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P O R T F O L I O NIVEDITA KESHRI ++ SELECTED WORKS - academic //SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY B. of Architecture 2019


Hello, My name is Nivedita Keshri. This portfolio is a curated journey through a creatively stimulated undergraduate career at Syracuse University’s School of Architecture. The purpose of this portfolio is two-fold:

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represent an assortment of selected academic work

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exhibit a seamless continuity from an academic discipline to a professional discipline through a rigorous passion and curiosity in the practice of design My intention is to provoke and challenge this ever-dynamic architectural landscape we find ourselves occupying. It is through a creation of enriched environments and spaces, I present to you my portfolio. Enjoy perusing my design contention.

Nivedita Keshri


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SELECTED WORKS

01

RE-TREETING DETROIT

02

CULTIVATED

Nurturing the void Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 01 08

Regeneration by urban farming Xiong’an

03

BRIDGING THE GAP

Stitching Neighborhoods Medellin

04

HIP BUT QUITE ROUGH

Transforming the Garage London

05

JUNGLE

06

STORED IN

. . . . . . . . . . . 09 14

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 20

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 26

Reconceiving the Library New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 32

Reoccupation of Objects New York . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 36


01

RE-TREETING DETROIT NURTURING THE VOID

Studio: Thesis / 2018-19

Instructor: Professor Lawrence Davis

Location: Detroit, Michigan

Collaboration: Shreeya Shakya

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The thesis explores the potential of voids within a blighted city. It is recognized that there is value in intentionally keeping voids as voids in a city and allowing the built environment to take a step back and allowing “nothing” to take its place. In losing over a million of its residents, Detroit’s overwhelming case of urban vacancy is largely owed to a complicated history of corruption, racial tensions and economical decline. As a way of addressing this, the project chooses to understand nature, not as something that is pristine and untouched, but rather something that grows out of human intervention and has productive value. The thesis focuses on the neighborhood of Brightmoor, a part of the city that has been laid to waste and left behind in the narrative of the city’s Renaissance. The project proposes a framework for a new urban landscape, about fifty to a hundred years from now that would allow for flexibility and versatility in land use over time. We propose new forests and tree farms to flourish where areas of high vacancy used to be, allowing to diversify the landscape and reshape the organizational logic of the city. We also introduce civic programs with public activities to energize the space. The voids between neighborhoods are then allowed to be spaces of regeneration for communities within Detroit and greater ecologies and ReTreeting creates more opportunity for a healthier standard of living by helping stitch sparse neighborhoods back together.

Brightmoor retreeted collage


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Initial conceptual timeline of growth

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Brightmoor proposed land use

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BLOCK STRUCTURE : A CATALOG As we look at the scale of the blocks we see more opportunity for flexibility. After understanding the nuances of the interactions between forests, farms, commercial, residential and civic spaces, we designed a catalog of possible typologies of blocks that explore various relationships between them. Some blocks in the catalog are heavily landscape driven, shaping and programming the “voids�. The options presented in the catalog only demonstrate some possible spatial scenarios.

Housing

Farm

Tree Farm

Forest

Field

Civic

Dense Housing

Farm

Tree Farm

Forest

Half Farm

Half Tree Farm

Half Forest

Private Center

Half Field

Split Forest+Farm

Split Forest+Trees

Split Farm+Field

Connection

Centered

Split Diffuse

Split Diffuse

Mixed Fields

Ends

Road

End Diffuse

Split and Bleed

Split and Bleed

Corner

Private Center

Public Center

Expanded Center

Mixed Use

Striated Block

Field Center

Auditorium End

Shifting Center Block

Retail Mid-Block

Civic End

Civic Middle

Civic Spread

Civic Opening

Block catalog for various block structures

Civic+Farm 05 Nivedita Keshri

Merged Water

Merged Water

Merged Center

Corner Bleed

Merged

Stitched

Civic Lined


Split Forest+Farm

Split Forest+Trees

Split Farm+Field

Connection

Centered

Split Diffuse

Split Diffuse

Mixed Fields

Ends

Road

End Diffuse

Split and Bleed

Split and Bleed

Corner

Private Center

Public Center

Expanded Center

Mixed Use

Striated Block

Field Center

Auditorium End

Shifting Center Block

Retail Mid-Block

Civic End

Civic Middle

Civic Spread

Civic+Farm

Civic Lined Street

Merged Water

Merged Water

Merged Center

Civic Opening

Merged

Corner Bleed

Forest Lined Street

Ends Facing

Corner Forest

Corner Market+Farm

Parallel

Corner Housing

Corner Forest

Corner Market+Farm

Corner Civic

Corner Forest

Farms+ Forests

Stitched

Mixed Use

Half Forest Farm

Farms+ Forests

Civic Lined

Mixed Use

Corner Water

Forest Hold-Out

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A PROJECTED FUTURE : 100+ YEARS IN THE MAKING We imagine this scheme applied at a larger scale than simply Brightmoor. Other high vacancy neighborhoods proliferate the city that urge similar interventions which have the potential of forming a larger network of ecosystems. The natural landscape, initially introduced and curated to an urban fabric becomes part of the healing of the city. What began as voids now establish their own agency as ecologies, and shape the city’s cultural landscape.

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Future of Detroit after spread of retreeted

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02

CULTIVATED REGENERATION BY URBAN FARMING

Studio: 2018

Instructor: Professor Fei Wang

Location: Xiong’an, China

In a country battling air pollution and overpopulation, Cultivated attempts to heal a fractured environment through a systemized means of urban farming. The building is home to a local farm that feeds, nurtures, and educates the community on farming and the management of plants. Programs within are dedicated to create a rural environment that self-sustains and co-exists in an urban locality. Cultivated facilitates the growth of plants primarily through stacked vegetation systems that draw from hydroponics and aquaponics. Cultivated also has research labs that aid in the advancement of environmental study and gather information on bettering the community through urban farms. Conceptually, the project plays with dualities as there are shifts between public and private, opaqueness and translucency, mass and void. These dichotomies propel the urban farming to occupy differing levels of accessibility and habitation. The ground floor is an expansive, double-heighted, space of an internal landscape in tune with plants cultivated and cared by the public. The accessible roof is home to stacked vegetation that is partly cared by the public and partly maintained privately for research purposes. This allowance of public intervention, juxtaposed with research, aids in the growth of the community as a whole. Structurally, the existing column grid was retained, and an additional two rows of columns were added.

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Left: exploded axonometric / Right: structural and programatic diagrams

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Sectional axonometric of structural details

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Short sectional perspective


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Long sectional perspective


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03

BRIDGING THE GAP STITCHING NEIGHBORHOODS

Studio: 2017

Instructor: Professor Francisco Sanin

Location: Medellin, Colombia

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Medellin is burdened by various physical, economic, and topographical boundaries. These boundaries have caused a separation between communities and neighborhoods. Therefore, this project seeks to stitch this separation back through a use of communal program that will bring together informal and formal settlements, blurring any hard and soft boundaries existing between these neighborhoods. This concept is meant to be furthered with a myriad of bridges, with their own intent, meant to redevelop the divide between communities. The ground floor acts as a flexible urban space that is open to a creek that divides the two settlements. It also allows for stores to be located at platforms on the ground. The first floor is comprised of many sports fields for the communal use of either neighborhoods. The second floor has a wide, spacious, market place with a hovering catwalk above. The catwalk meanders till it intersects the second floor by a series of stairs and is joined at an outdoor cafĂŠ. The top floor holds a public school for young children and a daycare program. These public spaces, essentially allow for a more harmonious merging of the two neighborhoods. This project is not meant to be placed in isolation. It is part of a system of bridges located at spatial nodes that will maximize communal interaction between the informal and formal settlements. Their form and program will also change according to what is necessary to that location. And in this way, Medellin will stitch together their differences.

Axonometric


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F A

B

C

D

G

H I

E

J

Site A

B

5000ft

5000ft

0ft

0ft

C

D

5000ft

5000ft

0ft

0ft

E

F

5000ft

5000ft

0ft

0ft

G

H

NODES : PORTS OF CONSEQUENCE

5000ft

5000ft

The site diagram denotes nodes. These nodes are not only important structural locations but are also meant to highlight primary and secondary nodes. The primary nodes are located at either end of the bridge, where there is a main connection to each neighborhood. These different nodes possess programmatic differences. The secondary nodes CONNECTION can be small stores at the ground level while the primary nodes make up a grander entrance to the bridge. 0ft

0ft

I

J

5000ft

5000ft

0ft

0ft

1

Left: Diagram denoting change in topography/ Right: site plan of bridge nodes

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BRIDGE PLAN

SOCCER FIELD

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Long elevation


Grid Variation

Polarity

Polarity

Commercial

CITY CENTER

Continuing the Trend

Readjustment of Urban Fabric

Stitching the Gaps

Initial diagrams denoting the polarizing effects of the site

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Sectional Perspective


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04

HIP BUT QUITE ROUGH TRANSFORMING THE GARAGE

Studio: 2017

Instructor: Professor Davide Sacconi

Location: London, England

Collaboration:

Stephanie Cuevas, Benedykt Ezlakowski

An expanding population coupled with speculators looking at property as an investment instead of a home, has lead to a disruption of established London neighborhoods. This process of gentrification is characterized by middle income families and individuals that move into previously “undesirable� spaces. Looking at this cycle of rehabilitation, we focused on Peckham. Our project aims to understand how gentrification plays out at the community scale by speeding up this gradual process. Our objective is to find a space that can provide a productive relationship that could come from the gentrification process. The Peckham Multistory Car Park is a split level car park with five floors. Differing from other car parks and the residential fabric bordering it, it has a distinctive facade that repeats throughout the exterior. The repetitive concrete structure creates large, open, and flexible spaces which allow for drastically different programs. Because of its imposing quality and distinctive facade, the car park acts as an island within the fabric of Peckham. To furthermore explore this condition, the project continues to treat the car park as an island with the aim of testing for the various conditions, such as the different subjects and speeds of gentrification This isolated quality allows for the inhabitants to create a city within a city where they could aim to project their own community.

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Axonometric


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4 bedroom unit

3 bedroom unit

Roof Plan

4th Floor Plan

4th Floor Plan

Communal space: kitchen and work space

Private house unit

4th Floor Plan

Communal space: lounge and study space

Rooftop Programs

PROJECTED SPEEDS

0

The rooftop exposes a different scenario of gentrification created by a different speed. This speed is characterized by the upcoming inhabitants and developers attempt at completely changing the existPlan and creating a new ing Roof built fabric Peckham. This 21scenario shows how 3 6 12 33 Stephanie Cuevas|Benedykt Ezlakowski|Nivedita Keshri the owners of the plots are able to fully curate it by placing their preferred amenities.

4th Floor Plan

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Projective elevation

4th Floor


Plan of street without plot style dwelling

4th Floor Plan

TWO INHABITANTS : TWO SPEEDS : TWO TYPOLOGIES The process of gentrification is shaped by two types of subjects: the existing and the upcoming. The project aims to acknowledge both of them and their different needs, because of this there are two main kinds of dwellings. For the existing inhabitant and new subject that is interested in Peckham because of its original qualities, a unit with shared common spaces is proposed, where the dwelling acts as a street with no plot. Because of the potential new speed, the new subject could behave as a third kind of inhabitant, to which a more individual setting is proposed, where the object acts as plot without a street. 4th Floor Plan

Roof Plan 0

3

6

12

21

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Stephanie Cuevas|Benedykt Ezlakowski|Nivedita Keshri

Plan of plot without street style dwelling

Roof Plan 0

3

6

12

21

33

Stephanie Cuevas|Benedykt Ezlakowski|Nivedita Keshri

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ISLANDS : THE CONVERGENCE The projected scenario exposes an accelerated condition and at the same time freezes the existing fabric of Peckham. The project’s proposed solution to this potential situation is to include community programs located at the rooftop, which is, physically, the division in between the real Peckham and this scenar-

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io. These spaces would be financially taken care of by all inhabitants, and as well, used by all inhabitants. Moreover, both the rooftop users, and the unit users, have to circulate through the same core, which would act as another space of coming together.

Sectional Perspective


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05

JUNGLE RECONCEIVING THE LIBRARY

Studio: 2016

Instructor: Professor Molly Hunker

Location: New York, New York

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Jungle is a look into an innovative library space where education is no longer viewed through the frame of physical books. The vast arrays of programs mingling in this building offer an opportunity for people to escape through books, while also participating and getting involved in public, communal activities. The library features auditoriums, provides day care, offers play rooms for children, has multi-media selections, has lounge spaces, private/public rooms for independent study, and a multitude of other programs for communal and individualistic use. The exterior is a glass shell that contains a forest of columns of various sizes. These columns act as supports for the rooms they hold. The ground floor is a vast expanse of lounge space and a place for public gathering. The rooms above the ground floor are distinctive in their size, and individual, according to the program they hold within and are connected by an array of ramps. From the ground floor, these spaces seem to hover and float above while a system of ramps interweaves to connect everything. The rooms in the lower level begin as small programs, small spaces, and increase in size and programmatic importance as you move through the space to the higher floors.


A

B

C

D

E

G

6

PERIODICALS

5

OFFICES

URBAN SECTION

4

3

CHILDREN

2 SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

LOUNGE

1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/8” Arc 205: City in the Object_Nivedita Keshri

A

B 20’-0”

C 20’-0”

D 20’-0”

F

E 20’-0”

20’-0”

G 20’-0”

H 20’-0”

Fourth Floor: 118’-0”

Fourth Floor: 95’-0”

Fourth Floor: 65’-0”

Third Floor: 50’-0”

Second Floor: 35’-0”

First Floor: 15’-0”

Ground Floor: 1’-0”

Top: second floor plan / Bottom: sectional perspective

URBAN SECTION Scale: 1’ = 1/16” Arc 205: City in the Object_Nivedita Keshri

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GRAPHIC NARRATIVE Arc 205: City in the Object_Nivedita Keshri

Spatial perpectives

UPROOTING : COSMETICS The project experiments with the cosmetics of the spatial elements. Cosmetics are more than a layer of aesthetics, they are deeper investigtion into the human interaction with the space due to the various cosmetic styles. Study of cosmetics

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STORAGE

BAR

AUDITORIUM KITCHEN RESTAURANT

SIXTH FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

OFFICES COMPUTERS

OFFICES

FIFTH FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

STUDY SPACES

AUDITORIUM CAFE

KITCHEN

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

CONFERENCE ROOM ADULT

CONFERENCE ROOM

YOUNG ADULT

THIRD FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

WEWORK RECEPTION STAFF OFFICES

LIBRARIAN SERVICES

FOOD CENTER KITCHEN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

A

B

C

D

E

G

6

5

URBAN SECTION

4

3

LOUNGE

OPEN ATRIUM

LOUNGE

2

SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1

Plans

GROUND FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1’ = 1/16” Arc 205: City in the Object_Nivedita Keshri

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A

B 20’-0”

C 20’-0”

D 20’-0”

Sixth Floor: 30’-0”

Fifth Floor: 30’-0”

Fourth Floor: 30’-0”

Third Floor: 30’-0”

Second Floor: 30’-0”

First Floor: 15’-0”

Ground Floor: 1’-0”

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Sectional Perspective

20’-


-0”

F

E 20’-0”

G 20’-0”

H 20’-0”

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06

STORED IN REOCCUPATION OF OBJECTS

Studio: 2016

Instructor: Professor Greg Corso

Location: New York, New York

33 Nivedita Keshri

The project explores the flexibility of storage spaces – particularly, the storage of an art museum that lives harmoniously in a space with offices. These spaces are delicately separated with an inner core and an outer shell of programs. The inner core contains the more private storage spaces and art testing areas, while the outer shell contains offices. The top floor is an entirely public spaces that houses a restaurant with an accessible rooftop. The duality of the spaces, is seen at many points in project. There is light friction between the spaces of the art museum and the offices. There is also a spatial duality between storage spaces, that contain a heavy density of things, against the backdrop of more spatial empty rooms. These dualities can be viewed in both plan and section. In section it can also be seen that the buildingi interacts with the highline. The spatial bulges that are seen in front of the building can also be seen in the back, where the building hangs partially over the highline.


FRONT ELEVATION Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

FRONT ELEVATION Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

AA

BB 20’-0” 20’-0”

CC 20’-0” 20’-0”

DD 20’-0” 20’-0”

FF

EE 20’-0” 20’-0”

20’-0” 20’-0”

GG

AA

20’-0” 20’-0”

Sixth SixthFloor: Floor: 90’-0” 90’-0”

Sixth SixthFloor: Floor: 90’-0” 90’-0”

Fifth FifthFloor: Floor: 75’-0” 75’-0”

Fifth FifthFloor: Floor: 75’-0” 75’-0”

Fourth FourthFloor: Floor: 60’-0” 60’-0”

Fourth FourthFloor: Floor: 60’-0” 60’-0”

Third ThirdFloor: Floor: 45’-0” 45’-0”

Third ThirdFloor: Floor: 45’-0” 45’-0”

Second SecondFloor: Floor: 30’-0” 30’-0”

Second SecondFloor: Floor: 30’-0” 30’-0”

First FirstFloor: Floor: 15’-0” 15’-0”

First FirstFloor: Floor: 15’-0” 15’-0”

Ground GroundFloor: Floor: 1’-0” 1’-0”

BACK ELEVATION Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

Top: elevation / Bottom: short section

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BACK ELEVATION Scale: 1’ = 1/16” SECTION SECTION1 1 Scale: Scale:1’1’= =1/8” 1/8”

BB 20’-0” 20’-0”

CC 20’-0” 20’-0”

Ground GroundFloor: Floor: 1’-0” 1’-0”

Top: elevation / Bottom: short section


Fourth Floor Plan

LEFT ELEVATION Scale: 1’ = 1/16”

D 20’-0”

F

E 20’-0”

20’-0”

A

G

B 20’-0”

20’-0”

C 20’-0”

D 20’-0”

F

E 20’-0”

20’-0”

G 20’-0”

Third Floor Plan Sixth Floor: 90’-0”

Fifth Floor: 75’-0”

Fourth Floor: 60’-0”

Third Floor: 45’-0”

Second Floor: 30’-0”

First Floor: 15’-0”

Second Floor Plan

RIGHT ELEVATION Scale: 1’ = 1/16” SECTION 2 Scale: 1’ = 1/8”

Ground Floor: 1’-0”

SECTION 3 Scale: 1’ = 1/8”

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+ Thank you

x Contact Nkeshri@syr.edu 516.400.6006 115 Westwood Drive, Westbury, New York 11590

Profile for Nivedita Keshri

Nivedita Keshri Architecture Portfolio  

2019 B. Arch graduate from Syracuse University School of Architecture

Nivedita Keshri Architecture Portfolio  

2019 B. Arch graduate from Syracuse University School of Architecture

Profile for syr610
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