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Sassy • Spirited • Successful

Co-editors Jennifer Ruple and Mary Helen Darah

If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you. This month, we encourage you to expand your mind and your world on a quest of continued learning. Plates and Places explores the 755 acres of Hidden Lake Gardens, situated in the rolling Irish Hills of southeast Michigan (pg. 3). There was not a ‘dummy’ to be found in the six-week class presented by the Toledo Symphony School of Music where participants expressed their musical inner soul (pg. 6). Welcome fall by baking some fresh Apple Fritter Bread (pg. 7). Numerous opportunities are available to continue your quest for knowledge and new experiences inside the classroom and beyond (pg. 8). Our rock enthusiast, Robert Alexander, urges readers to embark on a creative journey through music (pg. 11). Life continues to teach us new lessons. So sharpen those No. 2s and your minds as you explore the world around you remembering that not all classrooms have four walls.

sas•sy

spir•it•ed

suc•cess•ful

adjective very stylish; confident and energetic

adjective full of courage or energy; very lively or determined

adjective having the correct or desired result; ending in success having achieved wealth, respect, or fame

Editors Mary Helen Darah Jennifer Ruple Boomer Consultant Sharon Lange Contributing Writers Robert Alexander, Dennis Bova, Jeff Bucher, Mary Helen Darah, Jennifer Ruple, Sue Schafer Distribution Donald Frazier, Nancy Jomantas and Paul Jomantas Layout and Design Elissa Cary, Penny Collins Boom Your Business with Advertising boomersandbeyond2014@gmail.com 419-824-0100 On The Web sylvaniaadvantage.com/boomers-beyond facebook.com/ Boomers Hangout 5657 N. Main St. #1, Sylvania, Ohio 43560

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Inside

• Visit Hidden Lake Gardens

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• In Tune with TSO

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7 • Hop On the Road to Learning 8 • Apple Fritter Bread

• The Search for Meaning

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13 • Be Smart with Your Money 14

• Crossword Fun

• Books for Boomers

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• It’s a Date

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In or out of the classroom, lifelong learning can increase the quality of your life.

ON THE COVER

BOOMERS

& Beyond


Plates and Places

Explore the beauty of Hidden Lake Gardens By Jennifer Ruple

Nestled in the scenic Irish Hills of southeastern Michigan, Hidden Lake Gardens presents a wonderful opportunity to spend the day relaxing, recreating and discovering. While the setting is secluded, the gardens are only about eight miles west of Tecumseh and easily accessible from Jennifer Ruple M-50. Owned and operated by Michigan State University under the division of land management, the park includes six miles of paved drives for automobile or bike access, 10 miles of hiking trails, a picturesque landscape and an incredible collection of flowers, trees and shrubs. Here are some of the many highlights ccccccccccccccccccccc of Hidden Lake Gardens.

The Conservatory The Conservatory is made up of three distinct zones. The Temperate House includes an assortment of beautiful flowering plants. The Tropical Dome, which is humid and warm, allows tropical trees, palms and fruit-bearing plants such as bananas and limes to thrive even through Michigan’s coldest winters. The Arid Dome, which lacks humidity and moisture, is perfectly suited for its collection of succulents and cacti.

Bonsai Courtyard An extraordinary display of miniature trees in the Bonsai Courtyard is accessible from The Conservatory. Visitors can view the permanent display from May through October. On Sunday, Sept. 17, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., the gardens will hold its 5th annual event, The Art of Bonsai, featuring art inspired by bonsai, a bonsai show, vendors offering bonsai, pots and tools, and a lecture on how to get started in growing miniature trees. Daily admission applies, and there is an additional $3 entry fee for the show. SEPTEMBER 2017

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Touring the Grounds Next to the lake, you’ll find The Benedict Hosta Collection, or “Hosta Hill,” which includes more than 800 varieties of the species. Woodland Drive is a winding scenic road through an oak and hickory forest. The Harper Collection of dwarf and rare conifers contains over 500 specimens. A picnic area is available to enjoy lunch or a snack in a covered shelter or under a shade tree. Stop by the visitors center and gift shop for more information on the park and trails, and peruse the assortment of garden-related gifts.

Educational Opportunities

Hidden Lake Gardens offers a variety of classes and events for all ages. Mark your calendar for:

Run for the Hills – 1 Mile and 5K Run/Walk, Sept. 23, 9 a.m.

Morticulture: Hidden Lake Gardens, Forest of the Living Dead Sept. 23, 10 a.m. Creatures of the Night Hike Sept. 30, 8 p.m.

Jerry’s Pub on the Lake While in the area, take advantage of the early fall weather and grab a bite to eat at Jerry’s Pub on Wampler’s Lake, located at 650 Egan Hwy. off US 12. A favorite among locals and visitors alike, Jerry’s outdoor deck overlooking the lake is the perfect spot to enjoy a burger, pizza or fish and chips.

Fall Foliage Festival Oct. 21, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Forcing Bulbs for Indoor Winter Beauty Nov. 12, 2-4 p.m. For more information, visit hiddenlakegardens.msu.edu.

Hidden Lake Gardens is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. through October 31. Winter hours begin November 1 and are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Check the website for holiday closings. Admission is $3 per person, free for children age 2 and under (and free for your dog, on a leash, of course). The first Monday of every month is free (unless it is a holiday such as Labor Day).

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BOOMERS

& Beyond


For more photos visit somedaycowgirl.blogspot.com

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T

here are all sorts of classes that seniors and eventual seniors can take, but usually a class is one of three things: remedial academics, personal enrichment, or just plain fun. The one that Toledo Symphony School of Music offered this summer covered all three. crankshafts interact to get you where you’re The six-week class was called Music for Dummies. The title wasn’t meant to be offensive. going. It was educational, enriching, and fun. It was patterned after the series of instruction Among the fun musical tidbits: books on any matter of subjects that are explained in simple terms “for dummies.” •The speed of sound is 1,125 feet per second. There were no dummies in this class. Of the The TSO’s percussionist said he takes that into roughly two dozen people in their 50s and up, account as he times when to strike a drum. That just about everyone said they had some formal way, the note enters the venue at the right time music education or instrument lessons going so folks in the back can hear it as it should be in back to their youth. conjunction with the other instruments. Toledo Symphony Orchestra musicians and staff Talk about a space-time continuum. accorded themselves well as they did what they •The inside of a violin has a dowel near the usually don’t do: Explain music to people who opening on the top and is roughly perpendicular might find music to be a foreign language. Most with the strings. It transfers the vibrations of the people don’t know how an internal combustion top to the bottom. Those vibrations turn into engine works, but they enjoy driving their cars sound, which becomes music in the hands and trucks. Music for Dummies was like having of someone skilled in such things. mechanics explain how pistons, valves and •There are nonverbal cues musicians give each other during the performance to match what the conductor wants. It’s like a football team: The conductor is the head coach calling the plays, the concertmaster is the quarterback, the lead musicians are the heads of the offensive and defensive units adjusting to game situations.

The TSSM offers classes throughout the year for former musicians to pick up their instruments and play in a relaxed setting. There also are stringinstrument classes for adult beginners who find it’s time to express their inner musical soul. And possibly next summer: “Music for Dummies II: The Sequel.” For more information, visit toledosymphony.com.

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BOOMERS

& Beyond


Apple Fritter Bread

By Jennifer Ruple

Nothing welcomes fall like the smell of fresh apple fritters wafting through the air. Apple Fritter Bread has all the elements of the classic seasonal treat - soft apples, rich cinnamon, and a bit of crunch drizzled with sweet glaze. The addition of walnuts is optional because they are such a great complement to the apples. Why wait for the apple-pickin’ festivals? This bread is perfect for brunch, dessert or anytime.

Apple Fritter Bread

Heat oven to 350 F. Coat a 9x5-inch loaf pan with nonstick spray or line with foil and coat with non-stick spray. In a small bowl, mix brown sugar and cinnamon together. Set aside. ⅓ cup light brown sugar In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat white sugar and butter 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon together until smooth and creamy. ⅔ cup white sugar Beat in eggs, 1 at a time until blended. ½ cup butter, softened Add vanilla extract. 2 eggs In a medium bowl, whisk flour and baking powder 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract together. Add into creamed butter mixture and mix until blended. 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour Mix milk into batter until smooth. 1 ¾ teaspoons baking powder Pour half the batter into prepared pan. Add half the apple ½ cup milk mixture, then half the brown sugar/cinnamon mixture. 2 apples any kind, peeled and chopped Lightly pat the apples into batter. If using walnuts, mixed with 2 tablespoons white sugar sprinkle the full ⅓ cup over batter/apples. and 1 teaspoon cinnamon Repeat layers (except walnuts). Lightly pat the apples ⅓ cup chopped walnuts, if desired into batter. With a knife, swirl brown sugar mixture through apples. Bake approximately 55 minutes or until a toothpick Glaze: inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean. ½ cup powdered sugar To make glaze, mix powdered sugar and milk together. 2 tablespoons milk Let bread cool for 15 minutes before drizzling with glaze. (Recipe adapted from thebakingchocolatess.com)

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Lifelong Learning

Hop on the road to exploration

Albert Einstein once said, “Wisdom is not a prodCoordinator of By Mary Helen Darah uct of schooling but the lifelong attempt to acquire Lifelong Learning at Lourdes University, Laura it.” He also stated, “once you stop learning, you Megeath, believes in the importance of engaging in start dying,” which may sound harsh but stresses the joy of learning throughout life. “Imagine if we Laura his belief would go to school Laura Megeath, Megeath, coordinator coordinator of of Lifelong Lifelong Learning at Lourdes University in the importance of without worrying about Learning at Lourdes University continually expanding grades or exams. Imagone’s mind. Study after ine learning just for fun. That’s what lifelong study confirms that the learning pursuit of lifelong is all about,” she stated. learning may enhance “You take classes with the quality of your life people who are interby providing opportuested in the same topics nities to understand and explore the world as you. It’s a great way around us. to experience social inWhat makes lifelong teraction and mental learning unique is that individuals independently stimulation.” Lifelong learning comes in many take the initiative and select courses and programs forms and numerous formal and informal learning of their choosing. programs are available for Boomers in our area.

Megeath, who has been at the helm of Lifelong Learning at Lourdes University for the past 12 years, encourages everyone, in every stage of life, to continue on a path to new discoveries and knowledge. “Consistently I have seen how grateful people in our program are for having such a positive experience,” she stated. “They feel connected to a community, are meeting new people and feel active and engaged. That is so important. They truly appreciate having

these classes and opportunities to get outside of themselves. There is an entire body of research that says we are healthier and happier if we stay connected to people and our intellect. We need to continuously learn to keep our brains awake. I understand that doing something new can be difficult for people but basically use it or lose it.” So hop on the road to new discoveries and bring along a notebook and an open mind.

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” -C.S. Lewis Options, options and more options

Lourdes Lifelong Learning

Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd. 419-824-3707 lifelong@lourdes.edu Lourdes.edu/LifeLong There are three dominant parts of Lourdes Lifelong Learning. They include lectures, courses and travel. Lectures are free for members and first-time visitors. The lectures are a great way to learn about the program without financial obligation,” stated Laura Megeath. “The lectures change every single semester and cover topics on everything from the history of the European witch to a fellow who has written a book, ‘Terror in the City of Champions: Baseball and Murder in 1930s Detroit.’” Of COURSE Courses are available in a wide array of topics. Lifelong learners at Lourdes University can explore the Native American tribes that settled in the Great Lakes. Are native plants more your thing? Head out on field trips with a knowledgeable plant enthusiast

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in the Oak Openings Region. You may also choose to dabble in art, culture, bridge playing, learn a little Spanish or a thing or two about wine. The choices are too plentiful to list but available to explore online. Hit the road Travel opportunities are also available through Lourdes Lifelong Learning. Do a little day-tripping to Detroit or Ann Arbor, or pack your bags for a 14day adventure to Jerusalem and Galilee. “The day trips are all inclusive,” stated Megeath. “We take care of all the details, admissions, taxes and driving. You don’t have to worry about a thing. It is easy, relaxed traveling. It’s not like we are renting a school bus!” A fourth element There is also a fourth component to the program called hot topics. “Think of it as a lunch and learn,” explained Megeath. “We have scheduled lively discussions that give people a chance to talk about things going on in the area that aren’t going to make the front page news.” BOOMERS

& Beyond

Metroparks of the Toledo Area Outdoor Skills

419-407-9700 Metroparkstoledo.com If you are not a fan of being enclosed in a classroom, the Metroparks of Toledo Area Outdoor Skills classes will enhance your mind and get your heart pumping. Try archery, camping, hiking, backpacking, or learn how to build a shelter or fire to better experience a healthy, active outdoor life. One-on-one lessons for a group or yourself as well as public programs are available. The programs give you the opportunity to enhance your skills or learn new ones. “Folks 50 plus in age are in a great stage of life to go back and explore things they may not have had the time to do when they were younger,” stated Director of Public Relations for

SEPTEMBER 2017

the Metroparks of the Toledo Area Scott Carpenter. “Often the skills we teach correlate with outdoor adventure to improve someone’s experience. Our programs are intergenerational. We have people of all ages but consistently have those over age 50. There is no better place to try something new than in the great outdoors.”

For the Love of Art

4027 N. Holland Sylvania Rd. 419-882-2060 Forloveart.com “Adult art classes are composed of people from all walks of life; working and retired, doctors, lawyers, educators, teachers and caregivers,” stated Bob Schira, owner and teacher of the For the Love of Art. “Many people discover they have a talent they never knew they had.”

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Penta Adult Ed

419-661-6555 pentacareercenter.org Penta Adult Ed classes have many options including in-demand training for skill trades and health care course in addition to GED and ESOL classes.

Toledo Botanical Garden Adult Hands-On Studio Classes

419-902-6800 ksavino@bex.net toledogarden.org/education/ Hands-On Studio offers art and fine craft workshops for adults in glass, clay, fibers, paper, wood, metal, and more. Classes are beginner friendly and can be customized for groups.

The University of Toledo Program 60

Rocket Hall 1300, Main Campus 419-530-3142 UniversityCollege@utoledo.edu UToledo.edu/uc.pgm60.htm Program 60 provides access to numerous learning

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experiences at the University of Toledo. Individuals, 60 years of age and older, are permitted to take classes on an audit (register and attend a class without earning a college credit) basis only and tuition will be waived. Program 60 participants are responsible for course fees that may include parking, lab fees, facility fees and parking. Those wanting to take classes toward a degree are required to pay regular tuition fees as a regular university student.

Williams Sonoma Cooking Classes Franklin Park

5001 Monroe Street 419-475-6368 Williams-sonoma.com Head to Williams-Sonoma Franklin Park to experience a lineup of cooking classes taught by culinary specialists. Classes include cooking demonstrations, samples and take-home recipes. “We teach you the basics and beyond,” stated Penny Roth, general manager of Franklin Park Williams Sonoma. “Cooking is really not a mystery once you learn the fundamentals.”

BOOMERS

& Beyond


Penta Adult Ed

419-661-6555 pentacareercenter.org Penta Adult Ed classes have many options including in-demand training for skill trades and health care course in addition to GED and ESOL classes.

Toledo Botanical Garden Adult Hands-On Studio Classes

419-902-6800 ksavino@bex.net toledogarden.org/education/ Hands-On Studio offers art and fine craft workshops for adults in glass, clay, fibers, paper, wood, metal, and more. Classes are beginner friendly and can be customized for groups.

The University of Toledo Program 60

Rocket Hall 1300, Main Campus 419-530-3142 UniversityCollege@utoledo.edu UToledo.edu/uc.pgm60.htm Program 60 provides access to numerous learning

10

experiences at the University of Toledo. Individuals, 60 years of age and older, are permitted to take classes on an audit (register and attend a class without earning a college credit) basis only and tuition will be waived. Program 60 participants are responsible for course fees that may include parking, lab fees, facility fees and parking. Those wanting to take classes toward a degree are required to pay regular tuition fees as a regular university student.

Williams Sonoma Cooking Classes Franklin Park

5001 Monroe Street 419-475-6368 Williams-sonoma.com Head to Williams-Sonoma Franklin Park to experience a lineup of cooking classes taught by culinary specialists. Classes include cooking demonstrations, samples and take-home recipes. “We teach you the basics and beyond,” stated Penny Roth, general manager of Franklin Park Williams Sonoma. “Cooking is really not a mystery once you learn the fundamentals.”

BOOMERS

& Beyond


Rock Matters

The search for meaning

As summer comes to a close, I marvel at the busyness of individuals and families as they prepare for school and a renewed dedication to learning and selfimprovement. Everyone is getting ready! But if you are a retired Boomer like me, you may have discovered that every day all year long is a time for self-actualization. You find you have time to take a deep breath, to reflect, to look around, to search for meaning. Today yoga and mindfulness are popular ways to refresh the body, mind and spirit to provide respite from an overly stimulated environment ... as the Eagles sang, “everything all the time.” For me, rock music has always provided an escape from the material world, a rebellion against the blandness of conformity and the

SEPTEMBER 2017

By Robert Alexander hype of commercialism. Perhaps this is what separates rock from pop. The Beatles evolved from “I Want to Hold Your Hand” to “The End”... “and in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make.” As early as 1964, Dylan sang “ah but I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now” and Donovan brought us Zen teachings in 1967: “first there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is.” In 1971, AB (after the Beatles), John Lennon soloed with “Imagine,” and George Harrison asked, “What is Life.” Van Morrison was in search of “The Philosopher’s Stone,” a possible elixir of life, so he could experience enlightenment and immortality. Then there was Little Stevie Wonder who journeyed from “Fingertips (Part 2)” to “Higher Ground.” Wonder, a child prodigy blind since shortly after birth, was to become one of the greatest forces in American popular music and a global voice for peace and love. In 1963, I was fortunate to see the then 13-

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year-old “little wonder” who could play numerous instruments performing live at the Family Drive-In in Clifton, PA. He had to be helped to the microphone on stage; he had not yet learned to fully control his muscular movements. But then, with his chromatic harmonica, he blew us all away! From this amazing performance, I gained a lifelong appreciation for the talent, skills and potential

“The Word,” The Beatles “Imagine,” John Lennon “Living in the Material World,” George Harrison “My Back Pages,” The Byrds (written by Bob Dylan) “Wear Your Love Like Heaven,” Donovan “Philosopher's Stone,” Van Morrison “What's Going On,” Marvin Gaye “Higher Ground,” Stevie Wonder

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of those living with disabilities. Like Hermann Hesse’s “Siddhartha,” many of our rock idols have embarked on a spiritually creative journey of self-discovery that produces masterpieces that enrich our lives. Whether your choice is Alanis Morissette or Robert Plant, take the time to search for the meaning in their work. Why not? You’ve got the time.

“Changes,” David Bowie “Dust in the Wind,” Kansas “New Constellation,” Toad the Wet Sprocket “Car Radio,” 21 Pilots “Hand in My Pocket,” Alanis Morrissette “In the End,” Linkin Park (we should have listened, Chester, RIP) “Stairway to Heaven,” Led Zeppelin “When I Paint My Masterpiece,” The Band (written by Bob Dylan)

BOOMERS

& Beyond


Crossword Fun: Back to school

ACROSS 1. Pink, as in steak 5. "Death ____ for Cutie" 8. Rum cake 12. Czech or Serb 13. "____ and hearty" 14. Equipped with feathers 15. Weather ____ 16. Seed covering 17. Desktop pictures 18. *The boss 20. 32-card game 21. Delhi dresses 22. How the weasel goes 23. Develop, as in story 26. Covered porch 30. Jersey call 31. *Storage 34. Garden ear 35. Wet nurses 37. Owned 38. Ohio metropolis 39. Ingrid Bergman to Isabella Rossellini 40. Saudi Arabia money, pl. 42. Masseuse's office 43. Pastoral 45. Right to enter 47. Lincoln lumber 48. _____ New Guinea 50. *Paper mistake 52. *Learning space 56. South Pacific sailboats 57. Angler's decoy 58. Arm bone 59. Black Beauty, e.g. 60. Singer Tori 61. Skirt opening 62. 15th of March 63. Who's from Mars? 64. Hippocrates' promise, e.g.

6. Batman to Bruce Wayne 7. *End of class notice 8. *Worn to school 9. Dwarf buffalo 10. Out of shape 11. *Found in the back of many yearbooks 13. Bob, e.g. 14. Golfer's sun protection 19. "When a Stranger _____" 22. p in mph 23. Savory taste 24. Wanderer 25. Like beer head 26. Sacred Hindu writings 27. Relating to Scandinavia 28. What ball does on New Year's 29. Pavlova and Karenina

32. Swanky 33. Mary ____, businesswoman extraordinaire 36. *Special permission 38. Singular of asci 40. Equip with sails 41. Memory failures 44. These lips sink ships 46. Enrico, of operatic fame 48. D'Artagnan's hat decoration 49. Hammerin' Hank 50. Trampled 51. Bygone era 52. Chowder protein 53. Paella pot 54. Dealing with a problem 55. *Calculating subject 56. *Between Sigma and Epsilon

DOWN 1. A requested response 2. Wing-shaped 3. Feminine of raja 4. Be that as it may 5. Plural of carpus

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Make a difference with your money At some point during their lifetime, most people wonder whether they’ve done enough — if they’ve made a positive impact, said Jeff Bucher, a financial advisor who helps working-class Americans plan their golden Jeff Bucher years. “For most people, I think that concern increases as they get closer to retirement — they wonder what their earning years have bought for themselves and the people they care about, which may extend to their greater community,” said Bucher, who, through his firm, Citizen Advisory Group, has contributed to the local Boys & Girls Club, the Cherry Street Mission and to the development of an Olympic training center for wrestling at the Ohio State University, his alma mater, where he earned a wrestling scholarship. “You don’t have to be super-wealthy to make a significant contribution to others. The smarter you are with the wealth you do have, however, the more of an impact you’ll be able to have,” stated Bucher. If you want to make a difference with your money, you’re better off having your financial affairs in

order. Bucher offered a few suggestions: • Now is the time to design a lifetime income plan. Simply attaining a minimum figure in savings probably won’t work; such figures do not account for family emergencies, inflation, etc. Social Security does not cover what it used to, and its future is uncertain at best. You need to establish a laddered, inflation-adjusted income using safe and dependable accounts that will provide a check every month. This should be informed by a plan that maps out your lifetime income needs to ensure that you do not outlive your money. For example, if you need $3,000 a month now, at a four percent inflation rate you will need $3,649.96 in five years. In 10 years you will need almost $4,500 per month. • Consider holding off on retirement. Many people are understandably eager to retire as early as possible; others fear Social Security benefits will vanish, so they want to get what they can as quickly as possible — at age 62. But if you’re counting on those benefits as part of your income, you should wait until you’re eligible for the full amount. That’s age 66 if you were born from 1943 to 1954, and age 67 if you were born in 1960 and later. If you’re in the older group, retiring at 62 cuts your benefits by a quarter; for the younger group it’s nearly a third. “Chances are, you’ll be better off mentally and physically if you wait anyway,” Bucher said. “Many studies show that people live longer and are more vital the longer they remain employed.” • Know when to transfer investments out of taxdeferred plans. If you’re working for a company that provides a match for 401(k) contributions, by all means, contribute up to the maximum match. “That’s free money — you’d be crazy not to take advantage,” Bucher said. But anything beyond that should be invested in something that’s more tax efficient: Roth IRA, municipal bonds, life insurance or real estate. No one expects taxes will go down — they’ll be going up. Uncle Sam already has a lien on your IRA or 401(k); don’t let his lien, the taxes you’ll owe, continue to grow. Go ahead and pay now. Your future retired self will be glad you did. Jeff Bucher is the President and co- founder of Citizen Advisory Group, a comprehensive financial planning company in Perrysburg. You can contact him at 419-872-0204; email at jeff@citizenadvisory.com; visit at 770 Commerce Dr., Perrysburg; or visit the website at www.citizenadvisory.com.

Investment Advisory services are offered through Alphastar Capital Management. Alphastar Capital Management, LLC and Citizen Advisory Group are independent entities. Citizen Advisory Group does not offer legal or tax advice.

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BOOMERS

& Beyond


Books for Boomers

Did you know that September is Library Card Signup Month? Now is the time to get a library card if you don’t already have one. Here are some great books about libraries that you can read to your grandchild or special child in your life. Amelia Bedelia’s First Library Card, Greenwillow Books, 2013 By Sue Schafer By Herman Parish; Ages 0 – 8 Manager, Amelia Bedelia helps out at the library with her classmates and Sylvania Branch, wonders what kind of book she should borrow when she Toledo Lucas County receives her first library card. Public Library Bunny’s Book Club, Doubleday Books for Young Readers, 2017 By Annie Silvestro; Ages 0 – 8 Bunny loves reading so much that he begins sneaking into the library at night to borrow books, and soon his friends want to join him. Do Not Bring Your Dragon to the Library, Picture Window Books, 2016 By Julie Gassman; Ages 0 – 8 A child brings a dragon to the library and learns a valuable lesson--libraries and dragons do not mix. A Library Book for Bear, Candlewick Press, 2014 By Bonnie Becker; Ages 0 – 8 Bear does not want to go to the library. He is quite sure he already has all the books he will ever need. Yet the relentlessly cheery Mouse thinks differently. When Bear reluctantly agrees to go with his friend to the big library, neither rocket ships nor wooden canoes are enough for Bear’s picky tastes. How will Mouse ever find the perfect book for Bear? Library Mouse, Home Sweet Home, Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2013 By Daniel Kirk; Ages 0 – 8 While the library that Sam and his adventurous friend Sarah live in is being renovated, the two mice try to make new homes for themselves in the attic, constructing everything from a yurt to a geodesic dome. Includes photographs of real house styles discussed and a brief glossary of terms.

Crossword Puzzle Solution WE ARE ONLINE! sylvaniaadvantage.com/boomers-beyond

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! facebook.com/BoomersandBeyondSylvania

Do you have big home-improvement plans this year? THE BRUNNER COMPANY, INC. CAN HELP! We’ve remodeled hundreds of homes over the past 40+ years! Call us today for a free, no obligation estimate and schedule

567.455.6121 SEPTEMBER 2017

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It’s a Date arts

Momentum - Hot Glass Cool Music Promenade Park, downtown Toledo September 15-17 The Music of Prince, peformed by the TSO, members of His Royal Badness’ own band, and singer Mackenzie Green on Friday, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Glass, Music and Art Festival with 20 glass and design vendors, music, food trucks on Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. theartscommission.org/momentum

fairs

Fulton County Fair Fulton County Fairgrounds 8514 State Route 108, Wauseon, Ohio September 1-7 Agricultural judging, tractor pulls, carnival rides, demolition derby; grandstand entertainment including Travis Tritt, Loverboy and Survivor. Single-day gate admission $5/adults. For grandstand concerts and event tickets, visit fultoncountyfair.com. Country Living Fair Ohio Village, Columbus, Ohio September 15-17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Shopping - antiques, vintage, art, furniture, home décor, handcrafted clothing and jewelry; seminars and demonstrations; and delicious food. Tickets, 1-866-500-FAIR (3247). countryliving.com

topics

Boomers Resource Network Uncle John’s Restaurant 3131 Secor Rd., Toledo Thursdays Boomers Resource Network, Lake Erie Region welcomes those born from 1946 to 1964 for its weekly event, 11:30 a.m. networking and lunch, 12 p.m. featured speaker, 1 p.m. networking. For speaker information, visit boomersrn.com.

October Issue: Sept. 26 DEADLINE: Sept. 11

sweats

50+ Sports Classic Fort Meigs YMCA, 13415 Eckel Junction Rd., Saturday, September 30, 9 a.m. Individual and team athletic events for those 50 and over. Presented by the Area Office on Aging and the YMCA of Greater Toledo. areaofficeonaging.com Namaste for Nature – Yoga at the Toledo Zoo Saturdays, September 9, 16, 23, 30 9 - 10 a.m. Help support the Zoo’s native prairie and horticultural programs while getting your Zen on. Wear comfortable clothing and bring your own yoga mat and bottle of water. Tickets: $20/zoo members, $25/nonmembers per week (includes admission and parking). Register for all four and save $5. toledozoo.org

eats

Greek-American Festival Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church Downtown Toledo September 8-10 Enjoy Greek food, pastries, and dancing; browse through the Greek boutique; and tour the beautiful Byzantine Cathedral. Admission: Fri./Sat. $5, Sun. $2. Children under 12 free with parent. holytrinitytoledo.com/the-greek-festival

Got upcoming events? Email us at boomersandbeyond2014@gmail.com

Boomers & Beyond SEPT 2017  

Boomers & Beyond is a monthly publication in Northwest Ohio and Southeast Michigan dedicated to the unique joys and challenges of being born...

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