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budget edition

PLEASE VOTE TUESDAY, MAY 20 One polling place: Rye Middle School Gymnasium

Voting Hours: 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

TAX CAP-COMPLIANT BUDGET Preserves Programs and Class Sizes

Dear Rye Residents: The 2014-15 School District budget vote and Board of Education trustee election will be held on Tuesday, May 20. This newsletter contains pertinent information regarding the proposed budget. All presentations and materials that have been shared at our public meetings are available on our website, www.ryeschools.org and will help you understand what this budget includes and how it supports the community of Rye. The proposed 2014-15 budget preserves all programs while remaining below the allowable tax cap. In an effort to be as fiscally conservative as possible, we have instituted a number of cost-saving measures over the past several years. At this point the Superintendent has advised the Board that we have reached the point in which no further cuts can be made without impacting the quality of the educational program. We also face the impact of significant and continuous growth in our enrollment. Our high school population, which will have grown by 144 students in a two-year period, necessitates the addition of four high school teachers. The proposed budget fully funds the Writing Mentor Program for all ninth- and tenth-grade students, and adds one custodian and one security guard at the High School/Middle School campus. The

Administration and the Board were able to include these additions while remaining tax cap-compliant. The State’s tax cap calculation only permits Rye to increase property tax revenue by 1.64%. This represents a significant challenge, given the increasing costs of unfunded mandates, health care premium increases, and pension system increases. The State, in order to balance its budget, began withholding State Aid in 2010. A significant portion of that aid has still not been returned to the District. The proposed budget includes the use of up to $2.7 million from reserves, and assumes revenue that could be raised through the implementation of a utility tax. A public hearing will be held on May 28, during which the Board will make a formal decision regarding the utility tax. If the Board chooses not to enact the utility tax, cuts would have to be made, which the Superintendent does not recommend, or more funds would have to be allocated from reserves. Though we considered seeking a tax levy cap override this year, we ultimately decided against it for three key reasons: first, the tax cap-compliant budget allows homeowners to remain eligible for the

Governor’s property tax credit, which would provide Rye’s homeowners (those who qualify for the STAR exemption) with rebate checks in the fall to offset the school tax increase. Secondly, we firmly believe that before asking taxpayers to go over a tax levy cap, the District must have exhausted all other options. Lastly, an override is a serious matter and, although it may be inevitable in future years, we must invest the time to effectively inform the public and address their questions. As a community, we can be proud of the learning, growth, and achievement taking place within each of our schools. This is due to the collaborative efforts of our students, faculty, staff, and administration. We appreciate your involvement in our excellent school system. Sincerely,

Laura M. Slack President, Rye City School District Board of Education

Stay Current! Visit the District Website: www.ryeschools.org


Board of Education Candidates There are two seats up for election this year: those of Karen Belanger and Edward Fox. Edward Fox is retiring after nine years of Board service, and Karen Belanger is running for re-election. Information about the candidates is provided below.

Karen Belanger Karen Belanger has lived in Rye for 15 years and has three children in the schools. She has served the Rye community as a Board of Education member for the past three years and currently chairs the Audit and Instructional Technology committees, while also participating on the Policy and Finance committees as well as Curriculum Council. Mrs. Belanger has volunteered in the District for many years, starting as a class parent, progressing to the PTO Executive Board and co-Presidency, and serving on various committees. She continues to volunteer at the schools, including co-chairing the fifth grade play at Midland School this year. Mrs. Belanger holds an MBA and was previously a consultant for the Boston Consulting Group, working primarily on strategy and organization design projects. “I have served on the Board of Education during a time of change for the District,” Mrs. Belanger stated. “Over the past three years, the District has been very successful at hiring new administrators. With my background in management and active involvement in the schools, I hope I have been able to assist in getting new professionals acclimated to the District and the community. I am comfortable providing feedback and advice on a range of financial and management matters critical to the District.”

Blake Jines-Story

Blake Jines-Story and his family moved to Rye four years ago for the sense of a close community and the excellent schools. His children currently attend Rye Middle School and Milton School. Mr. Jines-Story has served on the District’s Curriculum Council for two years and also participates on the Instructional Technology Committee. Mr. Jines-Story has served as Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for Zachys Wine International for four years. Previously, he worked for a variety of private companies and government agencies as a consulting software engineer. “I can make a valuable difference on the Board of Education because I have a skill set which is different, yet complementary to the current Board,” Mr. Jines-Story stated. “My experience as a CTO allows me to offer a particular perspective and approach to the education Rye City Schools provide.”

Jason L. Mehler

Jason L. Mehler has resided in Rye for 13 years and has two children in the schools. He is currently serving a three-year term on the Rye Town Park Advisory Committee and also participates on the Rye Recreation Commission. Mr. Mehler additionally volunteers in the schools and for the Red Cross. Mr. Mehler is a realtor/licensed real estate associate broker for William Raveis Real Estate, and also has previous work experience as an accountant, auditor, and tax specialist. “I am prepared to make the many important and necessary decisions from day one,” Mr. Mehler stated. “I understand what is meant by a sense of urgency and I will do my best to exceed all of your expectations. I am committed to serving our community with everyone’s best interest. I will bring a different prospective to the school board as a local real estate expert. My business experience includes budgeting, management and financial planning. I have previously worked as a Corporate Controller, Accountant/Auditor and Budgeting/Tax Specialist.”

Sample Ballot For Budget Resolution and Board of Education Election YES

NO

Resolved: That the Rye City School District Budget for the school year July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2015 in the amount of $79,365,200 as set forth in the detailed statement of the budget, be adopted and that the Rye City School District Board of Education be authorized to levy the necessary taxes therefore. Vote for Any Two (2) IA Karen Belanger

2A Blake Jines-Storey

2

3A Jason L. Mehler


Points of Garnet Pride 

2013-14 School Year Highlights Rye students have excelled throughout the current school year. Below are just some of the many outstanding achievements earned over the past eight months: • Rye High School has earned recognition on US News & World Report’s list of Best High Schools and the Washington Post’s list of Most Challenging High Schools. RHS ranked #11 in the state and #68 in the country on the US News & World Report list. When looking at open enrollment schools only, RHS ranked #2 in the state and #4 in the nation. US News & World Report bases its rankings on how well students score on Advanced Placement exams, in addition to how many students take the tests. On the Washington Post list, RHS ranked #2 in all of Westchester, #16 in the state, and #213 nationwide. RHS ranked #10 in the state out of open enrollment schools. The Washington Post simply focuses on the number of students taking AP exams.

• Midland School initiated a gymnastics program for students this year, which is taught in physical education classes. The program improves coordination, balance, and strength through the use of equipment that has been generously provided by the PTO.

• A total of 18 Rye High School students earned recognition from the National Merit Scholarship Program, a competition based on the PSAT. Three were named National Merit Finalists (after first being honored as Semifinalists), one student was recognized by the National Achievement Scholarship Program, three were named National Hispanic Recognition Program scholars, and 11 were distinguished as National Merit Commended Students.

• All ten fall varsity sports teams and six winter sports teams received the New York State Public High School Athletic Association Scholar Athlete Team Award, an honor that requires a number of athletes from each team to earn a 90% or higher average.

• Fourteen students were selected to participate in the New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) Area All-State and All-County Festivals in chorus, band, and orchestra ensembles. • Rye Middle School’s Science Olympiad Club earned nineteen medals and an overall second place finish at the Regional Middle School Science Olympiad Competition. This was the team’s second year participating in this event, where they competed against 32 schools in the Lower Hudson Valley. • At the annual Rye High School Arts Awards Dinner, 125 students were celebrated for their artistic endeavors. Twelve students were recognized for excellence in their discipline. • Osborn School children, parents, teachers and administration members together participated in a Ben’s Bells event promoting kindness. They spent an evening creating beads, painting kindness coins and discussing the importance of the theme as it ties in with the school’s iCARE character education initiative. • A Rye High School sophomore won the local level of the Burke’s Brain Bee Championship and went on to compete at the national level of this challenge. The competition is based on neuroscience and encourages students to pursue studies in biomedical brain research. • Twenty-five Rye High School senior athletes have signed letters of intent to play for college teams. They were recognized during a ceremony that was held in the form of a press conference. • Two Rye High School students represented the Section 1 Boys Swim Team at the 2014 New York State Championships, where one of the students ranked 9th overall and placed 3rd out of public schools in the 100 freestyle.

• The Science 21 curriculum has been a great success since its introduction in the elementary schools at the start of the school year. The curriculum, which is aligned with the state’s standards for mathematics, science and technology, emphasizes investigations that are student-directed and relevant to the children’s’ lives. Hands-on, inquiry-based science with integrated math, language arts and technology achieves a balance between process and content.

• Rye High School’s Model United Nations club traveled to Boston for the Harvard Model United Nations conference, where they represented the nations of Mali, Trinidad and Tobago. One student was chosen by Harvard Model United Nations as Outstanding Delegate for his work in the National Assembly of the French Revolution. • One hundred and eleven Rye High School students were inducted into the National Honor Society, recognizing outstanding high school students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of Scholarship, Leadership, Service, and Character. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 90 percent and complete a minimum of 75 community service hours in order to be eligible for membership. • The Parsons Street Players captivated audiences during performances of their winter musical, “Beauty and the Beast.” All three shows were sold out and the cast and behind-the-scenes crew did an outstanding job portraying the classic story. • Two Rye High school students have earned recognition as Con Edison Athletes of the Week, an award that highlights the region’s outstanding student athletes who also demonstrate academic excellence, leadership, citizenship, and school and community involvement. • A Rye High School student was selected by US Squash to represent the FairWest Squash League among the Nation’s High School All Americans. Only seven candidates were considered by a committee of US Squash representatives for this prestigious achievement. • Milton School held its annual Japanese Festival in January, bringing children and parents together for an afternoon of celebrating and learning about Japanese culture. There were many opportunities to be part of Japanese lessons, dance, games, and art.

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College Acceptances The Guidance Department processed 1,444 applications to 278 colleges and universities for the Class of 2014. Some of the schools at which Rye High School seniors have been accepted are: American University Barnard College Bates College Berklee College of Music Boston College Boston University Bowdoin College Brown University Bucknell University Carnegie Mellon University Colgate University College of the Holy Cross Connecticut College Cornell University Dartmouth College Denison University Dickinson College Duke University Elon University Fordham University Franklin and Marshall College George Washington University Georgetown University Hamilton College Hobart and William Smith College Ithaca College Johns Hopkins University Lehigh University Loyola University Miami University Middlebury College New York University Northwestern University Oberlin College Occidental College Pennsylvania State University Princeton University Purdue University Rhode Island School of Design Santa Clara University Savannah College of Art and Design Skidmore College St. Lawrence University SUNY College of Geneseo Syracuse University Trinity College Tufts University University of Colorado at Boulder University of Miami University of Michigan University of Notre Dame University of Pennsylvania University of Richmond University of Tennessee at Knoxville University of Toronto University of Virginia Vanderbilt University Villanova University Wake Forest University Washington University Wesleyan University Williams College Yale University


Questions & District

What is the amount of the current budget, and what is the amount of the proposed one that I will be voting on? The current budget is $76,758,000 and the proposed one is $79,365,200. This represents a budget-to-budget increase of 3.40%, a tax levy increase of 1.64%, and an estimated tax rate increase of 1.08%. This budget is compliant with the tax levy cap, the allowable tax levy increase calculated for the District.

Per Pupil Expenditure Rate*

Briarcliff Manor Byram Hills Scarsdale Chappaqua Bronxville Blind Brook Edgemont Rye Rye Neck

What does this budget include? The budget fully funds all current programs, supports class size guidelines, and re-instates the Writing Mentor Program for all 9th and 10th graders. It includes the addition of four teachers to meet the enrollment growth of 144 students at the High School in just two years, as well as one security guard and one custodian in order to accommodate the increase in building square footage of 27,000. The budget also addresses unfunded mandates and their associated rising costs.

$31,388 $29,667 $28,936 $27,973 $25,962 $25,246 $25,001 $21,758 $21,674

*Source: The Westchester-Putnam School Boards Association Facts & Figure$ 2013 Publication.

What does “per pupil expenditure” mean, and how does Rye compare with other districts? Per pupil expenditure is calculated by adding the general fund amount plus interfund transfers and dividing by the total number of pupils. This includes pupils educated out-of-district, for whom the District pays tuition. Rye’s per pupil expenditure ranks among the lowest of its peer districts and has remained lower than the rate of inflation.

What are the major budget drivers? Unfunded mandates continue to drive costs. They include requirements associated with pension cost contributions, Race to the Top, the Common Core Learning Standards, and Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR). None of these are eligible for exemptions under the tax cap. APPR has cost the District in excess of $450,000 over the last two years, and the State’s newly-required computer-based testing is expected to cost $1,000,000. Expenses of the Teachers’ Retirement System and Employees’ Retirement System are collectively estimated to increase by $484,000 and Health premiums are estimated to drive costs up at a rate of 4.75%.

What efficiencies have been made in the budget over time? The District has made a number of cuts in the past, including the reduction of 61.9 staff members since 2009-10 and decrease in reserves by 29%. WinCap financing software has been implemented this year to better track costs and spending as well as the use of staff time. High School and Middle School schedules were aligned in order to increase efficiency and allow flexibility with staffing and improved use of facilities. Throughout the District, roles of department chairs were consolidated, staffing was adjusted based on student population, and contractual obligations of staff members were maximized.

How does enrollment impact our budget beyond the details mentioned above? Enrollment growth significantly impacts the budget, and is one of the District’s greatest challenges, since the tax cap calculation does not permit exemption of the per pupil cost of educating those additional students. The District’s enrollment has grown 18% since 2004.

Are there any cuts in this budget? The recommended budget does not call for cuts. The District has made staffing reductions over the past several years,

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& Answers captured efficiencies with scheduling, and continues to look for areas of potential cost-savings, but there is a point at which no further cuts can be made without impacting programs. The Superintendent believes the District is at that place now and his proposed budget reflects this reality.

would require a supermajority vote of over 60%, therefore more time is needed to ensure that the community as a whole agrees to support it. It is important for the District to communicate extensively with the public to educate residents as to why an override would be necessary and what it would involve. An override would increase the tax base, shift part of the burden to businesses, and help maintain the District’s favorable Aaa bond rating from Moody’s Investors Services by diversifying the revenue stream. The high bond rating lowers borrowing costs, saving taxpayer dollars.

Why is the budget cost center chart different this year? The District implemented WinCap financial tracking software in July 2013, improving the management of costs, spending, and staff by enabling more accurate budgeting and reporting. As a result of this transition, this year’s line item budget appears somewhat different from those in the past, as many budget codes have changed and funds have been shifted to other areas in order to better align with required state reporting. For example, as explained at the bottom of page 7, the “Instructional Support” line item includes security, membership, postage, and copy machine funds, all of which were previously allocated on other budget lines. What is the utility tax and what will it do for the District? In order to remain a tax levy cap-compliant budget and address an almost $3.6 million shortfall in the rollover budget, the District looked for other ways to raise revenue. Implementing a utility tax would provide a new stream of revenue estimated to be $913,250 (prorated) in the first year and approximately $1,100,000 in each subsequent year. The utility tax applies to services such as gas, electricity, refrigeration and steam, and telephone. It appears on the utility bills, is collected by the utilities, and the monies are remitted to the District by the utilities. Why is the District considering a utility tax instead of a tax levy cap override? By staying below the tax levy cap, the District maintains eligibility for the Governor’s proposed property tax freeze. This means that in the fall, residents who qualify for the STAR exemption would receive a rebate check in the mail to offset the school tax increase. If residents were to vote for an override, taxpayers would be ineligible for this opportunity. An override is a serious matter and

District

2013 True Value Tax Rate*

Briarcliff Manor Edgemont Chappaqua Blind Brook Rye Neck Scarsdale Byram Hills Bronxville Rye

$23.42 $21.85 $20.64 $18.43 $18.19 $15.81 $14.64 $14.20 $11.43

*Source: The Westchester-Putnam School Boards Association Facts & Figure$ 2013 Publication.

How does our tax rate compare to those of neighboring districts? Rye is one of the lowest-taxed communities in the area. Rye’s True Value Tax Rate (tax rate per $1,000 of value) is the lowest out of nine comparable districts, indicating that our residents pay less in taxes per $1,000 of assessed value than those in neighboring communities. What happens if the proposed budget is defeated? If the proposed budget is defeated, the Board of Education can re-submit the same budget for a revote; submit a revised budget to be voted on, or adopt a contingency budget. If a revote is held and the budget is defeated a second time, a contingency budget calling for a 0% tax levy increase automatically takes effect, and spending is controlled by the state.

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Total District Proposed Budget: $79,365,200 • Budget-to-Budget Increase: 3.40% • Estimated Tax Rate Increase: 1.08%

Mission Statement

The mission of the Rye City School District, in partnership with the community, is to ensure that every student becomes a lifelong learner, capable of adapting and thriving in a global environment as a selfreliant and socially responsible citizen. To realize this mission, our schools will provide an engaging, challenging personalized program that supports each individual’s talents and potential in a fiscally responsible manner.

The budget includes: • Educational program for 3,377 students. • Preservation of existing class size guidelines. • Writing Mentor Program for all 9th and 10th graders. • Addition of four RHS teachers due to enrollment growth. • Addition of one security guard and one custodian at RHS due to increase in building square footage of 27,000. • Continued modest efforts to address aging building needs • Mandated computer-based testing/instructional technology.

School District Budget Notice Overall Budget Proposal

Budget Adopted for Budget Proposed Contingency the 2013/14 for the 2014/15 Budget for the School Year School Year 2014/15 School Year* $79,365,200

$78,235,575

Increase/Decrease for the 2013-14 School Year

Total Budgeted Amount, Not Including Separate Propositions

$ 76,758,000

$2,607,200

$1,477,575

Percentage Increase/Decrease in Proposed Budget

3.40%

1.92%

Change in the Consumer Price Index

1.5%

Total Proposed School Year Tax Levy, Including Levy to Support Library Debt, if applicable

$ 68,859,600

$ 69,989,225

Total Permissible Exclusions

$ 5,725,289

$ 4,388,727

A. Proposed School Year Tax Levy, Not Including Levy for Permissible Exclusions or Levy to Support Library Debt

$ 63,134,311

$65,600,498

B. School Tax Levy Limit, Not Including Levy for Permissible Exclusions

$ 63,142,083

65,600,366

($7,772)

$132

Administrative Component

$ 7,074,008

$ 7,275,433

$7,262,868

Program Component

$ 59,061,833

$61,739,527

$61,397,467

Capital Component

$ 10,622,159

$ 10,350,240

$9,575,240

Difference: A - B (Positive Value Requires 60.0% Voter Approval - See Note Below Regarding Separate Propositions)

$68,859,600

* Provide a statement of assumptions made in projecting a contingency budget for the 2014-15 school year, should the proposed budget be defeated pursuant to Section 2023 of the Education Law. As required under a contingent budget, non-contingent expenses must be removed, including those for technology and other equipment purchases. The free use of school facilities by authorized groups would not be permitted. Funds for security improvements and other capital repair projects would be removed, as would budgets for student supplies and non-contractual salary increases. Finally, another $1.3 million of staffing and student programs would have to be removed from the proposed budget, as determined by the Board of Education. List Separate Propositions that are not included in the Total Budgeted Amount: (Tax Levy associated with propositions not eligible for exclusion may affect property tax levy limit and voter approval requirements)

Description None

Amount N/A

Budget Proposed for the 2014/15 School Year

Estimated Basic STAR Exemption Savings1 $1,049 The annual budget vote for the fiscal year 2014-2015 by the qualified voters of the Rye City School District, Westchester County, New York, will be held at Rye Middle School Gymnasium in said district on Tuesday, May 20, 2014 between the hours of 7:00am and 9:00pm, prevailing time in the Rye City school(s), at which time the polls will be opened to vote by voting ballot or machine. 1 The basic school tax relief (STAR) exemption is authorized by section 425 of the Real Property Tax Law.

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2014/2015 Budget Recap by Cost Center Please note that some changes reflected in this chart result from new financial software that the District implemented this year. Many budget codes have changed and funds have been shifted to other areas, acccounting for several of the increases/decreases noted below. COST CENTER 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 BUDGET TO COST ACTUAL  APPROVED PROPOSED BUDGET CENTER EXPENSE BUDGET BUDGET CHANGE % CHANGE SALARIES 39,781,201 40,349,840 42,516,426 2,166,586 5.37% INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 32,348,668 32,695,860 33,997,238 1,301,378 3.98% 2013-14 ADDED STAFF 604,186 604,186 ADDED STAFF 340,000 272,000 (68,000) -20.00% NON-INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 7,432,533 7,313,980 7,521,609 207,629 2.84% 2013-14 ADDED STAFF 63,393 63,393 ADDED STAFF 58,000 58,000 BENEFITS 16,471,385 19,363,000 19,775,020 412,020 2.13% TRS - MANDATED TEACHER RETIREMENT*1 ERS - MANDATED EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT*1 ACTIVE/RETIREE HEALTH INSURANCE OTHER BENEFITS SCHOOL BUDGETS HIGH SCHOOL COST CENTER MIDDLE SCHOOL COST CENTER MILTON SCHOOL COST CENTER MIDLAND SCHOOL COST CENTER OSBORN SCHOOL COST CENTER PROGRAM SUPPORT BY DEPARTMENT RYE SCHOOL OF LEADERSHIP CURRICULUM & PROFESSIONAL DEV TECHNOLOGY*2 SPECIAL EDUCATION ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ATHLETICS GUIDANCE INSTRUCTIONAL BOCES INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT*3 HEALTH SERVICES DISTRICTWIDE SUPPORT BY DEPARTMENT FISCAL LEGAL COSTS HUMAN RESOURCES FACILITIES INSURANCE/ASSESSMENTS/FEES/REFUNDS OTHER TRANSFER TO OTHER FUNDS CAPITAL LUNCH SPECIAL AID DEBT SERVICE PRINCIPAL INTEREST

3,970,749 1,210,078 7,801,202 3,489,356 1,178,749 487,346 181,359 135,092 191,578 183,374 4,568,726 7,604 230,051 1,038,226 2,589,126 9,886 323,171 30,452 50,236 215,167 74,807 6,464,399 233,584 276,646 66,661 2,673,288 1,691,846 1,522,374 1,170,000 1,100,000 22,478 47,522 3,418,221 2,615,000 803,221

5,676,000 1,240,000 8,739,600 3,707,400 1,428,280 645,630 246,300 131,600 184,600 220,150 4,841,430 32,600 327,600 1,015,260 2,603,220 22,900 306,450 48,000 118,900 222,800 143,700 5,123,450 266,900 245,800 96,700 2,327,050 658,000 1,529,000 1,170,000 1,100,000 30,000 40,000 4,482,000 3,530,000 952,000

5,880,000 1,210,000 8,999,500 3,685,520 1,278,722 580,630 214,810 116,118 162,498 204,666 5,395,780 12,500 407,600 1,023,430 2,772,750 24,100 342,650 43,000 118,400 512,100 139,250 5,214,631 311,700 245,800 94,200 2,418,700 709,331 1,434,900 863,000 775,000 30,000 58,000 4,321,621 3,110,000 1,211,621

204,000 (30,000) 259,900 (21,880) (149,558) (65,000) (31,490) (15,482) (22,102) (15,484) 554,350 (20,100) 80,000 8,170 169,530 1,200 36,200 (5,000) (500) 289,300 (4,450) 91,181 44,800 0 (2,500) 91,650 51,331 (94,100) (307,000) (325,000) 0 18,000 (160,379) (420,000) 259,621

3.59% -2.42% 2.97% -0.59% -10.47% -10.07% -12.79% -11.76% -11.97% -7.03% 11.45% -61.66% 24.42% 0.80% 6.51% 5.24% 11.81% -10.42% -0.42% 129.85% -3.10% 1.78% 16.79% 0.00% -2.59% 3.94% 7.80% -6.15% -26.24% -29.55% 0.00% 45.00% -3.58% -11.90% 27.27%

TOTAL SPENDING BUDGET 73,052,681 % CHANGE BUDGET-TO-BUDGET

76,758,000 5.07%

79,365,200 3.40%

2,607,200

3.40%

* TRS & ERS (MANDATED REQUIREMENT*1): ALTHOUGH EXPENDITURES ARE PROJECTED TO INCREASE BY 9 & 2% RESPECTIVELY, BUDGETED FIGURES REFLECT ANTICIPATED BUDGET-TO-BUDGET INCREASES NOT CHANGE IN ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES. * TECHNOLOGY*2: MAINTAINS EXISTING TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT AS WELL AS MULTI-YEAR PARCC TESTING IMPLEMENTATION * INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT*3: INCLUDES MUCH MOVEMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT FUNDS PREVIOUSLY ALLOCATED ON OTHER BUDGET LINES ($208,300): SECURITY, MEMBERSHIP, POSTAGE AND COPY MACHINES

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NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID PERMIT #1107

Rye City School District 411 Theodore Fremd Avenue 100S Rye, NY 10580 914-967-6100 www.ryeschools.org

Postal Customer Rye, NY 10580

Board of Education Laura M. Slack, President Katy Keohane Glassberg, Vice President Karen Belanger Edward M. Fox Nancy Pasquale Chris Repetto Nicole Weber Superintendent of Schools Frank Alvarez, Ed. D.

Voting Information Where to Vote

There is only one polling place, the Rye Middle School gymnasium located at 3 Parsons Street. Please follow the parking instructions of security personnel.

Who May Vote

and a resident of the Rye City School District for at least 30 days preceding May 20. You may register up to the day of the election at the Board of Elections, 25 Quarropas Street, White Plains.

Absentee Ballots

All Rye City School District residents who are registered voters are eligible to vote. Registered voters must be, by law, 18 years of age, a United States citizen,

If you are not in town during polling hours, you may vote by absentee ballot. Ballot applications are available on the District’s website: www.ryeschools.org under Community Voter Information.

Applications are also available at the District office, 411 Theodore Fremd Avenue Suite 100 South Lobby. An application must be filed before a ballot may be obtained. Applications must be received by the District Clerk or Board of Registrars at least seven days before the vote (by May 13) if the ballot is to be mailed to the voter by the School District, or by the day before the vote (May 19) if the ballot is to be delivered personally to the voter. Ballots must be returned no later than 5:00 PM on May 20 to be counted.

The Board of Education Election and Budget Vote Tuesday, May 20, 2014 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Rye Middle School Gymnasium

Rye City School District 2014 Budget Edition  
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