Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT

2017

SYLVESTER MANOR E D U C AT I O N A L

cultivate | preserve | share

FA R M

W W W. S Y LV E SSYLVESTER TERM ANOR .ORG MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

A


WE ARE GRATEFUL TO ALL WHO HAVE DEMONSTRATED THEIR COMMITMENT AND DEDICATION TO SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM BY CONTRIBUTING TO OUR SUCCESS. Those who made gifts in the 2017 fiscal year (November 1, 2016 – October 31, 2017) are listed on the pages that follow.

2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Samuel Seymour, Board President 1 Benjamin Dyett, Vice President 3 Jennifer Ruys, Secretary 4 Peter Vielbig, Treasurer Eben Fiske Ostby, Founding Trustee Blair Borthwick | Whitney Browne | Thomas F. Carrier | Steven Eisenstadt | Donna Emma Cynthia Flynt 2 | Kathleen R. Gerard 2 | William Johnston III | Alfred Kilb, Jr. 5 | Edie Landeck, MD | Kathleen Minder Steve Mrozowski, PhD | Marc Robert 6 | Glenn Waddington | Elly Karp Wong 2

2017 STAFF Jo-Ann Robotti, Executive Director | Courtney Wingate, Director of Development Bennett Konesni, Co-Founder / Chief Ambassador | Kim Folks, Director of Programs & Community Outreach Donnamarie Barnes, Curator / Archivist | Sara Gordon, Planning & Conservation Consultant Tom Hashagen, Musical Events Coordinator | Caroline Scudder, Educational Coordinator | Gunnar Wissemann, House & Grounds Manager Max Spielmann, Office Administrator | Gabi Spielmann, Office Administrator | Joseph OByrne, Office Administrator Yvonne Lieblein, Communications Consultant | Scott Feierstein, Staff Photographer Deborah Lajda, Bookkeeper | Eloise Robert, Events & Fundraising Intern

FARM Jocelyn Craig, Windmill Field Manager | Brittnee Bauman, Assistant Farm Manager Andrew Porzio, Resource & Livestock Manager | James Gilbert, Apprentice | Caitlin Ervin, Apprentice

WWOOFERS Selvina Ballaguy | Angie Cretella | Emily Hitchcock | Sharlow Hitchcock | Mandy Penska | David Vermes

GATEHOUSE

Kimberly Atkins | Caitlin Ervin | Maria McBride | Carrie Wood

OUR MISSION We cultivate, preserve and share the history of Sylvester Manor to ensure that food and art remain connected to community and the land. 1 5

Term ended February 2017 | 2 Joined Board FY17 | 3 Incoming Board President as of March 2017 | Termed off board | 6 Incoming Vice President as of February 2017

4

Term ended February 2017


A MESSAGE FROM THE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dear Friends and Supporters, What a year this was at Sylvester Manor... and it’s all possible because of your strong and unwavering support. As we look back on our 2017 fiscal year, I believe that the one word that sums it up is “innovation.” We not only had many “firsts” this year, but tweaked and altered existing programs and ways of doing things to better address our community’s needs and improve our operations. This, our first Annual Report, provides the details about all the programs and initiatives we undertook in 2016-17 but I wanted to give you my personal view of the highlights: • ‘Til the cows come home. Acabonac Farms began a regenerative grazing project for beef cattle on about 60 acres of our land. This lease had many benefits: it cut our overhead and maintenance costs, improved the quality of the soil and extended one of the organization’s original objectives to bring farming back to Shelter Island. Bonus: the meat is absolutely delicious!

These are just a few of the innovations we undertook this year.

• We are no longer Shelter Island’s “Best Kept Secret!” We increased attendance at all our events and elevated visitorship to the house and grounds in the bargain. Being open on Saturdays this season for self-guided house tours allowed hundreds more visitors to experience the wonder that is the Manor. • We live on an island but can’t act as one. We continued to improve our outreach and partnering with many other organizations, both on and off Shelter Island. The Library, Stony Brook University, Bay Street Theater, the Shelter Island Schools, the Town of Shelter Island, Eastville Community Historical Society, Suffolk County, and Perlman Music Camp were just a few of our programmatic partners. • “Innovation” was the key word. We kicked off the restoration of our 1810 Dominy Windmill; mounted the first-ever in-house exhibition, “Women of the Manor;” launched the state-of-the-art “Clean Water Project” and started an “Artist in Residence” initiative.

cultivate | preserve | share

As you read this I will have left the position of Executive Director and will have “passed the baton” to Stephen Searl. It has been an honor and a privilege to work with all of you these past few years and I am confident that I am leaving the organization in professional hands. So, a final thank you to each and every one of you who supported us so wonderfully in so many ways. Here’s to another exciting new year and many new milestones! With sincere thanks,

Jo-Ann Robotti Executive Director

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

1


TABLE OF

CONTENTS Financials: Revenue Overview................................................3 Volunteer Recognition...............................................................4 Goldman Sachs Community Works.......................................5 Women of the Manor Exhibit..................................................6 Slave Dwelling Project Symposium at UVA..........................6 2017 Membership......................................................................7 Farm / CSA.............................................................................8-10 Education on the Farm............................................................11 Where Are They Now?........................................................... 12 Regenerative Grazing with Acabonac Farms.....................13 Cultural Events & Concerts....................................................14 Summer Programming............................................................ 15 Farm to Table 2017............................................................16-19 Clean Water Project.......................................................... 20-22

ABOUT

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM Since 1652, Sylvester Manor Educational Farm on Shelter Island has been home to eleven generations of its original European settler family and is now considered to be the most intact plantation remnant north of Virginia. In 2009, the property, with its 1735 Manor House, 240 acres of woodland, waterfront, meadows and farmland, became a non-profit. In its latest reincarnation, it encompasses an organic educational farm that provides the community with fresh produce much of the year, a Summer Youth Program and numerous arts and cultural initiatives. The Manor House, still full of family history, artifacts and possessions, is open on a seasonal basis for tours and exhibitions, while its grounds and gardens provide a tranquil respite for visitors April through December.

2

1810 Dominy Windmill Restoration............................. 23-25 Donor Acknowledgements............................................. 26-27 Letter From Our Co-Founder............................................... 28

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS

*In compiling our list of contributors, volunteers and partners, we have strived to be as accurate as possible. Please accept our apologies for any inadvertent omissions.

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


FINANCIAL

OVERVIEW

60

Fiscal Year: November 1, 2016 - October 31, 2017 At Sylvester Manor Educational Farm we seek to demonstrate sound fiscal management and accountability measures to ensure our long-term sustainability.

REVENUES

THOUSAND DOLLARS

was raised from Donor Cards the evening of Farm to Table

18%

12%

1%

9%

8% 1% 7%

8%

6%

208 Received in County Reimbursements for the Clean Water Project

20% 39%

THOUSAND DOLLARS

THOUSAND DOLLARS

TOTAL: $1,775,383

15%

82

was raised in three weeks to support the restoration of the 1810 Dominy Windmill at Sylvester Manor

EXPENSES

TOTAL: $1,772,661

31%

11%

5%

0% 9%  Direct Public Support

 Special Events

 Farm & Apprentice Program

 Farm & Apprentice Program

 Cultural & Educational Programs

 Cultural & Educational Programs

 Retail (Farmstand & Gatehouse)

 Retail (Farmstand & Gatehouse)

 Facility Use Fees

 Facilities / Organizational Support

 Capital Expenditure Restricted Donations

 Capital Expenditure

 Endowment

 Development Communications

 Grants

 Other

 Other *Data based on preliminary, unaudited financial information. Audited Financial Statements will be available in June, 2018, for fiscal year 2017. Please contact the organization to request a copy.

cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

3


VOLUNTEER

RECOGNITION The following individuals generously contributed their time, efforts and services in the 2016-2017 fiscal year to directly benefit our many programs and events for no other reason than a dedication to our mission. They are the muscle of Sylvester Manor, and we could not do what we do without them. They deserve all of our thanks and appreciation. Jonnet Abeles Ronit Avneri Jane Azia Omar Baddeley Wade Badger Lori Beard Raymond Terry Becker Brenda Bergman Chuck Berry Jackie Black Jen Buice Bill Burford Carol Burston Andrew Carlsen Gabrielle Chamberlain Elisabeth Cholnoky Amanda Ciaccio Wendy Clark Robin Coppola Laura Correa Susan Coursey Anthony Crane Holly Cronin Elizabeth Cummings

4

Kathryn Cunningham Ian Curry John Cuti Janet D’Amato Mackenzie Daly Pat Damuck Jay Damuck Pete Dandridge Renata de Dalmas Kellian Delice Denise DiPaolo Laurie Dodson Laurie Dolphin Laury Dowd Virginia Edwards Kimberly Feierstein Connie Fischer Cynthia Flynt Tina Folks Karla Friedlich Virginia Gerardi Lizabeth Gewirtzman Linda Gibbs

Sharna Goldseker Sara Gordon Karyn Ginsberg Greenwald Judith Grodowitz Christine Guelton Philippe Guelton Bryan Gutman Dana Hallman Madi Hallman Brenda Harms Eric Hecker Catrina Heimann Joel Hoffman Nancy Jaicks Howard Johansen John Kerr Penny Kerr Kerry Kinney Edie Landeck Kareen Laton Lynn Leary Stephanie Lebowitz Samuel Lebowitz

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

Heather Lee Martin Levenstein Valerie Levenstein Joy Lewis Tullia Limarzi Thomas McMahon Sarah Medford Joseph Messing Joan Moran Lucille Morgan Stephen Morgan Jill Moser Sarah Netburn Bethany Notley Eleanor Oakley Lisa Parrish Emily Parsons Renate Paul Susan PetrieBadertscher Patricia Piotrowski Jim Pugh Margaret Pulkingham Dennis Raffelock

Maria Razza Deirdre Riou Kate Rowe Penny Rudder Mallory Samson Pat Sanders Sarah Santo Perry Sayles Gayle Scarberry Karen Seymour Stuart Shapiro Lisa Shaw Shelby Slayton Ray Smith Gabi Spielmann Hans Spielmann Jay Sterling Amedeo Teseo Manisha Thapa Olga Velez Peter Vielbig Jim Webster

cultivate | preserve | share


“Sylvester Manor is a special place. The community there has cultivated a warm, friendly environment where people from all walks of life can come together and celebrate the beauty of the Manor as well as learn about the numerous benefits of organic farming. We very much enjoy the work we have done there in the past and look forward to coming back next year.” – Timothy Ryan, Goldman Sachs Volunteer

GOLDMAN SACHS COMMUNITY TEAM WORKS This annual partnership brings a dozen or so Goldman Sachs staffers to volunteer their time on the grounds at Sylvester Manor each May. In 2017, the GS-CTW support included funding the team’s installation of a 200-ft. Long Island native perennial pollinator-attractant planting bed at the Manor’s Windmill Field.

cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

5


WOMEN OF THE MANOR

EXHIBITION

The “Women of the Manor” exhibition was the first in-house exhibit held at Sylvester Manor incorporating photographic and painted portraits from the Manor’s house collection. Accompanying the exhibit, all of the house tours for the 2017 season told the story of the women who lived and worked at Sylvester Manor beginning with Grizzell Sylvester in 1652 and the enslaved women she brought with her to Shelter Island, to Alice Fiske and her decision to invite archaeologists to dig on the grounds in the 1990s. Included in Sylvester Manor’s collection are examples of paintings done by leading portraitists of their age as well as a photographic record that spans the entire history of photography from Daguerreotypes to Polaroids. These images displayed in the downstairs rooms of the Manor, along with the letters, dresses and ephemera of the women illustrated their lives and their enduring connection to the Manor’s house and lands. The presentation of the “Women of the Manor” exhibition increased our visitors viewership as we incorporated a new program of Saturday selfguided house tours for the summer months.

SLAVE DWELLING PROJECT SYMPOSIUM October 18-21, 2017

Sylvester Manor was invited to participate in a panel entitled “New Interpretations at Historic Sites” at the Slave Dwelling Project Symposium at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. The conference, themed “Universities, Slavery, Public Memory & the Built Landscape,” was attended by 500 participants from 61 universities, colleges and institutions. Sylvester Manor Educational Farm was the only northern site in attendance and was represented by its Curator/Archivist Donnamarie Barnes. She presented a paper telling the story of the enslaved African and Native American indentured servants at Sylvester Manor along with a photographic slide show of the grounds and Manor house that highlighted the connection between the unwritten history of slavery at Sylvester Manor and how “the story and memory” can be felt in the physical place. Inclusion in this prestigious symposium was very significant for sharing information about the work we do here. Although we are a relatively young organization, the conference proved that we are moving forward in a highly progressive, honest and innovative way to preserve our past, share our story and contribute to the future. Joseph McGill, Founder of the Slave Dwelling Project and Donnamarie Barnes at University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

6

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


SYLVESTER MANOR E D U C AT I O N A L

FA R M

2017

43

DRAWINGS

of ships on attic walls carved by Isaac & William Pharaoh, indentured Montaukett teenagers, circa 1830

14 TUBES

of rolled & sealed letters written by Mary Gardiner Horsford found after being stored in a trunk since 1855

19 INCHES

Average waist size of the dresses stored in the attic

MEMBERSHIP Active Members Between November 1, 2016 – October 31, 2017 PATRON MEMBERS Elizabeth Auman Marianne Baird Ann Berkowitz Edward & Julia Brennan Archer Brown Diane Harris Brown Elizabeth Browne Lynne Burgess Michael Carroll Michael Daly Alexandra Eames Thomas Farmakis Hadley Feingold Dulany Foster Nancy Gilbert Holly Holden Judith Hole Allan Horland Stephen Houston Deborah Jamieson William Johnston Lynn Kent Lynn King Joseph Lavinio Maureen MacDougall James Marshall Jim Mitchell Mary Morgan

cultivate | preserve | share

Helen Carey O’Neill Suzanne Townsen Adam True Patricia Turner Richard Wines

MANOR MEMBERS

Penelope Payne Ann Robertson Michael Shatken Ruth Shortt Anne Vaughan Susan Winkler George Zinger

Martin Ainbinder VOLUNTEER Wade Badger MEMBERS Cynthia Belt Helen Atkinson Barnes Gertrude Bourne Brenda Bergman Jean Brechter Carmen Bissell Louis Cicero Georgette Grier-Key Nancy Cunniffe Heather Lee Bran Dougherty-Johnson Jacqueline Osborn Frederick Dress Jim Polychron Katherine Dyas-Brockbank Margaret Pulkingham Evan Ernst Mallory Samson Brenda Grosbard Jody Sutter Bard Hamlen Emily Weitz Stephen Harvey Eleanor Kobel Howard LeShaw SYLVESTER STUDENTS Joy Lewis Dennis Baresich Vivian Lindemann Elisa Parrish Thomas McMahon Sarah Santo Henri Michaud Max Spielmann Joseph McGill, Founder of the Slave Eleanor Oakley Dwelling Project and Donnamarie Barnes Renate Paul at University of Virginia Charlottesville. SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

7


8

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


FARM AND CSA BOUNTY

AS LOCAL AS IT GETS... SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM 2017 GROWING SEASON

952

VOLUNTEERS contributed their time and efforts

21,900 EGGS

were produced by our flock this year

5

In the Windmill Field‌ Around 30 tons of our own compost was spread on the field at the beginning of the season. This addition of organic matter combined with continued cover-cropping efforts contributed to the overall health of the soil including water and nutrient holding capacity. Wood chips, donated by local tree/ landscaping companies, were collected to continue onsite composting operations. The chicken pen migrated southward in the Windmill Field, claiming some of the area that had formerly been used for parking. This freed up a third of an acre for growing. Three rounds of cover crop were sown on this area over the course of the season. We are excited to expand our vegetable-growing space to include this area in 2018. The chickens themselves seemed to be happy in their new digs after an early-season rotation on the field. Their new home was surfaced with more donated wood chips and their feed was supplemented by grain from Shelter Island Craft Brewery. We also welcomed five heritage breed pigs to a newly fenced-in area at the north end of the Windmill Field. By the end of the year, we were selling pork including our first ever Sylvester Manor bacon!

SELLERS AT THE FARMSTAND Tomatoes Cherry Tomatoes Summer Squash Blackberries Cucumbers

cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

9


In the community… The emphasis in 2017 was on community connections, from friendly exchanges at the CSA pickups to volunteers, in-kind donations and business relationships. It was not uncommon for one of our farmers to be dog-sitting on their offhours or for a local chef to be helping to dig sweet potatoes in the Windmill Field. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) continues to be the cornerstone of our farming operations at Sylvester Manor Educational Farm. The vegetables we grew on the three cultivated acres at the Windmill Field fed at least 120 Shelter Island families for 21 weeks from June 10 to November 1. Our CSA members not only supported the farm by paying up front for their shares but many also contributed their time by volunteering during pickups and various field activities. Members and non-members alike were able to enjoy our farm offerings, including produce, eggs, pork, lamb and seedlings, by shopping at our on-site farmstand. By highlighting our own products and carefully managing expenses, we demonstrated a marked increase in net sales at the farmstand for 2017. Efforts were made to establish wholesale relationships between the farm and local restaurants and purveyors. Our eggs were sold during the winter season through Schmidt’s, Southampton until our own retail sales picked up in May. Our vegetables were featured at the Shelter Island Yacht Club, and at the Red Maple, Pridwin and Isola Restaurants. Each Spring we welcome a new round of young farmers who make the Manor their home and take on the responsibility of growing food for the community while learning how a small vegetable operation works. The 2017 crew will be remembered as “small but mighty.” We encourage them to keep growing! We thank you for your continued support of the Farm at Sylvester Manor and look forward to seeing you at the Windmill Field during the 2018 season.

10

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


Franck, Visnja and Luka Brdar: “We love the farm at Sylvester Manor for so many reasons. We were raised in Europe and Australia with the awareness of the importance of eating healthy, clean, fresh produce that our parents grew in their vegetable gardens. We now live in Manhattan but spend most weekends on Shelter Island all year long. Having the Farm there is an extra bonus. We are so grateful that we can purchase pesticide free produce. We love that our 6 year old son has that experience and connection with nature. He can see how vegetables grow, connect with the animals, experience feeding the chickens, collect their eggs and eat them later at home. He understands that there are seasons to eat specific produce. At the end of the summer he loves gleaning with us, eats raw kale straight from the source. We remember his face when he pulled a carrot from the earth for the first time!

Stephen & Lucille Morgan, CSA Members: “The Saturday morning pick up nurtures and enhances our community spirit and has enriched our appreciation of Shelter Island.”

We also love the Community at the Farm and truly enjoy meeting all the team members at the beginning of each season. Their passion shines through. The Sylvester Manor Farm is of fundamental importance to our life on Shelter Island.”

Nancy Robin Jaicks Ph. D., CSA Member: “When we first came to the Island – many decades ago – we were entranced with the farms still here, so unique to the region. Then, one by one they disappeared. The CSA at Sylvester Manor Educational Farm has done more than simply replace those farms that dotted the Island. Under wise and visionary management it has recreated the Island’s farming history while weaving together a like-minded community of citizens who work to see that luscious vegetables, flowers, and other farm goods spring from Sylvester’s lands. So many islanders band together to make it a success. I am proud to be a part of it!”

cultivate | preserve | share

Leah Peeks, CSA Member: “I worked in the hospitality industry and was always surrounded by the best of the best of food stuff, but I rarely cooked at home, or even thought about where the food came from. I came to Shelter Island to take time to live more mindfully and intentionality. I lucked into getting a weekly share from Sylvester Manor and committed to cooking every meal for myself. The quality of the produce was amazing. Grocery store veggies usually don’t taste like much, but the produce I got in my share had such big flavor, my simple plant based meals were delicious and endlessly entertaining! I remembered why I love kale and figured out that scallions and garlic make everything taste like magic. I realized how long of a shelf life produce actually has. The grocery store produce usually went bad before I used it, but these greens that were picked the day I got them lasted for weeks. Most interestingly, I found that eating food grown a half mile from my house made me more aware of what I was putting into my body and how it got there. Letting my Sylvester Manor farm share drive my meal planning is exactly how I want to eat all the time! The quality is superior, the freshness is unmatched, and it was all grown right on Shelter Island. You feel good about every part of the process.”

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

11


WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

SPEAKING WITH ELIZA WEINER, 2016 FARM APPRENTICE After leaving Sylvester Manor, I was so pleased to get a field crew position at Sunny Meadows Flower Farm in Columbus, Ohio. Sunny Meadows is a ten-acre cut flower farm run by a very ambitious husband and wife team who started the farm when they were in their early twenties. Ten years in, they have created a thriving business, marketing to grocery stores and florists and also doing their own floral design and a couple farmers markets a week. I was really excited to get this job and experience first-hand a successful, profitable and beautiful flower farm. This was a “normal” job, not an apprenticeship, so the day to day was a bit more monotonous than my days at Sylvester Manor, though there’s really nothing monotonous about looking at flowers all day. Most days, we spent the entire morning harvesting and the entire afternoon bunching, with assorted other projects sprinkled throughout. There was no official educational component, but my bosses are very open to questions and generous with their knowledge, plus you can learn so much just by observing and doing. I’ll be going back for another season, with expanded responsibilities, including leading the harvest crew and starting seeds. You can check them out at sunnymeadowsflowerfarm.com Other fun things that happened were traveling to Amsterdam, Berlin, Vienna and Salzburg with my mom, purchasing a 1968 Holiday Rambler trailer, which I live in on the farm, right next to the peony patch, falling in love (long distance) with another former East End farmer, and hanging out with Bennett, Edith and Manisha at the Young Farmer’s Conference at Stone Barns in November 2017. I think about Sylvester Manor so often, and truly cherish the memories and the connections I made there.

12

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


ACABONAC

FARMS

In 2017, we were pleased to welcome Acabonac Farms to the Sylvester Manor family. Acabonac Farms produces 100% grass-fed, pasture-finished beef throughout eastern Long Island. Using sound grazing techniques and other environmentally-conscious approaches to livestock management and soil conservation, Acabonac Farms is helping us achieve both the economic and biological goals for our farmland. In addition to increasing the productivity of our pastures, Acabonac Farms is producing high-quality local beef for our community. The techniques used by Acabonac Farms involve dedication to the biological health of the pastures. Part of this is a focus on managing above-ground production of grasses and legumes. Also, using sound grazing management, the cattle themselves become part of the sustainability effort. Acabonac Farms uses techniques to capture sunlight and water while recycling the aboveground parts of the plant through the livestock. Cattle consume a portion of the plant which is then deposited as urine and manure. Cattle trample the remainder of the plant into the ground to begin decomposition into the soil. This feeds the soil microbes that in return feed the plant. The manure, plant organic matter and carbon dioxide captured from the air by the plant combine to build a carbon bank in the soil that holds water and nutrients for plant use. Acabonac Farms’ beef production operation is very light-touch with few, if any, purchased inputs. Their methods employ livestock (instead of human labor) to perform the majority of the work. Acabonac Farms simply allows cattle to be cattle as they enjoy fresh air, delicious and nutritious lush green grasses and legumes, fresh water and the peace and quiet of Sylvester Manor. Acabonac Farms never uses herbicides, pesticides, fungicides or synthetic fertilizers. We welcome you to visit the beautiful herd during the grazing months of April through October and, of course, to enjoy the delicious and healthy Acabonac Farms beef offered at the Farmstand or via their website at acabonacfarms.com

cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

13


CULTURAL EVENTS

& CONCERTS It was another wonderful year of programming at Sylvester Manor Educational Farm. We enjoyed seeing new faces and welcoming back familiar ones. We kicked off 2017 with our sixth annual January Bluegrass concert. It was a packed house where the award-winning Lonely Heartstring Band had the audience on their feet. Our year-round concert series celebrated the Celtic sounds of Katie McNally in March at the Shelter Island Presbyterian Church, and The Slocan Ramblers were a sell out for both house concert performances in the spring. As the concert series continued “Creekside” in July, August and September, audiences enjoyed more award-winning artists: the Jim Hurst Trio, The Barefoot Movement and The Seamus Egan Project. These relaxed outdoor concerts also featured local libations, food trucks, and local vendors like Joe & Liza’s ice cream. In July Shakespeare at the Manor, ran its eighth season with “As You Like It.” We were thrilled to have Director Drew Foster return with his amazing troop of incredibly talented Juilliard alums. In addition to a beautiful kick off evening at Richard Smith’s waterfront home on Friday, we had over 300 people attend the two performances on Saturday and Sunday that weekend. The fall brought us a beautiful October Saturday, when over 250 adults and children came costume clad to “Mysteries of the Manor.” Attendees enjoyed potato sack races, a scavenger hunt, face painting, crafts, and even visiting llamas and sheep from Long Island Livestock Co.

14

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


SUMMER

PROGRAMMING 2017

800 PEOPLE

attended our year-round Concert Series

300 PEOPLE

enjoyed “Shakespeare at the Manor”

500 PEOPLE

attended Mysteries of the Manor and Tea & Tree

Sylvester Manor is a special place, particularly during the summer months, and nothing captures this better than the youth programs. From July 1 through August 18 we had thirty children age 3-7 enrolled each week in Little Sprouts (3-4) and Young Farmers (5-7). Our new on-line registration system went live February 1 and enrollment was filled by mid-May. Both Little Sprouts and Young Farmers had a wait list that ran throughout the summer. With three instructors returning from the previous year, the program started very smoothly and lost only one day to inclement weather. This year each week was centered around a theme – History, Environment, Plants, and Animals – with an emphasis on highlighting the resources of Sylvester Manor. The children went on “field trips” to the Quaker Cemetery, the Manor House, the Windmill, and the Windmill Field, where mini instructional lessons were held. In addition, they had full responsibility for maintaining the Children’s Garden, composting, feeding the chickens and collecting eggs each morning. During our prep week, we updated the doors of the Long Barn with chalkboard paint, giving the children another creative outlet and an excellent excuse to get wet when the day ended and the doors had to be cleaned! Highlights included tractor rides to see cows in the back pasture, watermelon scavenger hunts, Pirate Day, and lots of cooking! A key component of both the Little Sprouts and Young Farmers program is establishing a meaningful understanding of “farm to table.” To that end the children helped to prepare at least two dishes each week using the eggs and vegetables they collected. Pickles, zucchini muffins, and blackberry yogurt popsicles were among the favorites, and each week ended with a pot-luck lunch at the Long Barn. Although there is snow on the ground the planning for 2018 continues, and we are looking forward to the summer!

3

FAVORITE FOODS

kids made in Youth Program were Pickles Zucchini Muffins Blackberry Yogurt Popsicles

cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

15


FARM TO TABLE 2017 Sylvester Manor Educational Farm kicked off the Summer of 2017 with its Sixth Annual Farm to Table Dinner on June 24, held on the beautiful grounds surrounding the historic Manor house. Although the morning torrential downpours had us nervous, the clouds parted and we couldn’t have asked for a more picture-perfect evening. We were also thrilled to welcome back Berkshire-based company, Fire Roasted Caterers and their open pit barbecue. Once again they brought a new dimension to “farm to table” as they roasted the various components of the meal, some of which came from the Manor lands, over fires stoked with wood from the Manor grounds. It was quite a delicious show! The HooDoo Loungers, a New Orleans inspired party band, provided a high energy and highly entertaining show after dinner down by the creek. As one of the first gala events of the Shelter Island season, the Farm to Table Dinner is a great time to see old friends and make plans for the summer. It has quickly become a “must attend” party for Shelter Islanders. Last year, more than 300 Manor supporters were in attendance. And thanks to the generosity of our guests, we raised more than $367,000 on this lovely evening. These contributions helped to ensure another year of Sylvester Manor programming in agriculture, education, the arts, history and conservation. Thank you to those who were part of this very special and important event.

FARM TO TABLE COMMITTEE Co-Chairs: Donna Emma and Edie Landeck Matthew Arendt Ingrid Bateman | Katherine Birch, Blair Borthwick | Kate Dinkel Benjamin Dyett | Tom Fallon Chuck Fleckenstein Kathleen Gerard Andreas Hommert Bennett Konesni | Mara Manus Karen Mateo | Lindsay McCann Susan McDowell | Russell Piccione Susie Pribor | Karolann Rubin Jennifer Ruys | Sam Seymour Jennifer Van Zandt Melina Wein | Elly Wong

Photos by Eleanor Labrozzi Photography

16

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

17


FARM TO TABLE DINNER Saturday, June 24th, 2017

18

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


cultivate | preserve | share

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

19


“What’s happening here at Sylvester Manor, the first example of a constructed wetland, is going to serve as a model. It is so consistent with the mission of the Educational Farm … we’ve got to keep thinking outside the box as to how we solve these problems. It’s only appropriate that we should be looking to you to figure out how to make it work.” – May 11, 2017 – Suffolk County Legislator Bridget Fleming

Advancing Environmental Conservation With Partners in Science, Education and Technology The New York State Center for Clean Water Technology at Stony Brook University (CCWT) is actively exploring constructed wetlands as an innovative alternative on-site wastewater treatment system to improve the quality of nutrient-rich waters that subsequently contaminate receiving bodies of water. The vegetated recirculating gravel filter installed at Sylvester Manor has been carefully designed to achieve high levels of nitrogen removal (Total Nitrogen [TN] less than 20 milligrams per liter). The CCWT is working to identify optimal nitrogen removal pathways. To this end, we collect aqueous samples at various depths and locations within the system and analyze nitrogen species to better understand where N is removed. In 2018 we plan to take gas samples as well to achieve more complete nitrogen budgets. In addition to nitrogen removal, wetlands are also capable of removing metals and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). The CCWT is monitoring these additional contaminants at Sylvester Manor as well. – Samantha Roberts, PhD candidate Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

20

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


CLEAN WATER PROJECT

280

CREW MEALS cooked in the new temporary kitchen, no longer in the 1737 Manor House

16.4 MILLIGRAMS

per liter of total nitrogen, promising first season results

207 PLANTS

of 8 varieties comprise the constructed wetland vegetation

50

PROJECT PARTNERS

contributors and State, County and local public officials attended the CWP First Flush in May, 2017

“The Most People Ever Assembled to Flush a Toilet!” – NYS Assemblyman, Fred Thiele “I want to thank Sylvester Manor for taking the leadership [on] this...monumental occasion for Suffolk County. This project is the example that we need, to show everyone else that this can be done. Typically, when we think of Sylvester Manor, we think of historical associations, the focus is looking backward, and ... certainly Sylvester Manor provides a great part of educating about history..., but they are to be commended for looking forward, and leading the County forward.”

– NYS Assemblyman Fred Thiele, May 11, 2017, ‘First Flush’ Celebration

In May 2017, with the extraordinary support of public and private contributors, partners and supporters, Sylvester Manor Educational Farm completed the first alternative wastewater treatment system of its kind in Suffolk County. A constructed wetland vegetated gravel recirculating system, it is the first system implemented in the region to model a “non-proprietary” design that can be custom engineered and installed by any licensed professionals, rather than purchased from a manufacturer. Its implementation at Sylvester Manor Educational Farm provides a jump start for a new industry, creating economic opportunities for design professionals and septic system installers and operators while helping with quality in the aquifers and bays. Sylvester Manor Educational Farm’s innovative treatment system exemplifies the practice of carefully considering past, present and future in all that we do: • A 21st-century garden, its simple, easily replicated native plantings and gravel beds naturally process visitor, staff and resident farmer wastewater to transform nitrogen; greatly reducing the harmful nutrients entering the groundwater and bays. • Great care was taken by excavator Peder Larsen and consulting archaeologist Dr. Stephen Mrozowski to prevent disturbance of cultural resources during construction (none were found). • The constructed wetland aligns with the boxwood allée in the Manor’s historic garden, connecting it to the 1737 Manor house in a continuum from past to present to future. • The pilot installation lays the groundwork for similar systems to be approved and adopted across Suffolk County, to reduce nitrogen loading from septic systems and result in significant water quality improvement. Sylvester Manor is profoundly grateful to the many contributors to this project, and particularly for major grant funding from: • Suffolk County Water Quality Improvement Program and Assessment Stabilization Reserve Fund • New York State Community Capital Assistance Program • Long Island Community Foundation • McConnell Family Foundation

cultivate | preserve | share

“This is extraordinary ground we are on here. This Educational Farm...is one of the treasures in our region… and across our State and in the Country. This project will be viewed as one of the key turning points.” – Suffolk County Executive Steven J. Bellone

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

21


County Legislator Bridget Fleming, County Executive Steven J. Bellone and Preservation Consultant, Sara Gordon

Dr. Stephen Mrozowski, archaeologist and Peder Larsen of Shelter Island Sand, Gravel & Contracting

The temporary reused shipping container restrooms and the 21st-century garden treating wastewater to reduce nitrogen

2016-2017 DONORS TO THE CLEAN WATER PROJECT Anonymous (3) Jennifer Snodgrass and Peter Belknap Elizabeth and Louis Bevilacqua Bridgehampton National Bank M. Archer Brown Lois Weir* and Richard Burdge Brad Davis Rosemarie Ryan and Benjamin Dyett William Geraghty Karyn and Bruce Greenwald Carrie Grin Mac Griswold

22

J.W. Piccozzi, Inc. Jasteka Foundation, Inc. Elly and Tony Wong MaryAnn Koch and William Johnston III Penny and John Kerr Langner Family Fund Edie Landeck and Michael Coles David Lapham and Clark Mitchell Pamela Sweeney and Peter Levenson McConnell Family Foundation Jo-Ann Robotti and Joe Messing

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

Matthew Arendt and Thomas Misson Jr. Grace Morgan Renate Paul Kimeran Daley and Rudy Reinhart Nancy Richardson Suzanne and Bob Robotti David Kamp and Michael Rubin Amanda Schumacher Sara Gordon and Peter Vielbig *deceased

cultivate | preserve | share


1840

1810 DOMINY WINDMILL

THE MILL

was moved from Southold, NY to Shelter Island, NY, where it stood in the center of the village

RESTORATION In July 2017 the Sylvester Manor Board of Directors gave the “GO” to dive into a capital campaign to fully restore and preserve the iconic Sylvester Manor Windmill (which is one of eleven surviving 18th and early19th century wind-powered gristmills on Long Island and one of four extant windmills built by Nathaniel Dominy V, a prominent East Hampton craftsman) so that it may be open to the public for viewing, educational activities, demonstrations and to revive its legacy as an operational mill.

1879

IT CEASED OPERATING

sometime before then, when Lillian Horsford, daughter of Eben Norton Horsford (18181893) and Mary L’Hommedieu Gardiner (18241855), purchased it “to preserve it as an antique” (Mary L’Hommedieu Gardiner was the daughter of Samuel Smith Gardiner (1789-1859) and Mary Catherine L’Hommedieu (1806-1838))

During World War I, however, there was a great need for food production, so the mill had been put back into service to provide meal and flour for the community of Shelter Island

1926 In order to

PRESERVE

the mill, Cornelia Horsford moved it to the grounds of Sylvester Manor, where it currently resides

From L-R: Donors Erwin and Margaret Zeuschner, Jo-Ann Robotti, Executive Director, Jim Cricker, Windmill Contractor, and (back row:) Marc Robert, Vice President of the Sylvester Manor Board of Directors

cultivate | preserve | share

Within a month, we raised over $80,000 and had a wonderful fundraising cocktail event at the base of the Windmill. People were called on to go above and beyond to make this happen, and that is just what they did. We received gifts of time, energy and of course, money, and every-last bit was sincerely appreciated. A special thank you goes out to Susannah Rose for helping to organize the event! We are so appreciative of all our families and community members that supported this initiative and came out on a stormy evening to raise a glass with us. (We were so grateful that the rain held off!) However, the biggest THANK YOU of all goes out to Thomas Roush, without whom none of this would be possible. We thank you, Tom, for your vision, backing, continued guidance and patience with this project. We look forward to seeing those blades go up in Summer 2018!

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

23


WINDMILL COCKTAIL PARTY

Friday, August 18, 2017

24

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


SPECIAL THANKS AND APPRECIATION

to those who helped make the Windmill Cocktail Party possible The Buice Family Edie Landeck & Michael Coles James Dougherty Elizabeth & Joseph Eckman

Susannah & Brandon Rose Thomas Roush Elly & Tony Wong Margaret & Erwin Zeuschner

…and to the generosity of our donors for being a part of this historic preservation project: Anonymous Katherine and Marco Birch Karen Bocksel Blair and John Borthwick Ria and Whitney Browne William Buice Susannah and Thomas Carrier Betsy Morgan and Jonathan Cary Kristin and Stanley Church Leslie Clarke Coles Family Foundation Nancy Cooley Christine and Cromwell Coulson Cindy Walke and David Currie James Dougherty Elizabeth and Joseph Eckman John Fifield Barnaby Furnas Dr. Carol Galligan Kathleen Gerard Kathleen Minder and Stephen Gessner Galen Guengerich Mary and Jorge Hevia Jasteka Foundation, Inc MaryAnn Koch and William Johnston III Lisa Kelland Sharon H. Kim Cynthia Flynt and David Kriegel

cultivate | preserve | share

Lori Lancaster Kate Lawless Pamela Sweeney and Peter Levenson Emily Lyons Betty and Tara McCollum Kathryn Lynch and Peter Moore Kate Moxham Paulette Ofrias Helen Carey O’Neill Brad Goldfarb and Alfredo Paredes Martha L. Pichey Cynthia Godsoe and Eric Pitt Kirstin Powers Todd Prager Nancy Richardson Karen and Marc Robert Susannah and Brandon Rose Kathleen Tait and Ian Rosenthal Thomas Roush Jane Royal David Kamp and Michael Rubin Jennifer Ruys Amanda Schumacher Karen and Sam Seymour Richard Smith Marsha and Herb Stern Amy and Kirby Wilcox Arthur Williams Margaret and Erwin Zeuschner

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

25


DONOR

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS $50,000+ Edie Landeck and Michael Coles Jennifer and Steven Eisenstadt Thomas Roush Karen and Sam Seymour

$20,000 - $49,999 Anonymous (2) The Gillian S. Fuller Foundation, Inc. Jasteka Foundation, Inc. Elly and Tony Wong McConnell Family Foundation David Lapham and Clark Mitchell

$10,000 - $19,999 Ingrid and Justin Bateman Susan Brady and Eben Ostby Nancy Richardson Donna Snow and Michael Rubinoff / The Caliban Foundation The Mamdani Foundation, Inc. Shelby and Iqbal Mamdani The Walt Disney Company Foundation Margaret and Erwin Zeuschner

$5,000 - $9,999 Elizabeth and Louis Bevilacqua Katherine and Marco Birch Blair and John Borthwick Bridgehampton National Bank Susannah and Tom Carrier Christine and Cromwell Coulson Donna Emma and Larry Davis James Dougherty Rosemarie Ryan and Benjamin Dyett The Joseph and Elizabeth Eckman Family Fund Kathleen Minder and Stephen Gessner Joyce and Irving Goldman Family Foundation Katja Goldman and Michael Sonnenfeldt

26

Brenda and David Harms Pamela Sweeney and Peter Levenson Dana and Tal Litvin Richard Smith Natasha and Richard Stowe Kathleen and Kenneth Tropin / Orchard Farm Foundation

$1,000 - $4,999 Mary Ellen and Frank Adipietro Anonymous Susan Petrie-Badertscher and Brian Badertscher Anitra Bareikis BC Partners Foundation Evelyn Benjamin Victoria and Craig Bergstrom Ann Berkowitz Bessemer Trust Elizabeth and William Pedersen Bill Birch Virginia Blair Bettina and Brendan Brownyard William Buice Lois Weir and Richard Burdge Nancy and Frank Bynum Edward Carey and Kathryn Dinkel Carey Krista Miniutti and Paul Carberry Jonathan Cary Meryl Rosofsky and Stuart Coleman Isobel and Struan Coleman Kelly and Richard Coles Carol Mandel and Vincent Covello Susan and Christopher Cowie M Elaine Crocker Suzanne Shaker and Pete Dandridge Park Davis Sue Lonoff and John de Cuevas Barbara de Portago Kathleen DeRose Peter and Kathryn Dinkel Mara Manus and Mark DuBois Ingrid and Robert Fagen Jenna Fagnan

Richard Hersh and Thomas Fallon Deno Fischer Charles Fleckenstein Gillian Fuller Jane Galasso Kathleen Lynch and William Geraghty Kathleen Gerard Patricia and Edward Giles Mary Cirillo-Goldberg and Jay Goldberg Great South Bay Audubon Society Inc. Karyn and Bruce Greenwald Brenda and Robert Grosbard Alexandra Hahn David and Martha Hamamoto Lily and Joel Hoffman Andreas Hommert Harriet and Elihu Inselbuch J.W. Piccozzi, Inc. Jane and Alex Jackson Derek and Eugenie Jacobson MaryAnn Koch and William Johnston III Kathryn Huarte and Sheldon Kasowitz Kasowitz Family Foundation Joseph and Susan Kelly Linda Frankenbach and Hendrik Kranenburg Cynthia Flynt and David Kriegel Gerald L’Hommedieu Stephanie and Samuel Lebowitz Jane and Jeff Lightcap Gretchen Mannix Jerri and Thomas Mayer Lindsay and Emmett McCann Jessica McCarthy Linda Gibbs and Thomas McMahon Melanie Coronetz and Bruce Miller Christine Miller Martin Matthew Arendt and Thomas Misson Jr. Sharon McCarthy and Antonio Molestina Lucille and Stephen Morgan Brad Goldfarb and Alfredo Paredes Russell Piccione PItt Miller Family Fund Jamie Pitt Miller

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

Mallory Samson and Robert Pressman Kimeran Daly and Rudy Reinhart Karen and Marc Robert Susannah and Brandon Rose Kathleen Tait and Ian Rosenthal Jane Royal David Kamp and Michael Rubin Karolann and Alex Rubin Amanda and David Russekoff Jennifer Ruys Stephen Harvey and Perry Sayles Bettina Schoenbach Paula and Jay Sessa Debbie and Michael Shepherd Gail and Eric Shube Gully and Felicity Siegel Clora Kelly and Helge Skibeli Liana and John Slater Dr. Alicia Rojas-Sloan and Dr. Robert Sloan Christine and Paul Smith Leila Straus Eva and Jan Sudol Suffolk County Jenny and Jack Sullivan Kristen Kehrberg and Richard Tarlow Gordon Thompson III Jennifer and Derek Van Zandt Sara Gordon and Peter Vielbig Mary and Kenneth Walker Sedgwick Ward Melina and Marc Wein Wilcox Family Fund Amy and Kirby Wilcox Jacqueline and Kenneth Winston

$500 - $999 Regina and Donald Becker Jennifer Snodgrass and Peter Belknap Alyssa M. Bliss Gina Ma and Christopher Blum Emily and Scott Brittingham Betsy Morgan and Jonathan Cary Amanda Ciaccio Amy Cococcia Krista Corl

Tim Croneberger and Glenn Finn Connie and Woody Fischer William Geraghty Alice and Stuart Goldman Kathleen and Gordon Gooding James Heidenry Esther Hird Hunt Nancy Robin Jaicks Lori Lancaster Kareen and Scott Laton Kirsten and John Lewis Emily Lyons Billy Mack Diana Malcolmson Leo McMahon Ryann McMahon Jo-Ann Robotti and Joe Messing Diane and James Murphy Thorne Perkin Martha L. Pichey Elizabeth and Maurice Pinto Jane Azia and Rob Quaintance Colette and John Roe Amanda Schumacher William Shepherd Gail Shube Stephen Skrenta Landey Strongin Nicole and Baran Tekkora Patricia Turner Jean Vanderbilt Gwen and Glenn Waddington Joan Wicks Lion Robin C. Zust

$250 - $499 Marianne Baird Herve Bernard Karen Bocksel Courtney Wingate and Marcus Borowsky Ria and Whitney Browne M. Archer Brown Kristin and Stanley Church Nancy Cooley Marla Chait Cornejo and Jorge Cornejo Cindy Walke and David Currie Brad Davis Coral Dawson Olympia De Castro Cecilia Dean

cultivate | preserve | share


John Fifield T John Folks III and Augusta Ramsay Folks Barnaby Furnas Nancy Gilbert Carrie Grin Galen Guengerich Ricki Stern and Evan Guillemin Mary and Jorge Hevia Holly Holden Allan A. Horland Judith and Jay Inglis James McChesney Architect Penny and John Kerr Georgiana and Wallace J. Ketcham Jamie Bishton and Christian Kraus Bobbie Lane Kate Lawless Cara and Michael Loriz Sally and Barry Mandel Betty and Tara McCollum Kathryn Lynch and Peter Moore Grace Morgan Kate Moxham Helen Carey O’Neill Paulette Ofrias Kirstin Powers Todd Prager Janet A. Pyers Charity Robey Robert Ruben Polly and Thaddeus Seymour Shelter Island Educational Foundation Ruth Shortt

Up to $249 Accelerate Consulting Group Yvette Janssen and Martin Ainbinder Mary Holt Allen Anonymous (10) Holly Atkins Beth Auman Wade Badger Barbara Barnes Donnamarie Barnes Richard Behrke Karin Bennett Brenda Bergman Linda Betjeman Annette and Stanley Blaugrund Jean Brechter Edward and Julia Brennan Virginia and Kevin Brooks Diane Harris Brown Kim and Chris Browne

cultivate | preserve | share

Elizabeth Browne Thea and John Browning Lynne Burgess Mary Woltz and Rob Calvert Maryanne and Donnie Carey Carroll Family Michael Carroll Tia Chapman Adele Chatfield-Taylor Wendy and Rowland Clark Leslie Clarke Jeanne and Forrest Compton Christopher Cory Eric Crugnale Donna Damarodas Sara Davison Renata de Dalmas Rebecca DeAngelis Katherine DeConti Richard and Carolyn Denning Mike Devonshire Deborah Jamieson and Scott DeWald Margaret and David Doyle Pierre Duleyrie Susan Dusenberry Katherine Dyas-Brockbank and Terry Brockbank Colleen Smith and Frank Emmett Evan Ernst Madelyn Ewing Barbara Fair Hadley Feingold Ann Robertson and Jeffrey Feingold Kim Folks Lynn Franklin Mary Butler and Donald Fraser Dr. Carol Galligan Becky Goodhue Bill and Jenny Gordh Rhonda Greene Catherine and Carlo Grigioni Mac Griswold Janis Ebli-Halsey and John V. H. Halsey Bard and Richard Hamlen Jean Held Susan and Clarkson Hine Lily and George Hoffman IBM Corporation Lisa Kelland Jane and John Kenney Sharon H. Kim Kathryn O’Hagan and Dave Klenawicus Edie Konesni Karen and Russ L’HommeDieu Joseph Lavinio Nanette W. Lawrenson

Maria Razza and Charles Lenardi Howard LeShaw Valerie and Martin Levenstein Timothy Lewis Vivian Lindemann Linda Francke and Harvey Loomis Robert Lowery Rosalie Luber Patricia Lutkins Maddie Seymour and Friends Diana Malcolmson Justin A. Manus Paul and Roberta Martin Wendy Turgeon and Mike McClain Leo McMahon Connie Migliazzo Mary and Tom Morgan Dr. Stephen Mrozowski Katherine Nardin Laura and Arthur Nelsen New York University Pamela and Robert North Joseph O’Byrne Helen Carey O’Neill Thomas C. Orr Renate Paul Joanna Patton and Bill Persky Janet and Dave Persson Jean and Peter Pettibone Cynthia Godsoe and Eric Pitt Plein Air Painters of LI James Polychron Andrew Porzio Margaret Pulkingham Shelley Pyers Marilynn and Ken Pysher James Marshall and Paul Rabito Barbara Rathborne Celia Regan Ann and Guy Roberts Suzanne and Bob Robotti Pat Sanders Marya and Aaron Schock Shelter Island Environmental Dr. Robert Sloan Catherine Smith Joseph Peter Spang Jillian Steadman Marsha and Herb Stern Heather Sullivan Peter Tipograph Beverly and Barbara Tyler Darleen and Eric Vandenbergh Sarah & Sandy Wiener Arthur Williams Jenn and Gunnar Wissemann Amy Wood Hilary and Eric Woodward

IN HONOR OF

IN KIND DONATIONS

Jennifer & Steven Eisenstadt, Lindsay and Emmett McCann Virginia Blair

American Tent & Rentals Bartlett Tree Experts Susannah and Thomas Carrier Christian Johnson Tree and Turfworks Inc. Edie Landeck and Michael Coles Denise Fielder Kathleen Minder and Stephen Gessner Brenda and David Harms James Hull Kathy Lynch and Fred Hyatt J.W. Piccozzi, Inc. Eleanor P. Labrozzi Photography Valerie and Martin Levenstein Liberty Landscaping Marcello Masonry Milk Pail North Fork Native Plants Inc. Ram’s Head Inn Ray Smith & Associates, Inc. Signarama Riverhead of New York LLC Gabriela Spielmann The Chequit The Pridwin Hotel Tom & Lisa Music Roswitha Wissemann Wölffer Estate Winery

Edie Landeck Annette and Stanley Blaugrund Capability Coulson Christine and Cromwell Coulson Courtney Wingate Katherine DeConti Kathleen Minder Nanette Lawrenson Sara Gordon and Peter Vielbig Cara and Michael Loriz Maximilian Spielmann Andrew Porzio Josh Gladstone Margaret Pulkingham Donnamarie Barnes Celia Regan Jo-Ann Robotti Suzanne and Robert Robotti Karen and Samuel Seymour William Shepherd Kathleen Gerard Leila Straus Quirke House Darleen and Eric Vandenbergh Marshall Rando Amy Wood Samuel Seymour Polly and Thaddeus Seymour

IN MEMORY OF Al French Kevin O’Connell Robert Allen Mary Holt Allen Charles Wissemann Marla Chait Cornejo and Jorje Cornejo Alice and Andrew Fiske Susan and Clarkson Hine Alice Fiske Judith and Jay Inglis Vera B. Burns Janet A. Pyers

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

27


LETTER FROM THE

CO-FOUNDER Dear Supporters, Did you know that in 2017 we polished up Sylvester Manor’s mission statement? Here it is: We preserve, cultivate and share historic Sylvester Manor, to ensure that food and art remain connected to community and the land. This tidy statement represents hundreds of hours of conversations with people who care about what Sylvester Manor has been and will become. It addresses some of the contrasts that are naturally part of the place, for instance, between historic preservation and modern farming. And It guides us as we take on projects like our new partnership with Acabonac Farms, which is restoring our historic fields by raising cattle on them and selling the meat online. Though the beef partnership is a new and thoroughly modern enterprise, the Manor’s lands have been productive for hundreds of years, as shown in over one million archaeological artifacts and in our archives of over ten thousand letters, journals and books, many of which were discovered and catalogued for the first time in 2017. The fields were initially cleared by the Native Manhansetts for farming and hunting, and used by Nathaniel Sylvester in the 1600s for grazing livestock as part of his pioneering global food corporation. In the 1700s, Thomas Dering used them to conduct important wheat research for President Jefferson and the first Agriculture Committee of the new American government. (You should see the letter from Thomas Jefferson thanking the Manor for its work fighting the Hessian fly, the number one agricultural pest during the revolutionary era and therefore one of the largest economic threats to the new nation!) In the 20th century the fields became overgrown with invasive vines and bushes, and today’s 21st century beef partnership is restoring these historic lands to their former robust productivity.

28

Projects like these knit together the seemingly disparate threads of history, food, and culture on our island and in our world. We’re proud that our tuned-up mission encompasses more fully these types of projects; initiatives that preserve, cultivate and share historic Sylvester Manor, ensuring that food and art remain connected to community and the land. Sincerely,

Bennett Konesni

SYLVESTER MANOR EDUCATIONAL FARM | 2017 ANNUAL REPORT

cultivate | preserve | share


2018 CALENDAR

YOUTH PROGR AMS BEGIN Monday, July 2 | 9AM-12PM | Manor Grounds

CSA REGISTR ATION BEGINS Tuesday, January 2

CREEKSIDE CONCERT: INDA EATON, NANCY ATLAS PROJECT & GENE CASEY & THE LONE SHARKS Sunday, July 15 | 5PM | Manor Grounds

JANUARY

CONCERT: MILE TWELVE Saturday, January 13 | 7:30PM | Shelter Island School

FEBRUARY “AN EVENING OF PHILANTHROPY” Thursday, February 7 | 6-8PM | Club Colette/Palm Beach BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENT Sunday, February 25 | 2-4PM | Bay Street Theater

APRIL MANOR GROUNDS OPEN Monday – Friday | 10AM-4PM | Manor Grounds CONCERT: COLD CHOCOLATE Saturday, April 14 | 6 & 8PM | House Concert

MAY CONCERT: NEW MOON ACOUSTIC BLUES BAND Saturday, May 12 | 6 & 8PM | House Concert FARMSTAND OPENS Saturday, May 12 | 10-4PM | Farmstand

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS Saturday, July 7 | 12-3PM | Manor House

SHAKESPEARE COCKTAIL FUNDR AISER Friday, July 20 | 6-8PM | Smith Residence PERLMAN MUSIC INSTRUMENT PETTING ZOO Saturday, July 21 | 10AM-12PM | Farmstand “SHAKESPEARE AT THE MANOR” Saturday, July 21 | 6PM | Manor Grounds “SHAKESPEARE AT THE MANOR” Sunday, July 22 | 6PM | Manor Grounds FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT Wednesday, July 25 | 8PM | Manor Grounds

AUGUST SELF-GUIDED HOUSE TOURS Exhibition “A Place In Pictures” Every Thursday & Saturday | 11AM-3PM | Manor House | $10 MANOR GROUNDS OPEN Tuesday - Saturday | 10AM-4PM [ Closed Sun. & Mon. ] STORY THYME Every Saturday | 10AM | Farmstand

JUNE

LAST DAY OF YOUTH PROGR AMS Friday, August 17

PHOTOGR APHY EXHIBITION OPEN RECEPTION Exhibition “A Place In Pictures” Friday, June 1 | 5-7PM | Manor House

CREEKSIDE CONCERT WITH FLATT LONESOME & CONTR A DANCE WITH BENNETT & FRIENDS Sunday, August 12 | 5PM | Manor Grounds

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS Saturday, June 2 | 12-3PM | Manor House

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT Wednesday, August 22 | 8PM | Manor Grounds

FIRST CSA PICKUP Saturday, June 9 | 9-11AM | Farmstand

SEPTEMBER

FARM TO TABLE DINNER Saturday, June 23 | 6:30PM | Manor Grounds

MANOR GROUNDS OPEN Monday - Friday | 10AM-4PM | Manor Grounds

COMMUNITY POTLUCK Saturday, June 30 | 6:30PM | Farmstand

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS Exhibition “A Place In Pictures” Saturday, September 8 | 12-3PM | Manor House

JULY SELF-GUIDED HOUSE TOURS Exhibition “A Place In Pictures” Every Thursday & Saturday | 11AM-3PM | Manor House | $10 MANOR GROUNDS OPEN Tuesday – Saturday | 10AM-4PM [ Closed Sun. & Mon. ] STORY THYME Every Saturday | 10AM | Farmstand

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS Exhibition “A Place In Pictures” Saturday, September 29 | 12-3PM | Manor House

OCTOBER LAST CSA PICKUP Saturday, October 27 | 9-11AM | Farmstand “MYSTERIES OF THE MANOR” FAMILY FUN DAY Saturday, October 27 | 12-3PM | Manor Grounds


SYLVESTER MANOR E D U C A T I O N A L

FA R M

80 North Ferry Rd. P.O. Box 2029 Shelter Island, NY 11964 info@sylvestermanor.org | 631.749.0626

sylvestermanor.org

Profile for sylvestermanor

Sylvester Manor FY2017 Annual Report  

The first annual report for Sylvester Manor Educational Farm. Fiscal year 2017.

Sylvester Manor FY2017 Annual Report  

The first annual report for Sylvester Manor Educational Farm. Fiscal year 2017.

Advertisement