1988 Program for the Sydney International Piano Competition

Page 1

4th Sydney International Piano Competition

of Australia 8-24July 1988 QANTAS THE ALSTRALIAN ARLNE


CONTENTS

Acknowledgements

Sydney

5

International Advisory Panel

and Jurors of National

Sydney Conservatorium

6

Australia International Piano Competition of

International

8 10

Audition Panels/Audition Facilities

Cultural Exchange Institute of Australia of Music/The Cladan Music Patron/Chairman

Jurors

15

Competition Rules Prizes

14

20

21

Engagements

22

Irina Plotnikova

244

Toward a World Piano Centre 2 6 Competition Diary

Competitors

28 50 4

Previous Juries and Prizewinners

Piano Works by Australian Composers/John Hopkins

46

47

Sydney Symphony Orchestra

The Australian Chamber Orchestra/ Stephen Bishop-Kovacevich

Christopher

Kimber/Miwako

Abe/Georg

Pedersen

Piano Building in Australia Australian Piano Music

50

51

53

The Friends of the Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia Application/ Voting Fornm

49

55

54

12


As Governor of New South Wales and Patron of the Sydney International Piano Competition, it gives me great pleasure to again extend a welcome to all1 competitors, jurors and special guests to Sydney. This is the fourth occasion on which this Competition has been held here and it is most appropriate that, this year, it takes place during the 200th Anniversary of European settlement of Sydney and of Australia. I hope that the 40 pianists, selected from over 260 applicants from 38 countries

by

worldwide auditions, will find this

experience. Judging by the success

Competition

a most

rewarding

of previous years, there will be

large and

attentive concert and radio audiences enjoying all stages of the Competition.

To all artists,

jurors and organisers,

I send my best wishes.

His Excellency Air Marshal Sir James Rowland, AC KBE DFC AFC, Governor of New South Wales


At Qantas,we don't just applaud Australian

talent,we help keep the showV on the road. STAGE DOOR ustraliu

Istrn

Orehesir

Furean

Iniestra Lun

Grnd l

n

i r d iaU

unras

Promoting Australia can be quite an art. As the Australian Youth Orchestra, Sydney Dance Company, Australian Ballet, National Institute of Dramatie Art and the Australian National Gallery have proved so well Qantas helps provide vital sponsorships for all of these. As well as the Australian Video Festival, Australian Pops Orchestra and the Sydney Theatre Company. In fact, when it comes to promoting Australian talent,

Qantas puts on quite a performance.

TASThe spirit of Australia. QPH 5037 Mojo. MDA


MESSAGE FROM THE HON. NICK GRElNER, MP. PREMIER OF NEW SOUTH WALES FOR THE FOURTH SYDNEY

I

am

INTERNATIONAL PIANO COMPETITION

honoured

to be

able

to

welcome

to

OF AUSI

KALI

New South Wales everyone

participating in the Fourth Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia. The Competition deserves pride of place in our Bicentennial celebrations as it has, in its relatively short life span, served to promote and enhance excellence amongst Australia's young pianists. The

Competition offers Australian pianists the opportunity

to

take their

place,

side by side, amongst the best in the world. Miss Claire Dan, and all those involved with In this

creating and organising the event,

year's

event, 40

pianists

should indeed be very

from 20 countries will compete

at

proud.

Sydney's

historic Conservatorium of Music. It is a further tribute to the Competition that over

260 pianists sought

places.

As Premier of this Stute and Vice-Patron of the Sydney International Piano

Competition, I wish all participants every success.

Nick Greiner, Premier


Proudly

brougi

y TNT

you

.PHOTOGRAPH OF A FORMER FIRST PRIZE WINNER. MR. CHIA CHOu OF CANADA, BY COURTESY OF SILP.CA.

TNT is

proud to be a sponsor of the 1988 Sydney

International Piano Competition of Australia.

TNT

The Worldwide

Transportation Group TREBLE WATSON +MORETNTOOT


Acknowledgements

nDetition

gratefully acknowledges the wide ranee of support received from the organisationsand ad n services, or volunteered tneir below, who have

individuals listed professional advice. Foundation Sponsors

J. Albert& Son Pty Ltd Allans Music Australia Pty Ltd

donated funds and/or provided

And for the kind

Sponsors Alumax Inc. USA

Director and Staff of the Sydne

Ansctt Airlines of Australia

Australasian Performing Right Association L. Bösendorfer Klavierfabrik AG, Vienna

Corporation (Australia) Australia Israel Society for Cultural Exchange

Cladan Cultural Exchange Institute of Australia

Boral Ltd

Council of the City of Sydney

Challenge Bank Ltd Cornelius Furs Deutscher Musikrat, Bonn, West Germany Neville Grace

Steinway & Sons, New York, Hamburg and London

Musicians Union of Australia Pioneer Concrete (NSW) Pty Ltd

Rothmans Foundation

John Reid

Sydney Opera House Trust Thomas Nationwide Transport

Dr Alex Reisner and Dr Pamela Pennycuik

Anonymous Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Logans Music

Triton Energy Corporation USA

2MBS-FM and volunteers Ginette Ackermann

Betsy Brown Gordon Clarke of J. Albert & Son Pty Ltd

Shirley MacGrory John McLean

Tooheys Ltd The Ana Sieiro de Trenchi Foundation

Virginia Maxwell Iain Nurthen

Mr and Mrs K Woolley

Gervaise Saminaden

Kawai Australia Pty Ltd, Sydney and Hamamatzu, Japan Nippon Gakki Ltd (Yamaha), Tokyo,

Kerry Packer

Musica Viva Australia

Qantas Airways reservation statt

Max Loveday

For the loan of Pianos and Technical Teams

Regent Hotel

and staff

Council of the City of Sydney

Daphne Cross

Mrs E Sternberg

Ipoh Garden (Aust) Pty Ltd and

Lotto NSW

Sydney Opera House Trust

Sony (Australia) Pty Ltd

Inter-Continental Hotel

Dr Michael Kennedy

Department of Immigration, Sydney Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Joy Annand

Hyatt-Kingsgate Hotel

Queen Victoria Building

Canberra

Australian Music Centre

Time Australia

American/Australian Bicentennial Foundation

Department of Foreign Affairs,

Friends of the SIPCA

Sir Asher Joel

Major Sponsors

Conservatorium of Music

Committee and members of the

Hunt&Hunt

Qantas Airways Ltd Radio 2MBS-FM

Westpac Banking Corporation

of

of Governors, The Chairman and Board

American Society with AT & T International (Aust.) and Digital Equipment

Musica Viva Australia NSW Government, through the office of the Minister for the Arts NSW State Conservatorium of Music

assistance

lelbourne and Sydney

Steinway & Sons, Hamburg with Brashs of Melbourne and Sydney

Alfred S. White Music Bequest

Jim Wolfensohn

5


Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia

The

Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia is presented by The Cladan Culurat Exchange Institute of Australia in co-operation with the sydney Conservatorium of Music. It is a member of the World Federation of International Music Competitions, Geneva.

Patron

His Excellency Air Marshal Sir James Rowland AC. KBE DFC AFC, Governor of New South Wales

Vice-

Nick Greiner, Premier of New South Wales

n

Music Patron Life President and Co-Founder

Dr Eileen Joyce CMG

Claire Dan AM OBE

Vice-President and Co-Founder

Rex Hobcroft

Directors

Claire Dan AM OBE Thomas May AO Dr Ronald Smart

Robert Tobias Sir Bruce Williams KBE, Chairman

Executivec Committee

Senator Bronwyn Bishop Claire Dan AM OBE

Jim Devi

Neville Grace

Trevor Green (until March 1988) Rex Hobcroft

Dr Michael Kennedy

Anne Landa Thomas May AO Sam Miller

Rosalyn Packer John Painter AM Richard Pratt Dr Ronald Smart Warren Thomson OAM Robert Tobias

Graham Watman Artistic Director Rex Hoberoft Deputy Artistic Director Warren Thomson OAM

Administrator

Penelope Drake-Brockman

Secretariat

Jannette Greenwood - Assistant to

Administrator Rachel Murphy - Publicity Joanne G0odman - Secretary

Hon. Treasurer and Secretary Hon. Accountants Hon. Auditors Hon. Solicitors

Ernst & Whinney Phillips Fox

Stage

Pierre St. Just

Management

Graham Watman Rowlands

Philip Chapman

Piano Technician Trevor Foulcher

The Sydney International Piano Competition of gratefully acknowledges the assistance given by students ofAustralia the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and the Conservatorium High School, as back-stage leading hands and ushers.

Friends of the Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia Patron Kathryn Greiner Music Patron Peter Sculthorpe OBE President Senator Bronwyn Bishop

Vice-Presidents

Alderman Margaret Carter Elayne Mills

Hon. Secretary and Deputy Chairmann Hon. Treasurer

Newsletter

Christine Gailey Sheila Prior

Editor

Carolyn Benn

Airport Receptiona

Denise Fink

Hon. Secretary (to March 1988)

Debbie Angus


N

SHUASMAEENE.

"The world's most beautiful Sbopping Centre." PIERRE CARDIN

Located in the heart of the City, the magnificently restored Queen Victoria Building- winner of the 1987 Australian Heritage Award, the 1987 Sulman Architectural Award and the 1987 Boma Awardoffers Sydney a unique shopping experience. Nearly 200 shops, cafés and restaurants. Open 7 days.

The Queen Victoria Building George Street, Sydney With Special Appearances Semi-Finalists will be performing in the Grand Dome area between 12 midday and 2pm daily Saturday16July through to Saturday 23 July.


International Advisory Panel

Marcello Abbado Sulamita

Aronovsky

Peter Averi

Jacob Bistritzky

Concert pianist; Dircctor, Conservatorio

Fanny Waterman OBE Chairman, Lecds International!

Giuseppc Verdi, Milan, Italy Chairman, London International Piano ompctition; Professor of Piano, Royal Northern College of Music, Birmingham, UR

Competition, UR Adam Wibrowski

Music Consultant, New Zcaland

Kazuko Vasukawa

Dircctor/Founder, Arthur Rubinstcin International Music Socicty, Isracl

Choo Hocy Pierre Colombo

Music Dircctor, Singapore Symphony Orchestra

Conductor; President of the World Federation of International Music Competitions, Geneva, Switzerland

Myrian Dauclsberg

Profcssor of Piano, School of Music, University of Rio dc Janciro, Brazil

John Drummond Dean Elder

Controller, Music Radio 3, British Broadcasting Corporation, London, UR Dircctor; Siciro International Piano Compctition, New York; Senior Consulting

Claude Frank Gerald Glynn

Concert pianist, New York, USA

Editor, Clarier Magazine, USA

Composer, cong

pianist and teacher,

Paris, France

Bradford Gowen

Concert pianist; Professor of Piano, University of Mary land, USA

Irving Hcller

Artistic Director, Montreal International Music Compctition; Professor of Piano,

Nicole Henriot Leonard Hokanson

Monireal Conservatory of Music, Canada Concert pianist and teacher, Paris, France Professor of Piano, Indiana University,

Leslie Howard

Concert pianist, London, UK

Toyoaki Matsuura

Concert pianist and Professor of Piano,

Denis Matthews CBE

Concert pianist and

Bloomington, USA

lokyo, Japan Birmingham, UK

Jurgen Meyer-Josten

Professor of Piano,

Concert pianist; Head of the Music Dept. of Bavarian Radio, Director of the International Music Competition of the Broadcasting Companies of Germany, Munich

Bryce Morrison Masaaki Niwa

Critic, London, UK Music Critic; Director, Toho Institute of

Music, Tokyo

Glacy Antunes de Oliveira Helena Oliveira Paloma O Shea

Bogumil Palasz

Chairman, Graduate School of Institute of Arts, Goias, Brazil

President, Sociedade Brasileira de Realizacoes Artistico-Culturais, Brazil

Founder/Presidenu/Director, Santander

International Piano Competition, Spain Director, Frederic Chopin Society, Warsaw land

Josef Pálenícek

Concert pianist; Professor of Piano and composer, Prague, Czechoslovakia

Josef W. Polisi

President, Juilliard School of Music,

Paul C. Pollei

New York, USA Founder/Director, Gina Bachauer

Richard Rodzinski

City, USA Executive Director, Van Cliburn International

International Piano Competition, Salt Lake

Piano Competition, Fort Worth, USA

Jean-Paul Sevilla

Concert pianist, Professor of Piano,

Peter Solymos

Professor of Piano, Franz Liszt Music

Takahiro Sonoda

Concert pianist and teacher, Tokyo, Japan

Hugo Steurer

Concert pianist and Professor of Piano,

Maria Tip

Concert pianist; Professor in the Virtuoso class, Geneva Conservatory of Music

University of Otawa, Canada

Academy, Budapest, Hungary London, UK

Jacques Vacrewyck

Adminisrator, Queen Elisabeth of the Belgians International Music Competition; Vice-President, World Federation of International Music Competitions

8

Zhou Guang-Ben

Artistic

forte

Director, and Professor, Music Sessi Grenoble State Conser France; Visiting Protessor, Southern Calitornia, USA University of Chairman

International

of the Music

International

on

Management Committee

Compctition Chairman, of Music, Piano Dept., Central Beijing, China

of

Japan

Conservatory


Theresso much

includedon

South MolleIsland, its a wonder

it doesnt sink. Ansett flights there and back.

Golt.7 Squash.

Allmeals

Tennis

Windsuxfng

Gym

Paddle boats

Childmindimg

Hobiecatsi

Sauna

Spa. Once you've paid for your holiday on South Molle, you've paid for everything m this pIcture.

In fact, apart from your drinks and a few activities, just about everything else is included. To find out what else you wont have to pay for, call Ansett or your travel agent.

Ansett Holidays.


Jurors of National and International Audition Panels Professor Sulamita Aronovsky Ronald Farren-Price Gerald Glynn Bradford Gowen Professor Hans Graf Dr Walter Gurtelschmied

Nicole Henriot Rex Hoberoft Professor Alexander Jenner Professor R.T. Kouliev Professor Li Mingqiang8 Assistant Professor V.l. Nosov Assistant Professor N.G. Pankova Dr Paul C. Pollei

Elizabeth Powell Acting Professor I.M. Ryabov Assistant Professor M.N. Sayamov Harold Schonberg Professor Herbert Seidel

Oleg Skorodoumov Dr Gordon Spearritt

Professor Hugo Steurer Warren Thomson OAM

Ana-Maria Trenchi de Bottazzi Assistant Professor A.A. Trifonov Professor I.A. Tsvetaeva Professor Lev Vlasenko Professor Joachim Volkmann Professor Adam Wibrowski Professor M.A. Zolourev

Audition Facilities The

Competition gratefully the use facilities and the efficient andacknowledges enthusiastiC support of ofaudition staff of thhe following organisations: Vienna Frankfurt Paris London

L. Bösendorfer Klavierfabrik AG Dr Roland Rädler, Peter Lemell and Dr Michael Niessen

Hessischer Rundfunk

Mr S. Barnikov and Mrs Montanari

Centre Européen des Activités Artistique Piano Yamaha Mr H. Toyoda and Alexandra Petrusca

Steinway & Sons Robert Glazebrook and Penny Bishop New York Yamaha Communication Center Inc. Kanehide Tarui, William Santaella and Ike Koike Los Angeles Department of Music, University of Los Angeles, California Mary Frances Armbruster and John Hayes

Sydney USSR

Shanghai

Conservatorium of Music

Daphne Cross and Trevor Foulcher

Kuibyshev and Moscow Conservatoria with Oleg Skorodoumov of Gosconcert

Conservatorium of Music Shanghai Professor Li Mingqiang

10


he best place

in the world.

The Regent of Sydney has always taken great pleasure in serving the very finest of

Australia's bounty. From wines to welcome, it's these little treasures that make a great hotel truly grand.

Sydney. The best place in the world.

the

Reent SYDNEY

199 George Street, Sydney. Reservations

O08 022 800 Leo Burnett RES P 5S14


Sydney Conservatorium

Sir Bruce Williamns

of Music

of Chairman KBE 4th Sydney the Executive Australia. International Pianommittee Piano dCompennntr Sir Australian Bruce by birth and formal an adviser Williams Was

The New South Wales State Conservatorium of Music was cstablished in 1916 and is the most prcstigiOus music school in Australia. CoursCS are offered at Associate Diploma, Bachelors

CompositiOn and Musicology. The Schoolof Extension organises In-Service Courses for teachersStudicCS and

a

Professorai 1967 s of th government ana thet

the Kingdom from 1946 to 1981 to 1986.

Degrec. Postgraduate Diploma and Master s Degree Ievels in the Schools of Practical Studies, Opera, Education and General Studies,

He was

of

again te

University Vice-Chancellor of sydney from and Prinei.

of the

board of the Reserve.1967 to 1ooPAl to 1981, and chaired 1981a Government Au into Educ the Federa ing from 1976Inquiry to 1979 a cation andT e Discipline of of the Engineerino Cent Re Cladan Cultural Excha Australia from

part-timc tuition for those wishing to further their musical studies, for students

om

attending the Conservatorium High School and for selected junior students.

The vitality of the Conservatorium is retlected the range of concerts, masterclasses, seminars, workshops and in-service courses open to the public: in the number of distinguished

in

1969

1976

international resident artists and iting musicians cach its renowned year and

to

dnge Instit 1982.

through resident ensembles such as the Sydney String Quartet, The Sydney Wind Quintet, Conservatoriun Symphony and Chamber Orchestras, which have

represented the Conservatorium throughout Australia and in some 50 countries throughout the world.

The Cladan Cultural

Exchange Institute of Australia Patron: The

Honourable

Prime Minister of R.J.L. Hawke

The

Australia

ac M MP

Cladan Australia, Cultural Exchange Institute of in 1976, founded by Mis Claire Dan AM formalised

Miss Dan's OBF extensivee involve patronage of The Institute in the was establishedarts Australia

ment in and

to cultural exchange promote between Australia and other countries, in all has a board of fields ot the arts. The Institute eminent who are Australians specialists in various areaS of the arts and business, by Mr Tom May. It is the chaired first private in this organisation established country t0 initiate and

cultural exchange and waS instrumentaldevelop in in conura conceiving of of Austra nternationCntal

Australia, which is held every four years in co-operation with the Sydney Conservatorium

of Music.

In January 1981 the Institute launched its international theatre season and already theatre

companies from Yugoslavia, Greece and The Netherlands have

come to

Australia to present

productions which are chosen for their qualitic of excellence and innovation. In 1982 the samK

8roups, plus a Melbourne Theatre Company

production of Einstein by Ron Elisha, were

taken on tour of the United States, organised

and sponsored by the Institute

Following the Competition this year, the Institute is to present a travel scholarship to

an Australían pianist.

12


ENCORE!

ENCORE Be it for morning tea. Lunch. Afternoon tea. Dinner.

Or a nightcap. Make sure you make an appearance at the

Hotel Inter-Continental.

HOTEL

INTER CONTINENTAL SYDNEY AGAIN AND AGAIN 117 Macquarie0200 street, Sydney. 117 Ma230


Music Patron AUSTRALIAUK

Perhaps Australia's most renowned concert pianist

of all time, Eileen Joyce, was born a tent near Zeehan in Tasmania and spent her childhood in Boulder City, Western Australia, where her nat

During the

ural talent was discovered by a local priest and encouraged by the nuns of Loreto Convent in Perth. Realising her great gifts, the nuns arranged for her to be heard by Percy Grainger and, with the assistance of Wilhelm Backhaus and funds raised by the people of western Australia, she

Eileen Joyce

went to Europe tostudy at Leipzig under Max Pauer and Robert Teichmuller. Later she studied

with Tobias Matthay and Adelina de Lara (a pupil

of Clara Schumann) in London and with Artur Schnabel in Berlin.

Her career was launchedin London by Sir Henry Wood at a Promenade Concert with a

performance of Prokofiev's 5rd Piano Concerto. For many years she played regularly with al the

leading British orchestras and made many

notable concert tours, to the USA, the USSR,

throughout Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Her repertoire, which included 70 concertos, had an extraordinary range and originality, including first performances of Busoni's Indian Fantasy, Shostakovich's concerto for piano, trumpet and orchestra, and works by Vincent d Indy and Pizzetti. She worked with John Ireland on the first recording of his piano concerto and had many works especially written for her. In addition to a demanding tour schedule, she has broadcast on radio and television, made

war

she is for her work remen touring thewarmly blitzed with the

in

citieeCTed

London

Philharmonic and sBritain Sargent. The importance the interest and love of ofher worle lalcol classical music cannot bethe British Sn nrou put lic rf Sing her óoverestimated Throughout to give her services career, she has fon to raise mone und time notably tne Leper Hospital at Vellore 1ity she has given ror conCerts the physicall Indiaa mentally handicapped, and in 4Ad prisons Eileen Joyce from her career in the retired professie early 1960s to her an in right hana. she nasfollowing since occasionally to raiSe performe for money to ities 2n and encourage young artists. charities In

ot ner recognition long, varied nd and out. services to music. standing she was madeou Honorary Doctor of Music of an the of Cambridge in 1971. In 1979 she University beca

first lady Doctor of Music of Western Australia, where she the Universi has the Eileen established Joyce Fund

a

unique

Music of

and has presented

collection artworks to the Depart. ment of Music. She the CMG n 1981 and has twice was awarded a International Piano been juror forandthehasSvYuney the Competitions Music been Patron since 1982.

Competition

recordings and played the musical scores tor films, including herselt appearing in a number of these films. Her are

recordings

still rcgarded

a5 Some ot the finest pianoforte playing and

many have been reissued since 1981 by EMI.

Chairman AUSTRALIA

Rex Hobcroft is Co-Founder and Artistic Director

of the Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia. He was director of the

Sydney servatorium of Music for 10 years from 1972 to 1982. During this period the range and of the Conservatoriums activities and quality study

Con-

programmes expanded on an unprecedented Scale to make it one of the major music schools in the world. In

Rex Hobcroft

addition concert pertormances as soloist and with orchestra, his career has included conto

ngCamber musiC, composing and teach-

ing. He was foundation head of the Keyboard Department at the Queensland State Conservatorium of Music and later founded the Music

Department at the University of Tasmania. He

founded and directed the Tasmanian State Conservatorium and also founded the Tasmanian

State Opera Company. He proposed and directed two national Seminars in 1963 and 1965, whichComposers' were of key importance

the first

14

in the

emergence of the younger Australian

composers in the late 1960s. He was chairman of the

jury of the first Sydney International Piano Competitions in three 19, 1981 and 1985, and has been on the jury of many

important competitions including the Chopin.

Liszt-Bartok, Tokyo, Munich and Gina Bachauer


Jurors

ENGLAND

Joan Chissell studied at the Royal College of

Music, London, subsequently teaching piano

in its junior department and lecturing on music for the extramural departments of Oxford and

London universities. In 1948 she became a

critic for the London Times andin 1968 a reviewerfor theGramopbone magazine. She is alsoa regular broadcaster. She is the author of books on Schumann, Chopin, Brahms and on Schumann s piano

Joan Chissell

music and, more recently, a study of the life and work of Clara Schumann.

FRANCE

AParisienne by birth, Nicole Henriot entered

international piano competitions including the

age and studied with Marguerite Long.close friend and associate of Maurice Ravel. On her

Van Cliburn, Texas, the Tchaikovsky in Moscow,

death Mademoiselle Long left some of Ravel's original manuscripts to Nicole Henriot and this

connection led to her playing Mother Goose for four hands with Maurice Ravel. Nicole Henriot

Nicole Henriot has been a juror for many major

the Conservatoire National de Paris at an early

Her concert career started in France and Belgium during the Sccond World War, which shecombined with activities in the French under ground. Following the war she toured extensively

the Queen Elisabeth of the Belgians, the Vianna da Motta in Lisbon, the Long-Thibaud in Paris,

and in Sydney. She lives near Paris and teaches at the Royal Music Conservatory in Brussels as well as continuing her concert career. Madame Henriot is a Knight of the French

Legion of Honour and of the Belgian Order of the Crown.

in Europe, the USSR, North America,Japan and Mexico, both in recital and orchestral concerts.

CHINA

Li Mingqiang was born in Shanghai and studied piano from the age of 10 with Alfred Wittenberg, Violinist of the Artur Schnabel irio in 1902, and

with Yu Bianming. In 1956 he joined the Faculty

Li

Mingqiang

of the Orchestral Instruments Department of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music as accompanist and tutor and conünued piano studies with Tatiana Petrovna Kravchenko in the Central Conservatory of Music, Beijing in 1958. Following his graduation in 1960, he taught in the P1ano Department of the shanghai Conservatory is of Music where and Professor of Piano. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the China Federation of Literary and Arts Workers, and of the Chinese

he currently Vice-President

Musicians ASSOciation.

15

Li has been awarded prizes at various inter national piano competitions, including the 3rd International Smetana Competition in 1957, the Enescu Competition in 1958 and the

Ist George

6th Chopin Competition in Warsaw in 1960. He has toured in many countries throughout

the world giving recitals and concerto perform ances, and been a member of the jury of several international piano competitions, including the

3rd George Enescu Competition, the 6th Van

Cliburn and for the 2nd Sydney Competition in

1981. He has recorded for Electrecord in Romania,

Supraphon in Czechoslovakia and for the China Recording Company, including works by contemporary Chinese composers.


w'EST GERMANY|

Albrecht Roescler studicd music at Detmold, Germany and Indiana University Music School,

Bloomington, USA, returning to Berlin where he gained his doctorate in musicology at Berlin University in 1957. He was a violinist in the Berlin Symphony Orchestra from 1950 to 1956, combining this position with lecturing at the Petersen Music Conservatory, Berlin. He has been editor for

Several German publishing houses and since Munich newspaper Suddeutsche Zeitung. He has contributed to many international music publications, including the Beethoven

1973 has been Senior Editor (Arts) for the

Albrecht Roeseler

Encyclopaedia, New York, 1955: the MozartAspekte, Olten, Switzerland, 1956; Idiomatic

Albrecht

highly regarded f translations Rocscler into German, rson Welles' Citízen amonaecd for h. Kane: YchudICh are Unfinisbed Journey; Anthony is

Menuhin

New

Europeans; and Harold mpson's The Schonbergs The journalist he has contributed of reviews, h commentaries and leadinonur for edk Suddeulsche Zeitung and Great Composers. As a

quently for Radi was autho of a Munich

He

broadeaeles Radio

and

R

Berlin.

film for television or Strauss and is a guest lecturer at sities in the United ad States. He is alsoseveral for the cultumla

correspondent Tribune in Paris.

International Herars

Herald

Instruments in H. Schuetz' Wores, Berlin, 1958;

Musical Europe Guide, London/New York, 1972;

Eine Kleine Lacbmusik (Wusic Anecdoles), Munich, 1972; and Great Violinists of our

Century, Munich, 1987. USA

Born in New York, Harold Schonberg studied

piano with Alice Frisca and music at Brooklyn College and New York University, where he obtained his BA cum laude and MA

respectively.

He also studied with Kuniyoshi at the Arts

Students League. His career was interrupted by war service as first

lieutenant in the US

Army serving parachutist, glider and code officer, including in Harold

Schonberg

as a

theHeEuropean theatre of operations has pursued busy in music criticism, a

career

writing for such magazines and papers as the

American Music Lover, Musical Digest, the New York Sun, the Musical Courier, the Gramopbone (London) and the New York Times, for which paper he is currently Cultural Correspondent.

In 1971 he was Criticism and is anawarded the

Pulitzer Prize for

Honorary Doctor of Letters, Temple University, and Doctor of Humane

Letters.. contributes currently tO American magazines and is the author of 13many books, including The Great The Great Pianists, Conductors, Lives the Great Grinnell College. He

of Composers, of Chess, Facing the The Glorious Music andGrandmasters Ones. He is presently assisting Vladimir Horowitz with his autobiography. by the Sponsored American-Australian Bicentennial Foundation with Alumax

Corporation.

Inc.

and Triton

EnergY

AUSTRALIA

Warren Thomson is Deputy Artistic Director for 4th Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia. He has been foundation Head of the School of Extension Studies at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music since 1974. He studied music at the University of Melbourne and has held many administrative and teaching

the

positions, including Director of Music, Trinity

Warren Thomson

Grammar School, Founder and President of the Federation of Australian Music ations, President of the Music Teachers Teachers'AssoC1 Association of New South Wales, and Director of Studies, Australian Music Examinations Board. In addition he has had an active career

in performance, conducting, recording and broadcasting, and holds many hOnorary and advisory positions.

Warren Thomson has made many overscas tours and has contributed to oveT ,

study

Publications currently available, including the

first Australian Urtert Edition. He has adjudicated at all the major Australian Eisteddfau and was Deputy Chairman of the Jury for the Tchaikovssy Competition in 1982.

n

1987 he was awarded the Order of Australi

Medal for services to music, especially in tne field of music education.


JAPAN

Professor Kazuyuki Tohyama graduated in

and Tokyo University ain 1944 critic. Aesthetics in 1946 Commenced his career as music from

He continued his studies in music at the Paris

Conservatoire under Norbert Dufourcq and at

His selected works have been published in

the University of Paris under Jacques Chailley

six volumes and he has been decorated by the Japanese and French Governments, in addition

from 195l to 1957. From 1948 to 1951 he taught at the Tokyo

and National University of Fine Arts and Music School been teaching at the Toho Gakuen has of Music since 1958.

Kazuyuki Tohyama

Professor Tohyama has been a member of the jury for the Long-Thibaud International Piano Competition in Paris in 1973 and 1978 and for the Vianna da Motta, Portugal in 1983.

to receiving several awards for his distinguished

contributions to music.

He is at present a director of the Toky0 (Tokyo Bunda

Festival Hall Metropolitan chairman of the Committee of the Kaikan),

chairman of the Japan Music Competition, Japan Music Pen Club, an honorary member

ofthe International Association of MusicCritics and president of the Documentation Centre of Modern Japanese Music Foundation.

ARGENTINA

Born in Buenos Aires, Ana Maria Trenchi de Botazzi was awarded the Premier Prix at the Conservatoire National de Paris and doctorates in music from universities in Argentina and the United States, including the Juilliard School of Music, New York. She has studied under such distinguished teachers as Nadia Boulanger,

Germaine Pinault, Ives Nat, Alberto Ginastera,, Roger Sessions and Martin Canin, and has been awarded gold medals and first prizes in many

international piano competitions. Following her first around-the-world concert

Ana Maria Trenchi de Bottazzi

tour at the age of 23, she was sent by the French Government to Japan for t o years as full professor for graduate students at the Kunitachi in Tokyo. Since then she has given University Solo recitals and pertormances with orchestras

in major cities in 54 COuntries. She is currently a member of the piano faculty of the Aaron Copland School of Music, Queens College, New York, and has given recitals annually at Carnegie Hall over the past seven years.

In 1982 Ana Maria Trenchi de Bottazzi was the of Outstanding Woman of the Year

recipient

the

Award granted by the All Nations Women's League Inc. and has since received many honours in different countries, including the United Nations of in 1983 she was one of five recipients when the award presented to outstanding artists from Latin America.

In 1985 she became director of the North Inter-American Music

American Chapter of the SoCiety, a non-protit organisation created to artists promote the interchange of performing from North, Central and South America.

She has recently signed a contract with Visual

Music Inc.

to

produce a

new videocasette

piano instruction series. In 1987 Madame de Bottazzi founded the Ana Sieiro de Trenchi International Piano Competition, to be held in New York in 1989.

ISRAEL Following his début at the age of 15, Arie Vardi has been recognised as one of Israel's finest

concert pianists.

As lst prizewinner of the Chopin Competition

in Israel, he appeared with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, conductedby Zubin Mehta, and upon

Won international acclaim. His wide repertoire includes Contemporary Isracli works, many t which have been dedicated to him. Vardi is presently Professor of Piano at the

throughout Europe.

Rubin Academy of Music, Tel Aviv University, having in the past been Director of the Academy. In 1987 he commenced a sabbatical year, teaching He at the Hochschule fur Musik in Hanover.

Vardi studied piano with Paul Barmgartner and Composition with Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen. He has performed widely as soloist with major orchestras conducted by Gary Bertini, Sergio Commissione, Lukas Foss, Zubin Mehta, Paul Paray, Carlo Zecchi and others. He has toured East and West Europe, the United States,

as adjudicator in international piano competitions. He is chairman of the Music Advisory Committee of the Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Master Competition In Israel Mr Vardi is well known to television viewers for his series Master Class as well as

winning the George Enescu International Competition in Bucharest, he performed

Arie Vardi

Debussy and Ravel. His RCA recordings have

South America, the Far East, Japan and Australia. In 1985 he was awarded the Omanut LaAm prize for the best performances in Israel.

He performs regularly assoloist-conductor and recently has specialised in the impressionist repertoire, including the entire piano works of

frequently gives masterclasses and participates

participating in other music programmes.


USSR

Born in Tbilisi, Georgia, in 1928, Lev Vlasenko attended the Special Music School for gifted children, studying under Professor Versaladze. In 1948 he entered the Moscow State Conservatoire and was a student of Professor Flier for eight years, followed by a period of

Lev Vlasenko

postgraduate studics. In 1956 he was awarded lst Prize and Gold Medal at the Liszt Memorial Competition in Budapest, and in 1958 was winner of the second prize in the Tchaikovsky Competition.

Vlasenko has

Europe, Americamade many concert member of some and Japan, and ours

Montreal, lOKyo, Chopir Bol/at

He has been on the staff of the Moscow State

Conservatoire since 1957 and is presently Professor and Head of the Chair of Piano. Many of his pupils have been prizewinners of international competitions, including Pletnev, Petrov, Randalu and Suk.

ENGLAND

Guest Observer

Tom Sutcliffe is the most controversial and wellregarded critic of opera in Britain today. He has worked for The Guardian for 15 years as an arts

feature Writer and critic, covering also musiC, theatre and occasionally dance. For eight years he also doubled as deputy arts editor.

Before taking tojournalism he was aprofessional musician. He sang countertenor for, among Nikolaus Harnoncourt and made his opera others, debut

Tom Sutcliffe

as Ottone in Monteverdi's Coronation of Poppea at the Darmstadt Opera. He performed with the

Concentus Musicus in Bremen and Vienna and was a founder-member of the vocal ensemble Pro Cantione Antiqua, in

spccialising

and Renaissance music. He was also, inmedieval the "60s, the manager of the pioncering carly nmusic instru mental and vocal ensemble Musica Reservata.

18

in

of the piano competitions, leading inCCna including Leedeina Tchaikovsky, and Athens. Lisbon Leeds,

He studied English at Oxford Magdalen for two years at aand after graduating, taught London musical children where hisspecialist school for pupils included the composer Oliver the

College,

Literature

Rnussen and Royal Oper principal cellist Christopher Vanderspar.

19970 to 1973 he edited the magazine MuciFrom and Musicians, launching some ofinethe most names in respected British music journalism oday as tresh contributors. ofFor 12 years he was music and opera critic British Vogue. His survey of opera in Theatre Plus, has beenpertormance, entitled publication by Century commissioned Hutchinson. Heforis married to the writer and music critic Mcredith Australian Oakes.


Official Piano Chopin 'iano Comnpetition Intermational Tchaikorsky Competition Competition

Warsaw:

Moscow; Rubinsteln International

T è l Arir; International Genera Competition -

Long-7hiband International Competition

Syedney ternational Piano Competition

Geneva;

Paris Sydney

*****

YAMAHA *********

www.w

*********

Yamaha makes more pianos than anyone From uprights that are ideal for young beginners to concert grands that are at home on stage perfecthy An extensive line of that look as splendid as they sound. Yamaha. Since 1887, pianos grand in

pianos

every way

YAMAHA YAMAHA MUSIC AUSTRALIA PTY. LTD.


Competition Rules Eligibility The 4th

Competition was open

of all nationalitics born on or after 23 pianists July 1950 and no later than 8 July 1970. It was not open to ot to

previous first prizcwinners a Sydney Inter national Piano Competition of Australia. Over 260 applications were 5 reccived 1988 Admission was limitcd to aby January maximum ot 40 pianists selected following international and national auditions.

Competition Stages The Compctition will have five stages. Stages I, 1, IIl andIN' will be held in the Verbrugghen Hall of the Sydncy Conservatorium of Music. Stage 'will be held in thc Concert Hall

of the Sydney The Opcning Ceremony and Recital, and the Prizewinners Concert, will be hcld in thc Concert Hall of the Sydney Opcra House. All pianists chosen to participate in the Compctition will be requircd to pcrform in the first Opera House.

ance and Recording Contract until that date The Competition also reservesanthe hold the first prizewinner under an Exclusive Australian Performance Contract for two ycars from 18 September 1988.

PLEASE NOTE No flash or other photography, other than that

of the official Competition photographer,

Will

beThe permittcd during performances. Conpetition reserves the right to change the programme. be

No material contained in this programme can reproduced without y ot tne

permission International Piano Competition ot Austrand.

All stages of the Competition will be open to

the

general public and broadeast livethrough

out Australia by the Australian Broadcasting

Repertoire Regulations

Twenty pianists will III

or mislcading information will be disqualified.

Any competitor who knowingly gives inaccurate

Competitors who took part in previous Sydncy chamber Piano Competitions must International sudmi new repertoire. appearance was drawn The list of works to be by lot prior to the Competition. landIl at it the Thereafter will Competition was chosen presented be by the competitors some alphabetical although

flexibility

. One sonata by Bcethoven or Schubert 2. The remainder Or tne programme will be the competitor s own choice. Cbamber muslc Each competitor will present one sonata:

Violin and Piano

Beethoven Op. 47108Kreutzer

Brahms

Sonatas

Franck

Op. Sonata inA

Debussy

Sonata

Bartok No. 2 Beethoven Op. 69 Brahms Op. 99 Chopin Op. 5 Fauré Op. I117

Cello and Piano Sonatas

Six (6) competitors will be sclected for the Finals Stage V.

Finals

Competitors will play one concerto from each of the following two groups: GROUP A Mozart major, K. 414 major, K. 453 F major, K. 459 C major, K. 467 C minor, K. 491 B flat major, K. 595

in the

order ol appcarance in Stages IV and V will be allowcd for rehcarsal and programming lactors. All works preparcd for the

Compctition be played from memory, with the exceptionmust of Stage IlI and chamber

rom the Competition repertoire and includes the competitors' own choice of works where this is required.

the Australian works in

No works, whether own choice or listed in the repertoire, may be repeated in another stage.

In the case of illness or accident certified by an

Competitors must list timings and publishers of contemporary works. Competitors must ensure that the timings

music in Stage IV. Thosc competitors who are to unable perform when called upon to do so may be disqualified.

independent mcdical practitioner, the Jury may at its discretion allow the competitor to change the order of his/her appearance. Any competitor who attempts, or on whose

behalf an attempt is made whilst they are competing in he CCompetition, to communicate with any member of may be

the Jury,

Chamber Music Each competitor will presenta 50-minute recital and one chamber music work Recital- 50 minutes

Corporation.

two recital stages. be sclected for the recitals; 12 pianists will be selected for Stage the IV Stage recitals and siX pianists music; will be sclected for the Stage V concertos. in Stages Orderof

Semi-Finals Stage IV Recital

disqualified.

Practice and Rehearsals Daily practice facilities will be provided for competitors at the Sydney Conservatorium

of Music, between the hours of 7.30 a.m. and 9.30 p.m., during the time they are competing in the Competition.

There will be two rehearsals for each of the chamber music and concerto performances. Performance Rightss While competitors are in Australia they will be contracted exclusively to the Competition. The Competition has the right, without payment of

fees,to:

Televise, fiim, video, tape, broadcast or photograph all stages of the Competition for media or for any other purpose. Produce and distribute without limit or payment of fees to the competitors, recordings of all stages of the Competition, either in whole or in part, including the prizewinners concerts.

Produce documentary or feature films.

Performance Contract The first prizewinnerand some other will be required to be available to perform in

prizewinners

Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia prizewinner concerts from the end o the Competition until 18 September 1988. For

this purpOse the Competition reserves the right

GROUP B Beethoven Schumann

Chopin Liszt

Brahms

Saint-Saëns Tehaikovsky

specified for each stage are not exceeded. The

Jury reserves the right to stop a competitor

Rachmaninov

who runs Over timeC.

Repertoire Stage I Recital 2 0 minutes

Each competitor Will present 1. One Nocturne by Chopin.

2. The remainder of the programme will be Own choice of works by two other Composers. One or more works by each chosen composer may be played.

Nos. I or2 Nos. I or 2 Nos. I or 2 Nos. 2 0r 4 Nos. I or 2 No. 3 or Rhapsody on a Theme by

Paganini

Ravel

All competitors will play in Stages I and II.

Nos. 4 or 5

Op 4

Bartok

major

Nos. 2 or3

Prokofiev Nos. 2 or 3 Competitors will perform the Mozart concertos with the Australian Chamber Orchestra and the Group 2 concertos with the sydney Symphony

Orchestra. Smoking is probibited in the auditorium and practice r0oms in tbe Conservatorium. Unauthor

Stage II Recital - 20 minutes 1. One Prelude from either Preludes Books I or lI by Debussy. 2. The remainder of the programme will be own choice of works by two Other composers other than Debussy and the two own choice composers listed in Stage I. One or more works of each chosen compoOser may be

AUSTRALIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION

played. Twenty (20) competitors will be selected for

All concerts will be broadcast live on FM radio and the two Finals concerto concerts with the

the Quarter-Finals Stage III.

Sydney Symphony Orchestra, will be teler'ised

Quarter-Finals

by the ABC Jor inclusion in a documentary Jilm to be screened tbe following w'eekend.

Stage III Recital - 40 minutes . One sonata by Haydn, Clementi or Mozart. 2. A work by an Australian-born or resident composer, chosen from a selection of

published works sent to competitors three

months betore the Competition.

3. The remainder of the programme will be own choice of works by one or more

composers other than the composer of the Sonata chosen in I above.

Twelve (12) competitors will be selected for the

to hold prizewinners under an Exclusive Perform-Semi-Finals Stage IV.

20

ised recordings and the taking f photographs are

strictly forbidden tbrougbout tbe Competition. No one may enter Hall except in the

performances.

or leave the Verbruggben pauses betueen Competitors


Prizes

Ist Prize $15,000 The Qantas Prize awarded by

The

Hephzibah Menuhin Memorial Scholarship Prize for the Best Australian Pianist

Qantas Airways Ltd

$5000

2nd Prize $7000 The Qucen Victoria Building Prize

The Reisner-Pennycuik Concerto Prize for the best overall concerto performances $3500

(Ipoh Garden) 3rd Prize $4000 Presented by Dr Michael Kennedy

The Lotto NSW People's Choice Prize

$3000

4th Prize $2500 Presented by Claire Dan AM OBE 5th Prize S1500 Presented by Hunt & Hunt

The Musica Viva (Australia) Chamber Music Prize $2000

6th Prize S 1000 Presented by Yamaha Music Australia

The Australian Chamber Orchestra Prize for the best performance of a Mozart

Concerto $1500 The Australasian Performing Right Association Prize for the best performance of an Australian composition

7th Prize $750

Presented by the Musicians' Union of Australia and PPCA Trust 8th Prize $750 Presented by Kawai Australia

S1000

9th Prize $750

Cladan Cultural Exchange Institute of

10th Prize S500

Australia: Travel Scholarship for an Australian pianist

Sony (Australia) will award a CDP M.20

1lth Prize $500

Compact Disc player to the vinner of the lst prize

12th Prize s500

The Hephzibah Menuhin Memorial

Scholarship The Council of the Hephzibah Menuhin Memorial Scholarship

Fund has made available the 1988 Scholarship as the prize for

The Reisner-Pennycuik Fund The Reisner-Pennycuik Fund was set up by Dr Pamela Pennycuik and Dr Alexander Reisner in 1987 for the promotion and encouragement of the pianoforte, with

the best Australian pianist, in celebration of the Bicentenary. The Fund was set up in memory of Hephzibah Menuhin,

particular emphasis on the study and performance within

with the aim of assisting the advancement of keyboard pertormance in Australia, by providing scholarships toward the cost of training, travel and living expenses, and to assist keyboard performers in establishing careers as concert artists.

century composers. The Reisner-Pennycuik Concerto Prize is to be awarded for the first time at the 4th Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia, in this Bicentennial year. It will

Australia of the concertos of Mozart and 19th- and 20th-

be presented to the pianist judged by the international panel of jurors, together with the conductor and one the

member of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and Australian Chamber Orchestra, to have given the best overall concerto performances.

21


Engagements

1our

of

Australia,

30 July 2 August

New Zealand, Hong Kong and

Canberra School of Music Brisbane Performing Arts Centre

Singapore for the

Recital

24 August

August

August

Concerto performance with Australian Youth Christoph Eschenbach

Victorian Arts Centre, Recital Melbourne Recital tour of New Zealand for the Music Federation of New Zcaland

Recital

26 August 28 August

Sydney Town Hall Gold Coast Centre,

Recital Recital

Queensland 29 August

Pilbeam Theatre,

Recital

Rockhampton Civic Centre, Mackay 31 August 2 September Civic Theatre,

Recital Recital

Townsville

Christchurch

September Civic Centre, Cairns 6 September Performing Arts Centre, Darwin 8 September Concert Hall, Perth 10 September City Hall1, Hong Kong 13 September Radio-Television,

Dunedin

9.August 11 August 13 August 15 August 16 August 18 August 19 August

Araluen Centre, Alice Springs

Orchestra conducted by 4 August

First Prizewinner

Invercargill

Nelson

New Plymouth

Palmerston North Napier

Hong Kong 16 September Victoria Memorial Hall,

Hamilton

Singapore

Gisborne

17 September

Victoria Memorial Hall,

Singapore

Recital

Recital Recital Recital

Broadcast recital

Concerto performances with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra conducted by

Choo Hoey

Return tour of Australia in 1990

International Austria

England

Engagements for the First Prizewinner

Engagements for Australian Pianists

Bösendorfer Concert Hall, Vienna Niederosterreichisches Tonkunstlerorchester, Vienna Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra and Bournemouth

Concerto performance with the Sydney Youth Orchestra, conducted by Henryk Pisarek. Sydney Opera House Concert Hall, 10 September 1988.

International Music Festival, Toulouse

Concerto performance with the Australian Youth Orchestra, Singapore, conducted by John Curro, 6 August 1988.

Sinfonietta Northern Sinfonia, Newcastle upon Tyne

France

Germany Steinway Hall, Hamburg

Recital for the Blue Mountains Festival.

Bayerischer Rundfunk - broadcast recital

Thürmer Concert Hall, Herne Holland

Radio recording for AVRO Radio, Hilversum,

Hungary

8 October 1988 Recital for Salon Cristofori, Amsterdam Recital for TROS Radio, Hilversum Concert tour for Interkoncert, Budapest

USA

Recital for the Australian Society of Keyboard Music.

Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra

Krannert Center,Urbana, Illinois Yahama Center, New York Carnegie Hall, New York All negotiation.

engagements are ofered in principle and are subject to final

22


William Dobell "Cement Worker,

Sydney Graving

Dock 1944 Oil on cardboard 76.2 cmx 50.8 cm Australian War Memoral (30249)

What did he think about life in Australia? William Dobell's famous painting of "Cement

displayed in their State Art Gallery.

Worker" captures the toughness and wry humour of the Australian worker of 1944. As a tribute to the Australian worker and family the Boral Group is pleased to sponsor The Great

Australian Art Exhibition 1788-1988, at the Art Gallery of New South Wales from 21st October to 27th November, 1988. The exhibition portrays the people, the

so

Boral is very much a part of the everyday life of many Australians. The company is nearly totally

Australian owned and over 14,000 Australians earn their livelihood through Boral together with many thousands more subcontractors and

BORAL

countryside, and the constantly chang1ng litestyle ofi Australians over the past 200 years. Everyone should see it when it is

Building a

suppliers. f you would like a clear picture of the part Boral plays in the life of Australia, write for a free copy of the booklet "Our

Credentials" Mr D. Talty, Boral Limited, GPO Box 910, Sydney 2001.

better Australia BIL


Engagements

Tour of Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore for the First Prizewinner

0

July

Canberra School

Recital

24 August

Araluen Centre, Alice Springs

Recital

Concerto performance with Australian Youtn Orchestra conducted by Christoph Eschenbach Recital

26 August

Sydney Town Hall Gold Coast Centre, Qucensland

Recital

Pilbeam Theatre, Rockhampton

Recital

Civic Theatre,

Recital Recital

Music

Brisbanc Performing

August

Arts Centre

4 August

Victorian Arts Centre, Mclbourne Recital tour of New Zealand for the Music Federation of New Zealand

August 9

August

2 September

Nelson

15 August 15 August

New Plymouth Palmerston North

16 August

Napier

18 August

Hamilton Gisborne

19 August

Civic Centre, Mackay

Townsvile

Invercargill

11 August

29 August 31 August

Christchurch Dunedin

8 August

28 August

4

September

6

September Performing Arts Centre,

Civic Centre, Cairns Darwin

8 September 10

September

13 September

Concert Hall, Perth

City Hall, Hong Kong Radio-Television,

Hong Kong 16 September Victoria Memorial Hall, Singapore 17 September Victoria Memorial Hall, Singapore

Recital

Recital Recital

Recital

Recital Broadcast recital

Concerto performances with the Singapore

Symphony Orchestra COnducted by Choo Hoey

Return tour of Australia in 1990

International Engagements for the First Prizewinner Austria

Bösendorfer Concert Hall, Vienna

England

Niederosterreichisches Tonkunstlerorchester, Vienna Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra and Bournemouth

Engagements for Australian Pianists Concerto

performance with the Sydney Youth Orchestra, conducted by Henryk Pisarek. Sydney Opera House Concert Hal, 10 September 1988.

Sinfonietta

Northern Sinfonia, Newcastle upon Tyne International Music Festival, Toulouse

France

Concerto

performance with the Australian Youth Orchestra, Singapore, conducted by John Curro, 6 August 1988.

Germany Steinway Hall, Hamburg Holland

Bayerischer Rundfunk - broadcast recital

Recital for the Blue Mountains Festival.

Thürmer Concert Hall, Herne Radio recording for AVRO Radio,

Recital for the Australian Society of Keyboard Music.

8 October 1988

Hilversum,

Recital for Salon Cristofori, Amsterdam Recital for TROS Radio, Hilversum

Hungary USA

Concert tour for Interkoncert, Budapest Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra

Krannert Center, Urbana, Ilinois Yahama Center, New York

Carnegie Hall, New York All

engagements are offered in principle and are subject to final

negotialion.

22


William Dobell "Cement Worker,

Sydney Granng Dock 1944 Oil on cardboard 76.2 cmx 50.8 cm

Australian War Memoral (30249)

:

What did he think about life in Australia? William Dobell's famous

painting of "Cement

Worker captures the toughness and wry humour of the Australian worker of 1944. As a tribute to the Australian worker and fanmily

displayed in their State Art Gallery. Boral is very much a part of the everyday life of so

many Australians. The company is

nearly totally

Australian owned and over 14,000 Australians earn their livelihood through Boral together with many

the Boral Group is pleased to sponsor The Great Australian Art Exhibition 1788-1988, at the thousands more subcontractors and Art Gallery of New South Wales from 21st BORAL Ssuppliers. October to 27th November, 1988. Ifyou would like a clear picture of the The exhibition portrays the people, the countryside, and the constantly changing litestyle of Australians over the past 200 years. Everyone should see it when it is

Building a

part Boral plays in the life of Australia, write tor a free copy of the booklet "Our

Credentials." Mr D. Talty, Boral Limited, GPO Box 910, Sydney 2001.

better Australia BLLB


Irina Plotnikova

First Prizewinner of the First Sydney International Piano Competition 197.

Celebrating Australia's Bicentenary and the opening of the fourth Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia, and making her first visit to the West since she toured Australia and New Zealand in 1979, Irina Plotnikova is giving recitals in Melbourne, Sydney, Canberra, the Gold Coast, Mackay and Perth. In the past nine years she has been completing her musical studies and has performed widely in the Soviet Union as a soloist for the USSR concert organisation Gosconcert. Born in Moscow in 1954, her musical talent was recognised early by her parents, neither of whom were musicians, and she was enroled

in the Central School of Music, Moscow when she was seven. She studied with Manuilskaya until 1970 and from thence with Professor Kerer, who continued to be her tutor when she became a student of the Moscow Conservatory in 1972, and who prepared her for the first Sydney International Piano Competition in 1977. Following her very popular win in Sydney she undertook a strenuous tour of Australia and New Zealand. Her concerts were resoundingly successful with standing ovations following each performance, repeated during her returntour in 1979. There have

been many requests for a return visit and the Competition is proud to be bringing Irina to Australia for the third time. Ecstatic reviews of her 1979 tour led to a shortage of superlatives amongst Australian and New Zealand music critics, fully supporting the judges' decision in 1977.

PROGRAMME MOZART

Sonata in F major K. 332

SCRIABIN

24 Preludes, Op. 11 INTERVAL

LISZT

Sonata in B minor

The Herald, Melbourne

*..

.a

technique of astonishing ease and

brilliance with an unfailing sense of the

music's poetry. . abundant romanticism

of spirit superbly controlled range of dynamics.

CourierMail. Brisbane "Her tone is consistently beautiful worthy ofan Arrau Laurie Strachan, Tbe Australian

Romola Costantino, Sydney Morning Herald

Fred Blanks, ABC 24 Hours

a breathtaking performance.

Extraordinary qualities of musicality,

stamina and technical prowess."

wonderfully impressive musicianship

gossamer-like texture of sound."

And in 1977, Roger Covell wrote in the Sydney Morning Herald: The Age, Melbourne

"performance ofsustained insight, techniqueofsplendid fluency and unfailing respect for the humane values of the music"

playing

ofirresistible fire, grace, sparkle, humourand

involvement.. conquered theaudience in unmistakable and wholly deserved fashion


Sonata

in

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

K. 332

E

1756-91

.vears it was supposed that the three sonatas K.330, 331

After 1907 and discussions with Rimsky-Korsakov, Scriabin was to develop a strong interest in the synacesthesia of colour and music, linking particular colours with particular keys and experimenting with Alexander Mozer to design a colour organ which was to be incorporated in his orchestral work Promethée and his incomplete lifetime magnum opus and obsession, the Mysterium. While these preludes predate that conscious experimentation, it is not unreasonable to see in this collection of pieces in all the keys an embryonic explor ation of the association of key, emotion and colour, which pervades his later works.

(A majo, tonigntSF majOr, dB flat respectiveiy) were and 53d during Mozart's stay in Paris during 1778-79. Since these for Mozart his other had died, his distressing times -

had been

with his family had been strained and he had failed to relationslrant post which,| he always seemed sure, 1ay just arouna the important post get corner writers have oren putthe more stormy and pathetic

these sonatas down to the stress ot Mozart's private life.

1USt be somewhat humbling ror the would-be biographer, there into MOzart's

handwriting and

Icscarch fore, to find out tnat rccent which is manuscripts were written puts these w orks the paper on n or nis cariy years in Vienna. Mozart had later. in Munich in 1/80 to Munich opera 1aomeneo and his career had tne to compose gone was a aken accorded respect and the DEtter.ie the turntoror generally Derformances seem nave Deen a success (although since Leopold was in Munich with his son, nistory nas been denied that important source of Mozartiarna, the regular reports home to his father). So much, then, for art imitating life. The first movement of the F major Sonata is rich in melodic material, even introducing a new idea at the beginning of the development section. Its swift changes or mood recall the sometimes volatile

Sonata in B minor

Franz Liszt

1811-85

Liszt's Sonata in B minor was written in the years 1852-53 the period of great productivity which followed his retirement from the concert platform to take up a conducting appointment in weimar in 1848. As well as its extraordinarily original piano writing and musical power, it has two features which were to have far-reaching influence on well the next composers into century. The first is its use of classical sonata form in a strikingly original way. It is really a sonata in a double sense, taking the procedure of the first movement or 'sonata' an form, which

during

world of the opera bujfa. Mozart has left two versions of the Adagio -one in the autograph which is fairly plain and one in the first edition which contains elab

involves

orate ornamentation (one cannot be absolutely certain that the orna-

exposition,

development and recapitulation, and mapping this onto a structure which in fact embraces all four movements of the classical model,

mentation is Mozart's although from letters it appears that he at least sanctioned it). Again its presentation of ornate melody over a smooth

Compressing them into a large one-movement span. Thus the expo-

melody recalls the techniques and textures of opera.

SItion and recapitulation take the fast tempi of the outer movements

The teeming exuberance of the final Allegro assai brings a level of keyboard virtuosity which suggests that this sonata may have been intended for the concert hall rather than the private home, although there is no record of a performance by Mozart before the sonata's publication in 1784.

while the development section combines the slow movement Scherzo. It was an idea that Liszt had used in an embryonic way and in his

Dante Sonataand more importantly in the Grosses Konzertsolo (1849). The second is its thematic economy. All the principal musical ideas exposition are stated in a one-page slow introduction. There is a funereal a scale, drum-tap which is

of the

followed by descending

24 Preludes, Op. 11

groping

amorphously downinto the shadows. On the third appearance of

Alexander Scriabin 1872-195

the drum-tap, however,

it springs

to life into an energetically striving

themein octaves followed by a motive based on an insistent repeated note. In the music which follows, these four ideas become the central

r abin graduatedfrom the Moscow Conservatoryin 1892, winning changingguises. protagonists in aFaustiandrama whichpresentsthem allin constantly econdgold medal(Rachmaninov had won the first), andimmedi Even the more relaxed 'second subject' turns out atciy embarked on a career as a concert pianist. As a member or the

to be a variant of the repeated note figure and this figure also gives

rCat generation of Russian pianists which included Rachmaninov and Lhevinne, he gradually evolved a highly personal style basea on Intense mysticism and an increasingly personal harmonic languagt.

birth to a chorale-like theme marked 'Grandioso'. The only new material of the sonata is an expansive theme marked

Andante Sostenuto at the beginning of the slow section. This section

I1Owever, his early recital programmes and compositions reveala

builds to a powerful climax, really the clinmax of the whole work,

Srong leaning toward the music of Chopin whose own 24 Preludes Cearly form the model for this set. Not only does Scriabin copy Opin s model in his arrangement of keys moving througn eacn aor Key and its relative nminor by fifths, giving C major, A minor,

before subsiding to seraphic peace which is rudely interrupted by a demonic fugue and eventually the recapitulation. The Andante Sostenut0 returns serenely in the Coda but it is the drum-tap

-

d

which, perhaps ominously, has the last word.

E minor, etc. - but there are similarities between some or

Dins preludes and

Peter McCallum

their counterparts in Chopin's

collectio eancholy prelude in E minor, example, has altiniics wi n s in the sanme key, particularlyfor in its DasCu etiy insistent repeated chords, while accompaniment its left-hand

melody the and Tecal Chopin's B minor prelude, effectively evoking

Doru

portamento of the cello. 2

ur

parts of the 24 Preludes

of recital t

CCtal

tours

ntroduced

publishe

er

to

were

composed

in

the

tne time of the second piano sonata andyears. a series

throughout Europe. During this time scriadu and Petersburg

the St

publisher Belyayev Coe a lifelong friend. Belyayevbenefactor acted not only s and patron but also as agent and in some cases

pamperino in OOK OVer from the elderly aunts whose hot-house in pampering Scriabin's early Oposers years

seems to andd eootism later in singular eccentricity, fastidiousness lire cE

25


Toward a World Piano Centre

The foundation of a World Piano Centre has long been a dream of mine. While it may be fanciful

(tor the commissioning of such a project could be tormidable) many more fanciful dreams have become realities.

Around 300

years ago in Florence, Bartolommeo Cristofori (1655-1731) of a instrument which coulddreamed a keyboard produce range of sound from soft to loud that

could be clearly heard in hall. That dream he turned into reality. Did Cristofori also dream that his would most

a

large

colpianoeforte musical

gravicembalo

become the popular instrument ever invented, spawning a vast piano industry involving millions of people, millions of dollars and countless compositions for the instrument? Today's piano industry is booming worldwide. More peple are studying the piano With more piano teachers on more pianos tuned by more piano technicians than ever before. More are listening to the piano. There are morepeople

makers (despite the demise of this industrypiano in Australia) and more piano in more departments music schools. More piano music, b0oks magazines are published and more piano and recordings made. Then too, there are more critics and reviewers, entrepreneurs and publicity agents. Many more again are indirectly linked with the industry. Yet all this despite perhaps partly because of it a focal point is lacking. There is no piano no Mecca for all capital, those who, in many and various ways, are involved with the piano and its industry. -

Several fine libraries and museums in Europe and the United States have comprehensive tions of piano music, collec b0Oks and manuscripts, recordings and sometimes in unlikely impressive piano archival collections areplaces but nowhere in the world is there a centrelocated,

ising in all facets of the piano, its music, specialits

practitioners and all related areas.

Likewise too, piano activities are plentiful and

many excellent national and international Iestivals, fairs, compectitions, masterclassespiano and

conferences abournd, yet they are scattered and largely unco-ordinated. In cation and discord while inplaces there is dupliothers, nothing happens at all. A

could provide the World Piano currently lacking Centre point focal and help over Come of the

many

abovementioned problems and inconveniences. A Piano as I see it, should

World

Centre, Comprise two main sections: one concerned with Information, the other with Activities. At its heart, a World Piano

Centre would

Contain a computer-based world information

service. In effect, this would be a library and archives which would aim to hold the most comprehensive collection of pianoworld's music,

manuscripts, books, discs, tapes, films and mem orabilia.

Membership, for which a

fee could be

reasonable

charged, would be open to all The Information sectionorganisations. would promote research on past and future directions of the piano and would issue its own publications. In addition, it would house a Piano Museum ing of a permanent collection of historical consist on which recitals could be given and pianos made. There would recordings also be a collection of parts as they developed over the years. píano The section relating to would promote international events suchActivities as: a n annual piano festival; an original form of piano awards; the election of composers, pianists, teachers, builders or designers to a Hall of an annual residential masterclass Fame series for 12

interested individuals and

young pianists chosen from around the world;

conferences, seminars and workshops for pianists, teachers, composers, critics, agents, musicologists and music publishers;

anannual piano fair;

conventions and conferences for piano makers, tuners and technicians;

exhibitions of pian0 music books, paintings and photographsmanuscripts, of pianists and pianos (these occasional exhibitions could

26

tour to be

displayed at

elsewhere, such as musicappropriate events

international piano teachers conferences competitions); an annual film and television festival on or

pianists, pianos and A

related

World Piano Centre wouldtopics. to establish credentials from the outset. need In addition to offering a tangible and reliable information service, international in scope, it should aim for an its

extensive annual festival at which

both established and up-and-coming concert pianists Would be invited to give recitals and play concertos. From time to time the complete works ofa composer might be

Other regular fixtures presented and recorded. form of piano awards might include an original (it would be nice to move on now from piano competitions ), a piano fair, piano teachers' and conferences, specialist seminars, film and television

technicians'

and the election of people to a Piano festival Hallofa Fame. Given adequate unding and resources World Piano Centre could be located would make more sense for it to anywhere, but it be accessible to as many geographically as poSsible. Thus Vienna, Paris, London people or New York have the edge Over, say, my home town ofwould Renmark in South Australia.

There are three main ways in which a orld Piano Centre might be established: as a project backed by private or corporate funding; as a State or City project; as an with a music school oron-canmpus arrangement university. (The last is probably the most likely.) Whatever the form of a

establishment, World Piano Centre would benefit the piano profession and industry significantly while the inaugurating body the World Piano Centre itself - would also stand to reap ernormous benefits. It seems to me it is a dream worth bringing to reality...

Rex Hobcroft, April 1988


What's better than a Yamaha

Ibach... or Beale grand? A Yamaha... lbach.. . or Beale from

LOGAN'S PIANOS

***********************w*****

*****

LOGAN'S PIANOS 70 YEARS &3 GENERATIONS EXPERIENCE WORKING

FOR YOU!

250 BURWOOD RD, BURWO0D NSW 2134 Ph (02) 747 3028


Competition Diary GALA OPENING RECITAL 8 JULY 7.30p.m.

Sydney Opera House Concert Hall

His Excelleney Air Marshal Sir James Rowland, Ac KBE DEC AFC, Governor of New South Wales, will oft

sificial y

open the Competition. Recital by IRINA PLOTNIKOVA.

STAGEI&U Saturday 9 July and Monday 11 July

Sydney Conservatorium

9.30 a.m. Youngshin An

Anton Batagov

2.00p.m. S. Korea USSR

FranciscoBencivengaItaly

David Buechner André Desponds

SergciErohin

USA

Sunday 10July

Megumi Fugita

Japan

9.30 a.m. Peter Mack

Ireland

FINALS

EduardusHalim KayajaHan Michael Harvey PhilipHosford

Australia

Alexander Korsantiya USSR Natalia Koval Australia

USA

Adrienne Krausz

Canada

StéphanLemelin Netherlands James Lisney Luo Xiao

GavinMartin Gilead Mishory Luca Monti

India Israel

Italy

Victor Sangiorgio

Australia

Phillip Shovk Philip Smith

Australia

Claude Webster

Canada

Stephanie Wendt

Australia

Riccardo Zadra

Fali Pavri

Italy

Asaf Zohar

India UK

Sydney Conservatorium

20

Hungary

Canada UK China

Israel

Competitors

2.00 p.m.

Thursday 14 July

2.00 p.m.

9.30 a.m.

W. Germany

UK

Tomislav N-Baynov Bulgaria USA Heng-Jin Park

Wednesday 13 July 9.30a.m.

STAGE IV

IwanKönig

China

IvoJanssen

Japan

Japan

2.00 p.m.

Jonathan Plowright STAGE II QUARTER-

7.15 p.m. Indonesia Mari Kodama

Switzerland Huang Du USSR LindaIppolito

Matthias Fletzberger Austria

and Tuesday 12 July

All Competitors to each play two 20-minute recitals

Sydney Conservatorium Competitors to each play a 50-minute recital and

SEMI-FINALS

12

Friday 15 July Saturday 16 July Sunday 17 July

12.00 noon

6.00 p.m.

12.00 noon

6.00 p.m.

to each

play a

40-minute recital 7.15 p.m.

one

violin/piano or cello/piano sonata

12.00 noon

6.00 p.m. Chamber Musicians: Violin - Christopher Kimber, Miwako Abe. Cello - Georg Pedersen

STAGE V FINALS

Sydney Opera House Concert Hall 6 Competitors to each play two concertos with orchestra

Wednesday 20 July

8.00 p.m.

Australian Chamber Orchestra, conducted by

Stephen Bishop-Kovacevich:

Thursday 21 July

8.00 p.m.

three pianists/ three Mozart concertos Australian Chamber Orchestra, as above.

Friday 22 July

8.00 p.m.

Sydney Symphony Orchestra" conducted by John Hopkins:

Saturday 23 July

8.00 p.m.

Sydney Symphony Orchestra, as above.

11.30 p.m.

Announcement of Prizewinners in Northern Foyer

approx.

Presented in association with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation

three pianists/ three 19th-or 20th-century concertos

Sunday 24 July

Sydney Opera House Concert Hall 2.30 p.m. Presentation of Awards Recitals by the six finalists

THE COMPETITION IS TO BE BROADCAST LIVE THROUGHOUT AUSTRALIA ON ABC-FM Smoking is probibited in the auditorium and practice rooms in the Conservatorium. Unautborised recordings and tbe taking of pbotograpbs are strictly forbidden tbrougbout the Competition. No one may enter or leave the Verbruggben Hall except in the pauses between Competitors" performances. MUSIC SHOP: Throughout the Competition, Brashs (the Sydney music shop) will be selling sheet music and records, including many of the works

being performed, in Room 353, off the Courtyard in the Conservatorium new building.

28


The 4th Sydney International

Phano Competition is now playing at VOur home If you cant attend all concerts, listen to them on ABC-FM: live. ABCAOW

RADIO

ABC-FM

John Bevins ABO5001


Competitors

Francesco Bencivenga

Anton Batagov

Youngshin An

TTALY

USSR

SOUTH KOREA

MOSCOW 10.10.65

SEOUL 19.6.60

TREVISO 24 Youngshin An commenced piano studies with her mother at the age of three and a half. On moving to Brazil she studied with Souza Lima and then in Paris with Lucette Descaves.

. Whilst in Paris she also attended lessons with Ventsislav Yankoff at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Paris and Germaine Mounier at

Anton Batagov attended the Moscow Special

USSR

the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris. She has given many concerto concerts and recitals in France and overseas and has Orchestra. apPpeared as soloist with the Cleveland Symphony

1986 Special Prize, best performance of Tchaikovsky's music, Int. Tchaikovsky Competition, Moscow

Awards

PROGRAMME

1983 1st Prize, Robert Casadesus Int. Piano

Competition, Cleveland, USA

1986 4th Prize, Marguerite Long/JacquesParis Thibaud Int. Piano Competition,

PROGRAMME STAGE I

Nocturne in E flat major, Op. 55, No. 2 Rachmaninov Moment Musical in C major, Op. 16, No. 6

Debussy

STAGE I

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in F major Op. 15, No. I

Etude, Op. 65, No. I Sonata No. + in C minor, Op. 29 (2nd and 5rd movements)

From Images, Book I1: 2. Et la lune descend

sur

le

ifüt

temple

RECITAL

Debussy

Le

Soler Messiaen

Debussy

La terrasse des audiences du clair de lune, Prelude No. 7, Book II Toccata Regard de l'Esprit de joie from

Vingt Regards sur l'Enfant-Jésus STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Mozart

Sonata in C minor, K. 457

Hyde

Valley of Rocks

Kreisleriana, Op. 16 SEMI-FINALS

STAGE IV

Vingt Regards sur l'Enfant-Jésus STAGE II

QUARTER-FINALS

Haydn Hyde

Sonata in B minor, Hob. XVI:32

Ravel

Beethoven STAGE V

onata in E minor, Op. 90

Pictures at an Exhibition CHAMBER MUSIC Sonata No. 3 for violin and

Brahms

Suggestion diabolique, Op. 4, Nu QUARTER-FINALS

Clementi Amendola

Sonata in F sharp minor,

RECITAL

FINALS

CONCERTos Mozart Prokofiev

B tlat major, K. 595 No. 2 in G minor, Op. 16

83

30

Liszt

piano

Polonaise Brilliante, Op. 22

Prokofiev STAGE III

Hyde

Beethoven

at

is

RECITAL Nocturne in E major, Brahms Variations on a ThemeOp.ot 62, Nu 2 Paganini. Vol. I1, Op. 35 Rachmaninov Prelude in D major, Op 23, No + STAGE II RECITAL Debussy Ondine, Prelude No. 8, Book II Chopin Andante Spianato and Grande

STAGE IV

Mussorgsky

performed as solo

Chopin

RECITAL

FINALS

major, Op.

studying in Paris withlenet

SEMI-FINALS

CHAMBER MUSIC Sonata for violin and piano in A major, Op. 47, Kreutzer

C major, K. 467 No. 2 in B flat

Conservatory Aldo Ciccolini.

STAGE IV

CONCERTOS Mozart Brahms

has made

many solo in Italy an appearances recorded for radio Bulgarian National ltalian and the At present he teacnesBroadcasting Corporatün tne Castelfranco and He has

Ravel

STAGE V

Sonata in B flat major, Op. post. D. 960 Four pieces from Miroirs

with orchestra and chamber music

Valley of Rocks Miroirs

in D minor, Op. 108

RECITAL Schubert

plaine

Sonata in F sharp major Le baiser de l EnjantJésus trom

RECITAL

RECITAL

Schumann

dans la

PreludeNo. 3, Book

3. Poissons d'or

STAGE II

Sancan Messiaen

rent

is

PROGRAMME

Prokofiev

STAGE II

age

STAGEI

Scriabin

RECITAL

Chopin

Francesco

studied piano f of seven.Bencivenga He a graduate of the rom the Since 1985 he has been studyingat the Moscow Benedetto Marcelloe lo. State Conservatory with Tatiana Nikolaeva. Venice, ofandthehasCorwon first prizes nservat orio at He was 15 ltalian competitions. several Awards 1985 Ist Prize, 7th National Piano Competition when he first Music School in the class of A.P. Kantor.

Sonata II (1947) Mephisto Waltz Valley of Rocks SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Op. 26, No 2

Beethoven

Sonata in E flat major, Op. 8la, Les Adieux*

Schumann

Symphonique Erudes, Op 1 CHAMBER MUSIC

Chopin

Sonata for cello and piano in G minor, Op. 65

STAGE V

FINALS CONCERTOos

Mozart

Cminor, K. 491

Saint-Saens

No. 2 in G minor, Op. 22


André Desponds

p a v i dB u e c h n e r

Sergei Erohin

SWTTZERLAND

USSR

.

BALTIMORE 8.9.59

piano

with

Reynaldo

Bucchner studie oI Six.

David

the

age

Irom at the NeW York to study went to RudolfFirkusny. At 16 he School of MusiC with Concerto huilliard Or the Juiiard won the Van He has been winner Competition and nas

Reyes

twice

Cliburn scholarship.

frequently perlorms

He United in the

States and

in

nas

recial and as

DeCn

soloist

a prizcwinner

at several

del Prize, VinaChile 1982 2nd Competition, 1983

Mar, Int. Piano

Elisabeth Int. 3rd Prizc, Qucen CompetiliOn, Belgium

Piano

Salt

City,

RECITAL

major,

STAGE Art

studied piano with Sava Savoff at the Zurich

Conservatory He has been the

Book

II,

BWV 890

Nocturne in C sharp minor, Op. post

Introducion and Cprice on theme of Paganini

Chabrier STAGE III

prizes and

with orchcstra and chamber ensembles, and has Composcd tor film, theatre and ballet, as well as recording tor Swiss radio.

Awards 1985 Diploma of Merit, Int. Piano

Competition, Vercelli, Itualy

RECITAL

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in E minor, Op. 72, No. I

Bartok

Rhapsody in Blue Mikrokosmos Vol. VI, No. 148, Dance in Bulgarian Rbytbm

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Les tierces alternées, Prelude No. I, Book II Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52

Adagio in B minor, K. 40

La fille auX cbereux de lin, Prelude No. 8, Bk.

Bourrée Fantasque

Piano Rag Music

ango

Sonatensalz in G minor, K. 312 STAGE III

Mozart

Chopin STAGEIIV

STAGE V

MOZATt Bartok

Debussy

Schubert Bach

Desponds

Autumn Leaves

Sonata No. 3 for violin and pian0 in D minor, Op. 108

tor Sonata celloand piano in minor, Op.65

STAGE V

FINALS CONCERTOS

Mozart

FINALS CONCERTOS

Beethoven

RECITAL Général Lavine -

F major, K. 459 No. 4 in G major, Op. 58

major, K. 407 O 2

31

eccentric,

ichmaninov Etude Tableau in E flat minor, Op. 33, No. 6 Sonata No. 5, Op. 53 Scriabin STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Soler Clementi

Sonatas G minor, F sharp major

RECITAL

Chopin

Sonata in F sharp minor, Op. 26, No. 2 Waltzes - C sharp minor, Op. 64, No. 2; D lat major, Op. 64, No. I

Polonaise in Aflat major, Op.

chubert

Mussorgsky

RECITAL Sonata in A minor, D. 537 Pictures at an Exhibition

CHAMBER MUSIC

Beethoven

Sonata for violin and piano in

STAGE V

FINAL CONCERTOS

A major, Op. 47 Kreulzer

CHAMBER MUSIC

Brahms

Sonatas in D minor and E major

Prelude No.6, BookII

RECITAL

CHAMBER MUSIC

Chopin

sSTAGEII|

Alborado del gracioso from Miroirs

SEMI-FINALS

Improvisation on the theme

Valses nobles et sentimentales Three movements trom PetroucDRU

carlatti

RECITAL Nocturne in F minor, Op. 55, No. I

STAGE IV

RECITAL

Ravel

STAGEI

SEMI-FINALS

SEMI-FINALS

SITAN INSKV

PROGRAMME

Valley of Rocks

Busoni

Sonata in C minor, Op. 13, Putbètique

Paloma O'Shea, Santander, Spain

Hyde

STAGE TN

eethove

Moscow, USSR 1987 2nd Prize, Int. Piano Competition,

Sonata No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 35

Sonata in B flat major, Op. post. D. 960 Prelude and fugue No. 22 in B flat minor, Book II, BWV 891

iHvde

USSR

1986 8th Prize, Int. Techaikovsky Competition,

Valley of Rocks Sonatu in D major, K. 3

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL Sonata in E Nat major, Hob. XVI:52 Valley of Rocks Ten Variations on a Chopin Prelude

lavdn

Awards 1985 3rd Prize, National Piano Competition,

QUARTER-FINALS

RECITAL

Hyde

egional Philharmonic Society

Chopin Ravel

PROGRAMME STAGEI

Gigue in G major, K. 574

Debussy

of many

Schafthauscn Conservatory.

Chopin Stravinsky

D.A. Bashkirov.

He is presently a soloist for the Moscow

recipient

scholarships. In March 1984 he was awarded the Soloist Diploma with distinction from the

Prelude and fugue No 21 in B Nat

Bach Chopin Buson

Sergei Erohin attended the Central Music School attached to the Moscow State Conservatory, which he later attended, studying with

Gershwin

PROGRAMME

STAGET

From an early age André Desponds displayed a wide range of musical talents, studying piano, guitar, oboc and organ. From the age of l6 he

Competition, U'R

Piano Pri2e, Lecds 1984 5th Music Prize, Prize and Cnamber 1984 1st Piano Competition, Int. Gina Bachauer USA Lake Int.

MOSCOW 13.1.61

e hasgiven manyrecitalsand performances

competitions.

iniernational

Awards

LUSSERY 7.2.58

Mozart Rachmaninov

B flat major, K. 595 No. 3 in D minor, Op. 30

55


Matthias Fletzberger AUSTRIA

VIENNA 24.8.65

Matthias Fletzberger studied piano from the age of three. He attended the Vienna Musikhochschule and from 1978 was a student in the class of

Hans Gral. He has participated in masterclasses given

by Bruno Scidlhofer, Hans Graf, Leon Fleisher, Tatiana Nikolaeva and Jacques Rouvier. Later teachers have included Maurice Gendron,

Jean Fournier and Francine Trachier (violin). He has given recitals in Europe and overscas, appearing as soloist with orchestras in Europe, Chile and Isracl and made radio broadcasts and video recordings.

Awards 1984 2nd Prize, Violin/Piano duo, Int. Chamber

Music Competition, Trapani, Italy 2nd Prize, Busoni Int. Piano Competition, Bolzano, IialyY 4th Prize Arthur Rubinstein Int. Piano

1984 1986

Competition, Israel 1986

3rd Prize, Int. Piano Competition, Rina Sala Gallo, Monza, Italy 1987 5th Prize, Int. Piano Competition, Paloma O'Shea, Santander, Spain 1987 2nd Prize, Int. Piano Dr Luis Sigall,

Competition, Viña del Mar, Chile

PROGRAMME

As the daughter of a Japanese diplomat, Megumi Fujita has lived and studied in many

COuntries. In the USA she studied with John Chagy and made her first appearance as a

Gorodnitski and James Barbagallo. He won the

School of Music, studying with Simon Nicholls and Louis Kentner. In 1984 she accompanied

and many other scholarships and awards. He is currently a student of Rudolt Firkusny. He has given recitals and appeared with orchestras in the United States, Holland, Chile, Australia and Indonesia and has been featured

Menuhin

Yehudi Menuhin in recitals in England and took part in the Menuhin Festival in Switzerland In 1985 she pursucd postgraduate studies at the Rubin Academy in Tcl

Aviv, Isracl, return ing to London to attend the Royal College of

Music and study with Irina Zaritskaya. She has given many concerts in Europe, the Middle East and Japan.

PROGRAMME STAGE I

RECITAL

Chopin Liszt

Nocturne in E major, Op 62, No 2 Sonata No. 3 in A minor, Op 28 Paganini Etude No. 3. La Campanella

STAGE II

RECITAL

Prokofiecv

schubert-Liszt

STAGE III

Ravel Schubert1

Etude Tableau in C minor, Op. 39, No. T

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Mozart

Hyde

Sonata in B lat major, K. 335 Valley ot Rocks

Schumann

Sonata No. 2 in G minor, Op 22

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

RECITAL

Beethoven

Sonata in B flat major, K. 333 Valley of Rocks Three movements from Petrouchka

Liszt

SonatainE major, Op. 109 Liebestraume No 3 Transcendental Etude No. 12,

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Ravel

Le Tombeau de Couperin

Sonata in A Nat major, Op. 110 Valscs nobles et sentimenales Sonata in A minor, D. 784

Franck

Sonata for violin and piano in

major

Bach Busoni

RECITAL Nocturne in E major, Op. 62, No. Toccata in C major (2nd and 5rd movemcnts)

Sourées de Vienne Valse Caprice,

Op. 25, No. 6

RECITAL

Chasse-neige CHAMBER MUSIC

STAGE V

CHAMBER MUSIC

Franck

PROGRAMME STAGE I

Book I Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op 52 Etude in G sharp minor,

RECITAL

Beethoven

Competition, Chile

1984 3rd Prize, Maryland Int. Piano Competition, USA 1984 Special Prize, Gina Bachauer Int. Piano Competition, Salt Lake City, USA 1985 +th Prize, Sydney Int. Piano Competition, Australia

Chopin

Impromptu in F minor, D. 935, No. I la Puerta del V'ino, Prelude No. 3. Book I Etudes Nos. 1, 2 and 5, Op. 100

STAGE IV

ards 1982 3rd Prize, Viña del Mar, Int. Piano

Chopin

STAGE II

Hyde Stravinsky

in radio programmes and appeared on television.

Des pas Sur la neige, Prclude No o,

Schubert

Mozart

at Lincoln Center's Alice Tully Hall in 1986

Debussy

Rachmaninov

QUARTER-FINALS

of six with A. Becalel, S. Sulungan and Su Sawv Ching. In 1980 he went to the United States to attend the Juilliard School, studying wvith Sasha Juilliard William Petschek Piano Début award

Nocturne in E major, Op. 62, No. 2 Scarbo from Gaspard de la nuit Paganini Etude, No. 3, La Camfpanella

STAGE III

Eduardus Halim studied piano from the age

when she was 12. From 1979 to 1984 she lived in England and attended the Yehudi

Chopin

Chopin

BANDUNG 25.8.61

soloist with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

RECITAL

Debussy

INDONESIA

NEW ZEALAND 20.4.65

STAGE I Ravel Liszt

Eduardus Halim

Megumi Fujita

JAPAN

Sonata tor violin and piano in A major

FINALS CONCERTOS

Mozart

Cminor K. 491

Chopin

No. I in E minor, Op. Il

STAGE III

RECITAL

Debussy

La Puerto del Vino, Prelude No. 3,

Scrabin Brahms

Etude, Op +2, No. + Variations on a Theme of Paganini, Op 55, Book II Etude in G sharp minor, Op. 25, No. 6

BOok II

Chopin STAGE II

QUARTER-FINALS

Clementi

RECITAL Sonata in F sharp minor

Grainger Chopin

Jutish Medley

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven

Sonata in F minor, Op. 5,

Schumann Stravinsky

Sonata No. 3 in B minor, Op. 58

Appassionata Kinderscenen, Op. 15 Three movements from Petrouchka CHAMBER MUSIC

Beethoven

Sonata for cello and piano in A major, Op. 69

STAGE V

FINALS

Mozart

CONCERTOS B flat major, K. 595

Mozart

C major, K. 467

Tchaikovsky

No. 1 in B lat minor, Op. 23

Tchaikovsky

No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23

STAGE V

FINALS

ORCHESTRAL

32


Michael Harvey

Kayaja Han

Philip Hosford

AUSTRALIA

$OUTHKOREA

USA

OSAKA 12.10.58

Kayaja Han was a student at the Toho Music School, Tokyo, from 1978 to 1982. From 1982 to 1986 she attended the Musikhochschule in Frciburg. studying with Edith Picht-Axenfeld

and Ramon Walter. She has won several prizes

in competitions in Japan, Italy and Germany

and has aPpeared as soloist and chamber

musician in Europe and Japan.

SYDNEY 7.7.61

Michael Harvey began piano lessons at the age of three. He attended the Canberra School of Music, studying with Alan Jenkins, and made his first ABC broadcast when he was 12.

He studied at the Sydney Conservatorium High Scho0l and the Sydney Conservatorium with Gordon Watson.

Further study followed in Europe where he

ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO 15.8.59

Philip Hosford attended the University of Arizona, completing his musical education at the Uni-

versity of Maryland, College Park and Peabody Conservatory of Music, Baltimore. His principal teachers have been Ellen Mack, Thomas Schumacher, Stewart Gordon and Audrey Bart Brown.

He has given recitals and concerto performances in North and South America, Africa and Europe.

She is presently a lecturer at the Musikhochschule in Freiburg.

attended the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest, Hungary. While in Europe, he gave recitals, concerto pertormancesandradio broad-

PROGRAMME

casts as well as competing in several international

La Gesse to perform in France.

competitiOns. Since returning to Syaney nec s taken part in the 1988 Opera House Début Series

Awards 1984 2nd Prize, Washington Int. Piano

STAGEI

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in F sharp minor, Op. 48, No. 2 Sonata in G major, K. 427, L. 286 Preludes 5, 4 and 8 from Eight Preludes

Scarlatti

Frank Martin STAGE I1

RECITAL

Debussy

Ce qu a vu le vent d'Ouest, Prelude No. 7, BookI Paganini Etude No. 6 in A minor Suite Op. 14

Liszt

Bartok STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Awards 1985 Claude Debussy Medal

Chopin

Liszt

Bach

Chopin

Sonata for cello and piano in

STAGE V

FINALS CONCERTOS

Mozart Bartok

A major, K. 414 No. 3

Op. 27, No.l E major, K. 403, L. 470 Mephisto Waltz RECITAL

Sonata No. 3 in F minor, Op. 5

A major, Op. 69

PROGRAMME

Sonatas -

Debussy

Becthoven

ECITAL Nocturne in C sharp minor,

Scarlatti

STAGE II

CHAMBER MUSIC

College Park, USA

1985 2nd Prize, Young Keyboard Artists ASsociation, Int. Piano Competition, Ann Arbor, USA

PROGRAMME STAGE I

SEMI-FINALS Sonata in E major, Op. 109

Int. Piano

1986 4th Prize, Franz Liszt Competition, Utrecht, Holland

STAGE IV

Beethoven Brahms

Competition, USA

1984 Loren Eisely Memorial Award, University of Maryland Int. Piano Competition,

Competition, Paris

Hyde Bartok

RECITAL

USA selected by the Foundation for Music at

and given many recitals.

nata in E minor, Hob. XV1:34 Valley of Rocks Sonata

Haydn

In 1985 he was one of the six pianists from the

E minor, K. 263, L. 321;

Feux d'artifice Prelude No. 12, Book l Prelude and Fugue No. 4 in C sharp minor, Book 1, BWV 849 Scherzo No. 3 in C sharp minor,

Op. 39, Etude in A minor, Op. 25, No. 11

STAGE I1I

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Haydn

Sonata in Eflat major, Hob. XVI:52

Banks Liszt

Pezzo Dramatico

STAGE IV

Aprés une lecture du Dante Jantasia quasi sonata Intermezzo in A major, Op. 118, No. 2 SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven

Sonata in F minor, Op. 57,

Liszt Scriabin

La lugubre gondola - 2nd version

Debussy

L'Isle joyeuse

Brahms

STAGEI

RECITAL

Copland Chopin

Variations (1930)

Brahms

Rhapsody in E flat major, Op. 19, No. 4

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Ce qu a vu le vent d'Ouest, Prelude No. 7, BookI Prelude and fugue No. 22 in B flat

NO. 2

Bach

minor, B0ok I, BWV 867

Scriabin

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Haydn Chopin

Sonata in E minor, Hob. XVI:34 Polonaise-fantaisie in A flat major, Op. 61 Pezzo Dramatico

-

Banks

Liapunov

Lesgbinka

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS - RECITAL

Beethoven Debussy

Sonata in E major, Op. 109 Preludes from Book l: 9. La serenade interrompue, 5. Les collines d'Anacapri, 12. Minstrels 10. La catbédrale engloutie Sonata

Etude Op. 8, No. 9, Alla Ballata Three pieces from Petroucbka CHAMBER MUSIC Sonata for violin and piano in A major, Op. 47, Kreutzer

Sonata No. 5, Op. 53

STAGE II

Appassionata

Stravinsky

Nocturne in F sharp major, Op. 15,

Bartok

CHAMBER MUSIC Brahms

Sonata No. 3 for violin and piano in D mino, Op. 108

FINALS CcONCERTOSs

STAGE V

FINALS cONCERTOS

G major, K. 453 Mozart Rachmaninov No. 3 in D minor, Op. 50

Mozart Prokofiev

major, K.453 No. 3 in C major, Op. 26

Beethoven STAGE V

33


Huang Du CHINA

Linda Ippolito

Ivo Janssen

CANADA

NETHERLANDS

SHANGHAI 30.1.70

Huang Du began piano lessons when he was six. He entered the Primary School Division of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music when he was eight, studying with Fan Mingjuan. Since 1982 he has been studying with Lin Eryao in the Middle School Division. He gave his first recital when he was 15 and has since given many other recitals in China.

Chopin

Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27, No. 2

Bach

Prelude and Fugue No. 14 in F sharp minor, Book I, BWV 859 Hungarian Rhapsody No. 12 RECITAL

STAGE II

Debussy Liszt

PROGRAMME

Transcendental Etude No. 9,

Chopin

Morel

NOcturnein C sharp minor, Op. 27, No. I Concert Etude in F minor La Leggierezza Paganini Etude No. 3 La Campanella Eude de Sonorité No. 2

STAGE II

RECITAL

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL Kinderscenen, Op. 15 Preludcs B lat major, Op. 23, No. 2;G sharp minor, Op. 52, NO. SEMI-FINALS

Debussy Chopin

Estampes

RECITAL Scherzo No. 4 in E major, Op. 54 Sonata in F minor, Op. 57,

Appassioata CHAMBER MUSIC

STAGE V

Sonata for violin and piano in A major, Op. 47, Kreulzer FINALS

CONCERTOS Mozart

Chopin

Liszt

Sonata in D major, K. 576 Valley of Rocks

STAGE IV

Beethoven

Her teachers have included Boris Berlin, Pierre Souvairan, Irina Kugucheva and Patricia Parr, and she has taken part in master classes With Abbey Simon, Claude Frank and the late

RECITAL

STAGE III

Beethoven

In 1986 she toured Canada with Les Jeunesses

Musicales and was invited t0 take part in the

STAGE I

Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23

Hyde

Montreal Symphony Orchestras.

La fille aux cheveux de lin, Prelude No. 8, Bookl

Chopin

Schumann Rachmaninov

performed on radi0 and television, in recitals and with orchestras, including the Toronto and

Gina Bachauer. She is presently studying at the University of Toronto.

Ricordanza

Mozart

A graduate of the Royal Conservatory of Music,

Toronto, Linda Ippolito has won many scholar ships and awards in North America. She has

Tchaikovsky International Piano Competition, Moscow.

PROGRAMME STAGEI RECITAL

Liszt

TORONTO 11.6.62

B flat major, K. 595 No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21

2

Brahms

IntermezZi -

Debussy

No. 1; A major, Op. 118, No. 2 Ondine, Prelude No. 8, Book II

A minor, Op.

118,

Rachmaninov Etude 1ableau in D major, Op. 39, No. 9

STAGE II

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Mozart Liszt

Hyde STAGE IV

Beethoven

VENLO 13.7.63

Ivo Janssen studied with Jan Wijn from 1979 to 1987 and is a graduate of the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam. His teachers have included

Gary Graffman, Gyõrgy SzebOk, Naum Grubert, Andrzej Jasinski and Karl-Heinz Kammerling. He has taken part in several European competitions and has made radio recordings both as soloist and with orchestra and in

chamber music. This year he has recorded. works by Bach, Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov.

Awards

1986 Ist Prize, Benelux Tromp Piano

Competition, Belgium

1987 Semi-finalist, Queen Elisabeth Int. Piano

Competition, Belgium PROGRAMME STAGEI RECI Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27, Chopin No. 2

Rachmaninov Polka de WR Ravel Prelude, Minuet and Toccata from Le Tombeau de Couperin

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Feux d'artifice, Prelude No. 12, Book

Messiaen

La première Communion de la Vierge from Vingt Regards stur

Prokotiev

Toccata in D minor, Op. l1

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Mozart

Sonata in F major, K. 533 and +94 Three movements from Petrouchka

L Enfant-/èsus

RECITAL

Stravinsky

Sonata in D major, K. 576 Mephisto Waltz Valley of Rocks

STAGE IV

Valley of Rocks SEMI-FINALS

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Schubert

Sonata in A major, D. 664

Sonata in C major, Op. 53,

Hyde

RECITAL

Chopin

Ravel Albeniz

Valses nobles et sentimnentales Navarra

Franck

CHAMBER MUSIC

STAGE V

Franck

Sonata for violin and piano in A major

Mozart

STAGE V

FINALS

Prokofiev

CONCERTOS Mozart Liszt

C major, K. 467 No. I in E flat major

34

Twenty-four preludes, Op. 28 CHAMBER MUSIC

Waldstein

Sonata for violin and piano in major

FINALS

CONCERTOS A major, K. 4l4 No. 5 in C major, Op. 20


Mari Kodama

Iwan König

JAPAN

WEST GERMANY

Alexander Korsantiya USSR

OSAKA 3.3.67

BONN 176.64

Mari Kodama obtained her Premier Prix from the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris. She has performed in France and overseas, giving concerto performances with the

Iwan König first studied piano with his father in Taiwan. From 1974 to 1976 he attended the Musashin0 Academy of Music in Tokyo.

Osaka Philharmonic and the London Philharmonic Orchestras. She is presently studying with Germaine Mounier and Tatiana Nikolaeva. She has broadcast for French radio and appeared on television.

in 1978 and attended the

Awards

1981 2nd Prize, Concours Jeunesse Musicale,

Switzerland

1982 3rd Prize, Int. Piano Competition, Vioti,

Italy 1986 2nd Prize, Int. Piano Competition, Cittá di Senigallia, Italy. PROGRAMME

STAGEI Chopin Liszt

Hannover, from 1982 to 1984 studying with

Karl-Heinz Kämmerling. Since 1984 he has been studying at the Hochschule der Kunste, Berlin, with Klaus Hellwig. In 1980 a scholarship enabled him

to

study

with Ludwik Stefanski in Poland. Between

1981 and 1985 he studied with Byron Janis in New York, Maria Curcio in London and since 1985 has attended several piano courses with György Szebok. Awards 1980 3rd Prize, Int. Masterplayers Competition,

Lugano, Italy

STAGE II

Scarbo from Guspard de la nuit RECITAL

Debussy

Feux d'artifice, Prelude No. 12,

Bach

Chopin Brahms

Alexander Korsantiya attended the Music High School in Tbilisi in the class of V.N. Shiukashvili

and N.G. Khalatlvoi, and finally in the class of T.K. Amiradzhibi. He is presently a student in the Tbilisi State

Conservatory where he continues studies with TK. Amiradzhibi. Awards 1981 lst Prize, 6th Trans-Caucasian Competition, USSR 1985 Hon. Diploma Chopin Int. Competition, Warsaw, Poland PROGRAMME STAGEI

Sehuma Schuma

RECITAL Nocturne in F major, Op. 15, No. 1

Novellette in F sharp major, Op. 21, No. 8

RECITAL Nocturne in E minor, Op. 72, No. PROGRAMME STAGE I RECITAL Transcendental Etude, No. 5, Feux Follels

Ravel

He gave his first solo recital in Heidelberg Musikhochschule,

TBILISI 18.4.65

Liszt

Transcendental Study No. 8,

STAGE II

RECITAL Ondine, Prelude No. 8, Book II

Wilde Jagd

Nocturne in F major, Op. 15, No. 1 Ballades -D major, Op. 10, No. 2;

B minor, Op. 10, No.3

Debussy

Haydn

Prokofiev

Sonata in G major Toccata in D minor, Op. Il

Schumann STAGE II

Toccata in C, Op. 7

Debussy

La danse de Puck, Prelude No. l1

Chopin

Toccata in D major, BWV 912 Ballade No. 2 in F major, Op. 38

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Scarlatti

Sonatas

D minor, K. 141, L. 422; E major, K. 380, L. 23 Scarbo from Gaspard de la nuit

Chopin

Sonata No. 5 in A minor, Op. 28

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Prokofiev

Pezzo Dramatico Sonata No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 35

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Haydn Hyde

Beethoven Bach

Sonata in E nlat major, Op. 7 Chromatic Fantasy and guc,

Beethoven

Sonata in E flat major, Op. 8la,

Book I

RECITAL

Haydn Banks

Chopin

Schunann Dutilleux

Sonatain E Nat major,

Hob.

XV1:52

Les Adieu* Carnaval, Op. 9 Choral and Variations

CHAMBER MUSIC Franck

Sonata for violin and piano in

Mozart Prokofiev

FINALS CONCERTOS

LISZI

Debussy

Sonata in F major, K. 332 Valley of Rocks Five Preludes from Op. 28, Nos. 15, 8, 10, 17 and 18

RECITAL

Sonata in F major, Hob. XVI:23 Valley of Rocks Paganini Etude No. 3 in E major, La Campanella Mcphisto Waltz

BWV903

Chopin

L'Isle joyeuse

Debussy

Schubert

Sonatu in C minor, Op. post.

STAGE

Prokofiev

D. 958 Sonata No.

7 in B flat major,

Op. 83 CHAMBER MUSIC

STAGE V

RECITAL

Hyde

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven

QUARTER-FINALS

Mozart

STAGE IV

A major, K. 419 No. 3 in C major, Op. 26

from Book

RECITAL

A major

STAGE V

STAGE

RECITAL

Sonata for cello and piano in A major, Op. 69 FINALS

CONCERTOS Mozart

No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Chopin

No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21

Mozart Liszt

Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52 Etude in B minor, Op. 25, No.

CHAMBER MUSIC Sonata for cello and piano FINALS

CONCERTOS C minor, K. 491

No. I in E flat major


Natalia Koval

HUNGARY

CANADA

PERTH 7.1.60

Natalia Koval began piano studies at the age of

four and later attended the NSW State Conser vatorium in Sydney. at

She completed her Bachelor of Music degree the University of Cincinnati, USA where she

studied with Bela Siki. In 1983-84 Natalia attended the Banff School of Fine Arts in Canada and then moved in to Norway where she has appeared as soloist1985 with the Bergen Symphony Orchestra and recorded for Norwegian radio. She has performed in

Australia, North America and Europe as soloist and chamber musician.

Currently she is resident in London and studying with Sulamita Aronovsky.

MISKOLC 20.3.67

Adrienne Krausz began music studies when she was nine. She has been successful in many local Competitions and won the Hungarian Piano

Competition in Tarhos in 1985. Her teachers have been Gabrielle Torma and Suzsanna Kiss. Since 1985 she has been studying at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in

Budapest with

György Nádor, and has given concerts in Italy,

France and East Germany. Awards 1985 Ist Prize, Int. Piano Competition,

Senigallia, Italy

1987 Hindemith Prize, Frankfurt Int. Piano Competition, West Germany

PROGRAMME

PROGRAMME

STAGE I

STAGE I

Chopin

Scarlatti

Janácek

CITAL Nocturne in B major, Op. 62, No. 1 Sonata in E major, K. 162, L. 21 Sonata 1.X. 1905: i) Presentiment

ii) Death STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy Chopin

Minstrels, Prelude No. 12, Book I Etude in A minor, Op. 25, No. 1

Bach-L Liszt Scarlatti

STAGE II

Debussy

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Liszt Bartok

Scriabin Banks

Sonata in F major, Hob. XVI:23 Sonata No. 3 in F sharp minor, Op. 23 Pezzo Dramatico

STAGE III

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

Beethoven

Claude Frank and Boris Berman, and is AssistProfessor of Piano in the school of Music. He has performed in recitals and as soloist

ant

with orchestras in North America, France and Luxembourg and given recitals on CBC radio and WQXR in New York. He has been a prizewinner at several Canadian competitions.

Awards 1983 3rd Prize and Special award for best

performance of a Mozart concerto Casadesus Int. Competition, Cleveland, USA

CHAMBER MUSIC

PROGRAMME

Op. 32, No. 12

STAGE I

RECITAL Ce qua vu le vent d'Ouest,

Chopin

Prelude No. 7, BookI

Mozart Ravel V

Paganini Etude No. 3, La Campanella Suite Op. 14

RECITAL Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27, No. 2 Rondo in A minor, K. 511

Rigaudon from 7ombeau ae Couperin

QUARTER-FINALS

STAGE II

RECITAL

RECITAL

Debussy

Ce qu a vu le vent d'Ouest,

Haydn

Sonata in F major, Hob. XVI:23

RECITAL

yde LiSzt

Valley of Rocks

Beethoven Brahms

Sonata in C major, Op. 2, No. 3 Fantasie in C major, Op. 17

Paganini Etude No. 4 in E major Mephisto Waltz

Prelude No. 7, Book I Sonata in F major, Op. 10, No. 2 Intermezz0 in A major, Op. Il8,

Debussy

L'Isle joyeuse

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL Sonata in D major, Op. 10, No. 3 Polonaise-Fantaisie in A flat major,

Mozart Franck

Sonata in F major, K. 332

Edwards

Monos II

Op. 6

STAGE IV

Beethoven

Sonata for violin and piano in A major, Op. 47, Kreulzer

Beethoven

STAGE V

FINALS

Chopin

CONCERTOS

Chopin

Karl-Ulrich Schnabel in New York, with Leon

Fleisher at the Peabody of Music, Baltimore, and with PaulConservatory Badura-Skoda and Philippe Entremont in Vienna. Since 1986 he has been at Yale University Completing his Master of Musical Arts with

Prelude and fugue in A minor Sonata in G major, K. 427, L. 286

Rachmaninov Prelude in G sharp minor,

Sonata

Mozart

Stéphan Lemelin studied in Montreal with Yvonne Hubert; further studies followed with

Nocturne in D flat major,

Bartok

Schumann

RECITAL

RIMOUSKI, QUEBEC 2.4.60

Op. 27, No. 2

STAGE III

Haydn

Stéphan Lemelin

Adrienne Krausz

AUSTRALIA

C minor, K. 491 No. 2 in Fminor, Op. 21

Ravel

Scarbo from Gaspard de la nuit

Franck

Sonata for violin and piano in A major

CHAMBER MUSIC STAGE V

NO. 2

RECITAL

Berg

Sonata, Op. I Sonata in B tlat major, Op. post. D. 960

Franck

Sonata for violin and piano in A major

Schubert

FINALS B tlat major, K. 595 No. I in E lat major

CHAMBER MUSIC

STAGE V Mozart Brahms

36

SEMI-FINALS RECIT

CONCERTOS Mozart Liszt

Prelude, Chorale and Fugue

FINALS

CONCERTOS B fat major, K. 595 No. 2 in B flat major, Op. 83


Luo Xiao

Peter Mack

CHINA

James Lisney

IRELAND

ENGLAND

READING6.5.62

the

Lisney entered 1980 London in

lanmes

TO

Royal College of study with Phyllis

Music, Further studies Sellick and John Merlet at the Nice Monique follow ed with Music, France. début at the Academy ol his London he made In 1986 pertormed through since nas Wigmore Hall and Wigmoied Kingdom in recital and concerto Barstow.

chamber

concerts,

in and taken part Bank.

the concerts at

music

South

sucCCssfully in several In 1987 he perlormed competitions. national Bath and He has competed

at

music

Gosport.

festivals in DeVIZCs,

SHANGHAI 17.12.67

DUBLIN 4.7.61

Luo Xiao comes from amusical family. Her mother is a pianist and her father a trombonist and teacher. From the age of cight she studied piano with her mother and then from the age of 12 with

Music, studying with Frank Heneghan. Further studies followed at Trinity College, Dublin. In

Sheng YiqI In 1980 she entered the Middle School of

silver medal from the Guildhall Schol of Music, London.

the Shanghai Conscrvatory of Music, continuing Studics with Sheng Yiqi, and since 1984 has been in the class of You Dachun. In 1986 she com menced studies in the Piano Department of the Shanghai Conservatory of Music

In 1984 he went to the USA tO Study with Bela Siki at the University of Cincinnati Con-

PROGRAMME STAGE I

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in E tlat majo, Op 55, No. 2

Bach Rachmaninov

Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826

Awards

1987

Wells Int. Concert Finalist Tunbridge Artists Competition, UK

1987

1st Prizc, Hastings Competition, UK

Int. Concerto

PROGRAMME

STAGE T

Haydn Chopin RachmaninoOV

RECITAL

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

La catbédrale engloutie, Prelude No. 10, Book I

Brahms

Intermezz0 in A major, Op. 118,

Sonata in C major, Hob. XVI:50 (Ist movement) in E flat

NOcturne

Etude Tableau in E flat minor, Op. 33, No. 6

major, Op. 55,

No. 2

No. 2 Prelude in D majOr, Op. 25, No. 4 Etude 1ableau in D major, Op. 59,

No. 9

Prokofiev

Sonata No. 3 in A minor, Op. 28

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

Hyde

Valley of Rocks Prelude, Forlane, Rigaudon and

STAGE I

RECITAL

Tchaikn sky Stevens.

Dumka, Op. 59 Ondine, Prelude No. 8, Book II Peter Grimes Fantasy (l971)

STAGE |

QUARTER-FINALS

Havdn

Sonata in F major, Hob. XVI:29

Hyde

Valley of Rocks

Chopin

Beethoven Schumann

RECITAL Sonata in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2 Humoresque in B tlat major, Op. 20

Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise lBrilliante, Op. 22

Debussy

Ravel

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven

Sonata in F

Chopin STAGE V Mozart Brahms

servatory of Music, and then the University of Washington where he is presently studying tor Ph.l He has taken part in several music festivals, appearcd on television and recorded on radio in the USA and Europe, and recorded for Musical Heritage. ni

Awards 1987 Ist Prize, 4th Int. Pacific Piano Competition, Olympia, Washington, USA PROGRAMME

STAGE I

Chopin

Sonata 1.X. 1905 i) Presentiment

Scriabin

Etude, Op. 8, No. 12

ii) Death

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Les collines d'Anacapri, Prelude No. 5, Book I

Mozart

Frank Martin

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

CHAMBER MUSIC

Sonatu No. 3 for violin and pian0

STAGE III

FINALS CONCERTOS

47

MOzart

Liszt

G major, K. 453 No. 1 in E flat major

Debussy

Sonata in E flat major, Hob. XVI:52

Sonata Pocme Images, Book l SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven

Sonata in Cmajor, Op. 53,

Franck

Prokofiev

Waidstein Prelude, Chorale and Fugue

Sonata, N0. 5 in A minor, Op. 28

CHAMBER MUSIC

STAGE V

FINALS

QUARTER-FINALS

STAGE IV

Fauré

SOnata tor cello and piano in G minor, Op. 05

Prelude and fugue No. 4 in C sharp minor, Book I, BWV 849 Preludes Nos. 7 and 8 from Eight Preludes RECITAL

Haydn Agnew

in D minor, Op. 108 STAGE V

Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27,

Janácek

Couperin Sonata in D major, K. 576

Brahms

RECITAL NO. 2

Bach

sharp major, Op.

OstakOVIch Sonata No. 2 in B minor, Op. 6l Sallade No. 3 i n A tlat major, Op. Chopin CHAMBER MUSIC

December 1980 he was awardedthe diploma

Toccata from Le Tombeau de

RECITAL

STAGE IV

Peter Mack attended the Dublin College of

Sonata for cello and piano in G minor, Op. 117

FINALS CONCERTOS

CONCERTOS A major, K +l4

MOzart

No. I in D minor, Op. 15

Prokofiev

37

C major, K. 467 No. 3 in C major, Op. 26


Gavin Martin INDIA

Gilead Mishory

Luca Monti

ISRAEL

ITALY

GOA 28.2.60

Originally from the ex-Portuguese colony of Goa, Gavin Martin studied piano in New Delhi With Renee Hallen. In the SWIss pianist

1976 he went to London toO study at the Royal College of Music with David Parkhouse and in 1978 to the USA where he studied with

Jorge Bolet andd Gary Graffman at the Curtis Institute of Music.

In 1982 he was awarded the Curtis Institute's Rachmaninov gold medal. He has given concerts in Europe, India, Africa and the USA, including

Concerto pertormances conducted by Rafael

Fruhbeck de Burgos and zubin Mehta, with whom he made his New York Philharmonic debut. He has been a prizewinner of several

competitions in the USA and was invited by Jorge Bolet to take part in a BBC TV master class in 1984.

PROGRAMME

JERUSALEM 6.10.60

Gilead Mishory began his musical education at the age of nine. He attended the Rubin Conservatory and in 1977 graduated with In

distinction.

1980 he began studies in the Rubin Academy

with Michael Boguslavsky.

With the recommendation of Alfred Brendel he received

scholarship from the German Hanns-Seidl Foundation and in 1986 completed studies

at

a

the Munich Hochschule

fur

Musik

with Gerhard Oppitz. An Austrian government Scholarship enabled him to attend the Mozarteum

TERNI 178.66

Luca Monti studied at the Terni Conservatory of Music with Elio Maestosi. He has taken part

successfully in various national competitions and has pertormed as soloist and chamber musician in France, Switzerland and

Italy.

At present ne is doing a postgraduate course

for concert pianists with Jurg von Vintschger at

the Musik Hochschule in Zurich. Awards

1987 Semi-finalist, Int. Piano Cittá di Senigallia, Italy

in Saizburg, Studying with Hans Leygraf in 1987.

He has performed as soloist, accompanist and chamber musician in Israel, East and West Germany and France, recorded for radio stations in Germany and performed with the Jerusalem

PROGRAMME STAGE I

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in C sharp major, Op. 27, No. 1

Symphony Orchestra, Israel.

Beethoven Liszt

PROGRAMME

Competition,

Fantasia, Op. 77 Mephisto Waltz

STAGE I

RECITAL

STAGE I

RECITAL

STAGE II

Chopin

Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27, No. 2 Prelude and fugue No4 in C sharp minor, Book lI, BWV 873 Sonetti del Petrarca Nos. 123 and

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in G minor, Op. 15, No. 3 Capriccio in G minor, Op. 116, No. 3; Intermezzo in E minor, Op. 116, No. 5

Debussy

Feux d'artifice, Prelude No. 12,

Ravel

Book II Toccata from Le Tombeau

Variations, Op. 27

Chopin

Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Isolde's Liebestod from Tristan

Clementi

and Isolde

Hyde

Bach Liszt

104 from Années de Pelerinage

Brahms

Webern STAGE II

STAGE II

RECITAL

RECITAL Haim Alexander Patterns (1973)

Debussy

Les collines dAnacapri, Prelude No. 5,

Wagner-Liszt

Schulz-Evler

Arabesques on Johann Strauss's

Debussy

Book II

Blue Danube Waltz Rachmaninov E Op. 23, No. 6; G sharp minor, Op. 32, No. 12

Preludes- nat major,

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

RECITAL

Mozart

Banks

Franck STAGE IV

STAGE III

Schumann

Godowsky

SEMI-FINALS

Beethoven

Sonata in A major, Op. 101 Humoresque, Op. 20

QUARTER-FINALS In the Mist:

1. Andante,

2. Molto adagio Pezzo Dramatico Sonata in B minor, Hob. XVI:32 Out of Doors suite

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven Ravel

Sonata in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2 Miroirs

Debussy

Sonata for cello and piano

Sonata in A major, D. 664 Kreisleriana, Op. 16 Transcription of Le Cygne by

Saint-Saens CHAMBER MUSIC Sonata for violin and piano in A major

STAGE V

FINALS CONCERTOS

Mozart

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

Franck

Chopin

Liszt

Book

Haydn Bartok

RECICITAL Schubert

Feux d'artifice, Prelude No. 12,

Sonata in D major, K. 576 Pezzo Dramatico Prelude, Chorale and Fugue, Op. 21

Bank

CHAMBER MUSIC STAGE V

FINALS CONCERTOS

Mozart Ravel

RECITAL Sonata in B flat major, Op. 24, No. 2 Valley of Rocks Sonata in B minor

RECITAL

Janácek

de Couperin

C minor, imajor

G major, K. 453 No. 1 in E minor, Op.

38

491

RECI

Schumann

CHAMBER MUSIC Franck

STAGE Mozart

Chopin

Sonata for violin and piano in A major V

FINALS cONCERTOS F major, K. 459 No. I in E minor,

Op. I


Heng-Jin Park

Fali Pavri

USA

INDIA

mislav Nedelkovic-Baynov

IGLRL4

BOMBAY 8.8.59

KOREA 16.10.63

SOFLA 22.11.58

from a

comes Nedielkovic-Baynov

local

many c1ld ne won s i d zmil As and studied at the Bulgarian Ts

Conservatory of

2

He

been 2 s ns

prizewinner

ras

gven

Poand.

T2nd

the

Beebe grant tor stuy

in

Bacquet

Union,

Competition,

Int. Piano C22nzaro. ltaly

1996 15t Prizz.

recitals at Alice

in

F major, Op. 15,

No.

I

STAGEI

Rigoletto paraphrase RECITAL 12. Feux d artifice, Prelude No.

Bartok

Sonata No 7, Op. 83

Preludein D major, Op.

STAGE II

QUARTER-FINALS

25,

No.

RECITAL Sonata in A minor, K. 310

Vallcy of ROCKS

STAGE IV

Sonata No 5, Op 53 Etude Tableau in E flat minor. Op 39. No 5

Ravel

Chopin STAGE II

Chopin Debussy LiSZ STAGE III

Edwards

Brahms

Sonata in C minor, Op. 11

STAGE IV

Kaksky

FINALS CONCERTOS C major, K. +67

Sonata 2nd Jeux d'eau

Rachmaninov

and 3rd movements

RECITAL

Schumann

STAGE II

Waldesrauscben, Gnomenreigen

Ravel Prokotiev

Haydn Banks

Chopin STAGE IV

theme on a

Brahms

No. I in Bflat minor. Op. 25

Beethoven Prokofiev

FINALS CONCERT0s

C minor, K. 491

Mozart Liszt

No. 2 in A major

RECITAL La catbédrale engloutie,

Prelude

No. 10, BookI Toccata in C

major, Op.

7

QUARTER-FINALS

Sonata in

E flat major,

Hob. XVI:49

Pezzo Dramatico

Sonata

35 No. 2 in B flat minor, Op.

SEMI-FINALS

Sonata

83 No. 7 in B flat major, Op.

Beethoven

and Sonata A major, Op. 69

STAGE V

FINALS CONCERTOos

in

Mozart

Tchaikovsky STAGEV

39,

CHAMBER MUSIC

D. 845 Sonata in A minor, Valses nobles et sentimentacs 28 A minor, Op. Sonata No. 3 in CHAMBER MUSIC

major, Op. 99

-

RECITAL Sonata in C minor, Op. 11

SEMI-FINALS

cello and piano Sonata No. 2 for

de la nuit minor, 39, No. 3; E flat minor, Op.

Ondine from Gaspard Etudes Tableaux F sharp

RECITAL

QUARTER-FINALS

RECITAL Schubert

No. 2

Ballade No. I in G minor, Op. 23

Two Concert Etudes:

and Fugue of Handel, Op. 24

STAGE II

Chopin

No. 5, BookkI

Variations

Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27,

No.

Debussy

Op. 52 Ballade No. i in F minor, Prelude dAnacapri, collines Les

Monos Il

RECITAL

Op.

48, No. I Nocturne in C minor, Op.

RECITAL

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

CHAMBER MUSIC orata for violin and prano in A major

Ravel

RECITAL

Sonata in A minor, K. 310 Mozart

Sonata in B minor

ratds STAGE V

Chopin

PROGRAMME

Jeux d eau

actmains

achmanuns

STAGE I

RECITAL Nocturne

STAGE II

PROGRAMME

in

festivals in

PROGRAMME

STAGEI

Tully

participated Calitornia. She has ingtonand Switzerland and Canada.

further scholarship tor postgraduate

national competitions many All-India Beethoven Competition.

and chamber musician and accompanist, and given Hall, New York, in Wash

Cittá di

here

and appeared as soloist He has given recitals in the Soviet Union, India, Hong with orchestras a winner ot Kong and England and has been including the

was winner of the New England Conservatory concerto award. She has appeared on television as a radio in the United States, performed

sIUZETiand.

Awzrds

awarded a

when

Schumann

a

of Music, London, studies at the Royal Academy student of Christopher he is presently a where Elton.

concerto She performedthe Boston Pops Orchestra and she was 15 with the

Germany,

Soviet

abroad and is currently with Marie

is studying she Conservatoire National

Superieur de Paris.

music

he attended the Moscow Conservatory, f+ve years. with Victor Merzhanov for heAfter studied graduating with distinction he was

Paris where at the Francoise

living in

various com

concerts

n d . Bulgaria, bu

S

or

age ot 11.

with Leonard Shure.

In 1987 she was awarded the Huntington

zwzrds Ganev. nd witn Aonstantin and in S e Conservztoryto Germany West 1931 he sent Musikhochschule at the van Beek. 1962 - 2 2 student studying with Johan Trossingen,

Music

the

study in India at in Having won scholarship 1979,

Fali Pavri began

at

movedto the United States HengJin the age ofPark 1l and studied at the New England

for cello

piano

in

C major, K. 467 23 No. I in B Nat minor, Op.


Phillip Shovk

Victor Sangiorgio

Jonathan Plowright

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

ENGLAND

MILAZZO 1.2.59

SYDNEY 10.1.59

DONCASTER 24.9.59

Jonathan Plowright has studied at the Royal Academy of Music, London, with Alexander Kelly and in the United States at the Peabody

Conservatory of Music, Baltimore, with Julio Esteban. In 1983 he won the Royal Overseas with

Competition in London League Music of the Year. the title "Commonwealth Musician New York début at

The same year he made his

Hall and now performs regularly in Carnegie Britain and broadcasts for the BBC. Awards 1984 2nd Prize, Washington DC Int. Piano

Competition, USA 1985 3rd Prize, Int. Piano Competition, Rina Sala Gallo, Monza, Italy

Chopin

Brahms

Frank Martin

RECITAL Nocturne in B major, Op. 9, No.3 Rhapsody in B minor, Op. 79, No. Preludes Nos. 5, 4 and 8

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Les collines d'Anacapri, Prelude

Chopin Rachmaninov

No. 5, BookI Ballade No. 3 in A lat major, Op. 47

Haydn Hyde

Debussy

Rachmaninov

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL Sonata in D major, Hob. XVI:37 Valley of Rocks

Estampes

Etudes Tableaux -

In 1979 he was a Youth Orchestra on tour in China and Hong

the WA Symphony Kong and in 1985 with Orchestra on their first visit to Singapore concerto He has given many recital and performances in Europe.

Competition, Barcelona, Spain 1985 Finalist, Busoni Int. Piano Competition, Bolzano, Italy 1986 Semi-finalist, Tchaikovsky Int. Competition, Moscow, USSR 1987 Special Mozart Prize, Zecchi Int.

Competition, Rome, Italy

SEMI-FINALS

Brahms Prokofiev

Sonata in D Nlat major, Op. post, D. 567 Rhapsody in G minor, Op. 79, No. 2 Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 14

CHAMBER MUSIC

Debussy

Sonata for cello and piano

STAGE V

FINALS

CONCERT0S Mozart Brahms

G major, K. 453 No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15

For six

years he

attended tne Conservatorium High School studying syaney George Humphrey From 1979 he studiedwitn with Valery Kastelsky at the Moscow State Conservatory, graduating in 1984. He competed in the 1981 and Sydney Piano Competitions and in 19861985 returned to MoscoW Ior rurther study. year he has been teaching in Paris at theThis Rachmaninov School of Music. Awards 1981 Best pianist, Sydney Int. Piano Competition 1985 Semi-finalist, Sydney Int. Piano Competition 1987 5th Prize, Int. Piano Competition, Vianna da Motta, Lisbon, Portugal

Australian

PROGRAMME STAGE I

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in E major, Op. 62, No. 2 Les jeux d eau à la Villa d'Este

Liszt

from Années de Pelèrinage Rachmaninov Moment Musical in E flat minor Op. 16, No. 2; Etude Tableau in F sharp minor, Op. 39, No. 3

STAGE I

RECITAL

STAGE I

RECITAL

Chopin

Nocturne in D flat major, Op. 27, No. .2 Sonata in D major, K. 576

Debussy

La terrasse des audiences du clair de lune, Prelude No. 7, Book II

Scarlatti

Sonatas -

Mozart

F major, K. 445, L. 385;

D minor, K. 444, L. 420

(Ist movement)

Iranscendental Etude, No. 10 in

Scriabin

Poème, Op. 32, No.l;

STAGE II

RECITAL

STAGE III

Debussy

La sérénade interrompue, Prelude No. 9, Book I Scherzo No. 2 in B tlat minor, Op. 3

QUARTER-FINALS

Mozart Banks

Sonata in D major, K. 31l

Liszt

F minor

Chopin

Etude, Op. 42, No. 5

Rachmaninov Prelude in B flat major, Op. 23 No. 2; Etude Tableau in E flat minor, Op. 39, No. 5

RECITAL

Schubert

Phillip Shovk's first music teachers were Anatole Mirosznyk and Gwen Spark.

PROGRAMME

E flat major,

Op. 33, No. 7; G minor, Op. 35, No. 8; D major, Op. 39, No. 9 STAGE IV

and continues his presently lives in London studies with Noretta Conci-Leech. soloist with the Australian

Etudes Tableaux - E lat minor,

Op. 39, No. 5; C sharp minor, Op. 33, No. 9 STAGE III

of his

most

Awards 1985 Gold Medallist, Maria Canals Int.

PROGRAMME STAGE I

but spent was born in Italy where he studied early lite in Perth He later studied at piano with Stephen Dornan. in Melbourne Arts the College of the Victorian In with Roy Shepherd and Stephen Macintyre. and in Sienna 1981-82 he went to Italy to study the and in 1983 to the USA to attend Rome, Berkshire Music Centre at Tanglewood. He Victor Sangiorgio

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS RECITAL

RECITAL

Chopin STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

Schubert

RECITAL Sonata in A minor, D.53 Chorale, Fantasy and Fugue on the Ad nos, a d salutareni undam

LISZt-Busoni

Mozart Banks Schubert

Sonata in F major, K. 280

STAGE IV

EMI-FINALS RECITAL

Brahms

Beethoven

Sonata in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2 I.X. 1905 Images, Book I

STAGE V

CHAMBER MUSIC

Prokofiev

Janáce Debussy

Pezzo Dramatico

CHAMBER MUSIC

Wanderer Fantusie in C major, D. 760

Franck

Sonata violin and piano in A major

STAGE V

Mozart

FINALS CONCERTos G major, K. 453

Saint-Saens

No. 2 in G minor, Op. 22

40

Pezzo Dramatico Sonata No. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 55

Sonata No. 3 for violin and piano in D minor, Op. l08

FINALS CONCERTos

Mozart

G major, K. 453 No. 3 in C major, Op.

0


Claude Webster CANADA

Stephanie A. Wendt

philip Smith

AUSTRALIA

1GLAND

COLCHESTER 6.1.58

ROBERVAL, QUEBEC 5.9.61 NEW ZEALAND 1.3.60o

p1ano

een Exhibitioner at lunior

tne

the age of became Academy of

lessons

began philio Smith Kington. At with Beryl

II

at

he

Koyal jean Anderson.

witn London, studying when he w a s 16 continued studies during Full-time a n d GuyJonson, Langrisn the with Vivian h e w o n many prizes arnd hich period Recital Diploma. Britain and widely in He has performed in a BBC Jorge the USA, participated tOured

appeared

at

major

nas Bolet masterclass ana television, as soloist festivals, on radio and B r i t i s h orchestras. with several leading

Awards 1978 Semi-finalist,

Leeds

Int. Piano

Competition, UK

Int. Bcethoven Competition, 1985 Diploma, Vienna, Austria

Claude Webster studied at

the University of Durand. During this time he attended summer

Born in New Zealand, Stephanie Wendt received her early musical at the Elder schools with Jacynthe Conserva torium of Music intraining Couture and Janina Adelaide. She won many classes Fialkowska, master and awards with Leon Fleisher and for six Scholarships months in 1985-86 for ABC radio including and played frequently with André Laplante in New York. He continues performances with the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra. studies in New York with Adele Marcus. In 1978 she received He has received several awards and scholarand private grants for overseas study, government ships and been a prizewinner at national comenabling her to complete a Bachelor's at the Curtis Institute in degree petitions in North America. He has given many Philadelphia, studying with Jorge Bolet and Gary recitals in Canada and appcared with the Montreal Gratfman. She is now doctoral studies Symphony Orchestra and broadcast on Radio i n piano performanceundertaking at Indiana University Canada. He is to tour with Les Jeunesses Musicales with Enrica Cavallo-Gulli. She teaches part du Canada later this year and will make his time at the University of Indianapolis. Carnegie Hall, New York début in November. PROGRAMME PROGRAMME STAGEI RECITAL STAGE I RECITAL Sonata in G major, Hob. XVI:40 Montreal

with MarC

Haydn

Chopin Mozart

PROGRAMME

STAGE I

Chopin

Nocturne in B major, Op. 62, No.

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Le vent dans la plaine, Prelude No. 3, Book I Intermezzi - E flat major, Op. 117, No. 1; B flat minor, Op. 117, No. 2 Sarcasms, Op. 17

Prokofiev STAGE III

Haydn nyde LISZ

STAGE IV

Beethove Chopin Prokofie

Franck STAGE V

Mozaru

QUARTER-FINALS

Ravel

Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48, No. I Alborado del Gracioso from Miroirs

Liszt

Hungarian Rhapsody No. 12

STAGE I

RECITAL

STAGE II

RECITAL

Mendelssohn

Brahms

Intermezz0 in E lat minor, Op. 118, No. 6

Debussy

Variations sérieuses, Op. 54 Les sons et les parfums tournent dans l'air du soir, Prelude No. 4, BookI Toccata in D minor, Op. 11

Debussy

Les collines d'Anacapri, Prelude No. 5, Book I

Prokofiev

Ravel

Scarbo trom Gaspard de la nuit

STAGE III

STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Bach-Busoni

Clementi

Chorale No. 5 in F minor from

Chopin

Ten Chorale Preludes

Banks

Pezzo Dramatico

Sonata in F major

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

Bach

Toccata in D major, BWV 912

Beethoven

Sonata in E major, Op. 109 Romance in F sharp major, Op. 28,

Hyde Prokofiev

Sonata No. 7 in B flat major, Op. 83

Après une lecture de Dante -

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS

Jantasia quasi sonata SEMI-FINALS

Beethoven

RECITAL Sonata in F sharp major, Op. 78

Mussorgsky

Pictures at an Exhibition

Sonata No. 8 in B flat major, Op. 84

Sonata for violin and piano

STAGE V

Sonata for violin and piano in A major

FINALS CONCERTOS

Après une lecture du

Dante

-

fantasia quasi sonata

CHAMBER MUSIC

Sonata No. 3 for violin and piano in A

major

Brahms

FINALS

STAGE V

C minor, K. 491 Op. 23 No. I in B flat minor,

Mozart Liszt

CONCERTos

Mozart Tchaikovsky 50

No.

Liszt

No. 2, Moonligbt

Three mazurkas, Op. 59

Op.

Schumann

Sonata in C sharp minor, Op. 27,

CHAMBER MUSIC

Fantaisie in F minor, Op. 49

RECITAL

Valley of Rocks RECITAL

CHAMBER MUSIC

Sonata in G major, OpP. 40, No. 1

RECITAL

Haydn

Franck

QUARTER-FINALSs

RECITAL

RECITAL Sonata in C minor, Hob. XV1:20 Valley of Rocks

C K. 467 maninov No.major, 3 in D minor,

Chopin

movement)

RECITAL

Teruyuki Noda Ode Capricious Fledermaus Concert Paraphrase Godowsky on themes by Johann Strauss

Brahms

Nocturne in C minor, Op. 48, No. 1 Sonata in D major, K. 311 (lst

in D minOr, Op. 108

FINALS cONCERTos C major, K. +67 No. 2 in A major


Asaf Zohar

Riccardo Zadra

ISRAEL

ITALY

RAMAT-GAN 31.3.63

BOLZAN0 23.12.61

Riccardo Zadra is a graduate with honours

of the Conservatorio 'C. Monteverdi Bolzano where he studied with Lydia Conter. Further studies followed with Nikita Magaloff in Geneva,

With Carlo Zecchi and Hans Leygraf in Salzburg

and with Yvonne Lefebure in Paris. He is presently studyin8 with Marisa Somma. He has been a prizewinner in several national competitions and has given many recitals and

appeared as solo1st in ltaly, Austria, Germany and England, broadcast on radio and appeared to television, as well as being accompanist on international singers. Presently he is teaching

at the Conservatorio 'C. Monteverdi. Awards

1984 6th Prize, Busoni Int. Piano Competition, Bolzano, Italy STAGEI

RECITAL

Chopin Ravel

Nocturne in D Nat major, Op. 27, No. 2 Sonata in G major K. 125, L. 487 Scarbo from Gaspard de la nuit

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Rachmaninov

Chopin STAGE III

Ondine, Prelude No. 8, Book II

Etude Tableau in F sharp minor, Op. 39, No. 3 Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52

QUARTER-FINALS

RECITAL

Mozart

Sonata in C minor, K. 457

Stravinsky

Three movements from Petrouchka

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven

Sonata in E flat major, Op. 81la, Les Adieux Sonata in B minor

Hyde

Liszt

Beethoven STAGE V

Mozart

Chopin

awarded a Fulbright Music, he is scholarship to study in the USA where School of Music attending the Indiana University His teachers tudying for his doctoral degree. Arie Vardi and ave included Hanna Schalgi, Menahem Pressler as He has appeared

soloist with the Israel

Philharmonic Orchestra conductcd by Zubin with Gary Mchta and the Jerusalcm Symphony broadcasts Bertini, and has given recitals and

in Israel, Austria and South Africa.

Awards 1984 5th Prize, Pretoria Int. Piano Competition,

South Africa

1985 Semi-finalist, Becthoven Int. Competition Vienna, Austria

1986 Semi-finalist, Rubinstein Int. Piano

PROGRAMME

Scarlatti

Asaf Zohar studied piano at the Givatayim Rubin Academy of

Conservatory and then the Israel. In 1986 he was

Valley of Rocks

CHAMBER MUSIC Sonata for cello and piano in A major, Op. 69 FINALS CONCERTOS B flat major, K. 595 No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21

Competition, el Aviv, Isracl

1987 2nd Prize, R. Casadesus Int. Piano Competition, Cleveland, USA PROGRAMME

STAGE I

RECITAL

Mozart Rachmaninov

Chopin

Nocturne in C sharp minor, Op. post Sonata in C major, K. 330 Etude Tableau in D major, Op 59, No..9

STAGE II

RECITAL

Debussy

Des pas sur la neige, Prelude No. 6, Book Hungarian Rhapsody No. 12 Triana from lberia, Book II

Liszt Albeniz STAGE III

QUARTER-FINALS

Haydn

Sonata in C major, Hob. XVI:50

RECITAL Banks

Beethoven

Pezzo Dramatico Bagatelles, Op. 126

STAGE IV

SEMI-FINALS RECITAL

Beethoven Schuman

Sonata in A major, Op. 101 Fantasie in C major, Op. 17 CHAMBER MUSIC

Beethoven

Sonata for cello and piano in A major, Op. 69

STAGE V

FINALS

cONCERTOS Mozart

C major, K. 467

Chopin

No. I in E minor, Op. 11


KAWAI

The choice

K

of those wvho know

oichi Kawai - the pioneer of Japanese piano making had a dream - to create

the best piano in the world. That dream is now embodied in the

development of the Kawai EX Grand Piano.

Every Kawai Piano is the rewarding end result of over 60 years evolution of design excellence combined with the world's finest craftsmanship.

Kawai's reputation for quality is further enhanced by its recognition at recent musical events including -

Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw North Sea Jazz Festival

Arthur Rubinstein International Piano Competition Belgium's Elizabeth Piano Competition

hawai

Japan International Music Competition Dublin International Piano Competition

In Australia, distinguished owners of Kawai include the Sydney Opera House,

Queensland Performing Arts Complex, Victorian Arts Centre, Canberra School of Music, and Conservatoriums in major

cities as well as many hundreds of schools, colleges and homes. In fact, rwo million Kawai pianos are played and heard around the world.

As one of the major quality piano makers Kawai offers you the largest selection of Upright and Grand piarnos designed in beautiful timbers and finishes to complement

your decor. Kawai's rich sound and Ultra Responsive Action readily translate your artistic

intentions into reality. Kawai excellence can be yours. Choose Kawai - a Sound Investment providing you with dynamic performance, great value and the lifetime pleasure of playing and

owning the finest. KAWAI AUSTRALIA PTYLTD., P.O. BOX

Q173, SYDNEY

2000


Previous Juries and Prizewinners

1977 Jury

1985 Juryy

Rex Hobcroft, chairman

Australia USSR Australia West Germany

Sergei Dorensky Sir Bernard Hcinzc

Ludwig Hoffman Lucrecia Kasilag

Philippines

Eugene List

USA

Andre-F. Marescotti Denis Matthews

Switzerland England England

Hephzibah Menuhin Jan Webecr

Poland Poland

Wiktor Wcinbaum

Prizewinners 1. Irina Plotnikova

2. Svetlana Navasardian 3. Andre Laplante 4. Marioara Trifan

5. Philip Fowke 7. Daniel Blumenthal 8. Dennis Lee

9. Diana Kacso 10. Gary Steigerwalt

11. Jeno Jando

Canada

2. Bernd Glemser

USA

3. Thomas Duis

13. Piers Lane

Malaysia

7. Istvan Gulyas 8. Rita Kinka

Special Prizewinners Piers Lane

The Australian

Newspaper Prize for Musica Viva Chamber Music Prizee

1981 Juryy Rex Hobcroft, chairman Claude Frank Eileen Joyce Andre-F. Marescotu

Australia USA

Australia/UK Switzerland

Frederick Page

New Zealand

Cecile Ousset

Australia

Japan China West Germany West Gernmany Indonesia Israel Switzerland

Hungary Yugoslavia

9. David Selig

Australia USA

10. Michael Gurt 11. Luigi Ceci

Italy

12. Phillip Shovk

Australia

Special Prizewinners David Selig

Cladan Cultural

Exchange Institute Prize

Best Australian Pianist Jeno Jando

for Best Australian Pianist Bernd Glemser

Lotto People's Choice

Thomas Duis

Prize Musica Viva Chamber Music Prize

Eduardus Halim

Australian Opera Auditions Committee Prize for Best

Accompanist

France USA China Australia

Abbey Simon Li Ming Qiang

Gordon Watson

Wiktor Weinbaum

Poland

Roger Woodward

Australia

Prizewinners 1. Chia Chou 2. Endre Hegedus

Canada

Hungary

3. Catherine Vickers 4. Daniel Blumenthal

Canada USA

5. David Owen Norris 6. Liora Ziv-Li

Israel

7. Marc Raubenheimer 8. Patrick O'Byrne

New Zealand

9. Martin Roscoe

England outh Africa

England

10. Alec Chien 11. S Edward Newman

11.YvesRault

USA USA

France

Special Prizewinners Daniel Blumenthal David Owen Norris Phillip Shovk

Musica Viva Chamber Music Prize Musica Viva Special Prize Yamaha Music Foundation Prize for Best Australian Pianist

Endre Hegedus

Canada China West Germany Australia USA

4. Eduardus Halim

5. Arnan Wiesel 6. Ueli Wiget

Poland Australia

Italy France

Hungary

1. Du Ning-wu

USSR USA

Hungary

12. Pawel Checinski

Elizabeth Powell Harold C. Schonberg Peter Solymos Gordon Watson Kasuko Yasukawa

Prizewinners

Brazil USA

Australia Australia/UK

Jürgen Meyer-josten

USSR USSR

England

6. Manana Doidzashvili

Rex Hobcroft, chairman Eileen Joyce CMG Marcello Abbado Nicole Hcnriot Andre Laplante Li Min-duo

Alfred S. White Bequest Prize for Best

ACCompanist

44


YKKYKYKYKIKKYKIKYK CRAIGEND ******************

At the

Hyatt Kingsgate Sydney

. . for main course, I can recommend the Mille Feuilles of Atlantic

Salmon on a Spicy Capsicum Yoghurt or perhaps you would prefer the Marinated Venison n

Wrapped in a Fine Herb

Mousse..

Making decisions can be deliciously difficult at Craigend. For reservations phone 356 1241.


Piano Works by Australian Composers To celebrate Australia's

Bicentennial year, a

ot Selcction Australian piano works were chosen for inclusion in the Stage IlI recital programmes. Each competitor was requestedto select one work perlormance. The seven works were sclected to Tor

represent a broad spectrum of Australian compositions in different styles. Distinguished

composers Nigel Butterley, Graham Hair, James Penberthy. Larry Sitsky, Peter Sculthorpe and

Ross Edwards 1943Ross Edwards studied at

the Sydney Conserva Adelaide universities.

torium, and Sydney and He has taught at tdhe Sydney Conservaronu and has received commissions from Musica

Viva Australia and the Australian Broadcasting

Corporation. His works include those for stage, orchestra, chamber groups and piano.

Bozidar Kos were commissioned in 1981 and 1985 to write works for the 2nd and

Percy Grainger 1882-1961 Following completion of his musical studies in

Sydney Competitions.

Germany, Percy Grainger had an extensive inter

3rd

Roy Agnew 1893-1944 After carly studies in Sydney, Roy Agnew won a

national careerasconcert pianist and settled in the USA in 1914. He developed an interest in Engisn and Scandinavian folk music for which he made

scholarship to study at the RoyalCollege of Music awidevariety of arrangements. Heheldacademic

Lnaon. In 1928 he returned to Australia and

appointments at the Chicago Musical college

4 i s n g u i s h e d career as a recitalist, teacher

rom i91-21 and from 1952 at the New York

and

State University. He was also active as editor and arranger of old music. In the early 1930s he established the Grainger Museum at the UniversityofMelbourne. Compositions include works for orchestra, chamber groups, choir, voice and piano.

composer, winning

a number of and prizes. Compositions include works for

awards

voice and piano.

Don Banks 1923-80 Don Banks studied at the University of and later in USA He

aymond

Composer

Raymond Hanson studied at the Sydney Con

London,arranger andforItaly. and

Melbourne

was active a sactive

VISion, and received commissions from many bodies including the Edinburgh Festival, the

BBC and the London Symphony Orchestra. He was Head of the School of Composition at the

Sydney Conservatorium at the time of his death. Compositions include works for orchesta, chamber groups, choir, voice and piano.

Hanson

Miriam Hyde MBE 1913Miriam Hyde studicd at the and later in London. Universitvo

She has had a didelhide carcer as concert pianist, comn stinguiehned and teacher, iS nposer, and still active in nine. Her include worksallf thecn compositions choir, chamber or 2arcas She recently groups, voice and instrstra, ner with the Westre-recoracd Australian two piano conc ichard Meale 1932-symphony Orchestr estra. Richard Meale studied

the h e y Conscr torium, in the USA andatSpain

sydney Conserva.

as a

Composer. Upon returning to Aaught Worked with the

Australian

poration. For a casting of years now been on the statrnumber he has or the of Adelaide in addition to his career University as composer a

and

Concert pianist.

Compositions include works for orchestra, chamber groups

and

piano.

1913-76

The

Sydney International Piano servatorium and taughttheoretical subjects and of. ofAustralia gratefullyacknowledgesCompetition the tion composition there until his death in 1976. Many Albert& Son Pty Ltd, Allans Publishort ofhis compositions werecommissionedbysuch bodies as APRA, the Music Foundation ana the NSW Government Cultural Grants Committee. Works include those for stage, choir, orchestra, chamber groups, voice, organ and piano.

Pty Ltd and Schott &Co.(London indm Copies or giving permission to reproduce the works listed above. Special thanks is given to J. Albert & Son Pty Ltd for printing and collating the collection.

John Hopkins John Hopkins has been Director of the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music since 1986 and is Artistic Adviser to the Sydney

John Hopkins has becn closely associated with young audiences and the training of young musicians, especially through the National Music Youth Orchestra. In

Symphony Orchestra. Hehas made a substantial contribution to music

amps and the Australian

in Australia and was awarded an OBE in 1970 and the Queen's Jubilee Medal in 1977. He was the founding Dean ot the scho0l of Music of the Victorian College of the Arts, a position he held since 1973. In addition to his present teaching commitments, he makes

for the USA Bicentenary and in 1980 conducteu

1976 he took the orchestra to the United starcs

Its tour of China - the first tour of that country by an Australian orchestra.

Since 1983, John Hopkins has regularly a}

was

conductor for Dame Kiri le tours of New Zealand, Australia and Japal. ir

peared as

Conducting appearances both in this country

has conducted with the Australian Operaand

and overseas, and is currently the Principal Conductor of the Auckland Philharmonia

Victorian State Opera, and gave tne prc pertormances ot Peter Sculthorpes Kiest and Barry Conynghams Fiy. Passage and 1988 he conducted perforiancesorNIOA for The Australian Opera. Ibe Magic Flute in December 1980 and to is tast viSit Europe nt January 1987John Hopkins conducteu and Dug ScOtland, Austria, Czechoslovakia Director tor t

Orchestra in New Zealand.

Born in England,John Hopkins joined the ABC

as

Director of Music in 1963.

His previous

posts include those of Assistant Conductor of

the BBC Scotltish Orchestra, Chief Conductor of the BBC Northern Symphony Orchestra (now

BBC Philharmonic Orchestra), Conductor of the National Orchestra of the New Zealand BroadCasting Corporation and Music Director of the

New Zealand Opera Company. He has directed the Sydney Symphony Orchestra in Asia and Britain, and appeared with major orchestras in many parts of the world, including three tours of the USSR as Guest Conductor.

46

and in

1988 is Musical

wonal

Bicentennial

by Barry Conynghanm.

Dance Event

asi, wiun

mu


Sydney Symphony

The Sydney Symphony Orchestra, at 96 players under the direction of its Chief Conductor, Stuart

Orchestra

Challender, is thecountry's largest and busiest, of the

resident in one of the greatbuildings world the Sydney Opera House. The orchestra does not, however, confine itself to the concert platform. Hundreds of hours of broadcast each year from both live and studio performances.

music on radio and television are

During the more than 50 years of its existence an active recording orchestra has maintained achievement programme. Its most notable recent

the

has been the recording of Richard Meale's opera Voss with Chief Conductor, Stuart Challender.

(through the Sydney Symphony Orchestra is in every sense one

artistic of Australia's national

treasures.

Each

tneir salute tbe January over 100,000 Sydney-siders Under Sympbony orchestra at its open-air Stars for the Festival of Sydney Orchestra is the The Sydney Symphony Australia s premier city musical centrepiece of to and as such will represent Australia on tour America of States OctoDET the United during and November 1988, generously supported by EPSON Australia Pty Ltd.

VIOLAS Peter Pfuhl

FLUTES Janet Webb

HORNS Robert Johnson

Dene Olding

(Concertmaster)

(Principal)

(Principal)

(Principal)

Dittany Morgan (Associate Principal)

(Associate Principal)

(Associate Principal)

FIRST VIOLINS

Goetz Richter (ASsOCiate Concertmaster)

Anne-Louise Comerford

Antoni Bonetti (Principal)

Julie Batty Jennifer Booth Joseph Costa

Derek Jones

James Kortum PICCOLO

Mary McVarish

(Principal)

Alwyn Elliot

Jennifer James

Leonid Volovesky Waldemar Wolski

Rosamund Plummer

OBOES

Guy Henderson

(Principal)

Rosalind Maud

CELLI

Warren Reid

David Pereira

Janet Saprichian

(Principal)

AlcxanderVinokurov

Gregory Elmaloglou (Associate Principal) Patricia Ayling

Fiona Ziegler Leone Ziegler

BrianDuke Mayor Gorbatov

SECOND VIOLINS Gary Andrews

Frederick McKay

(Principal

Juris Muiznicks

Peter Ashley (Associate Principal)

Joyce Murphy Wendy Reid

Pieter Bersee Susan Dobbie

Leslie Strait

Maria Durek

BASSES

Christine Hill

Walter Sutcliffe

Stanislaw Kornel

(Principal)

Faina Krel

Neil Brawley (Associate Principal)

Philippa Paige Biyana Rosenblit

Maxwell Claxton

Robert Tepper

John Fardon

Karl T i t c h e n e r - B l o o m

David Potts Boris Warton

Ross Radioru

Elzabeth Lockwood

John Shields

Winston Sterling

HARP Louise Johnson (Principal)

Sydney Symphony Orchestra Dy g e e n t with the Australian Broadcasting Corporauon.

appear

7

Lee Bracegirdle Bernard Hillman

Douglas Trengrove

Graham Hennings Robert Humes David Jackson Catherine OFlynn

latalia Koloskova

e

Versatile in its activity and repertoire, meeting needs ot Sydney and its region the musical for the People), events such as 'Music

Kathryn Martin

(ASsociate Principal) Carol Hellmers

(Principal t

Clarence Mellor

Chris Harrison TRUMPETSs Daniel Mendelow

(Principal) Paul Goodchild (A/Associate Principal) Peter Walmsley John Wood

COR ANGLAIS

Karel Lang

(Principal) CLARINETSs

Lawrence Dobell

(Principal)

TROMBONES

Ronald Prussing (Principal) Timothy Dowling (Associate Principal) Russell MattoCkS

Margery Smith Associate Principal)

Anne Menzies

BASS TROMBONE

Alan Mewett

(Princir BASS CLARINET Craig Wernicke

(Principal) BASSOONS John Ctran

(Principal) Hamish McKeich

TUBA Fabian Russell

(Guest Principal) TIMPANI Richard Miller (Principal)

(Associate Principal) Lucinda Cran

PERCUSSION

CONTRABASSOON

(Principal)

Martin Foster

Rebecca Lagos Colin Piper

lan Cleworth

(Principa)


The Widest Range of Pianos in Australia, The Worlds Finest Grands&

Uprights

Agents for: Steinway Schimmel Feiirich Hoffmann Ronisch Petrof Kawai Neindorf

Royale Wertheim

Zimmerman

Eisenberg

Lisner

BSs 244Pitt Street Sydney. Ph. 261 2555 Incorp. Elvy's Pianos & Allans Music - Established 1862


ian Chamber Orchestra

The Australian Cham

1/

Consisting of a conductorless core group ot

String and three wind players, it is regularly toa'classical' format of up to increased 35 players by means of specialist players and soloists

permanently associated with the orchestra. Carl Pini, renowned British violinist, is Artistic Director and leader. In 1987 leading American

pianist/conductor Stephen Bishop-Kovacevich was appointed PrinCipal Gucst Conductor for a three-year period. Inroughout his appointment he will be soloist with and conduct the orchestra in

concerts

and recordings, including performances or

Beethoven's cycle of piano concertos wnicn he will direct from the keyboard. Other prominent overseas soloists and conduct-

ors

who have worked with

the orchestra inciuae

Neville Marriner, Sir David Willcocks, Sir Charles Mackerras, Christopher Hogwood,ehudi and Jeremy Menuhin, Isaac Stern, Kiri Te Kanawa, Gidon Kremer, Janos Starker, Isobel Buchanan and Michele Campanella as well as leading Aus tralian artists Dene Olding, Elizabeth Campbell, Thomas Edmonds, Hector McDonald, Geoffrey Collins, Irena Morozov and Beverley Bergen. The orchestra presents annual subscription Series in the Sydney Opera House Concert Hall;

Llewellyn Hall, Canberra; the Garrison Church,

Sydney, and in Parramatta and Penrith. Other activities include concerts for the 'Mostly Mozart series for the Sydney Opera House 1rust, the Musica Viva Schools Project, concerts with

prizewinners of the Sydney International P1ano Competition, local and international recording projects and broadcasts for the Australian

Broadcasting Corp01d A recent European tour arked marked the the orchestra's orchestra s

overseas tour. In previous years they have tenth performed in Europe, the United States of America,

Japan, Korea, Hong Kong, Indonesia, New Zealand and China. These touring programmes have been

The Australian Chamber Orchestra, founded in a well-deserved reputation at home and 1975, has as overseas Australia's finest chamber orchestra.

organised with the assistance of Musica Viva Australia, the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Australian Bicentennial Authority

Stephen Bishop-Kovacevich Mr Bishop-Kovacevich was born in Los Angeles and recital

debuts

at

and made his orchestral the age of 13 he the age of 11 in California; by twice with the San Franhad already appeared He later moved to cisco Symphony Orchestra. Myra Hess, making England to study with Dame two years later. He London début an acclaimed now

but lives permanently in England

as a

major

international artist, he is a regular guest at many including Edinburgh, European music festivals, freand Salzburg. He tours Bath, Berlin, Bonn East, Japan, Far the Europe, quently to America, heard on Australia. He is often New Zealand and at the Henry soloist a is and frequent BBC the Wood Promenade Concerts.

is known for

Stephen

Bishop-Kovacevich of chamber music.

his r e m a r k a b l e exposition for Cello Beethoven Sonatas He recorded the the Beethoven Pre, du and Piano with JacquelineP h i l h a r m o n i c Soloists with the Berlin Quintets Pianos and PerSonata for Two and the Bartok for the Philips Argerich Martha cussion with under artist, he is label. A prolific recording records include the his and C o n t r a c t to Philips Piano Concertos, Bartok and Beethoven

Complete Brahms

and

I

and

Schumann 2, c o n c e r t o s by Mozart,for Piano

Concerto Greig, the Stravinsky and Colin Davis)

with Sir

and Wind (all recital records.

49

several

London appearances in 1985-86 included the Royal Festival Hall with Vladimir Philharmonic Orchestra, and the

concerts at

Royal Ashkenazy and a Brahms cycle with Myung-Whun Chung Orchestra at the and the London Symphony schedule Barbican. On the Continent his busy Paris, includes concerts in Zurich, Amsterdanm, Milan

and

with Munich in televised pertormances Rundfunk and Sir Colin Davis.

the Bayerischer has recently Stephen Bishop-Rovacevich career as a pianiSt with started combining his

con-

his that of conductor, and in the Houston Symphony in ducting début with In February 1987 an all-Beethoven programme. debut at the his London conducting made with the Northern Sintonia and fur he Barbican include c o n c e r t s with ther conducting plans Bournemouth Philharmonic, the the BBC Australia with the Sinfonietta and a tour of Chamber Orchestras. Australian and Adelaide was apPpointed In 1987 Mr Bishop-KOvacevich Studies at Piano International Chair of to the of Music in London and 1984 made

the Royal Academy as Principal Commenced his appointment Chamber the Australian with Conductor Guest he will tour Australia for Orchestra.

the

This year Broadcasting Corporation.

Australian

February 1988


Christopher Kimber

Miwako Abe

Georg Pedersen

VOLIN

VIOLIN

CELLO

Miwako Abe was born in Japan and playing the violin at the age of five. Afterbegan from the Toho Gakuen School of Musicgraduating in Tokyo she became a prizewinning graduate at the Guildhall School of Music in London and was awarded the Boise Foundation Scholarship to study at

the Mozarteum in Salzburg. Meanwhile she Christopher Kimber studied at the Juilliard School in New York with Ivan Galamian and

Oscar Shumsky. He was appointed Assistant Concertmaster of the Baltimore Orchestra in 1964 and appeared Symphony as soloist on numerous occasions. FolloWing this he was invited to join Soloists from Marlboro on a US State Department Europe and Israel, and Department tour of Europeand israei,Rico. and participated in the Casalas Festival in Puerto In Mr Boston 1967 Kimber joined the Pops under Arthur Fiedler andJoseph Silverstein and in 1977 he became Artist-in-Residence and Associate

Professor at the Ohio State University, Columbus, USA. Christopher Kimber is Chairman of the String

Department of

the Sydney of Music. He performs frequently in Australia and overseas. In 1978 he toured the USA with the

Conservatorium

Montagnana Trio in addition to fulfilling concerto and recital engagements. In 1980 he visited the Banff Institute, Canada, for a series of consulta-

tions with Zoltan Szekely, the celebrated violinist who so closely collaborated with Bela Bartok Following this he gave a series of recitals and Concerto performances for the Bartok Centenary in Australia, performing with the Conservatorium

Symphony Orchestra in Sydney and Canberra

and for the ABC with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra under Stanislaw Skrowaczewski. At the Sydney Conservatorium Mr Kimber CO-ordinated a series of masterclasses the violinist William Primrose and he featuring toured Japan as a member of the Primrose Quartet,

deputising for Josef Gingold. This year he has appeared as cO-soloist with the distinguished Russian violinist Valery Klimov in performances of the Bach D minor double Concerto.

played at many International Music Seminars

in England, Switzerland and Portugal, and was selected for BBC TV masterclasses with Yehudi Menuhin. Her London début at the Hall as a

Wigmore brought critical acclaim. She pertormed guest member of both the Academy of St

Martin-in-the-Fields and the English Chamber rcnestra. MISS ADeS teachers included Toshiya Eto. Hideo Saito, Yfrah Neaman and Sandor Végh, who appointed her as his assistant at the Mozarteum.

She has appeared as soloist with the Mozarteum Orchestra, the Israeli Kibbutz Chamber Orchestra, the Polish Filharmonia Sudecka, the Sydney and

Adelaiae symphony Orchestras, as well as other

orchestras and ensembles in Australia and Japan. to Australia in 1982 she has given

Since coming

numerous recitals throughout Australia for the

Australian Broadcasting Corporation and ror

Musica Viva, enhancing her reputation as an

Danish cellist

is Georg a the Paris Conservatorium, where Paul Tortelier. He also studied in he studied with the masterclass of Gregor Piatigorsky at the University of Southern was Calitornia. He Principal Cellist with the Royal Danish the oldest orchestra in Europe, as well as with the finest chamber

Pedersen

graduatecof

Philharmonic,

orchestra in Scandinavia, the Copenhagen Chamber Soloists. Pedersen has performed extensively in Europe, USA, Canada, Asia, Australia and New Zealand

as a

soloist with major

orchestras a recital ist and chamber music player. He was a co-tfounder and

as

of

the Dania Quartet, and has performed and taught in music festivals in Europe and made records for EMI, CBS, Turnabout and Georg Fona. Since arriving in Australia in 1982,

Pedersen has been regarded as

frequent broadcasts and recordings for ABC

inent cellist resident in Australia.theAsmost proman ABC soloist he has appeared with major orchestras in Australia and New Zealand, and with both the Australian and Adelaide Chamber Orches tras. In 1984 he gave 14 solo concerts in the Festivals of Sydney, Adelaide and Perth, and

took

Since then has appeared annually in the

outstanding musician. She has also performed

at the Adelaide and Perth Festivals and has made

radio and televisiopn. Extensive overseas concert tours sponsored by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs her to Israel, Egypt, Jordan, India, New Zealand and ltaly, where she was applauded as una acclamata violinista di internazionale. She gave recitals in Spain at rango the Festival de Otoño in Madrid and

a

series of successful concerts

in Poland brought an invitation to return for a further tour. Audiences and critics alike have

responded enthusiastically to her superb

musicianship and profound artistry. She has conducted masterclasses in conservatoria and faculties of music in Australia, Poland and New Zealand. At present she is Lecturer in Violin at the School of Music in the Canberra Institute of the Arts. Miwako Abe on a Violin by Giovanni-Battista Guadagnini ofc 1776.

performs

Australian festivals.

As Artist-in-Residence at the Universities

of NSW, Adelaide and Western Australia, the

Victorian College of the Arts, the Canberra School of Music and the New South wales State Conservatorium of Music, Pedersen has given recitals in all capital cities. He has lectured at the South Australian College of

Advanced

Education School of Music, the University or

Auckland and taught regularly since 1983 at the Victorian College of the Arts, before jOining ne

Sydney String Quartet in residence at the New

bOuth wales Conservatorium of Music. Pedersen's repertoire ranges from the earliest music written for the cello to the contemporary He has premiered many new works here and

overseas.

50


lia

A u s t r a l i z

PianoBuilding,i n B u i l d i n g

o

since

Toward the end of the 19th century, English piano manufacturers had fallen right out of

the

Australia

it

in pianos cn

oCcupation:

7hcre h a c becn

of

the

EurOpcan

worgan,

favour with the Australian de:alers because of broken promises tor delivery dates and poor

who

nning F l c e t in 1788. rirst that om mWitnne w a s a cO 1Cns Sirius ie nthe p1ano win nim. h. o f the Piano s U r g c o n C o g

7hcTe

1 o

own

service generally, and the markct had been

scized by German builders whoservicedit

with Teutonic thoroughness. Probably inspired by thoughts of patriotism and the British Empire,

delails

the no survived evidcny (wvb as yct. ItN o r f o Island (where tct petcnrecd Nortolk O n On he left it C . e S i r i u s s o m e t i m e ) since

attt

his

Dut

musiCAn,

C)Sin

haNC

the,sir714s

ied for

OI

WTCCk

stra

he

arthur

hn

he

returned

to

Macarthur

1791"

Elandin

when

C f the skilled a nccd tor newsCrcating look through early A thus t h e m . brings t o light t h e tollowing Sdney 4 on May 1852: Australian maint 7pe n 7he papetsnent iin advertisCnient ctore.

walnut casework. C.E. Davies Pty Ltd of Sydney, who made

operating in the Richmond area of Melbourne at this time -

some being only assemblers of

imported parts, but the best-known builder was Wertheim.

Hugo Wertheim began in business in the 1890s

Austra

lanofortes

expe-|

engared an PEARSON having undertake workm ill Piauofortes in rienced

in the world.

The engine plant was located underground and supplied motive power for the machines belt up through the floor in the

tuning hoepairing and The mnveionts CaD be every

aCood

no

by importing sewing machines, gramophones andd

later, pianos. About 1905 he decided to build his own pianos, and to that end, he brought

three piano craftsmen out to Melbourne fromn the Lipp factory in Germany and built what he considered was the most modern piano factory

Copairlas a n d Tuning

Dy aSingie

interests of cleanliness and worker comfort.

hominer, A t a time when the Ronisc ume whenthe Ronisch factory in Germany Ad inalrnnent was making 500 pianos per year, Wertheim pro

of ado nearly onu the lone reah leathered, reableatl o its original olate. hen browght back are bruken of pianofortes boards moderato ex he soun Ean be put 4n at a

new Ones en deaeription. of Ponoforte ires every 88 uning Piano guare eceeoceJN G Cabinel o Siprle atriug, 0 1. Cach s Pl, U0. 8U.

duced 2000 and had aworkforce of 186. The factory made both uprightsandgrands,including 12 concert grands which had wider hammers than usual (12 mm) in order to accommodate struck strings in the treble. The actions were made in Canada, iron frames

four e

were cast by Metters' (the stove makers)and many Australian timbers were used, with all important

joints being dovetailed. In allit was a high-quality but the factory ceased operations in the

piano

po 1930s, when Wertheim's obstinacy in refusing

to allow any dealers to sell his pianos combined with the depression to force him out ofbusiness. The building is presently OCcupied by Channel 7 in Melbourne. Mr Pearson, who also taught the pianoforte,

must have been one of theearliest independent It generally accepted that pianotechnicians. t is u n e r did not emerge till the specialist piano around l850 with the universal acceptance of had tenmperament. Musicians up till then

Equal tuned their own pianos but

found Equal tem-

perament too difficult to master, and the new rOon-lranca pianOs too t1ghtly strung to set

with any degree of permanence at all. Meanwhile, on the other side ofthecontinent, Similar advertisement appeared in the Perth azette in Sepiember 1833; using a different approach, Mr Charles Gillingham begged to

Cquaint the Public that he would tune PianoFortes at the charge of six guineas per year GIVen the uncertainty of supplies from the otner country, it was only a matter of tinme Delore p1anos were built here. The earliest tar documented as SO is

Australian-made 1strumentconstructed by John Benham annin Benham arrived in the colony in 855. T851| and opened the first of his three shops in treet in 1832. Pitt He died in 1845. This particuiar Pano naS Wooden frame with a actuon and is enclosed in an Australian red

overdamper

dar case. It may be seen in the old Mint

iiding Macquarie Street between the Kum Hospital and the Hyde Park Barracks. in

y

WO

Other

early builders to Deen documented were Johnhave Williams

A good example of Wertheim's work may alsoo be seen in the Mint building. It is an upright built in 1910 with an iron frame, an underdamper action

and an Australian silky oak cabinet, intricately

carved with Australian floral emblems. The best known of the Australian manufacturers was undoubtedly Beale and Company of Sydney. The founder, Octavius Beale, was a man ofmany parts. Born in Ireland in 1850, he married in 1875 and produced 13 children. He was an

accomplished linguist and a great traveller; a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, London, and the Royal Society of Arts. He was president of the NS W Chamber of Commerce, a trustee

of the Australian Museum and the Bank of NSW, to list just a few of his attainments. He also found

time to conducta Royal CommissiOn in 190o

into Patent and Proprietary Medicines (at his own expense!). He was killed in a motor acc

dent in l1930 and, although 80 years of age, was

considered to be at the height of his powes Beale began importing pianos in 1893 andi

started his own manufacturing plant in 1900. The company celebrated its silver jubilee in

1925 and claimed in newspaper articles at the

time to be the largest piano manutacturer in

the British Empire as well as the world's most Self-contained tactory, having by that timne produced 52,000 instruments, both uprights

and grands up to concert size. NMost parts of Or

,around 1850, and William Ezold who a Cottage Piano made in e Sydney exhibition of 1879. Hethe Colony of Merit and received Degree the Well c ade, gOod noeu 8ood tone and material, workmanshipreport and touch."

a prescntation instrument with intricatcly carvcd

manufacturing enterprises take shape in Australia, in both Melbourne and Sydney.

hcre

Cast so

ISation and the low cOst of imported pianos combincd to force their closurc. Bcale uprights, all over player pianos and grands may be scen the country a good example of their concert grands is located in Government Housc, Sydnecy.

the 1890s saw the beginningof a number of piano

There were some half-dozen manufacturers

that assume reasonable to pianos, had settlers carly c r a f t s m e n to

ems

Beale pianos were manufactured until 1975 -

a total of95,000 when the high costof modern

the pianos were made in the Annndale tactory,

including the iron frame and the soundhoard. A patented tuning system using a cast-iron plank and tapered tuning pins Was claimed to be ideal for Australian conditions - from the number ot

Beales still in everyday use, particularly in country areas, the claim seems valid.

The last manufacturer

in Australia

was

Symphony' pianos. Thcy held the Governfor schools

ment contract for upright pianos institutions, and of thee 25,000 produced, and thousands may still be scen around NSW. The 25 and

employed a staffof about Company all the parts by hand from imported

made

materials,

even casting their Own iron frames. Davies Ceased operations in 1978 after 30 years in the business, having been unable to cope with rising of keepinga skilled workCosts and the difficulty Thus another Australian industry together. force w a s lost to with its attendant pool of expertise future generations. operation be established

Coulda piano-building

again in Australia? Present economic conditions but assemba Seem to be in favour of such move, be the will workforce a skilled probably ling deciding factor.

Trevor Foulcher


Cornelius fawd Jeathe 72 Castlerea.5822 Sydney

232-5822


Australian Piano Music

The scope and substance of any solo repertoire pertormers as well lests the commitnent or the

state ofhealth ACCOrdingiy, ComposeS. s CompC nmusic has tended to fluctuate, nen ing on whether or not there were virtuosi

Sonata and Vaughan Williams' Sixth Symphony However, there is a current consensus that

Australian music only came of age around 1960 with the first substantial works of composers like Nigel Butterley, Richard Meale, Peter Scul

tact is that, since that time, no pianist of comparable stature has emerged locally to continue what he began. All the same, good new works continue to

appear. Younger composers suchas David Worrall,

thorpe and Larry Sitsky. Perhaps one should

Carl Vine (another excellent pianist) and the

qualify that statement: it refers primarily to Australian music written in Australia. But

neo-Romantic Graeme Koehne have all written attractive short pieces. And the Sydney Inter

gic in the early years of this century (we may

Australian expatriates in England, such as the

national Piano Competition has also made an

have unknown masteS Irom ne Incenury but

Dallapiccola/Seiber student Don Banks (the author ot an eloquent Pezzo Dramatico tor piano), Margaret Sutherland and, in a lighter vein, Arthur Benjamin had already produced Solid works. For my taste, the most important piano works produced so far by an Australian

invaluable contribution to the sub-10-minute

Ihe late-classical/romantic

willing to play it. convention or the composer-pianist certainly underlay the virtual birth of Australian píano

they havent

betn

uncoverta yet). Percy' Grainger

exemplar, though in view of is its his reputatuon as a virtuoso (and as Grieg's fav is disappointing to find that, best-known

ounteinterpreter)it from some speCtacuiar concer parapnrases apart of TchaikovSky and Richard Strauss, his piano music is rather modestuy conceived.

Another early figure due for rehabilitation is Australias principal Scriabinist. A Agne, Roy number of surviving recordings Irom tne 19405

show that he was a very accomplished pianist; more to the point, his interpreters included At

present, Cortot, Gieseking and Moiesewitch. IS in print but, sadly, next to none of nis musIC even given the totally moribund state of music publishing in this country (it's easier to buy Australian music in London than in sydney), one assumes that it cant be long belore some of his works are re-issued. And although the 19305 and 1940s are still a somewhat murky arca ot our music history, they gave rise to at least one very substantial keyb0ard work, the 1940 Piano Sonata of Raymond Hanson, a typical wartime work in the sense of Prokofiev's Seventh

composer are the three major pieces by Londonbased David Lumsdaine: Kelly Ground, Rube

sanfte, sanfte Rube and Cambeuarra.

Of the "local quartet mentioned above, Larry

SIUSky is the only true Virtuoso 'composer-pianist (an inheritor of the Busoni tradition via Egon Petri), though the others are all, in varying degrees, accomplished pianists. Perhaps that is why only Sitsky has produceda substantial body of piano works. Yet Richard Meale's slightly Boulez1an Coruscations (1971) is one of the landmarks of

new Australian music and also, Significantly, one of the firSt Australian works to be championed by the young Roger \WOodward in the early 70s. It was Wo0dward, above all, who provided with an imyounger Australian composers passioned advocate during that crucial period

(Ross Edwards, Anne Boyd and Barry Conyngham all wrote significant pieces for him) and the sad

3

repertoire by commissioning a number ot

morceaux de concOurs whoSe artistic qualities have comfortably transcended their competitive include Origins: my personal favourites would Graham Hir's Under Aldebaran, which manages to combine Carter-like rhythms with an almost

Messiaenesque luminosity of sound, Nigel Butterley's ecstatic Uttering /oyous Leares, Bozidar Kos's Kolo, inspired by Yugoslav on dances, and Larry Sitsky's Arcb, based fragments from Szymanowsky's Sbeberazade.

And of recent expatriate works, Gerald Glynn's two elegant pieces entitled Filigres, which redeploy post-Chopin virtuoso figurations in Islamic art, terms of the subtle asymmetrics of deserve particular nmention. Yet, all in all, Australian composition still awaits a new resident Woodward, Pollini, Damerini,

Wambach, Helffer, Henck or whatever. Only when that happens, I believe, will the latent fecundity of Australian compoSition burst

back onto the keyboard. ©Richard

Toop

1988


The Friends of the

Sydney International

Patron

Kathryn Greiner

Music Patron

Peter Sculthorpe OBE

President Vice-Presidents

Senator Bronwyn Bishop Alderman Margaret Carter Elayne Mills

Hon. Secretary and

Deputy Chairman

Christine Gailey Sheila Prior Carolyn Benn Denise Fink

Hon. Treasurer

Newsletter Editor

Airport Reception Hon. Secretary (to March 1988)

Debbie Angus Executive Committee Debbie Angus Dr Lew Abbott

Malcolm Beazley

Marie-Lou Dorrance

Josephine Jacoby

Elizabeth Jetfrey Joan LevY

Christine Liddy Patricia Rochford Assoc. Prof. Ross Steele

Warren Thomson OAM The Friends of the Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia was founded in 1978 following the success of the first SIPCA in 1977. It was conceived by a group of people who saw the need to promote the ideals of excellence fostered by the

Competition. They also considered that the Competition was of Such importance that a continuing interest should be maintained

between Competitions.

Since its inception the Friends has built up a strong membershipP of people from all over Australia and all walks of life. Of its many Successtul functions, highlights have included a Beethoven Recital

by Roger Woodward at Government House, a reception following the return recital of the 1981 winner Chia Chou, a recital by Cécile Ousset at the Sydney home of Mrand Mrs Richard Pratt, and receptions at the homes of the Consuls-General ofJapan,Britain, France, Canada

and the USA, as well as at the Sydney Opera House to mark the openings of the 1985 and 1988 Competitions. Theseactivities and others have enabled the Friends to contribute substantial donations to the Competition funds.

There are many advantages in being a Friend. Membership is

only $10.00 per annum and some of the benefits are:

Concessions for subscriptions and single tickets for all stages of the Competition, including the Final Concerto Concerts at the

Sydney Opera House.

Special advance booking

Specialeventsand receptions connected with the world of music during and between Competitions.

The chance to meet distinguished international guests in Sydney for the Competition and at other times.

54

Piano Competition of Australia


If you have ejoyed the Piano Competition this year and would like to become involved in the next one, become a member of the Friends of the Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia by filling out the form below:

Application Form I wish to take advantage of a Special Competition offer and receive 18 months' membership for a

12-month subscription of S1o.00. This offer is available until 31 August 1988 Please print

Mr, Mrs, Miss, Ms Postcode

Address Telephone I enclose $10.00 being my annual subscription

Signature Please return to: Mrs Sheila Prior

Hon. Treasurer Friends of the Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia 149 Artarmon Road, Artarmon, NSW 2064

Telephone: (02) 419 4665

Lotto

People's Choice Prize $2000 Sponsored by Lotto NSW

VOTING FORM Indicate your vote in order of preference, numbered1, 2 and 3 only, in the boxes provided.

Competitors

Competitors

Adrienne Krausz

Youngshin An Anton Batagov Francesco

David

Stéphan Lemelin

James Lisney

Bencivenga

Luo Xiao

Buechner

Peter Mack

André Desponds

Gavin Martin

Sergei Erohin Matthias Fletzberger Megumi Fujita

Gilead Mishory Luca Monti

Kayaja

Heng-Jin Park Fali Pavri

Tomislav Nedelkovic-Baynov

Eduardus Halim

Han

Michael Harvey

Jonathan Plowright

Philip Hosford

Huang

Victor Sangiorgio

Du

Phillip Shovk Philip Smith

Linda Ippolito Tvo Janssen

Claude Webster

Mari Kodama Iwan Konig

Stephanie

Wendt

Riccardo Zadra Asaf Zohar

Alexander Korsantiya

Natalia Koval

Please complete this form and place it in one of the boxes provided in the front foyer of the Sydney Concerto Concert on Saturday, 25 July 1988. Opera House Concert Hall, following the last Finalists Forms must be

lodged

within hall

an

hour of the end of the concert. The winner of the Lotto 24 July at the Prizewinners' Concert,

NSW People's Choice Prize will be announced on Sunday, House. starung at 2.50 p.m., Concert Hall, Sydney Opera

55



NEW SOUTH WALES STATE CONSERVATORIUM

OF MUSIC ****""'

EXCELLENCE meets

EXCELLENCE WHEN STUDENTS AND FACULTY MEET TOGETHER AT THE SYDNEY CONSERVATORIUM The New South Wales State Conservatorium of Music, established in 1916, is one of the oldest and most prestigious music schools in Australia. It has a tradition of excellence in the training of performers, composers,

musicologists and teachers. Its graduates have done much to enhance the music environment of this country and have spread the influence of the School throughout the world. Former students can be found in most major performing ensembles and music schools throughout Australia, and in positions of leadership in many of the world's foremost orchestras and teaching institutions. The Conservatorium's statt is its greatest resource and its eminent musicians and educators are committed to providing the highest calibre of instruction. The Conservatorium's priority is the artistic and personal development of the most talented young musicians so they may realise their potential, and in turn, enrich the communities in which they will live.

Courses of Study offered are: PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR TALENTED YOUNG MUSICIANS EXTENSION STUDIES Guitar Ensemble, Arranging, Fundamentals, Big Band, Vocal Workshops, Musicianship, Individual Instruments and Singing IN-SERVICE COURSES FOR TEACHERS ASSOCIATE DIPLOMA IN MUSIC TEACHING ASSOCIATE DIPLOMA IN JAZZ STUDIES DIPLOMA OF MUSIC DIPLOMA OF OPERATIC ART BACHELOR OF MUSIC (Performers/Composers/Musicologists) BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN OPERA GRADUATE DIPLOMA FOR REPETITEURS GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN ACCOMPANIMENT GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MUSIC PERFORMANCE MASTER OF MUSIC

The Conservatorinm is pleased to receive applications for both undergraduate and post gTaduate couTses from overseas students.

Macquarie Street, Sydney 2000 Telephone: (02) 230 1222


Sydney International Piano Competition of Australia PO. Box 420, Double Tel: (02) 326 2405

Bay, Sydney,

NSW 2028, Australia