hypocrisy with humor and delightful characters. In this master work, a good-hearted, penniless, prostitute named Shen Tei disguises herself as a savvy businessman in order to master the ruthlessness needed to be a “good person” in a brutal world. She can fool just about everyone, but how will she be judged by the gods?

Winner of eight Tony Awards, Spring Awakening is a hard-hitting rock musical adaptation of Frank Wedekind’s expressionist play. Set in late nineteenth century Germany, the story follows Wendla Bergmann, Moritz Stiefel, Melchior Gabor and their peers as they struggle to understand the meaning of sexuality and violence in an oppressive, repressed society where adults refuse to answer any hard questions.

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s y r a c u s e s ta g e b o a r d o f t r u s t e e s Chair

Ann Clarke Dean, College of Visual and Performing Arts Syracuse University

President

Pat Colabufo Human Resource Manager Wegmans Food Markets

Robert Pomfrey* President & CEO POMCO Group Louis Marcoccia* Executive VP & Chief Financial Officer Syracuse University Vice Chair

Janet Audunson* Senior Counsel National Grid Vice Chair

Melvin T. Stith* Professor, Whitman School of Management Syracuse University Vice Chair

Fran Nichols* Vice Chair Eric Mower + Associates Treasurer

Brian Sischo* VP for Development Syracuse University Secretary

Rod McDonald* Bond, Schoeneck & King Dan Berman Partner HancockEstabrook, LLP Timothy J. Bond** Producing Artistic Director Syracuse Stage & SU Dept. of Drama Lorraine Branham Dean/Professor, S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications Syracuse University

Richard Driscoll Group Manager Commercial Real Estate Lending M&T Bank Ellen Kimatian Eagen

Samantha Millier Associate Attorney Mackenzie Hughes LLP Kevin O’Connor Sr. Resident Director & Sr. VP Investments Merrill Lynch Virginia Parker Retired Educator Annette Peters Human Resources Director The Post-Standard

Sandra Fenske VP & General Counsel Lockheed Martin Corporation

Linda Pitonzo Guild President

Helene Gold Private Voice & Piano Instructor

James Reed Sr. VP Marketing & Sales Excellus BlueCross BlueShield

Bea Gonzalez Dean, University College Syracuse University Nancy Green Investment Advisor Edward S. Green & Associates

Richard Shirtz Regional President NBT Bank Sharon Sullivan Community Volunteer

Larry Harris Sr. VP & CFO & Secretary Saab Sensis Corporation

Wanda Thompson Sr. VP of Operations Upstate Medical University

Jeffrey Hoone Executive Director, Coalition of Museum & Arts Centers Syracuse University

Phil Turner Pastor Bethany Baptist Church

Brian Howard Private Bank Market Manager Key Bank Gregg Lambert Dean’s Professor of the Humanities Syracuse University

Gregory Usherwood Branch Manager Chase Bank Jeffrey Woodward** Managing Director Syracuse Stage

Larry Leatherman President MOST

Ralph Zito** Chair Syracuse University Department of Drama

Sandra Brown President Grandma Brown’s Beans, Inc.

Vincent Love President 100 Black Men of Syracuse Inc.

Michael Zoanetti VP Senior Wealth Advisor Tompkins Financial Advisors

Nancy Byrne Community Volunteer

Suzanne McAuliffe Retired Educator

*Executive Committee **Ex-Officio

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s y r a c u s e S ta g e e m e r i t u s c i r c l e Noreen Falcone Eddie Green Joan Green

Elizabeth Hartnett Claude Incaudo Jack Mannion

Margaret Martin Eric Mower Judy Mower

Michael Shende Jack Webb

S y r a c u s e S ta g e G u i ld b o a r d President

Corresponding Secretary

Linda Pitonzo

Bev Short

executive vice president

Sara Lowengard Vice President, Membership

Gretchen Goldstein Vice President, fundraising

Julia Martin Vice President, Publicity

Elaine Cardone Treasurer

Ray Abdella recording Secretary

Kelly Gardner

Ray Abdella Deborah Borenstein Elaine Cardone Roxanna Carpenter Sarah Conley Nancy Danzer Terry Delavan Marsha Ferrara Grace Flusche Kelly Gardner Jacki Goldberg Barbara Ianuzi Josie James

Lauren Kochian Linda Lowengard Sara Lowengard Julia Joyce Martin Amy McHale Ann Mullin Mary O’Hara Linda Pitonzo Daniel Ryan Beverly Short Marian Stanton Jean Straub Maryam Wasmund Ginny Yerdon

S y r a c u s e S ta g e e d u c at i o n a d v o c a c y b o a r d Sara Bambino

Joe Goldberg

North Syracuse High School

Jamesville Dewitt High School

Todd Benware

Fred Montas

Christian Brothers Academy

Manlius Pebble Hill

Elizabeth Defurio

Kathleen Pickard

Nottingham High School

Baker High School

Kimberly Doan

William Preston

Auburn High School

Manlius Pebble Hill

Patricia Farrington

Jennifer Sabatino

Cicero North Syracuse High School

Cato Meridian Middle School

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the Glass Menagerie Sponsors M & T Bank. Continuing a long tradition of supporting the arts in the CNY community, M & T is pleased to underwrite Syracuse Stage’s production of The Glass Menagerie. M & T has always maintained strong support for civic and educational experiences and recognizes the need to be actively involved in helping to achieve a better quality of life in our community. Hiscock & Barclay is a proud supporter of the communities in which we practice and strive to make them a better place to work and live. The arts are important contributors to the quality of life we enjoy. We wish the cast and crew of all Syracuse Stage productions our best wishes and look forward to another entertaining season! Carrier is proud to continue to support Syracuse Stage and is delighted to sponsor the mainstage play The Glass Menagerie this season. We salute Syracuse Stage for remaining committed to its mission of bringing such exceptional performances and educational programming of live theatre to our community for 40 years. Lockheed Martin Employees Federated Fund is pleased to sponsor this season’s production of The Glass Menagerie. Lockheed Martin and its 1,900 local employees congratulate and thank Syracuse Stage for its commitment to bringing the very best of theatrical entertainment to Central New York and as a result, contributing to our high quality of life.

season supporters*

Richard Mather Fund

The John Ben Snow Foundation, Inc.

Grandma Brown Foundation

*Corporate, Foundation and Government support received in the last 12 months from $3,000 - $100,000 and above.

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s y r a c u s e s ta g e a n n u a l G i f t s Syracuse Stage depends on the generosity of contributions from individuals, corporations, businesses, foundations and government agencies. It is with much gratitude that we recognize the following donors to our annual campaign. Contributors listed below represent donations received in the past twelve months. For information regarding levels of contribution and benefits of each please contact the Development office at 315.443.3931 or visit syracusestage.org

c o r p o r at e h o n o r r o l l $100,000+ Syracuse University $50,000 - $99,999 Syracuse Media Group $14,000 - $24,999 Arts Engage, the Office of the Syracuse University Arts Presenter M&T Bank – The Glass Menagerie, Pay What You Can Series, Syracuse Stage Fundraiser POMCO Group – Presenting Sponsor, A Christmas Carol Time Warner Cable WAER WCNY $7,500 - $13,999 Bank of America – Children’s Tour, The Bully Games Clear Channel Media and Entertainment CNY Business Journal Excellus BlueCross BlueShield – Blithe Spirit Hiscock & Barclay KeyBank N.A. – A Christmas Carol Lockheed Martin MST NBT Bank – Blithe Spirit Syracuse Stage Board of Trustees WRVO

 = Increased Gift,

$5,000 - $7,499 Carrier Corporation – Glass Menagerie Constellation Energy Nuclear Group - ArtsEmerging Lockheed Martin Employees Federated Fund National Grid Scherzi Photography + Video SU Humanities Center, organizer of Syracuse Symposium: “Listening” Scorched Tompkins Financial Advisors – Educational Programs Wegmans –Educational Programs $2,800 - $4,999 CNY Latino Eagle Newspapers Syracuse New Times Urban CNY $1,500 - $2,799 Bristol- Meyers Squibb Foundation EBS-RMSCO, Inc. Phoebe’s SRCTec Inc. SU School of Education Syracuse Blue Print Young & Franklin $1,000 - $1,499 Action Printwear, Inc. 

Cooper Crouse - Hinds McIntosh Box & Pallet Co., Inc. Thomas R. Pratt, Architect, PC $500 - $999 Anoplate Corp. Merrill Lynch Law Office of Keith D. Miller Rapid Response Monitoring Service $250 - $499 ACLS Mailing & Fulfillment Freeman Interiors Geddes Federal Savings Hebert Financial Strategies/ Dennis & Judy Hebert Reeves Farms Smith Contemporary Furniture/Smith Interiors Ltd The Mid-York Press, Inc. $75 - $249 Brady System Fulton Savings Bank Giarrusso Building Supplies Mauro-Bertolo Therapy Services, P.T., P.C. L. & J.G. Stickley Urist Financial & Retirement Planning Visual Technologies Ann Wolfson Associates

* = Stage Board Member, Stage Emeritus Board Member,

n = In-kind Contribution

Contributors listed have provided support in the past 12 months.

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f o u n d at i o n & g o v e r n m e n t h o n o r r o ll $50,000 - $99,999 The Dorothy and Marshall M. Reisman Foundation – Presenting Sponsor, Scorched, The Whipping Man and Chinglish, and Founders Circle Member $25,000 - $49,999 Central New York Community Foundation, Inc. John F. Marsellus Fund County of Onondaga, Administered by the CNY Arts The Richard Mather Fund National Endowment for the Arts New York State Council on the Arts Shubert Foundation

$14,000 - $24,999 The John Ben Snow Foundation, Inc. ArtsEmerging $7,500 - $13,999 AXA Foundation The Gifford Foundation The Green Family Foundation $5,000 - $7,499 Theatre Development Fund, Inc. $2,800 - $4,999 Grandma Brown Foundation - The Whipping Man The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation – General Operating Support

Melvin & Mildred Eggers Family Charitable Foundation $1,500 - $2,799 The Allyn Foundation – A Christmas Carol Price Chopper’s Golub Foundation – Education Initiative $1,000 - $1,499 Henry A. Panasci, Jr. Charitable Trust Frank & Frances Revoir Foundation  $500 - $999 Peter & Wendy Blanck Family Foundation

endowment & planned gift donors $7,500 - $12,000 Mary Jane Woodward

$5,000 - $7,499 Mary Louise Dunn Fund

$1,000 - $1,499 Howard & Grayce Bendixen Memorial Trust

individual gifts All new and increased gifts this season are matched dollar for dollar by the Richard Mather Fund. Founders Circle $7,500 - $24,999 Paul Phillips, MD & Sharon* Sullivan Playwrights’ Circle $5,000 - $7,499 Daniel Bingham & Gail Hamner – The Glass Menagerie Eric & Judy Mower Sandra Lee Fenske* & Joe Silberlicht Producer’s Circle $2,800 - $4,999 Bill & Nancy* Byrne

Pete & Mary Beth* Carmen Margaret, Amy & Bob Currier Mary Louise Dunn William Eggers Sandy Fenske Helene* & Neil Gold Daniel Bingham & Gail Hamner Barbara & Brian* Howard Mary & Larry* Leatherman Louis* & Susan Marcoccia Suzanne* & Kevin McAuliffe Judy & Eric Mower* Judith Sayles & David Murray

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Frederick & Virginia* Parker Mrs. Sherwin Radin Nancy & Steve Rogers The Spina Family Elinor Spring-Mills & Darvin Varon Dr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Welch Director’s Circle $1,500 - $2,799 Janet Audunson & David Youlen Joan Christy & Thomas Bersani Nancy Seward & Tim Bond Cathy & Jim Breuer


RESTAURANT & COFFEE LOUNGE

ace The Pl Before

To Go

ow The Sh

315.475.5154 900 EAST GENESEE ST PHOEBESSYRACUSE.COM

Lunch ~  Dinner  ~  Full Bar  ~ Coffee Lounge 54


Sandra L. Brown* Laurie Clark Kristin & Sidney Cominsky Dana & Peggy Dudarchik Richard & Therese Driscoll James Eagen & Ellen* Kimatian Eagen Mike & Noreen Falcone Barbara & Michael Flintrop Bethaida Gonzalez Joan & Eddie Green* Winifred E. Greenberg Bonnie & Gary Grossman Ann & Larry*Harris Betsy Hartnett* Mr. & Mrs. Claude* Incaudo Tamara Jacobs David Epstein Michael & Barbara Flintrop Peter Cannavo & Helen Jacoby Tamara Jacobs Mr. & Mrs. Dudley Johnson Randy & Elizabeth Kalish Bea Gonzalez* & Michael Leonard Mr. John F.X. Mannion* & Mayor Stephanie A. Miner Nancy Green* & Tony Marschall Margaret* & Don Martin Sally Lou & Fran Nichols Kevin* & Michelle O’Connor John & Sheila Parker William & Rosemary Pooler Bob & Kellie Pomfrey Dene A. Sarason Elaine & Michael* Shende Leslie Kohman & Jeffrey Smith Dr. & Mrs. Sam Spalding Dr. Eric & Mrs. Karen Spina James Sprague Gies & Kenneth Gies Sprague Patricia & Melvin* Stith Cindy Sutton & Family Sally & Bob Theis Eileen & David Thompson Cherry & Peter Thun Linda & Jack* Webb Paul Barron & Leah Weinberg Glenda & Larry Wetzel Laurie & Michael* Zoanetti

Benefactors $1,000 - $1,499 Joan Christy Marya & John Frantz and Sutton Real Estate Company, LLC Sam & Deborah Haines Joyce Homan Susan Beth Burgess & Michael S. Nilan Sandra Hurd & Joel Potash Athenia Rogers George & Rita Soufleris Stars $500 - $999 Aminy Audi: Stickley Furniture Anoplate Dr. & Mrs. Richard Aubry Maria & Paul Badami  Marion & Bob Barbero Daniel* & Sarah Berman Louise Birkhead Gail Hamner & Daniel Bingham Patti & Frank Borer S. I Bretschneider Craig & Kathy Byrum Pat Colabufo* Drs. Alexander & Margaret Charters* Dr. & Mrs. Paul S. Cohen Ann Clarke* Frank N. Decker Mr. & Mrs. Richard Driscoll* Donald Blair & Nancy Dock Lew & Elaine Dubroff Clay & Dora Elliott Michael & Jacki Goldberg Deb & Sam Haines Theodore C. & Antonia M. Hansen Donna Mahar & David Heisig Della & Philip Holtzapple John & Gloria Kennedy Stephen & Janet Kimatian Gregg Lambert*, Director of HC, Syracuse University Barbara Beckos & Arthur McDonald John P. & Elizabeth Y. McKinnell Jane Merrill John MacAllister & Laurel Moranz

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In Tribute ontributions have been made to Syracuse Stage to honor someone, celebrate a special occasion or offer an expression of sympathy in memory of a loved one. In Memory of Arlene Alpaugh Allene Ayling in honor of Don Ayling Rose Erma Angotti in honor of Nancy Davenhauer Mrs. Gwynne Bellos in honor of Dr. Neal S. Bellos Sherly Day-Bernthal in tribute of Murray Bernthal Dr. Stuart Bretschneider in tribute to Cindy Bretschneider Carol Bryant in honor of Virginia Parker Susan G. Dorn in memory of Phillip K. Dorn June M. Estes in honor of Gerald L. Estes Mrs. Blanche & Ms. Carol Everingham, in honor of WWII, Purple Heart Veteran, Sgt. Robert I. Everingham Barbara Genton in honor of Donna Perricone Peggy Ginniff in honor of my parents Harold & Mildred Ginniff Jacki & Michael Goldbergin tribute of Natalie Goldberg Syracuse MT Student Tom & Christine Hafner in tribute of Peter Hafner Patti & Bill Haggerty in memory of Marilyn Parratt Kip & Terri Hargrave in honor of Gus Hargrave & Rick Menke Kathlyn Heaton in honor of Sharon Waletzko Drs. Timothy & Lisa Izant in honor of the Izant Brothers Linda & Bob Jackson in honor of Kevin Crewell Doris King in memory of Austin Hoffman II Richard & Joan Kollgaard in honor of Don Buschmann & Tracey White Robert & Ellen LaBerge in tribute of Daniela Varon Lorraine LaDuke in honor of Mrs. Cecile LaDuke Janet W. Lowe in honor of Bob Moss Mary S. Mahoney in honor of


ACCESSI B ILIT Y PERFORMANCES 2 0 1 3 / 1 4

the glass menagerie Sat. Apr. 12, 3:00 S Sat. Apr. 19, 3:00 AD Wed. Apr. 23, 2:00 OC Sun. Apr. 27, 2:00 OC

American Sign Language = S Sign Language Interpreted Performance Series supported in part by Welch Allyn, in memory of Susan Thompson. An American Sign Language Interpreted performance is offered for every production. For the most advantageous viewing, be sure to mention your interest in sign interpretation when reserving tickets. Open Captioned Performances = OC Open Captioning is provided for two matinee performances of every production. A small screen, placed to the side of the stage, displays text corresponding to the play’s dialogue and other sounds. Open Captioning can be viewed from most seats in the theatre. However, for the most advantageous viewing, please contact the Box Office. Open Captioning is supported by grants from Theatre Development Fund’s TAP Plus Praagram, NYSCA and donations from individuals and corporations. Audio-Described Performances = AD Simultaneous live narration and pre-show description for blind and visually impaired patrons is available upon advance request. Information at 443-9839 or jmwhelan@syr.edu. Audio Enhancement: Syracuse Stage offers an infrared hearing system for patrons with up to 70% hearing loss. Headsets can be reserved free of charge through the Box Office or at the Coat Room before curtain. Wheelchair Seating and Accessibility: Syracuse Stage is wheelchair accessible. Please call the Box Office at 315-443-3275 to arrange wheelchair seating.

PROGRAM BOO K Publications Director Graphic Designer Advertising Program Cover Art

Joseph Whelan Jonathan Hudak Katherine Keeney Brenna Merritt

The Glass Menagerie published April 2, 2014 The Syracuse Stage program is published seven times a year. For advertising rates and information contact the development office at 315.443.2709. Printed by Midstate Printing Corporation.

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Justin Sawyers & Jeffrey T. Morehead Anne Morford Jan & David Panasci Mark Re & Nancy Pasquale Jane Burkhead & Robert Sarason Gracia & Rick Sears Richard & Margaret Shirtz Walter & Nancy Shepard Brian* & Kathy Sischo Corinne & Lynn Smith James & Vicki Smith Laurence Sovik Raymond & Linda Straub Nancy Kramer & Doug Sutherland Tiso Family Lorraine Branham & Melvin Williams Lori Ott & Jeffrey Woodward Angels $250 - $499 George & Sandra Abbott Mr. Timothy Atseff & Ms. Margaret G. Ogden Anne Barash Joanne & Jim Beckman Micheal & Donna Bocketti Diane & Orville Boden Anthony & Nancy Bottar Dick Bowman Susan & Thomas Brett Mrs. William L. Broad Mark & Maren Brown Marlene A. Brown Marion L. Burke Dr. & Mrs. R. J. Cassady Drs. Alexander* & Margaret Charters Ann & Steve Chase Goodwin Cooke Thomas & Deborah Coyle Mr. W. Carroll Coyne Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Dannible Carol Decker Sandra Marie DiBianco Alan B. Dolmatch Lynn Cleary & David Duggan Jonathan & Rosanne Ecker Mr. & Mrs. William Elkins Ted Emerick Marsha & Benjamin J.

Ferrara Maryann Finn Michael & Grace Flusche Judith A. Fox Anita & Allen Frank David & Sylvia Fry Allan & Nirelle Galson Penny & Ernie Giraud David Jacobs & Douglas Goldschmidt Marie & Joseph E. Grasso Jean Jeffery Greene Jerry & Beth Groff Dana & Susan Hall Mr. & Mrs. Diane Hall Ellen & Dave Hardy Dr. & Mrs. Donald M. Haswell Nancy & Bud Haylor Mr. Larry Higbee Drs. Joe & Paula Himmelsbach Mr. & Mrs. Alexander Holstein Anne Barash & Eric Holzwarth Randall LaLonde & Patricia Homer Carrie Mae Weems & Jeffrey* Hoone Dr. Peter & Mary Huntington Robin & Mark Kasowitz Norma Kelley Penelope J.M. & Stephen M. Klein Mary Rose Kott Larry Leatherman Linda & Dan Lowengard Candace & John Marsellus Albert Marshall Philip & Kim Mazza Scott & Marlene Macfarlane Amy & Myles McHale, Jr. Sam & Margaret McNaughton James & Kathleen Muldoon Bernard P. & Leslie A. Molldrem Alejandro Amezcua & David Murray Betty Jane & Larry Myers Maria Maniscalco & James Nellis John & Joan Nicolson Mike & Maggie O’Connor Phyllis & Chuck Olmsted

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John Francis Mahoney John Huppertz & Diane Mastin in honor of Fran & Sally Lou Nichols Richard Midlam in tribute of Barbara Midlam Lois Moran in honor of Joan & Raymond Lee Janice Nelson in honor of Bea & Irving Solomon Heather Staub in honor of Curtis Staub Pamela K. Reisman Monaco in tribute of Dorothy & Marshall Reisman Mark Cywilko & Marianne Moosbrugger in honor of Isabell A. Cywilko In honor of Kathryn Mulligan Liz Nguyen in tribute of Jack P. Bleich Joy & Al Oliver in honor of Rebecca Oliver & Hillary Gale Joan & Lawrence Page – in tribute of the musicians of the orchestra who accompany some productions Susan A. Parker in honor of Virginia B. Parker Karleen Preske in tribute of Kathleen Wilkinson Anita Rathbun in honor of Mildred Rathbun David Relyea in tribute of Paula Relyea Nancy Remchuk – in honor of Tim Bond, for a job well done Terry & Marilyn Ryan in honor of Shirley Gersony Nancy Scheutziw in tribute of Syracuse Stage Staff/ Volunteers Mr. & Mrs. Jacob H. Schuhle in memory of William Whiting Mansukh L. Shah in memory of Indira M. Shah John W. Sivak, Jr. in memory of Phoebe P. Sivak Vivan Summerville, June 7, 1968 Darcie Bowden Judy & Jim Sweet in memory of Kara Sweet Gobron Peter & Hanora Vander Sluis in memory of Hildegarde B. Vander Sluis Ron Theel in memory of Karen Theel Gary Walters in memory of Patti Grycka Carol Bryant & Richard Ward in honor of Virginia & Fritz Parker Terry & Lynda Wheat in memory of Kathy GoldfarbFindling Octavia Wilcox in honor of Ethel May Pierce Janet & Larry Wolf in memory of Frederick I. Wolf


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Janice & David Panasci Robert & Teresa Parke Robert & Jane Pickett Marilyn Pinsky Kathy & Dan Rabuzzi Nancy & Gary Radke Rissa & Michael Ratner James* & Theresa Reed Arnie & Libby Rubenstein David Rubin Ellen & Lome Runge Lois & Ted Schroeder Marilyn & Mike Sees Nancy & Walter Shepard James W. Shults Rhoda Sikes Laurence Sovik Sharon Springer, MD Helene & George Starr Dr. J. Martin & Jackie Talcik Robert & Rosemarie Tenney Wanda Thompson Cynthia G. Tracy Elizabeth A. Tumbridge Pastor Phil M. Turner/ Bethany Baptist Church Sara & Jay Wason Marylou & Kurt Watson Lynda & Terry Wheat Lorrain Branham & Mevin Williams John & Mitzi Wolf Mary Jane Woodward Kathy, Tony, Victoria & Lucas Zappala Supporting Cast $100 - $249 Dr. & Mrs. Jerrold Abraham Judy & Bud Adams Bev & George Adams Sally Alden Howard & Sara Alexander David & Amy Allyn Kal Alston Kristi Andersen Robert & Jeanne Anderson Alice & Bob Andrews Nathan Andrews James & Nancy Asher Holmes & Sarah Bailey George S. Bain Dr. & Mrs. Harry Balmer Ed & Joan Bangel Nancy Barnum

Susan Barbero Gerhard & Carole Baule Andrew & Margot Baxter Ms. Gwynne Bellos Paula A. Bendis Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Berger Dr. & Mrs. William Berkery Wanda Warren Berry Cynthia A. Blume. Gary & Fran Bockus Brenda Bousefield Katherine & Jack Boyce Mary Brady Bernard B. & Ona Cohn Bregman Robert Moss & Michael Brennan James & Joyce Bresnahan Rachel May & Tom Brockelman Dawn Broderick G. Martin & Kathleen Brogan Dianne & Terry Brown Philip & Helen Buck Robert & Mary Burdick Mary & Bill Butler Frank & Kathy Campagna Fran & Larry Campbell Ronald M. Capone Peter Carney Tom & Maryann Carranti Robert E. & Dorothy C. Chambers Steve & Mary Chapin Joseph L. & Janice L. Charles Joan Cincotta Malcolm Clark R. Peter & Janet H. Clarke Carolyn & Sam Clemence Mr. James A. Clinton Mr. & Mrs. Craig Cobb Gregory Cohen Martha Cole Milt & Miggs Coleman James A Traver & Marguerite Conan Bob & Sue Congel Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Conine Roger & Judy Corwin Mr. & Mrs. Richard Cote Mr. & Mrs. Douglas L. Cotton Mike & LaRae Cottrell Orazio & Genevieve Covelli

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Elizabeth Cowan Tracy Cromp George W. Curry Peter & Margaret Darby Clive & Sandra Davis John S. & Catherine J. Davies Clive & Sandra Davis Arthur & Juleen Delaney Paula A. Dendis Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Derrenbacker David C. Dickinson Delores R. Dixon Elizabeth & Evan Dreyfuss Jeff & Linda Drimer David & Robin Drucker Walter & Linda Dudas Aco & Zoran Dudevski Lynn Cleary & David Duggan Nancy & Tony Ebersole Dr. Nabila A. Elbadwi/ Radiotherapy Associates of Upstate NY Betsy & Bill Elkins Susan A. Estabrook Cissie Fairchilds Lori & Christopher Farrell Tom & Jane Ferguson James & Barbara Finlon Joseph & Lillian Fischer Dan & Colleen Fisher Karen & William Fisher Carole Fitzpatrick Katherine Flack Robert & Terry Flower Theresa Flyn Len Fonte Philip & Marilyn Frankel Drs. Tess & Jeff Freedman Ellie & Cyril Freeman Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Freer Martin & Daisy Fried Melanie & Mark Fullerton Edgar & Eva Galson David & Bernice Gaynor Margaret Gelfuso Barbara W. Genton Dr. & Mrs. Henry George III Mr. & Mrs. John Gerson Michele Gildemeyer Carl Gildemeyer Frank & Anne Girardi Peggy Ginniff James Godleski


Sheila Goldie Robert & Karen Goldman Gretchen & Jeff Goldstein Annette Goodman Linda Fabian & Dennis Goodrich Lawrence & Dorothy Gordon Drs. Michael & Wendy Gordon Samuel & Judith Gorvitz David Graham Stephen & Julia Graziano Roger & Vicki Greenberg Drs. William & Ann Griffith Jinnette Grimes Patricia Haggerty James M. Hahn Elaine & Gregory Hallett Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Halsey Stewart & Ruth Hancock Kevin & Denise Hanlon Carole & Mark Hansen Milena Hansen Ellen & David Hardy Bill & Kathy Harmand David & Lib Hayes Lionel Lee Hector Alan & Dorothy Heller Roger Heimstra Dr. Karen Heitzman Lee & Nancy Herrington Mary Hershberger Celaine & Victor Hershdorfer Judy & John Hoepner Marcia Hayden-Horan & Philip Horan Patricia & John Hottenstein Mr. & Mrs. Richard Hovey Guy & Patricia Howard Karen Heitzman & James Howe Dr. Anne Hunt Jim & Sherri Hyla Pam Hyland John & Linda Isaac Janet & John Isabelle Virginia Jacob Elaine & Steven Jacobs Richard Jaegar Mr. & Mrs. Jastrzab Daniel & Rhea Jezer Sisters Janet & Joan – supporting cast James Aiello & Pam Johnson Dr. & Mrs. Howard C.

Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Stephen L. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Johnston Michael & Lynette Jozefczyk Marjorie T. & Joseph V. Julian Stephen Kankus & Lori Knapp- Kankus Rita & Allan Kanter Jan & James Kaplan Phil & Judy Kaplan Robin & Mark Kasowitz Gregory & Carolyn Keefe John & Jane Keegan David & Noel Keith Scott & Cheryle Kelley Stephen & Janet Kimatian Jean Kimber Barbara & Richard Kimm Russell & Joan King Sally & Dick Kinsey Richard & Joan Kollgaard Barbara Sutton & Liz Kolodney Dr. Sylvia Betcher & Martin Korn Donald & Margo Koten Kathy & Scott Krell Eileen Krell Roger Krieger Margaret Kufel Stephen & Cheryl Ladenheim Hume & Peggy Laidman Jay & Linda Land Phyllis & Harlan LaVine Linda & Jim LeMessurier Dr. Mark & Jeannette Levinsohn Bonnie Levy Elizabeth D. Liddy Edward & Carol Lipson Barbara Burke Liptak Brian & Susan Lison K.B. Lloyd Paul Brown & Susan Loevenguth Harlan London, Ph.D. Betsy Long John & Marian Loosmann Daniel & Linda Lowengard Nick & Cathy Lozoponi Dr. Eugene & Mrs. Christine Lozner Thomas Luck

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Matching Gift Program he following companies will match gifts of their employees, retirees and spouses with a gift of their own to Syracuse Stage. Ask your personnel office for a matching gift form, send the completed form with your gift – and we’ll do the rest! AT&T Allied-Signal, Inc. American Express Company Avon Products, Inc. AXA Equitable Bank of America Borden, Inc. CIGNA Corporation CNA Foundation Chemical Bank Chubb Group of Insurance Companies Citicorp & Citibank, N.A. Coopers Industries Foundation Crouse Hinds Co. – Cooper Industries Deluxe Corporation Digital Equipment Corporation Emerson Electric Co. Equitable Life Assurance Society Farmer & Traders Life Ins. Co. Fireman’s Fund Insurance GE Foundation General Foods Corporation GlaxoSmithKline John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance The Home Depot Foundation Honeywell IBM Corporation J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. Johnson & Johnson Kemper National P&C Co. Key Foundation Lever Brothers Company Marine Midland Bank, N.A. McDonald’s Corporation Merrill Lynch Mobil Oil Corporation The MONY Group Mutual Life Insurance Co. NCR Corporation National Grange New York Telephone Niagara Mohawk Foundation Owens-Illinois, Inc. Pitney Bowes The Prudential Foundation Charles Schwab Radio Shack Rockwell Automation Trust SmithKline Beecham Labs The St. Paul’s Companies The Travelers Companies United Parcel Service United Technologies Corp. Verizon Welch Allyn Xerox Corporation


Tom Miller & Mary MacBlane Patricia & James MacKillop Clark Malcolm John & Janet Mallan J.R. Manier Jon M. Maloff Louis & Nancy Maresca Mary K. Massad Fred & Virginia Marty Elizabeth G. Mascia Grace & Richard Mason John & Gloria Mandly Rick Manier Ann M. Marshall Nancy & Tony Marshall Frederick & Virginia Marty Mary K. Massad Mr. & Mrs. Peter Mazzaferro Drs. Toni & Bob McCormick Don & Rena McCrimmon Michael McGrath Pat McGrath Brian & Cheryl McIntyre Bev & Dave McKay Mrs. J.T. McKnight Marilyn McKnight Diane Cass & Tim McLaughlin Dr. & Mrs. James L. Megna Mary & Eckart Meisterfeld Clifford & Marjorie Mellor Ann R. Melvin Sis Merrell Nancy & John Merrill Mr. & Mrs. Charles Miller Dan &Terry Miller Merrill L. Miller, M.D. David & Beth Mitchell Gail & Peter Mitchell June M. Mitchell James Mitscher Robert & Barbara Moore John Palmer & Liz Morgenthein Eugene & Kimberlee Moretti Susan Moskal Janet S. Munro Richard & Barbara Natoli Dorothea & Douglas Nelson Brenda Neuss Stephen W. Nevins John & Joan Nicholson Douglas & Gail Nielsen Gloria Noble Dennis & Doren Norfleet Neil Novelli

Robert & Beth Oddy Howard McLaughlin & Mary O’Hara Sally O’Herin Albert Oliver Charles & Phyllis Olmstead Donna & Richard O’Neil Timothy & JoDean Orcutt Deborah O’Shea Cathy L. Palm Connie & Peter Palumb Robert & Teresa Parke Francis McMillan Parks David & Cynda Penfield Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Penner Kenn & Annette* Peters David & Susan Pickard Mary & Barry Pickard Richard & Nera Pilgrim David & Linda Pitonzo Joe & Karen Porcello Howard & Ann Port Thomas Potter Tom & Camille Potter David & Linda Rezak Robert & Christina Rhinehart Geraldine & Gary Richards Mr. & Mrs. David A. A. Ridings Brian & Chris Rieger Avard & Patricia Rogers Howard J. Rose Gayle Ross Nancy Machles Rothschild Elaine Rubenstein Maria & Richard A. Russell David Michelo & Peggy Ruzzie Linda & Bob Ryan Don & Florence Saleh Richard & Jill Sargent Kelly & Tony Scalzo Jeffrey & Abby Scheer M. Gelfuso & P. Scheibe Keith Schroeder Janice Scully Jeffrey & Abby Scheer Nancy Mudrick& Eric Schiff George & Sharon Schmit Herbert & Hillery Schneiderman Margaret Schuhle Ellen Schwartz Ruth Seaman Mr.& Mrs. Ed Sellmeyer Constance Semel

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e endeavor to provide a complete listing of all donors in all individual giving categories. However, if your gift is not listed or is listed incorrectly, please accept our apologies, and contact the Development Office at (315) 443-9848.

Drs. Peter Cronright & Judy Setla Rick & Betsy Severance Rob & Cheryl Shallish Mark Watkins & Brenda Silverman Dr. & Mrs. Robert Slavens Dr. & Mrs. L. Ryan Smart Craig & Martha Smith Debbie & David Smith Judith B. Smith Robert & Sheila Smith Harold & Ruth Smulyan Carol & Dirk Sonneborn Marcene Sonneborn Dr. & Mrs. George Soufleris Paul & Jean Soper Rosemary Baker & Stu Spiegel Helen E. Stacy Anne Stagnitti Deirdre & David Stam Dr. & Mrs. Dennis J. Stelzner Deborah & Jim Stewart Nona Stewart Jill & Ron Stratton Nan Strickland Kristin Swift Thomas Talbot Joan & Gene Tarolli Laura M. Terpening Dr. & Mrs. James A. Terzian Jim & Terry Toole Dr. Richard & Mavis Tornatore Jean & John Tromans Tom & Mollie Tucker Marc & Susan Viggiano Dina & Gershon Vincow Meghan & T.J. Vitale Sara Warner & Laurence Volan


Fred & Patricia von Mechow Frank & Alice Vreeland Barbara Vural Anita S. & Robert L. Wagner Kashi & Kameshawar Wali Tom & Maureen Walsh Barbara Wanamaker Dr. & Mrs. Donald Washburn Wilbur & Linda Webb – Audio Description Sally Webster Miriam Weiner Steven Shahan & Elizabeth Weinstein Ruth S. Weinstock Margaret Harding & Joseph Whelan Mr. & Mrs. Nathaniel White Evelyn D. White Stacey White Elizabeth R. Wiggins Garrett Wikoff Pauline & Robert Williamson Alex & Lola Winter Tina Winter Ivan & Bonnie Wolf Tom & Carol Wolff Kelly Wypych Cynthia A. Zacharek Judy & Steve Zdep, DDS Friends $75 - $99 Al & Jane Arras John & Mary Ann Baichi Gail & Dennis Baldwin Manny & Ellen Barbas Theresa & Dennis Bardenett Jon & Trish Booth Dr. & Mrs. Denis F. Branson Bob & Kathy Brown Helen Buck Dr. & Mrs. Deane Cady Sharon F. Campanelli Dr. Richard & Nina Sterne Cantor Ronald Capone Timothy McLaughlin & Diane Cass Tim Cassidy Gary & Shannon Comins Paula derBoghosian Martani Derooy Mary Ellen Drabot James & Marlene Dunford Molly Fitzpatrick Cliff & Jane Forstadt Judith Fox Ellen Golden N. Gordon Gray

William J. Gray Jinnette Grimes Jane Guiles Annette & Monroe Guisbond Patricia Haggerty Holly S. Hart Robert & Denise Heater John & Judit Hoepner Miriam Hudecheck Elizabeth B. Humphreys Janet Jaffe Richard Jablanka Nancy Freeborough-Kaczmar Phil & Judy Kaplan Kankus Family Linda Kashdin Alexander & Joan Keilen Gregory & Linda Keefe John & Susan Kline Richard & Joan Kollgaard Mr. & Mrs. Sheldon Kruth Robert & Lauren Lalley Lois M. Easterday & Susan J. Lamanna Eileen & James Lantier Joanne Lloyd Nicholas & Cathy Lozoponi Patricia & Donald MacLaughlin Thomas A Brisk & Gerald M. Mager Bob Mass Doug & Randi Matousek Ryan & Alyson McDermott Mr. & Mrs. Martin McDermott Nancy & John Merrill Robt & Maureen Minich Verner & Jane Mize Robert Moore David & Janet Muir Dr. & Mrs. Charles Muniak Deirdre Neilen Brenda Neuss Ellen O’Connor Sally O’herin Karen Orr Anita Pisano Cathy Palm Brian Silfer & Amy Romano Barbara Rothschild Dr. & Mrs. Bernard Schneider Richard & Denise Severance Judith Smith John Steinburg Dr. Lawrence Stewart Barbara Sutton Lennie & Elizabeth Turner Martha & Tony Viglietta

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Marc & Marcy Waldauer JoAnn Wallace Mrs. Barbara Wanamaker Larry Volan & Sara Warner Dianne D. Webb Ruth Weinstock Peter N. Wells Anna Giacobbe & Peter Welge Backers $50 - $74 Judy Bacon Tammy Balamut Joseph & Debby Barry Ralph Best Stephen & Patti Beuchner Jerrald & Nicolina Bisson Philip Blackwell Arlene K. Bloomer Charles & Mary Buckley Jenifer Breyer Donna Lee Johnson- Brown Karen Brundage Andrew & Teresa Brush Mr. & Mrs. William Burrows Joyce Cady Andrea Capani Ms. Alice B. Chico Vel Chesser Ronald Cicircillo R.K. Clark Michele Combs Julia Cramer Mary Lou Crowley Thomas & Maureen Curran Mr & Mrs. Jamie Cyr Judy Darracq Mrs. Patricia Davis Donald & Jacqueline Denahanty Mr. & Mrs. Charles T. Driscoll Jr. John Druke Clarence Dunham Barbara Edmund Patricia K. Eisenberg Carol Everingham Dorothy Fagerstrom Cynthia Ferguson Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Fieldman Mr. Christopher Finkle Frank Forward Eileen Foss Judith Gagnon Ms. Jacquelyn Gilels Paul Gittelson Martin & Peggy Gillard Ellen Golden William J. Gray Mr. Neal Greenfield


Mrs. Robert Gregg Beverly Kenyon- Haase William & Patricia Haggerty Mr. & Mrs. Hasenwinkel Susan A. Helmer Reverend Kenneth Heuermann Terry Hoey Philip Holtzapple Mr. & Mrs. Horstoestreicher Miriam Hudechek Wanda Irish Amy Jakes- Johnson Gregory & Carolyn Keefe Charles Kelly Mr. & Mrs. Richard Kendrick Susan Kimel Diane E. King Doris A. King Theodore King Neil & Marie Labrake Jill Ladd Gary & April Lazarus Joan Leskoske Mark & Jeanette Levinsohn Joanne Lloyd Mr. & Mrs. David & Michelle Lonergrain

Lisa Lopez Rosaline Letiecq & Nicholas Manzari Ann Marshall Hannah McClennon Nancy McPherson William & Evelyn Mercer Nancy & John Merrill Mr. Steve Metras Michael & Claudia Miceli Charles & Helene Miglerina Cristine Waters & Michael Miller Mr. & Mrs. Robert Munich Mary Jane Nathan Marty & Millie Newshan Joan & Donald Nicholson Mr. Steve Nistras Jennifer Nolan E.C. Oddy Ute Oestreicher Mr. Robert A. Papworth Thomas & Diane Parker Bernard & Jan Perry Barry Pickard Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Pinkes Erna Pulver Garry Upton & James Reagan

DELI & CATERING

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M-F: 6:30 am - 6 pm Sat: 9 am - 3 pm ph: 476 - 8363 fax: 476 - 8364

ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

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Mr. & Mrs. Roger S. Reid Mr. & Mrs. Boyce Rimel Josef Ritter & Toni VogtRitter Marilyn Ryan Leonard Savedoff Margaret & James Schneider Bartholemew Natoli & Janice Scully Donald & Bette Siegel Alan & Jean Smith Daniel & Nancy Smothergill Nona D. Stewart Joyce & Calixto Suarez Charles Tremper Dr. Eugene Turner & Mrs. Sylvia Turner Gary Upton Robert Visali Stephen Waldron Weiss, Savedoff & Ciccione, Dr. of Optometry Mary Anne & Don Winfield Joseph Pinkes & Cynthia Wong Dr. & Mrs. Jeryl Wright David Zehner

SERVICE


S y r a c u s e STAGE S ta f f

ARTISTIC S ta f f

Producing Artistic Director..........................................................................................Timothy Bond Managing Director..................................................................................................Jeffrey Woodward Resident Dramaturg.............................................................................................................Kyle Bass Artistic Assistant...............................................................................................................Chris Botek Director of Educational Outreach...........................................................................Lauren Unbekant Education Outreach Manager.................................................................................Kate M. Laissle Education Assistant.........................................................................................................Len Fonte PRO D UCTION S ta f f

Director of Production Operations...........................................................................Don Buschmann Assistant Production Manager..................................................................................Dianna Angell Company Manager/Production Management Assistant...............................................Brian Crotty Production Management Intern...................................................................................Jessica Feder Student Assistant.....................................................................................................Cynthia Moore Technical Director.......................................................................................................Randall Steffen Assistant Technical Director...................................................................................Rebecca Schuetz Scene Shop Foreman..................................................................................................Michael King Master Carpenter..............................................................................................Elizabeth Nosewicz Carpenters............................................................................................Robert Jenista, Adam Segal Graduate Assistant.........................................................................................................Mike Fong Student work study................................................................................................Mylene Quijano Scenic Charge Artist................................................................................................Holly K. LaGrow Assistant Scenic Artist..............................................................................Kristen Prescott-Ezickson Graduate Assistants.................................................................Carlie Miller Sherry, Aniela Sobieski Student work study................................................................................................Jennifer Donsky Properties Coordinator..........................................................................................Samuel S. Sheehan Props Carpenter.....................................................................................................Tammy Goetsch Props Artisan.................................................................................................................Lisa Letson Graduate Assistants.............................................................................James Gallagher, Lucia Sanz Student work study.....................................................................................................Ashley Kyker Costumer.....................................................................................................Gretchen Darrow-Crotty Assistant Costumer..................................................................................................Meggan Camp Cutter-Drapers.................................................................Jennifer Guadagno, Catherine Hennessy First Hand...............................................................................................................Victoria Lillich Stitchers...................................................................................Amanda Moore, Cynthia Papworth Craftsperson/Shopper................................................................................................Sandra Knapp Wardrobe Supervisor.........................................................................................Danielle Waterman Hair and Wig Stylist..............................................................................................Kristina Scalone Student work study.................................Kathryn Bailey, Kiersten Kozbial-Wu, Charity Van Tassel Master Electrician.................................................................................................David M. Bowman Assistant Master Electrician.......................................................................................Jamie Garrard Electrics Apprentice......................................................................................................Sarah Olsen Student Assistants....................................................Gregory Folsom, Ryan Gibson, Anna LiDestri Resident Sound Designer/Audio Engineer............................................................Jonathan R. Herter Assistant Audio Engineer......................................................................................Kevin O’Connor Sound Apprentice........................................................................................................George Hart Graduate Assistant......................................................................................................Stefan Zoller

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S y r a c u s e STAGE S ta f f

Production Stage Manager........................................................................................Stuart Plymesser Stage Manager....................................................................................................Laura Jane Collins Stage Management Apprentices..........................................................Erin C Brett, Paula Clarkson A D MINISTRATIVE S ta f f

Administrative Director...................................................................................................Diana Coles Director of Marketing and Communications...............................................................Patrick Finlon Publications Director/Assistant Marketing Director................................................Joseph Whelan Group/Corporate Sales Manager................................................................................Tracey White Group Sales Assistants...........................................................................Amanda Kurey, Julia Slater Graphic Designers.......................................................................Jonathan Hudak, Brenna Merritt Marketing Interns.......................................................................Erica Franceschini, Tyler Patchett Production Photographer.........................................................................................Michael Davis Director of Development............................................................................................Barbara Beckos Assistant Director of Development......................................................................Katherine Keeney Development Assistant.................................................................................................Joelle Milea Development Intern...............................................................................................Shantel Bobbitt Comptroller...................................................................................................Mary Kennett Morreale Human Resources Administrator/Assistant Business Manager..................................Kathy Zappala Student Assistant...............................................................................................Emily Buonsignore Director of Information Management & Technology................................................Garrett Wheeler Student Assistants.....................................................................................................David Amado Director of Ticketing & Subscription Services...............................................................Sandra Boyer Assistant Director of Ticketing & Subscription Services.............................................Ben Murphy Assistant Box Office Managers...................................Lisa Doerle, Stasya Erickson, Miguel Tarrats Angel Appeal Telefunding Manager..........................................................................Kathy Zappala Patron Sales and Services.......................Brian Balamut, Jasmin Fink, Dennis Lennox, Terri Wicks Box Office Assistants..........................................Kenia Cevallos, Madeline Corliss, Tatiana Fenner Daniella Franco, Amy Gleitsman, Jessica Moore Benjamin Odom, Jesse Roth, Maggie Siciliano, Danielle Spinello Interpreters for the Deaf.....................Brenda Brown, Angelo Coppola, Mikki Evans Sue Freeman Joanne Jackowski, Sarah Korcz, Zenna Preli, Shaun Standford Director of Audience Services.......................................................................................RenĂŠe Storiale S.U. Main Stage House Manager....................................................Pat Condello, Tammy Goetsch Student Assistant House Managers..............Katie Ball, Hannah Daly, Betty Etheredge, Jesse Roth Bartenders.............................................Laura Hahn, Michael King, Meg Pusey, MaryLou Wright Ushers........................................Luke Brau, Mary Louisa Britt, Kelsey Brodeur, Elizabeth Carson Thomas Countz, Jacob Custer, Hannah Daly, Crystal Ferreiro Abigail Gjurich, Alex Griffin, Troy Hussmann, Shea Kastriner Bridget McGlone, Mary McGowen, Lucy Morgan, Natalie Oliver Adam Segrave, Jenny Taylor, William Zimmermann Community Services Officer......................................................................................Stacey Emmons Custodians........................................................................Kitty Ashby, Delores Bachus, Tony Rogers

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G e n e r a l I n f o r m at i o n Syracuse Stage 820 East Genesee Street Syracuse, NY 13210-1508 Administration: 315/443-4008 Box Office: 315/443-3275 www.SyracuseStage.org Single Ticket Prices Opening Night: $52, $49, $30 Evenings: Fri., Sat.: $50, $47, $30 Sun., Tues., Wed., Thurs.: $39, $37, $30 Matinees: Wed., Sat., Sun.: $46, $43, $30 Previews: $35, $32, $30 All tickets can be purchased at the Syracuse Stage Box Office or online anytime at www.SyracuseStage.org. Prices may vary for opening nights and for A Christmas Carol. Discounts Available for senior citizens and students. Call the Box Office for prices. Group Discounts Available Available for groups of 10 or more; additional discounts for student/senior citizen groups. Call Tracey White: 315/443-9844. Rush Tickets Rush tickets are available for purchase at a discounted rate on the day of the show for all performances by cash or check. Limited availability. Box Office Hours The Box Office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. noon to 6 p.m., and two hours before each performance. Box Office phone: 315/443-3275. Box Office fax: 315/443-1408. Gift Certificates Call the Box Office or visit us online at www.SyracuseStage.org. Parking Entrance to the enclosed parking garage on Irving Avenue is on the corner of Madison Street and Irving, next to the MadisonIrving Medical Building. For hours of operation and parking costs, call (315) 475-4742. There is an open parking lot between Phoebe’s Garden Cafe and the garage maintained by Syracuse University. Beepers and Cell Phones For the actors’ safety and in consideration of the audience please turn off all cell phones; check your beeper and leave your seat number with an usher at the Coat Room prior to the performance. They will monitor your beeper and notify you if there is an emergency. Fire Notice The exit indicated by a red sign nearest the seat you occupy is the shortest route to the street. In the event of an emergency, walk to that exit and follow the house staff ’s directions. Smoking Policy Smoking is not permitted in this building or any public building in accordance with Syracuse University and New York State policy. We ask that our patrons who smoke do so outside of our theatre. Quiet Children Quiet children over the age of five are welcome at Syracuse Stage performances. We do ask that adults remove disruptive children to the lobby.

Ticket Exchange All tickets may be exchanged. Please call the Box Office 24 hours prior to the earliest performance involved in the exchange. Single ticket exchanges carry a $5 fee per ticket. 6Pack holders may make one free exchange per show. Subscribers may make unlimited free exchanges; upgrade charges may apply. Subscribers who missed a scheduled performance and did not exchange may use their Extra Value Ticket or purchase a missed performance pass for $5. Latecomers In order to ensure the safety and concentration of the actors and the uninterrupted enjoyment of our patrons, latecomers will be seated at the earliest, appropriate break in the performance in the closest available seats. Buy it if You Like it! Many of the items featured in our productions are available for purchase. For information contact Sam Sheehan, Props Master: (315) 443-2437. To Volunteer as an Usher If you would like to get a backstage view of Syracuse Stage, or would like to expand your social circle, this is the ideal opportunity for you. All we ask for is a positive attitude, a smiling face and the willingness to commit a few hours a month. Please call our House Manager at (315) 443-3219 for more information. Open Captioning We are pleased to offer two open captioned performances for each mainstage play. Open captioning provides a simultaneous display of the play’s dialogue on a screen next to the stage. Audio-Described Performances Simultaneous live narration and pre-show description for blind and visually impaired patrons is available upon advance request. Information at 443-9839 or jmwhelan@syr.edu. Audio Enhancement We offer an infrared listening system for patrons with up to a 70% hearing loss. Headsets can be reserved free of charge through the Box Office or at the Coat Room before curtain. Signed Interpreted Performances Tuesday evenings, the third or fourth week of each production, we offer performances for the hearing impaired. Wheelchair Accommodations Syracuse Stage is wheelchair accessible. Please call the Box Office to arrange wheelchair seating. Emergency Telephone Contact To be reached in an emergency, please leave your name and seat location at the Coat Room when you arrive. This is the only way we can locate you. In case of an emergency you may be reached at (315) 443-9922. www.SyracuseStage.org Subscribe, purchase 6Packs and single tickets 24-7. Information, schedules, reviews and more. Please . . . The use of cameras and recording devices is not permitted. Please do not bring drinks and/or food into the theatre. ADVERTISER SUPPORT Syracuse Stage encourages audience members to support the businesses advertised in our program.

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Live theatre

offers an opportunity for people to gather and experience the joys, triumphs, and sorrows of life through a shared experience. Syracuse Stage Education Department is committed to providing experiential programs that make learning in and through the arts possible.

Syracuse Stage is grateful to the following for supporting Educational Programs that will reach over 24,000 students in Central New York this season. John Ben Snow Foundation ArtsEmerging Bank of America  Children’s Tour The Bully Games Wegmans General Education Support Constellation Energy Nuclear Group General Education Support Tompkins Financial Advisors General Education Support

EDUCATION

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Gisela Chípe in Blithe Spirit. Photo: Michael Davis.

5 1 0 9 W. G e n e s e e S t . , S t e . 1 0 2 , C a m i l l u s 4 2 2 - 8 3 3 1 | 1 9 3 1 6 U S R t 1 1 , S t e A , Wa t e r t o w n 4 2 2 - 8 3 3 1 120 Cayuga St, Ste A, Fulton 593-2730 | 1000 E. Genesee St., Ste. 601, Syracuse 422-8331 F U A D S FA R A H M D • R A M S AY S FA R A H M D • J O Y C E B FA R A H M D

Angel Appeal 2013/14 SEASON YOUR CONTRIBUTION to our annual giving campaign helps us bring the country’s leading theatre artists to our Stage and supports educational programs that reach more than 20,000 students each season. All new and increased gifts will be matched dollar for dollar by the Richard Mather Fund. Thank you for your support. FOR MORE INFORMATION

call 315.443.3931 or visit www.SyracuseStage.org 72


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The Glass Menagerie Program  
The Glass Menagerie Program