Issuu on Google+

SPRING/SUMMER 2015

Wild Land News

£1 where sold (or £1 donation to Mountain Rescue/charity tin) FREE TO MEMEBERS

Magazine of the Scottish Wild Land Group

Wind farms: are there any limits? The Ribbon of Wildness Land Reform More Scottish National Parks? The Wildness of the South Atlantic Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

2015   


Spring/Summer 2015

WILD LAND NEWS  Spring 2015, Issue 87    Magazine of the   Scottish Wild Land Group    SWLG  www.swlg.org.uk  admin@swlg.org.uk  8 Cleveden Road  Glasgow, G12 0NT  Registered Charity No: SC004014    WLN Editor  Calum Brown  SWLG Co‐ordinator  Beryl Leatherland  Membership Secretary  Grant Cornwallis  Treasurer  Tim Ambrose    Editorial  Individual articles do not  necessarily reflect the views of  the SWLG Steering Team.  Contributions should be sent to:  Calum Brown  editor@swlg.org.uk    Graphic Design  Anna Torode    Printed by  Clydeside Press, 37 High St,  Glasgow, G1 1LX   Tel: 0141 552 5519     

2  


CONTENTS

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

2015

Editorial

p. 4

News & Views

P.5

Standing up for the wild land

p. 9

Respecting Scotland’s Mountains

p. 12

The Myth of Renewables

p. 16

The Munro SocietyMountain Reporting

p. 18

Upon the Ribbon of Wildness

p. 21

Land Reform

p. 24

Building Scotland’s Biggest Estate

p. 27

The Hebridean Islands National Park

p. 29

Scotland's Green Gold Revisited

P. 33

Book review

p. 34

The Wilderness of the South Atlantic

P. 36

My Wild Land

p. 39

Front cover: The Cobbler, C. Brown Left: Ian Smith

 3


F R O M

E D I TO R

Editorial Welcome to the Spring 2015 issue of Wild Land  News. This issue is appearing at something of a  defining moment for wild land in Scotland. Last  year, the Scottish Government adopted Scottish  Natural Heritage’s Core Areas of Wild Land map  and included safeguards for these areas in  national planning policies. It was inevitable that  developers, driven by subsidies for renewable  energy, would test the strength of the  Government’s resolve. They have recently done  just that with a slew of proposals for wind farms  in highly valued, supposedly protected areas.  Early indications are not encouraging, with the  Government’s approval of Stronelairg wind  farm in the Monadhliath and the subsequent  deletion of the Core Area of Wild Land that it  will industrialise being particularly troubling. If  Talladh‐a‐Bheithe, Caplich, Glencassley,  Sallachy, Allt Duine and others get the go‐ ahead, we will not only lose some of our most  precious landscapes, but notice will have been  served on most of the others as well.  Some find this rapid loss of wild areas  acceptable. In the context of a global fight  against climate change, wild land in Scotland is  viewed as a reasonable sacrifice (especially by  those who do not appreciate the immense  environmental, social and economic value of  wild areas). We are encouraged to believe that  Scottish wind farms, if not saving the world  directly, are making us ‘world leaders’ in carbon  emissions reductions. It would seem churlish to  complain about damage to our own  environments, however unprecedented, in the  face of such achievements.  However, the fact is that Scottish wind farms  have achieved very little. The climate system is,  of course, global, and is effectively independent  of what happens in any one small country ‐ 

4  

leading the world is only useful if others can  follow. It is both morally questionable and  entirely unrealistic to expect developing  countries, already starting to suffer the effects  of climate change induced by developed  countries such as ours, to forego the massive  potential of cheap energy sources when our  chosen alternative is expensive, inefficient, and  intermittent. It is also combined, hypocritically,  with the maximum possible exploitation of our  own fossil fuel reserves for economic gain. We  have a responsibility to help identify global  solutions; instead we congratulate ourselves on  grand but futile gestures such as building giant  windmills on remote mountains.  The parochial and sanctimonious dogma is that  wind farms ensure that we ‘do our bit’ in  reducing emissions. Here too, we are failing.  Recent figures for total UK emissions (including  those we have exported through our reliance  on foreign manufacturing) show that they are  still continuing to increase. Our entire approach  to what the Scottish Government calls “one of  the most serious threats facing the world” has  so far failed to achieve even its most basic,  localised objective. If we, as the sixth largest  economy in the world, do so little to reduce  global carbon emissions, who will act in our  place?  Despite all this, wind farm construction  continues apace, broadly supported by much of  the population. It is a beguilingly painless  approach to tackling climate change. After all  the warnings of dire consequences and drastic  lifestyle changes, regular press releases now  trumpet our unparalleled green credentials,  bought at the small expense of peat bogs and  hills that many politicians, at least, did not  really care for in the first place. There is a 


NEWS

discernible relief that our sacrifices turned out  to be so easy to make, and a consequent  hostility towards suggestions that they may  have been fundamentally pointless. The  impression of meaningful action is bolstered by  environmental groups with prescriptive  approaches that demand action on climate  change, but only through their preferred  technologies. Objectives therefore switch from  reducing global emissions to producing more  electricity from Scottish renewables, a measure  that is completely divorced from the problem of  climate change.  Nevertheless, the momentum of wind farm  development is sweeping aside all other  considerations. The planning system,  overwhelmed by applications, no longer  appears capable of striking the balances it is  intended to protect. Developers with deep,  subsidised pockets and broad government  backing can usually rely on their preferred  outcome – if necessary on the second or third  attempt. A government undertaking to  ‘safeguard’ wild areas is audaciously re‐ interpreted as a simple requirement for some  tweaks to the design of massive wind farms  that will be constructed in those areas. Very  few, if any, areas now appear safe from  development.  We therefore focus in this issue of Wild Land  News, once again, on wind farms. We include  contributions from a number of environmental  groups with similar concerns (as also expressed  in our joint letters on the need for reform of the 

&

VIE WS

planning system, below). Helen McDade  explains the John Muir Trust’s decision to  challenge the Government’s approval of the  Stronelairg scheme, the Mountaineering  Council of Scotland outline their vision for  Scotland’s wild areas, and David Batty of the  Munro Society presents their Mountain  Reporting scheme and some of its findings.  Tony Trewavas tackles some of the myths about  renewable energy, and Peter Wright, author of  Ribbon of Wildness, considers the value of, and  threats to, Scottish wild land.  We also include articles on several other  important issues such as land reform. Our  response to the Government’s recent land  reform consultation is outlined, and put into  some perspective by David Woodhouse from  Mull and Mike Stevens from Australia. Both  focus on the need for more National Parks in  Scotland, and opportunities for these in the  Hebrides and through public ownership of land.  We also continue long‐running discussions on  the nature and importance of wildness, partly  inspired, again, by Geoff Salt’s article in the  Summer 2014 issue. John Milne reviews Ramble  On by Sinclair McKay, James Fenton describes  the wildness of the South Atlantic, and Michael  Burke draws on his experiences to discuss the  link between wild mountain areas and the sea.  We hope you enjoy this issue of Wild Land  News and that it inspires you to support or  become involved in the work of the SWLG. 

News SWLG welcomes new Steering Team  members  At last year’s AGM, two new members of the  SWLG’s Steering Team were elected: James  Fenton and Hugh Tooby. Both are already busy  contributing to the Group’s activities, and we  will be hearing more from both in due course.  Members of the Steering Team are listed on our  website at www.swlg.org.uk/meet‐the‐ team.html.  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

SWGL Mailing list  Members wishing to join a Scottish Wild  Land Group mailing list, for updates on  activities and opportunities to get involved,  please send their email addresses to  calum@swlg.org.uk. 

2015  5


NEWS

&

VIE WS

Planning objections  The SWLG recently submitted objections to  three planning proposals: Talladh‐a‐Bheithe  wind farm, Caplich wind farm and Ardessie Burn  hydro scheme. Talladh‐a‐Bheithe would  industrialise part of Rannoch Moor, and  fundamentally change this wild and world‐ famous landscape. Caplich wind farm would  affect a swathe of wild land areas in north‐west  Scotland, including SNH‐identified Wild Land  Areas Rhiddoroch – Beinn Dearg – Ben Wyvis,  Inverpolly – Canisp, Quinag and Reay – Cassley.  Even in the absence of other wind farms, these  would have drastic impacts on important areas,  wholly outweighing any benefits they may have.  The Ardessie hydro scheme, though smaller‐ scale, is equally worrying. Renewable energy  subsidies are leading to huge numbers of ‘micro  hydro’ schemes such as this, each of which  makes a vanishingly small contribution to  energy generation while causing very  substantial damage to the local environment.  Even where remediation requirements are  properly satisfied (which they often are not),  considerable long‐term damage occurs. In this  case, the scheme would involve damming and  permanent track construction alongside a  particularly fine burn in the Wester Ross  National Scenic Area. We believe this to be one 

MCofS petition  The Mountaineering Council of Scotland 

All of our planning and consultation responses  can be found on our website at  www.swlg.org.uk/our‐work.html. 

John Muir Trust Stronelairg appeal  The SWLG has contributed £1,500 to the John  Muir Trust’s legal challenge of the  Government’s approval of the Stronelairg wind  farm. This is a crucial test case that will have  major implications for the siting of wind farms  in the future and for the processes by which  proposals are approved. We believe that the  JMT’s case is supported by very strong  arguments, and it is important that these are  heard (see Helen McDade’s article in this issue).  The potential costs of this legal action are high  and we fully support the JMT’s associated  fundraising activities. To make a donation, go to  www.jmt.org/stronelairg. . 

  SWLG land reform consultation  response  We also submitted a response to the Scottish  Government’s consultation on land reform.   A summary of our response is included in this  issue, and the full document can be found on  our website.   

National Parks Strategy 

members to sign.  

The Association for the Protection of Rural  Scotland recently submitted a petition calling  for a Scottish National Parks Strategy. We  supported this petition and the ongoing  campaign for the designation of more Scottish  National Parks (see articles in this issue by Mike  Stevens and David Woodhouse). 

The petition is available at: 

 

https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/

SWLG joing letters on planning process 

has launched a petition for remaining  areas of wild land to be protected from  industrial development.   We strongly support this petition and urge 

protect‐scotland‐s‐remaining‐wild‐land‐ from‐development 

6  

of the most inappropriate sites imaginable for    a hydro scheme. 

The SWLG has co‐authored two open letters to  the Scottish Government to press for fairer,  more transparent decision‐making in the 


NEWS

&

VIE WS

planning system, especially with respect to  large renewable energy developments.   The letters are below: 

ensure they have been exposed to the proper  and democratic scrutiny that their scale and  potential impact warrants. 

Letter 1 

John Mayhew (Director, Association for the  Protection of Rural Scotland), Brian Linington  (President, Mountaineering Council of Scotland),  Peter Willimott (President, the Munro Society),  Sir Kenneth Calman (Chairman, National Trust  for Scotland), David Thomson (Convener,  Ramblers Scotland), John Milne (Co‐ordinator,  Scottish Wild Land Group) 

Few people dispute the necessity of first  reducing our energy use, and then substituting  the use of fossil fuels with renewable energy  alternatives, to help address the challenge of  climate change. However, as we have seen,  there is public disquiet about proliferation of  energy developments in Scotland’s wild land  areas.  It is vital any decisions on the location of these  developments rely on the fair and impartial  assessment of all pertinent information and  points of view. The people of Scotland depend  on their government to ensure this happens.  Unfortunately, we do not believe that the  Scottish Government is doing this in a  consistent manner with wind farm  developments.  In the face of evidence and objections from  many different organisations, communities and  individuals, the Scottish Government has  approved proposals to site colossal wind farms  inland, at Stronelairg in the Monadhliath  Mountains, and offshore, straddling the Firths  of the Forth and Tay. In both cases the Scottish  Government chose to ignore the views of its  own expert advisers from Scottish Natural  Heritage (SNH).  Their advice made it absolutely clear that the  impact from these turbines will be very  significant, and that the locations were  problematic as a result. It seems iniquitous to  us that, having put in place a planning system  which invites the expert views of statutory  consultees, the Scottish Government too  frequently ignores them if they prove  inconvenient. At the very least, evidence of this  calibre from SNH should trigger public  inquiries.  We therefore call on the Scottish Government  to commit to taking cognisance of its own  advisers. Rather than force objectors to  challenge these decisions in the courts at great  expense, the Scottish Government should first  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

  Letter 2  Public trust in the planning process around  major infrastructure developments in Scotland  is at an all‐time low.  This doesn't just concern windfarms; a snapshot  of letters pages and online media on any given  day reveals angst and suspicion stemming from  the sacrifice of areas of wild land, natural  heritage, historic landscapes and greenbelt to  commercial priorities.  It is understood that difficult decisions need to  be made for the good of the nation and the  planet. Yet, at a time when community  empowerment is supposed to be in the  ascendant, it is ironic to see the honest  concerns expressed by local communities, and  those united by the desire to conserve our most  important natural and cultural assets, swept  aside in an unequal battle with powerful  commercial interests. As has recently been  observed, even the Scottish Government itself  has been shown to disregard its expert advisers.  This situation cannot continue and it is in  everyone’s interests to find a way forward.  If we are to rebuild public confidence in the  planning process and in the objectivity of  Scottish Ministers responsible for making such  decisions, then we must find a way to  demonstrate absolute transparency,  impartiality and fairness. Doing so would help  those affected by planning outcomes to accept  unpalatable choices.  We propose that fresh impetus be given to  revisiting the current planning system with  

2015  7


NEWS

&

VIE WS

a view to improving existing procedures,  potentially through the creation of a body or  process that is truly independent of  government. The goal would be to ensure clear,  neutral adjudication over controversial planning  applications where there could be significant  impact on important landscapes, natural  heritage interests or local communities.  We accept that there are many questions to  answer over how any new arrangements would  be established, who would oversee them and so  forth; but it is a discussion we must have soon if  we are to find a way out of the morass of  confusion and recrimination that characterises  the present system.  Change would obviate the need for ill‐funded  individuals, communities and charities to take  on lavishly‐subsidised developers in the courts  where they can rely upon the best advocacy  money can buy. It would also create a level  playing field on which the needs of nature and  communities can be weighed alongside other  priorities.  We invite the Scottish Government to join with  us in an open discussion based on our  suggestions.  John Mayhew (Director, the Association for the  Protection of Rural Scotland), Stuart Brooks  (Chief Executive, The John Muir Trust), Brian  Linington (President, Mountaineering Council   of Scotland), Peter Willimott (President, the  Munro Society), Sir Kenneth Calman (Chairman,  the National Trust for Scotland), David  Thomson (Convener, Ramblers Scotland), Stuart  Housden OBE (Chief Executive, RSPB Scotland),  George Menzies (Chairman, Scottish Rights of  Way and Access Society), John Milne (Co‐ ordinator, Scottish Wild Land Group) 

  “Generations of Change”  One of our members has penned a fifth verse  and chorus to this well‐known modern folk  song, written by Matt Armour, which describes  the changing patterns of work over several  generations, as experienced by a family in the  East of Scotland. If you don’t know it, there is   a fine version sung by Joe Aitken, which is 

8  

available on the internet, and the original song  lyrics are also findable with ease. Try Henry on  mysongbook.de or Jim Malcolm’s Tipsy Courting  page for the lyrics. There are several very  misheard versions also available...   The new verse was premiered at Celtic  Connections’ House of Song in January, but a  prominent MSP who loudly champions the  industry was not there that night. Perhaps Mr  Gibson will read his free copy of this magazine  and enjoy it anyway.   (“Copyleft” by Hector Forbes‐ sing it if ye like it.) 

Man, afore ye wid know it, the laddies are  growit,  And up on the moors digging holes in the peat.  In this modern age they get minimum wage  Tae build windfarms that profit the rich once  again.  They’ve gouged peat in Edinbane, concreted  Braes o Doune  Fallago, Novar, Whitelee and Ae.  We’re telt that it’s Green and Clean, but it jist  seems obscene  Tae waste whit we’ve got, while the polluters  don’t pay.    Are these days the end days, or are there some  better ways  For savin the planet while oor will is still strang?  This crisis will pass and be replaced by the next  As the bosses and bankers keep control o’ oor  young. 


NEWS

&

VIE WS

Helen McDade

Standing up for Wild Land: why the John Muir Trust has taken test case legal action against the proposed Stronelairg wind farm. Helen McDade is Head of Policy at the John Muir Trust  

Many SWLG members will know that the John  Muir Trust has taken legal action against the  Scottish Government. The test case is regarding  the government’s consent of a Scottish and  Southern Energy (SSE) proposed wind farm at  Stronelairg, in the Monadhliath mountains to  the south of Loch Ness.  SSE joined with the  government to contest the Trust’s case. There  have been a number of other decisions  approving applications in or near wild land  areas so why did we choose to contest this  development and this decision? 

1) Not only is Stronelairg the largest wind farm  approved to date in the Scottish Highlands, it  is also located in an area of wild land. There  are larger wind farms in Scotland – Whitelee  and Clyde, for instance – but this proposed  development of 67 turbines (mostly 135m  high, the same height as the London Eye) is to  be located in a highly sensitive mountain  landscape. This is arguably the wildest place  in the UK where an industrial wind  development has been approved. It covers an  area with the same footprint as Inverness. 

It wasn’t a decision that the Trust took lightly  and was after  detailed conversations with our  legal advisers, amongst our management team  and ultimately with the consent of our  trustees. 

2) The Monadhliath Mountains support one of  Europe’s most extensive tracts of upland  blanket bog. The developer, a subsidiary  company of Scottish and Southern Energy  (SSE), acknowledges that the site consists of  over 70 per cent wet blanket peat bog.  More  than one third of this bog is unmodified – in  other words in near pristine condition – with  the rest capable of being restored. 

We’ve been told on numerous occasions that it  was a brave decision. However, it was action  we felt we had to take. After all, the John Muir  Trust exists to stand up for wild land and our  members expect us to do so in accordance with  our charitable aims.  At time of writing the judicial review has been  heard with decisions still to be made.  Whatever the result the Trust felt it could not  sit by and do nothing if this decision could  undermine the value of the new Wild Land  Area’s (WLA’s) map and wild land itself.  Here are the key reasons why the Trust took  legal action: 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

Blanket bog is Scotland’s equivalent of the  rainforest with regard to its importance in  reducing carbon emissions to the atmosphere  by retaining carbon in the ground ‐ potentially  up to 20 times as much carbon per acre as the  average British woodland.  3) Despite a robust objection by Scottish  Natural Heritage (SNH) on wild land grounds,  the Scottish Government did not call a Public  Local Inquiry (PLI). Until the Scottish 

2015  9


NEWS &

VIE WS

Government’s 2012 decision consenting the  Viking wind farm in Shetland without a PLI –  another huge development involving Scottish  and Southern Energy (SSE) – it had been usual  government practice that a strong objection  from a statutory consultee such as SNH would  trigger an Inquiry, so that the application  could be properly scrutinised.  4) Moreover, the United Nations Aarhus  Convention and European environmental law  require that there is proper public  participation in planning applications that  have the potential to cause impact on the  environment. The Trust believes that in this  case, without a public inquiry, that has not  been fulfilled.  Unfortunately, due to the  potential costs of the legal case, the Trust had  to try to limit the time spent in court by  limiting the arguments we took forward and  so with advice chose not to fully develop this  particular argument at the judicial review.  5) The proposed development was  acknowledged in the Scottish Government’s  decision letter as creating “some significant  landscape impacts” and that it would “have   a significant impact on the wildness qualities”  of the Monadhliath Search Area for Wild Land  (the relevant wild land consideration under  the planning policy which was current at the  time of the decision).  6) The Government’s decision letter consenting  Stronelairg acknowledged the environmental  damage that would be caused, but claimed –  without substantiation – that benefits from  carbon emissions reduction and electricity  production by such a large scheme would  offset that loss. No supplementary  information was submitted to calculate the  carbon savings or economic benefit from the  scheme consented – which was reduced to  sixty‐seven turbines from the original  application of eighty‐three.  Moreover, if the premise argued by the  developer ‐ that a very large wind scheme was  bound to have clear carbon and economic  gains ‐ were accepted as sufficient reason for  consent there would soon potentially be no  wild land left in Scotland.   All that would be 

10  

needed to overrule policy protection of wild  land would be a sufficiently large wind farm  development claiming sizeable carbon target  contributions.  7) The wind farm would lie in an area that was  last year proposed to be officially recognised  as wild land by the Scottish Government’s  natural heritage adviser, SNH. However, the  site was excluded from the final map of Wild  Land Areas (WLAs) published on 23 June  2014, due to the consented wind farm. The  Trust submitted a Freedom of Information  Request to SNH and the government which  confirmed that, after the decision, the  Scottish Government asked SNH to revise  this area in the final WLAs map due to  Stronelairg.  A large area including and  surrounding Stronelairg was removed from  the final Wild Land Areas map published on  23rd June 2014. The then‐revised map  became embedded in Scottish planning  policy also published on 23 June 2014   http://www.snh.gov.uk/protecting‐ scotlands‐nature/looking‐after‐ landscapes/ landscape‐policy‐and‐guidance/wild‐land/ mapping .  This means that under Scottish planning policy  over 20,000 hectares around Stronelairg is  now not considered to be an area requiring  “significant protection” from wind farms. The  timing of the announcement of planning  approval for Stronelairg enabled the Minister’s  Decision letter to avoid considering the WLAs  map. However, the previous policy protecting  wild land was in place and was more than  strong enough to have prompted refusal.   

The legal process  The first stage in the legal process was to apply  for a Protective Expenses Order (PEO) to try to  reduce the risk of exposure to potentially very  considerable legal fees. The PEO mechanism  was brought in by the Scottish government to  address a requirement under the Aarhus  Directive, to enable people to take forward   a case for the public good regarding the  environment without it being prohibitively  expensive. Unfortunately, on 31 October 2014 


NEWS &

the judge in the Court of Session refused to  grant the PEO. The Trust was naturally  disappointed with that decision as it does not  have access to the resources of either the  Scottish Government or SSE.  The Trust  believes that this decision, alongside other  recent refusals of Protective Expenses Order,  suggests that the Scottish system does not fulfil  the obligation to allow public participation in  environmental cases and we will pursue   a complaint to the Aarhus Compliance  committee.  After carefully considering the implications of  the PEO ruling, but also the generous financial  support given by the public to the Trust for this  case by that point, the Trust decided to  continue with the Judicial Review. We also  decided at this stage to drop one of our lines of  argument to reduce time in court.  This was not  because we no longer thought it was a strong  or important argument but as a response to  the PEO decision.  Our legal challenge against the Scottish  Ministers, and also Scottish and Southern  Energy who joined in against the Trust as an  interested party, took place between 11th and  13th February before Lord Jones in the Court of  Session in Edinburgh.  The Trust’s case, led by Sir Crispin Agnew QC,  involved three main strands. We argued that:‐  i.  the Scottish Ministers had acted  unreasonably in granting consent to the  Stronelairg development because it was in a  Search Area for Wild Land (SAWL), was in a  draft Core Area of Wild Land (CAWL) at the  time of the decision and, as a result of the  decision, was removed from the final Wild  Land Areas (WLAs) map published on 23rd  June 2014. This removed over 20,000  hectares from the draft WLA as was still  proposed by SNH on 5th June 2014, despite  Scottish Planning Policy stating that wild  land should be safeguarded.   The Trust  case stated that Ministers did not give  proper consideration to Scottish Natural  Heritage’s advice that to consent  Stronelairg would mean the Search Area of 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

VIE WS

Wild Land would no longer be wild land. We  also emphasised Scottish Natural Heritage’s  position that the development at Stronelairg  raised natural heritage issues of national  importance because of the significant  adverse impacts to wild land.  ii.  The Scottish Ministers had taken into  account supplementary environmental  information which had not been advertised  and, therefore, the public had not been  given an opportunity to see the information  and comment, contrary to law.  iii.  The Ministers’ decision letter gave  inadequate reasons for departing from  SNH’s strong advice.    During the hearing, Counsel for the Scottish  Ministers argued that to “safeguard” wild land  merely meant mitigating the impacts of a  development on wild land by design and  reduction of turbines, whereas we argued that  to safeguard meant protecting wild land.   We expect it to be two to three months before  there is a decision.  The legal action has already  cost many tens of thousands of pounds. If, at  the conclusion of the case, the Trust wins, we  would not have to pay the other side’s costs.   However, we need to know we are in a position  to pay if we lose and we do not know how  much those costs are, at any point in the  process.  If we win, it is likely the other parties  would appeal.  If we lose, the Trust could  appeal if the legal advice was that we had good  grounds to do so and if we could do so without  exposing the Trust to risk.  So the Trust  continues to accept donations or pledges to  help us with this legal action – see our website.   It is because people have responded  magnificently that we were able to go to court.   We have already received heartening support  from over 1000 people – including many of our  members, supporters and other organisations  including the Scottish Wild Land Group (for  which we are very grateful) and also the  Mountaineering Council of Scotland and  National Trust for Scotland. 

2015  11


NEWS

&

VIE WS

As one of our supporters said: “If we let this one  – at the heart of wild land – go through, what  chance for Allt Duine, Glencassley, Sallachy,  Strathy Wood, Limekiln?” These industrial‐scale  developments, which would seriously diminish  wild land, are all currently in the planning  process. The logical end‐point would be the loss  of most of Scotland’s wild land.  The Trust is of the view that there is too much  at stake in terms of wild land protection both at  Stronelairg and throughout Scotland to allow  this decision to pass unchallenged. If we win the  case, we can fight to return Stronelairg to its  place as a recognised wild land area in SNH’s  map. So the Trust is fighting for our core  principles – to ensure that generations to come  can enjoy the wildness of this precious  mountain environment.  The Trust is not blind to the David and Goliath  nature of trying to win a Scottish legal case  taken to protect the environment.  However, 

The Torridon village, A E Torode

12  

taking a strong stand, in accordance with our  charitable aims and objectives, to try and stop  the Stronelairg development being built and to  defend the concept of wild land is too  important not to contest. We will also take  steps, possibly with others, to seek  improvements to the decision‐making process  to ensure environmental justice. Whether we  win or not, we will lodge a complaint under the  Aarhus Convention regarding the PEO not being  granted and the difficulty for the public in  putting forward their views in the Scottish  planning process.  Further information and updates at  www.jmt.org/stonelairg.asp     [The SWLG has contributed £1500 towards the  costs of the John Muir Trust’s crucial legal  action. We also urge members to contribute if  they have not already done so]. 


NEWS

&

VIE WS

Respecting Scotland’s Mountains: The Mountaineering Council of Scotland’s Vision for the Future The Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS) is the representative body for mountaineers,  hill walkers and ski tourers in Scotland . 

Mountain landscapes and wild places in  Scotland are threatened as never before by ill‐ considered large‐scale developments. A clear,  legal guarantee of the integrity of wild and  special landscapes is required.    Scotland is famous worldwide for its mountains  and wild lands. They are fundamental to our  national, cultural, ecological and historical  identity. Over the centuries they have inspired  poets, writers, painters and film‐makers.  Nowadays they are a magnet for visitors. Some  come to relax in a beautiful and unspoiled  setting, while others want to get out and walk,  climb, run, cycle or ski. Many also want to see  the wonderful wildlife and plant species. The  MCofS understands their value and the need to  protect their special qualities for the benefit of  all.  However, Scotland’s wild areas are under  immediate threat from inappropriate  developments such as industrial‐scale wind  farms and unsuitable hill tracks, which damage  the character and social value of these  landscapes. When wild places are lost, they are  gone forever. Experience shows that one  development often leads to another, resulting  in progressively more damage. Therefore, a  coherent, integrated national policy is needed  for mountain areas that defines what can, and  cannot, be done in such areas in the future. 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

Our vision for Scotland’s mountains and wild  places is underpinned by five key elements:  • Scotland’s mountains and remaining wild  lands should be treated as an irreplaceable  natural, cultural and economic asset –  respected and safeguarded for the benefit of  all.  • Their wildness and grandeur are a fabulous  resource, and they provide unrivalled  opportunities to develop and improve  informal recreation, tourism, health and  wellbeing through Scotland’s world‐class  access legislation.  • Scotland should harness the potential of the  mountains and wild land to contribute to a  foundation for sustainable futures for fragile  rural economies.  • Change should be planned and regulated to  enhance, not diminish, our wild lands and  mountains. Stopping intrusive developments  such as industrial‐scale wind farms will  protect Scotland’s natural heritage, wildlife,  culture and world‐wide reputation as a great  tourism destination and place to live.  • Appreciation and enjoyment of the  mountains including good practice and  responsibility (avoiding litter, erosion and  other damage) should be promoted from  childhood.  Fulfilling this vision needs an integrated  approach in the following key areas. 

2015  13


NEWS

&

VIE WS

Supporting communities  Wild land and mountains are valued by most of  Scotland’s residents (91% according to a  Scottish Natural Heritage survey) and large  numbers go walking and climbing. A remarkable  55% of visitors (65% among first‐timers) told a  VisitScotland survey that they mainly come here  for the scenery and landscape. Tourism is worth  around £11bn a year. VisitScotland says it is  “the engine room of the Scottish economy”.  Scotland’s population also faces major health  challenges associated with lack of exercise and  stress. People of all ages need to be encouraged  to go out and experience the beauty, enjoy the  exercise and benefit from the relaxation that  our mountains can provide.  Many of the most fragile local economies and  vulnerable communities are in highland areas.  Sustainable businesses can be created by  making the most of mountains as places for  recreation and leisure. To do this their wild  quality must be maintained – if not, the  evidence increasingly shows that visitors will go  elsewhere (MCofS, Wind Farms and Changing  Mountaineering Behaviour in Scotland, March  2014). The MCofS wants government, local  authorities and others to make the most of our  mountains and wild lands. This can be done by  empowering local people to provide good‐ quality facilities and services that contribute to  broad‐based, diverse and thriving local  economies.   

Onshore wind power generation  The MCofS supports the Scottish Government’s  aim of developing clean, renewable energy  sources but opposes developments that  threaten the wild landscape of Scottish  mountains. The protection for wild land in  Scottish Planning Policy 2014 is welcome but  falls well short of the absolute protection  required.  Our approach to proposed wind farm  developments is based on a detailed  assessment of each individual proposal taking  into account a number of factors:   

14  

• Position: Proposals affecting areas of  mountaineering interest, for example Munros,  Corbetts or other iconic hills, are largely  unacceptable, as are those in Wild Land Areas.  • Scale: Large clusters of turbines are highly  intrusive and destroy a wild landscape. Small  clusters in less sensitive areas can deliver  environmental benefits and also benefit  communities.  • Size: Scottish mountains may appear high but  their grandeur is relative to their surroundings  and a function of their setting in the  landscape. Large turbines, often with ground‐ to‐tip heights of over 120m, diminish the  relative scale of the mountains and dominate  the landscape.  • Siting: Ridge and hilltop developments are  most obvious. Careful positioning can  sometimes reduce the impact, but usually  they remain visible for miles in many  directions.  • Associated infrastructure: Wind farms require  access tracks for heavy equipment. These can  stretch for miles, are wide, and scar the  landscape. They are highly intrusive and add  to the impression of industrialisation.  • Pioneer and cumulative impact: The first  development in an area can be particularly  harmful. Once approval has been granted for  one wind farm in a sensitive area, further  applications often follow in quick succession.  Developers claim that, as one has been  approved, those that follow will have a limited  impact.   

Hill tracks  Footpaths made by man have given access to  remote areas for millennia. In the past they  were small scale and had minimal impacts on  the surrounding environment and landscape.  However, availability of mechanised earth  moving equipment has facilitated the  construction of tracks that are relatively wide,  sometimes long, and often damaging to the  overall landscape.  The MCofS appreciates that land managers 


NEWS

need to access remote areas and that hill  tracks facilitate this. The MCofS also  acknowledges that mountaineers use these  tracks to access the hills. However, we are  concerned at the recent unconstrained  proliferation of intrusive tracks in wild areas.  While welcoming the Scottish Government’s  current moves to bring tracks into the planning  system, its new measures are too weak and fail  to ensure democratic oversight. In particular,    a default position in which notifications not  responded to within 28 days can proceed is  unacceptable. All hill tracks should require full  planning permission.  Government and local planners must  guarantee that certain factors are taken into  account when approving the building of new  hill tracks. The need for a new track in a  particular position should be clearly justified,  and there should be no satisfactory alternative  available. The scale of the track should be  appropriate to its use, with small‐scale all‐ terrain vehicle tracks being much less intrusive  than those for 4x4 vehicles or trucks carrying  heavy plant. Careful positioning, appropriate  drainage and high quality construction should  be used to minimise visibility, especially on  higher ground where disused tracks often  remain very visible. The cumulative impact of  tracks within a limited area should be taken  into account. 

&

VIE WS

restrict access in breach of the spirit of the law.  In a few cases their compliance with the law is  in serious doubt. We will take whatever action  is needed, within the legislative framework, to  ensure that rights to responsible access are  upheld.  We also support measures to improve  footpaths when needed to prevent damage to  the landscape and environment. We applaud  work to remove litter and human waste from  popular areas and will continue to emphasise  the need for responsible behaviour in the  mountains. We will also encourage the  provision of appropriately screened parking in  areas of high public usage. 

Realising the Vision  The 21st century will continue to bring pressure  on our mountain landscapes that could never  previously have been imagined. Realisation of  our vision would see a mountain environment  that is enjoyed by people in a responsible way,  maintained as wild land by the highest  standards of management, and preserved from  damaging development.  These are achievable practical outcomes, and  the least that future generations will expect.   

 

Managing recreational activity  Because of the wider societal benefits which  accrue, it is good news that the popularity of  mountaineering and other recreational  activities in wild lands is growing. But this has  an impact. MCofS wishes to work with other  bodies to help manage the mountain  environment to maximise the recreational  benefits and minimise the environmental  impacts.  Scottish law has led the way in confirming  rights to access land for those who behave  responsibly and in recognising that land  managers have an obligation to enable  responsible access. Yet some estates try to 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

2015  15


OPINION

Anthony Trewavas

The Myth of Renewables Anthony Trewavas is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Edinburgh, a Fellow of the Royal  Society (London) and of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and a leading member of the Scientific  Alliance. A version of this article first appeared in The Scotsman  

16  

Renewables use sun, water, wind; energy  sources that won’t run out. Non‐renewables  come from things like gas, coal and uranium  that one day will. But unless electricity and  motorised transport is abandoned altogether,  all ‘renewables’ need huge areas of land or sea  and require raw materials that are drilled,  transported, mined, bulldozed and these will  run out. 

One thousand tonnes of concrete anchors the  turbine base.  The concrete used for the 5000  or so built or consented turbines in Scotland  would be sufficient to construct an eight lane  motorway from John O’Groats to Lands End.  Cement production generates 7% of the world’s  emissions. Wilderness that is partitioned  between turbines, access roads, crane pads and  power lines is no longer renewable. 

Wind turbine towers are constructed from  steel manufactured in a blast furnace from  mined iron ore and modified coal (coke).  Turbine blades are composed of oil‐derived  resins and glass fibre. The nacelle encloses a  magnet containing about 1/3rd of a tonne of  the rare earth metals, neodymium and  dysprosium. Large neodymium magnets also  help propel electric cars. Currently China  provides 95% of rare earths, proven reserves   of dysprosium will likely run out in 2020.   Processing one tonne of ore, generates about  one tonne of radioactive waste, 12 million  litres of waste gas containing dust concentrate,  hydrofluoric acid, sulphur dioxide, sulphuric  acid and 75 thousand litres of waste water.  Baotou, in China, mines and processes much   of the rare earth ores. The town abuts a 5 mile  wide, toxic, lifeless, radioactive lake of  processing wastewater. Local inhabitants have  unusually high rates of cancer (particularly in  children), osteoporosis, skin and respiratory  disease.  This unseen environmental  destruction may be far off but no less  damaging. 

The Oxford University conservationist, Clive  Hambler, has summarised data from Sweden,  Germany, Spain, Denmark and USA that  indicate one hundred birds are killed per  turbine per year on average. For bats (that  consume 3000 midges/night), it is two hundred.  UK estimates for turbine wild life mortality are  not available.  But with 5000 Scottish turbines,  premature destruction of birds and bats is in  the million range/year. Organisations  established by government to protect wild life  in Scotland, are in denial over the damage their  consent to wind farms is causing.  Current expenditure on UK wind farms is more  than £20 billion. If that money had instead been  used to construct 30 gas fired power stations to  replace those using coal, emissions reduction  would have been about 37%. Pristine  countryside, reliable energy supplies and  undamaged wild life would have been  maintained.  The present plethora of wind  farms has only reduced emissions at best by  7.5%; necessary use of gas‐fired back‐up for  reliable electricity supplies makes it less than  4% in practice. 


OPINION

The production of just 6 solar panels requires  at least one tonne of coal to bake the silicon at  high temperature. Solar panel‐production  plants generate 500 tonnes of hazardous  sludge every year. Their manufacture releases  hexa‐fluoroethane, nitrogen trifluoride, and  sulphur hexa‐fluoride, greenhouse gases  thousands of times more damaging than  carbon dioxide.  The life expectancy of solar  panels and wind turbines is 1/2‐1/4 that of gas  fired or nuclear power stations. Even dams for  hydropower (concrete again) are only  scheduled to last 50 years. The low density   of energy for both wind and sun requires huge  areas of land for electricity generation. To  replace the recently closed Cockenzie power  station (1.2GW) would require turbines  covering a minimum of 70 square miles of  countryside. Geothermal energy requires fossil  fuels/cement for power station construction.  Power transmission requires cables made  either of steel, copper (mined and processed)  or even carbon fibre processed from fossil  fuels.  Drax coal‐fired power station generates 7%   of UK electricity and has been partially  converted to burning wood to benefit from  government subsidies. A forest area  substantially larger than Wales is needed for  wood supply. But deforestation abroad to  supply the wood threatens replacement of  diverse ecosystems and wildlife damage with  tree monocultures.  When burnt, wood is  dirtier than coal in releasing CO2, nitrogen  oxides, carbon monoxide, particulates and  organic volatiles. Up to 50 years are required   to recover the CO2 emissions. Most biofuels  produce some surplus energy over energy  invested but with poor or negative emissions  saving.  Displacement of crop‐growing land for  biofuel forces food price rises.  Renewable energy is a myth; none will last  longer than the non‐renewable sources they all  need. Uranium and thorium reserves should  last thousands of years. Nuclear fission in  small, fast‐neutron, modular reactors  generates electricity but waste that decays in  1‐2 centuries. A breakthrough in the  construction of small containment vessels for  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

deuterium/tritium fusion has been reported.  One kg of fusion fuel produces energy  equivalent to 10 million kg of fossil fuel.  Deuterium is abundant in the oceans. This is the  future, not renewables.  The renewables philosophy seems to be based  on the assumption that in some way wind, sun  and water are a perpetual motion machine.  They may well be in terms of millions of years in  that the energy comes initially from the sun but  without the ability to access them from non‐ renewable sources this notion is again  mythology. The second assumption is that  somehow the energy is free. At source so it is;  but so is coal, gas and nuclear energy; at  source. Exploitation costs and the costs can be  heavy. Currently the costs of exploiting wind  are twice those of coal, gas or nuclear energy.  To replace the electricity output of the recently  closed Cockenzie power station on the river  Forth requires at least 2000 turbines that at a  minimum must occupy 225 square km of  countryside. Cockenzie occupied 1 square  kilometre of land. The financial value, let alone  aesthetic value of unspoilt countryside and wild  land never enters the discussion. Our birthright  is being stolen from under our feet. We must  challenge those who claim renewables are good  for the environment.  Electricity is the lifeblood of our economy and  our current existence, it underpins the use of  virtually all our activities, lifestyle and future.  The cost of electricity determines how freely it  flows. And just as blood flows freely through   a healthy body, but when constricted causes ill‐ health, so it is the same for electricity.  Increasing the price of electricity deliberately by  choosing expensive sources whatever the  philosophy behind them, does not bode well for  our future. Costs and benefits come with all  human activities. The costs of renewables are  too high and the benefits too few. 

2015  17


REPO RT

David Batty

The Munro Society – Mountain Reporting The Munro Society (TMS) was formed in 2002.  Although not part of the Scottish  Mountaineering Club, the traditional “Keeper  of the List”, SMC was kept informed during its  formation. The first president was the late  Irvine Butterfield. Much thought went into  formulating its Objectives and Ethos. The  intention was to be more than a club and social  network, although these were important. It  was hoped that over time The Society would  establish a “voice” in matters pertaining to the  Munros and Scotland’s mountain landscape.     A membership comprising individuals who had  climbed all the Munros was seen as a real  strength in terms of credibility and substance.  In those early days several threads were  developed. Social activities were relatively easy  to set up with an Annual Dinner and lecture,     a socially orientated AGM and a few meets per  year. Regular Newsletters and a biennial  Journal were produced. An archive of matters  related to Munros and Munroists was set up,  based at the A K Bell Library in Perth.   A programme of Heightings was introduced to  attempt once and for all, using modern GPS  surveying techniques, to resolve the heights of  mountains around the 3000 feet level and  ensure they were placed in the right category.  However, the most important and enduring  activity introduced was the systematic  recording and reporting of Scotland’s mountain  environment, focussed around the Munros.  It is worth quoting parts of TMS’s Constitution  and Ethos in regard to monitoring Scotland’s  mountain environment. The Constitution states  that The Society should be “an informed and  authoritative body of opinion and influence on  the protection of and access to the Munros and 

18  

their mountain landscape and Scotland’s  mountains in general”. Additionally, the Ethos  states “as a concomitant to conservation of the  physical environment, future generations  should also have access to the thinking of those  who preceded them on the mountains. There is  thus a requirement to record and store what  people thought important in their times and in  their context.”  That leads us into Mountain  Quality Indicators and Mountain Reporting.  Initially mountain reporting was called  “Mountain Quality Indicators of Environment  and Experience” (MQIs). A comprehensive  structure of information based on eight criteria  was drawn up together with a scoring (or  rating) system and this has been applied to  date. As could be anticipated the MQI Project  has had its problems and its detractors. Three  major concerns expressed by some members  have been their perception of its subjectivity in  judging a mountain, their aversion to the  principle of scoring a mountain and the request  to provide information on matters outside their  competence e.g. flora and fauna.  Also, it is true  to say that many members wish to go to the  hills to enjoy them without the task of  memorising what they see and completing          a form.  Additionally many members, having  completed their round of Munros, are now  engaged with Corbetts, Grahams, Donalds and  Marilyns. These issues have all been addressed  and a new form, “Mountain Reporting”, is being  launched in spring 2015. A pilot has been  running since early 2014. Scoring has been  dropped, contributors need only complete what  they feel is within their competence, a method  of on‐line reporting is being introduced and, as  The Society is concerned with Scotland’s  mountain landscape, reports of any hill 


REPO RT

So what has the MQI Project achieved to date,  what can we look for in the future and how can  the information be used? The MQI project has  now been running for eleven years covering  two phases from 2003 to 2010 and 2010 to  date. Over that period more than 1,500 MQI  forms have been completed, admittedly of  varying quality, by more than 30 members.  One member, Derek Sime, has been our most  prolific reporter and in 2014 “compleated an  MQI round” on Ben More on Mull. Reports  have been received for all 282 Munros for each  of the spring, summer and autumn seasons and  for almost half of the more demanding winter  season. Most of these reports are of good 

quality and, although more member  involvement would have been welcomed,           a sufficient number of contributors, each  providing more than fifty reports, has created    a substantive body of information across a  range of subject matter pertinent to Scotland’s  mountain landscape. This information covers  access, flora, fauna, past and present human  impact, erosion and members’ views on  physical aspects and aesthetic response.             A Phase 1 report was published in 2010.  Information from the MQI reports was used by  the British Trust for Ornithology in its Project  Ptarmigan initiative.  Phase 2 will complete at  the end of February 2015 and a second report  will be issued. These reports help to reinforce,  in a factual way, what is already apparent to  those interested in and concerned about many  of the issues of concern regarding Scotland’s  mountain landscape be it wind farms, hill  tracks, footpath erosion, hydro developments,  radio masts, litter or other matters. They  highlight positive aspects including ease of  access, footpath improvement and  regeneration. They also “record what people  thought important in their times and in their  context.”  Phases 1 and 2 can be seen as a  learning curve and the laying down of a  platform on which to build a substantive  database of information and knowledge which  will support TMS’s objective of being “an  informed and authoritative body of opinion and  influence”.  A measure of success is that TMS,  which is only 12 years old, is now being invited  to participate along with other long established 

Windy Standard, rubbish tip, at 450 metres 

Windy Standard, looking back to line of ascent  

category will be welcome. Of course some  members will not respond, whatever is  proposed, but it is hoped these changes will  lead to greater member involvement.  Two further initiatives will benefit the  Mountain Reporting project. As part of the on‐ line reporting initiative all future reports and  most of the backlog of past reports will be  available on‐line. Members of the public will  have controlled access to these reports.  Photographic evidence is also being  introduced. When reporting, members are  being asked to provide relevant photographs to  illustrate and emphasise matters being  reported on – as opposed to simply providing   a pretty view although the odd one or two of  these will be welcome e.g. if they emphasise  the unspoilt nature of the surrounding  landscape or otherwise. 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

2015  19


REPO RT

bodies in initiatives to lobby and to protect  Scotland’s mountain landscape. It has  developed a “voice”.  The worth of Mountain Reporting can best be  demonstrated by practical examples of  submitted reports, including the photographic  evidence. A pilot Mountain Report dated April  2014 from a visit to Windy Standard, a  Graham/Donald in Glen Afton, highlighted  some serious concerns. A few extracts from the  report follow:   Appalling wide and muddy ATV track right  over Lamb Hill and Wedder Hill appears  recently formed to aid erection of a Radio  Mast at approx. 632032. (unsure if this will  heal or remain damaged for maintenance  access)   Major Wind Farm and related access road  on top of Windy Standard.   Significant non‐native plantations in all  directions, particularly unattractive near  Windy Standard and on east side of  Cannock Hill. Tree felling beside west side  of Afton Reservoir very unsightly.   Significant litter at start and on walk up to  the dam at north end of Afton Reservoir.  Still some litter along west shore of  reservoir but less.   Significant rubbish tip at approx. 626043,  450 metres, beside the estate track. It  contained much that appeared to be  domestic type rubbish and warning of  asbestos which could relate to old broken  roofing sections. Truly appalling location. 

ATV scarring near Loch an Droma  20  

A report dated October 2014 following a visit to  Mullach na Dheiragain reported on ATV tracks:   As this was the stalking season the use of All  Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), particularly near  Iron Lodge and in the area around Loch an  Droma and Glen Sithidh, was very  noticeable. Due to the wet ground  considerable erosion and damage had been  caused. There was a multitude of tracks  going off in several directions. This was  much worse than noted on an earlier visit in  July 2011, although on this occasion it was  near the end of the Stalking season.  On the other hand a report dated April 2014  following a visit to Oban Bothy at the east end  of Loch Morar to climb An Stac and Meith  Bheinn reported only positives about an  unspoilt mountain landscape.  Although Mountain Reporting is well  established there remains much to be done.    An increase in member participation is  required. The on‐line system needs more  development to go live. Populating the  database with past reports will be a big task.  Most importantly, how to use the information  gathered to best effect is still a work in  progress. However, the need for continuing and  valid monitoring of change in all matters  affecting the Scottish mountains must be self‐ evident to those who have any interest in these  matters.  In the absence of any other body  taking on this country‐wide obligation, The  Munro Society does so in the belief that the  information collected and made available will  be of increasing value to other interested  parties. 


OPINION

Peter Wright

Upon the Ribbon of Wildness

Imagine if you will a single geographic feature  created entirely within the immense geo‐glacial  forces of Nature that crests the entire length of  Scotland.  Imagine too, that this is no modest  part of our geography; its wilder credentials  are appealing and impressive. Some 27% of its  length and habitats are already designated and  protected in 90 different sites.  The roll‐call of  Wild Land Areas that it embraces add‐up to   a formidable 60% of its considerable length,  from the border with England to Duncansby  Head in the far north‐east. An astonishing 87%  of it is a combination of Category 6 and 7 Land  in terms of its suitability for agriculture – as  defined by the Hutton Institute. Its suitability is  therefore marginal, but carries immense  potential for bio‐diversity. The brand‐name  that this 1,200 Km feature has so rightly been  accorded is Ribbon of Wildness.  This same line links our two current and highly  popular National Parks, and would touch upon  three more of the aspirational National Parks  identified in Unfinished Business. For walkers  and climbers, it offers outstanding experiences  upon the 45 Munros and 24 Corbetts, and with  an average elevation exceeding 600m, it has  lofty attitude. There are only 20 houses, one  redundant church and just a single settlement  on it: this feature constitutes a very big and  lengthy emptiness. Whilst much of it is remote,  there are immensely inviting parts of it within  the southern uplands and central belt, so  within easy reach of a fair proportion of the  Scottish population. The potential for health  and well‐being is almost boundless.  So what is this great swathe of wildness? It is  Scotland`s Watershed; the spine of the  country, which determines whether rainwater  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

falling is eventually bound for the North Sea on  the one hand, or destined for the Atlantic  Ocean on the other. The Royal Scottish  Geographical Society recently recognised the  route of the Watershed as set out in Ribbon of  Wildness: Discovering the Watershed of  Scotland and acknowledged it was a `hitherto  largely unknown geographic feature`.  As with all campaigning for wild places, we  must truly celebrate what we have. It is indeed  fair to say that the Watershed is amongst the  least interfered‐with landscapes on such a vast  scale, and is in a state that is undoubtedly at  the more naturally‐evolved end of the  spectrum. In this respect it can be fairly  credited with a unique distinction. It is a  survivor too, with around 70 Km in the southern  uplands having remained intact (just),  throughout forty years of commercial  afforestation. The one settlement upon it is  Cumbernauld, even here, amongst all of the  development the Watershed somehow links   a succession of established and more recent  woodland, old hedgerow and open green space.  The Cumbernauld Community Park has pride of  place. A Watershed`s eye view of this town is  indeed comparatively green. The emerging list  of Special Landscape Areas within each of the  relevant Local Authority domains now  incorporates almost 33% of the linear splendour  of the Watershed; local populations have been  consulted and found these landscapes to be of  importance in their lives. The relatively recent  formed Central Scotland Green Network  partnership, now has a role within the Planning  Process ‐ an optimistic means of further  strengthening the place of the Watershed  meandering around and between many of the  more populated parts. 

2015  21


OPINION

The author writes of this with a potent  combination of direct experience, research and  published works, see   www.ribbonofwildness.co.uk. Having walked  the entire Watershed ten years ago and much  of it again subsequently, he can visualise  almost every bog and bealach, moor and  mountain. He has followed in the footsteps of   a small number of fellow travellers, and others  have subsequently taken‐up the challenge and  the pleasure. He argues, with a substantial  body of evidence supporting his assertion, that  the Watershed, the Ribbon of Wildness is  worthy of wider recognition: quite simply for  what it is. He ventures to insist that there  should be a presumption of constraint upon  encroachment.  The worst form of blemish is where it has been  blighted by poorly‐sited wind farms. Their  location is often ill‐conceived and has generally  come‐about, with rare exception, by sheer  opportunism. There is a plea here, to look at  the bigger picture; to see beyond the  mundane, and embrace the special qualities of  the Watershed in its entirety. For it is a largely  continuous Ribbon of Wildness linking a  tangible chain of special sites where Nature,  biodiversity and real human benefit tower  above other considerations.  The Watershed landscapes actively involve  every single National environmental agency,  and many local such organisations are similarly  active upon this great Ribbon of Wildness. This  activity, much of it driven by that potent force  of voluntary involvement, includes everything  from native forest regeneration to peat‐land  restoration, from wildlife survey and  monitoring, to enhancing public access, and so  much more. The proposed UNESCO World  Heritage Site spanning the Flow Country will  straddle the Watershed, and those who  venture onto one particular section of it, will  look down from the Watershed over the North  West Highland Geopark.  As the spine of Scotland, the Watershed has      a key place in our landscapes, and there are      a hundred or more locations where this is  abundantly evident. For those who walk on it, 

22  

there is a magnificent sense of place to be  enjoyed. To stand on Bodesbeck Law there is all  the promise of vistas round from the Lakeland  Fells, the Solway Firth, westwards into  Galloway, across upper Clydesdale, and then  beyond Tweedsmuir to many of the headwaters  of that great river. Whilst arrayed at your feet  lie the Moffat Hills, where there is such bold  evidence of glaciation. Move north to Tomtain  in the Kilsyth Hills, and the whole of central  Scotland is spread‐out in a great mosaic of  settlement and greenery. The upper reaches of  the Forth, with its backdrop of fine hills marking  the skyline, give way to the more rounded form  of The Ochils. Morning light catches the  meandering Forth estuary, and the viewer will  be glad that the elevation of this hill lifts him or  her above the noxious output from  Grangemouth`s stacks. A last sighting of Tinto  provides an opportunity to bid farewell to an  old friend, before the journey north continues.  Fast‐forward, and the giant roller‐coaster  around the Rim of Rannoch embraces a 60Km  succession of tops providing an experience that  seems incomparable, and is indeed breath‐ taking, yet there are so many surprises still to  come. The sudden appearance of the chasm  that is the Great Glen is a precursor to the  magnificence of a wide swing west towards the  Rough Bounds – almost into Knoydart herself.   A sharp turn north however on the equally  sharp summit of Sgùrr na Ciche does give cause  and place for a pause though; to move‐on in  too much hurry would waste the opportunity.  Beyond Glen Shiel lies two or three days of  remote demanding interaction with Nature;   the form of the walker may be small within this  vastness, but the experience is immense.  Approaching The Fannichs, like so much of this,  is unconventional and not to be found in any of  the guide books. But this fine clutch of hills, and  the Watershed`s place among them will never  disappoint. Beinn Dearg and her northern  neighbours provide a succession of delight, with  Seana Bhraigh as simply one of the best. What  Rhidorroch may lack in elevation, is more than  compensated for in the variety, the twists and  turns, the hidden lochans, and a view of those  great mountains that rear‐up from the 


OPINION

landscapes to the west. Breabag is a world  apart, its near neighbour Conival presents a  formidable non guide‐book and challenging  ascent. The final tops in the north‐west,  present terrain that is exceptional in its stark  grandeur. Nature chose a route that is  unpredictable, with all of the rewards that this  brings.  Any notion that the Flow Country of Sutherland  and Caithness would be dull or lacking in  character should be left behind there, on the  summit of Ben Hee. These moors are richly  characterised by colour, light, wide‐skies,  movement and texture. There is only one thing  to do on reaching Ben Griam Beg, and that is to  find a rock to sit upon for a brew‐up, and to  take time for some pondering. Finally,  Duncansby Head comes into view, along the  last few kilometres of cliff‐top, with the Stacks  of Duncansby standing sentinel in the North  Sea. If the lighthouse on the headland is 

journey`s end, it is also an emotional point at  which to stop. The sense of place is enhanced  by both the journey travelled, and the view  beyond across the Pentland Firth to the Orkney  Islands: for another time though.  Just a glimpse then of an exceptional journey  upon an equally special route way‐marked by  Nature alone. We must keep it that way, and  just enjoy it for what it is, such “that this  wellspring of natural goodness can ever flow  outwards to replenish and renew”. 

From Beinn Bheag to Ben Dorain 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

2015  23


NEWS

&

VIE WS

Land reform— the SWLG position This is a summary of our response to the Government’s land reform consultation, a full version  of which can be found on our website at www.swlg.org.uk/our‐work.html. 

The SWLG is encouraged by recent  Government statements about land reform,  believing that this is an issue that clearly needs  to be addressed, with comprehensive  consideration and reform of our system of land  management and ownership long overdue.  Nevertheless, we did not agree with all of the  proposals in the Government’s recent  consultation, and were particularly concerned  that economic development and the perceived  interests of poorly‐defined communities were  being given too much weight. We also argued  for public ownership of nationally important  areas.   On the basic issue of whether the Government  should have a stated policy concerning land use  and ownership, we agreed that such a policy  was necessary. However, we were concerned  by the potential vagueness of this policy, and  felt it essential that it accurately and  completely described the full range of land  rights and responsibilities, especially  concerning societal/common interests in land  management and ownership, and didn’t place  undue weight on development, economic  benefits or the interests of particular groups.   We were especially concerned about the idea  of land management for ‘public benefit’ being  encouraged or required, especially given the  track record of successive governments in  interpreting ‘benefit’ only in narrow economic  terms. Many of the benefits that people derive  from land are not easily or directly measurable  in economic or, perhaps, any other terms, but  these should certainly not be neglected. 

24  

Scotland’s landscapes, for instance, are a  fundamental part of national identity and  provide a wide range of essential and desirable  ecosystem services, including mental and  physical health benefits. Any attempt to  measure all of these and so calculate ‘public  benefit’ would be extremely difficult, and likely  to drive land use change towards those benefits  for which simple metrics exist (such as  economic benefit, again).  We believe that the  phrase ‘in the public interest’ is preferable, as it  does not lend itself so easily to  misinterpretation.    We were also concerned that the draft policy  left no room for a lack of management.  Historically, much of Scotland’s land was  effectively unmanaged and, indeed, un‐owned  (in the modern sense), and it is still the least  managed areas that often produce some of the  most substantial public benefits (including  economic benefits derived from tourism, etc.).  A requirement that land should be managed for  public benefit would therefore be doubly  damaging, preventing land from being entirely  unmanaged for environmental or other  purposes, and instead forcing some form of  management to be implemented with  potentially inferior outcomes.  The Government’s proposals included measures  to substantially increase community ownership  of land. However, we believe that public  ownership is inherently and clearly preferable  to community ownership for ensuring that the  public interest is respected and satisfied. By its  very nature, community ownership involves the 


NEWS

prioritisation of the interests of people located  close to an area of land; interests that may  differ greatly from, or even be opposed to, the  interests of the wider community. Further, in  many remote areas of Scotland it makes little  sense to speak of a local community, and even  less sense to suggest that the management of  large areas that are of national and  international significance should be largely  determined by a few people currently living  close to those areas.   We were also very uneasy about the proposed  condition that land should be used to  ‘contribute to building a fairer society in  Scotland and promoting environmental  sustainability, economic prosperity and social  justice’. As a national‐level aspiration this is a  reasonable, if rather platitudinous, statement,  but at the scale of individual land holdings it is  effectively meaningless, and could allow any  form of management to be imposed on the  grounds that it contributes to one or more of  these vague, undefined and potentially  contradictory objectives.   The consultation asked for a list of three  actions that the Government should take on  land reform. We suggested the following:    Take more land into public ownership for  conservation purposes. As in other countries,  publicly‐owned National Parks should be  established.   Monitoring stewardship to ensure that it is  appropriate for the location (including  geological, environmental, social and other  characteristics), especially in the case of  community ownership   Introduce land value taxation, with a  reduction or waiver for democratically‐run  charities which provide conservation  services.  We also strongly agreed with the suggestion  that the types of legal entities that can take  ownership or long lease of land in Scotland  should be restricted. We believe it is crucial in   a modern democracy that secretive companies  registered overseas cannot be used to conceal  true ownership of large areas of the country. In 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

&

VIE WS

addition, information on land ownership should  be freely available to all, not least as a  statement of the Government’s recognition of  land as a common resource, subject to  legitimate societal interests in its ownership  and use. We do not believe that individual  privacy should extend to the secret ownership  of large areas of a common resource such as  land (and note that it does not extend even to  house ownership).  Far less encouraging was the suggestion that  powers should be introduced to ‘direct private  landowners to take action to overcome barriers  to sustainable development’. We believe that  ‘sustainable development’ is an excessively  vague term, and do not believe that it would be  appropriate to define any powers in these  terms. If implemented, such a measure would  effectively allow future governments to compel  landowners to do anything at all, as long as the  government described it as ‘sustainable  development’ (the current Government’s  erroneous conflation of sustainable  development, sustained development, and  ‘sustainable economic growth’ is notable).  In some sections of the consultation, the aims  of suggested changes were unclear. For  example, a suggestion that the Forestry  Commission and other public sector bodies  “should be able to engage in a wider range of  management activities in order to promote a  more integrated range of social, economic and  environmental outcomes” seemed unnecessary  (and potentially worrying), and we stressed the  lack of justification for industrial development  on Forestry Commission land in response. We  also argued that any management that  damages wild land qualities of core areas of  wild land should not be permitted.   Another suggestion that was troubling in its  vagueness and potential consequences was that  ‘a trustee of a charity should be required to  engage with the local community before taking  a decision on the management, use or transfer  of land under the charity’s control’. We believe  that the terms of engagement would be crucial  and that, in the case of charities with  democratic structures, a requirement to consult  local communities is appropriate. Where 

2015  25


NEWS

&

VIE WS

charities have non‐democratic structure,  tougher restrictions should apply. However,  engagement of all landowners with wider  communities of interest is also important, and  the same requirements should clearly apply to  local communities that receive public support  for purchasing land, and other landowners who  receive very substantial support from public  money.  Nevertheless, we are concerned that undue  weight should not be given to the views of   a particular group when land is under  charitable ownership. Introducing a  compulsion for democratic charities to take  account of community views would tend to  encourage development that may be contrary  to the charities’ aims and also to the interests  of the wider community. This is especially  worrying given that landowning charities are  responsible for most of the practical  conservation programmes in Scotland, at their  own expense and in the wider public interest,  delivering huge environmental, social and  economic benefits to society at large. In the  absence       of more widespread public  ownership for environmental protection, the  work of such charities should not be  undermined in the interests of a very small  sub‐group of the population.   In fact, a recurring theme was the definition    of ‘community’. We argued strongly that the  term should not be defined geographically.  Local communities do, of course, have very  substantial and legitimate interests in the  management of land near to them but very  much larger communities of interest exist  nationally and beyond, and undue weight  should not be given to the view of any. For  example, the tendency of local communities  will be to develop land in their own area for  economic benefit, while a strong national  interest exists in some areas not being  developed for environmental or other reasons.  In many of these areas (e.g. Core Areas of Wild  Land), no community can be meaningfully  identified as ‘local’, while the areas are  important to much of society in general.   In terms of land management, we agreed with  the proposition that business rate exemptions 

26  

for shootings and deer forests be ended, in  order to bring these into line with other forms  of rural business. The exemptions are relatively  recent and there is nothing to suggest that  businesses subject to them would suffer  significantly if they were removed.  Nevertheless, we expressed concerns about the  effects on landowning charities and others  where these activities are not undertaken as      a traditional business. We also supported the  introduction of further deer management  regulations so that, whatever form of  management is/is not required, it would be  possible to ensure it in a far more robust way  than is currently possible ‐ in particular so that  SNH could enforce culls where necessary  without fear of legal challenge. Finally, we  highlighted the need for further action on  access rights. We believe it is necessary for all  Local Authorities to have at least one specialist  access officer in place. Access authorities  should be expected to fully implement and fund  the Land Reform [Scotland] Act 2003; at the  moment there are several long‐standing access  problems in Scotland and Local Authorities  must honour their responsibilities in resolving  these problems.   Overall, we felt that many of the proposals in  the consultation appeared designed or destined  to encourage development of land for  economic gain. The potential for environmental  damage is great, as is the associated potential  for net economic losses. Much of the Highland  landscape has always been wild, undeveloped  land. This wildness has helped shape the psyche  of the people of Scotland who hold strongly to  the concept of the wild Highlands, even if living  in the Central Belt. Hence any approach to land  ownership or management which always puts  the onus on development of land will, in the  long term, be detrimental both to the people   of Scotland and the perception of Scotland  abroad. Any new legislation must allow for  wildness to continue to be a characteristic that  is cherished – and still exists in reality (as  promoted in government current planning  policy). We believe strongly that any attempt to  regulate land management and ownership must  carefully take account of the range of benefits,  interests and values found in the land resource. 


OPINION

Mike Stevens

Building Scotland's Greatest Estate - National Parks Following recent Scottish land reform discussions we asked Mike Stevens, a previous Wild Land News  contributor and protected area and wildlife conservationist in Australia, to provide some perspective  and context on Australian National Parks. You can follow or contact Mike on Twitter  @bushmanstevo  

I am imagining a day when I bring my twin boys  to Scotland to hike the Highlands, through the  world’s newest national park. Scotland is on its  way to having 10% of marine and terrestrial  areas protected as publicly owned national  parks.  The newly created Scottish National  Parks Commission is working with volunteers  planting millions of Scots pines.  Wildlife  organisations are reintroducing red squirrel,  beaver, Scottish wild cat, pine martin,  capercaillie et al. Major Universities are  undertaking an ambitious research project to  rewild a viable population of Lynx to restore  the balance of deer and return the grand  Caledonian forest. Our hike meanders over  snow capped peaks, sensitively through  thousand year old peat, amongst the  moorlands, down into thick willow and juniper  scrub into tall Scots pine glens and finishes at  the wild Scottish coastline. We camp in  highland bothies along the way, catch a few  fish, learn about epic battles and highland  struggles such as 'the clearances' from  interpretive displays and read about crofters  and tenant farmers. All through a single  national park with the local surrounding  township economies booming from a mixture  of nature based, wildlife, adventure and  sporting estate tourism.  So what is 'common‐good' land in Scotland and  how can a grand vision of creating truly  National parks be achieved?    What is a national park?  The definitive guide  can be found in the IUCN's Protected Area  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

Categories. Areas such as Scotland's Cairngorms  National Park are category VI (protected area  with sustainable use) being an overlay across  diverse private land tenure acting to guide  appropriate use and development. Australian  national parks are predominantly IUCN category  II, large areas of publicly owned land set aside  for conservation whilst providing opportunities  for science and visitation. Within most  Australian national parks, some areas are zoned  as IUCN Ia (reference area) and IUCN Ib  (wilderness).  How did Australia achieve national parks?  When the British colonised Australia it was  based on the fallacy that the entire country was  owned by the Crown of England, not the 600  Aboriginal nations across the great southern  continent.  European settlers had to apply for  land from the government and either be  granted or purchase parcels of crown land. It  was usually followed by Aboriginal people being  forcibly removed.  But here is the kicker.  Some crown land was  never sold off to private interests.  Let us fast forward from the early 1800s to  post‐WWI.  Returning soldiers were granted  'soldier settlement' parcels of crown land for  their war service. Often these settlements were  in very marginal areas as the best crown land  parcels had already been taken.  The same  occurred post‐WWII but the vast improvement  in mechanisation meant larger areas were being  cleared faster. This era led to the formation of  the Victorian National Parks Association in 1952 

2015  27


OPINION

and the first major steps in protecting areas     of crown land from development.  Around the 1960s and ‘70s crown land areas  were being seen as vital to the prosperity and  growth of Australia. Rivers were being dammed  for water and hydroelectricity, and old growth  forests logged.  Some areas of 'useless crown  land scrub' we're starting to be developed by  large companies at an alarming rate.  Companies would buy the rights to crown land  and bulldoze the scrub for agriculture.  This  was the watershed moment in Victoria.  Lobbying by the Victorian National Parks  Association in the early 1970s led to the  establishment of the Land Conservation  Council, who assessed the remaining crown  land for suitability to create national parks.   The Land Conservation Council had bi‐partisan  political support and was driven by community  demand to significantly increase the number of  national parks to protect representative  examples of Victoria's ecosystems before they  were bulldozed forever.  This lead to the  creation of the National Parks Act in 1975.   Utilisation of natural resources for economic  gain took a back seat to the conservation of  nature. Today, the ecosystem services, tourism  economic value and human health benefits  national parks provide are widely lauded.   Victoria now has 45 national parks covering  over 2.8 million hectares (10,820 square miles  or the equivalent of one‐third of Scotland).       In 2002 the National Parks Act was amended   to include Marine Protected Areas.  It is essential to remember the creation of  national parks is only a very small first step       in achieving protected areas. It may be a hard  fought political and legislative win but  delivering conservation action on the ground  can not be forgotten.   In Australia, national parks not only suffer  current threats such as pervasive foxes, rabbits  and feral cats but the legacy of historic land  use.  Tens‐of‐thousands of years of fire regimes  have been changed swiftly. Hundreds‐of‐years  old hollow trees lost from previous logging will  take another 200 years to be  created.  Wetlands have been drained. Some  species are locally extinct that provide essential  ecosystem services and unfortunately some 

28  

species have been lost forever (noting that  Australia holds the world record for mammal  extinctions).  Some parks are isolated in a sea   of farmland with no corridors for wildlife  movement with populations suffering the silent  genetic effects from inbreeding.  Ongoing management of current threats and  restoring the damage of legacy impacts is  critical and needs appropriate long‐term  resourcing when creating national parks.  As a quick calculation, to reserve 10% of the  Scottish terrestrial landscape as National Parks  requires approximately 780,800 Ha or 1.93M  acres.  Let’s say at a price of around £300 per  acre (excluding assets such as estate houses)     it will require £772Million just to purchase the  land let alone ongoing management costs.   Fortunately in Australia, the publicly owned  crown land system exists as a starting point.  Today, any new addition to Australian National  Parks is based on achieving the aim of a  Comprehensive, Adequate and Representative  reserve system. This system aims to ensure that  any rare ecosystems, or ecosystems that have  been significantly destroyed and that are poorly  represented in existing national parks, are  purchased and fully protected. Often, the  inclusion of important remnant areas into  protected areas is not possible or too  expensive, prompting the evolution of new  mechanisms such as ‘covenants’.  A covenant is when a legal note is added on  title to a parcel of land prohibiting sections       of the land from future development and  inappropriate use. The land is essentially  'locked' for the purposes of protecting the  remnant natural values. Covenants are  attractive to some land owners in Australia as  freehold ownership and individual property  rights are retained (subject to what is permitted  under covenant), whereas the conservation of  nature for public good is achieved.  It is a useful  cost‐effective mechanism as land does not have  to be purchased, but it can result in a piece‐ meal approach with small pockets of protected  land widely dispersed under multiple ownership  and differing management, which can be  problematic. Australia has 5,040 properties  under conservation covenant, covering  8,913,000 hectares consisting approximately 


REPO RT

50/50 by area of private conservation  covenants (4900 properties) and large private  land trust covenants (140 properties).  The key question for the people of Scotland is  "What is your goal for environmental  protection and land for common good?"   If the goal is to create truly publicly‐owned  national parks that have a comprehensive,  adequate and representative area of diverse  ecosystems for nature and people, then tough  economic and private land ownership buy‐back  discussions are required.  If the goal is to stop 

inappropriate development, than a covenant  style approach to protect priority sites whilst  generally retaining the overall property rights   in an area may be more appropriate.  Or perhaps the goal is to return land to the  traditional owners of the Scottish  landscape?  Google an amazing man named  Eddie Mabo. 

David Woodhouse & David Pollard

The Hebridean Islands National Park Concept Group: An Introduction Introduction  Proposals for National Parks in Scotland go  back many years, but only two (Cairngorms and  Loch Lomond and the Trossachs) have been  introduced.  SNH (Scottish Natural Heritage)  produced a report (1) in 2006, recommending    a Coastal and Marine National Park, covering  part of Mull, Coll, Tiree, part of Jura and the  mainland coast north and south of Oban.  This  proposal was supported by Argyll and Bute  Council and although the Scottish Executive  produced a follow up report (2) there was no  attempt to implement the recommendations.  In March 2013 the Scottish Campaign for  National Parks in conjunction with the  Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland  produced a report entitled ‘Unfinished  Business’(3) advocating the formation of more  national parks in Scotland.  This report once  again proposed a national park based on the  Argyll Islands and adjacent coast, which  included Mull, Iona, Coll, Tiree and Colonsay.  Other bodies have registered their support for  the proposals put forward in the ‘Unfinished  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

Business’ report. They include the National  Trust for Scotland, RSPB Scotland, Ramblers  Scotland, the Scottish WiId Land Group,  Woodland Trust Scotland and the  Mountaineering Council of Scotland.  Mull, Coll, Tiree, Colonsay and the surrounding  seas appear to the authors of this Concept note  so obviously to fit the criteria for a National  Park that they are surprised that one has not  already been set up.  Working from the  proposals in the SNH and ‘Unfinished Business’  reports, a list of ‘Potential Benefits’ and  ‘Perceived Drawbacks’ have been drawn up to  act as a starting point for taking the Concept  forward (see Table 1)  The National Parks (Scotland) Act 2000 defined  a National Park as an area within which the  aims are:‐  a.  to conserve and enhance the natural and  cultural heritage of the area  b. promote sustainable use of the natural  resources of the area 

2015  29


REPO RT

c.  promote understanding and enjoyment  (including enjoyment in the form of  recreation) of the special qualities of the  area  

d. to promote sustainable economic and social  development of the area’s communities    Progress in Cairngorms National Park  The Cairngorms National Park was set up in  2003 and last year produced a report  celebrating its 10 years of existence(4). Below  are some of the benefits the National Park has  brought to the residents who live within its  boundaries:   200 more people move into the Cairngorms  National Park (CNP) than move out each  year.   More than £14 million has been invested in  the CNP in community‐based projects, land‐ based businesses and the Scottish  Government’s ‘Shovel Ready’ capital  projects.    235 (23%) of businesses in the CNP use the  Park brand.    Over half the visitors to the CNP come  because it is a National Park, an increase of  25% from 2004.    250 affordable houses have been built  across the CNP in 10 years.   The number of 18‐25 year olds leaving the  Park is considerably lower than is the norm  in other rural areas across Scotland.    In Kincraig the Highland Small Communities  Housing Trust have been working with the  local Community Council to build  sustainable houses. Part of this is a  partnership project called the Cairngorms  Skills and Construction Project: 19 young  apprentices are working with the  contractors, learning construction and  woodland skills, while the Park is getting  affordable housing built on affordable land  from the Forestry Commission. 

 

30  

Our Vision for a Hebridean Islands  National Park  We live in an increasingly environmentally  aware world. The idea that an area is even  exploring National Park status immediately  suggests that it has outstanding natural  wonders. Within a National Park, many things  are likely to become more sustainable: schools  and school children become more  environmentally aware and thus more caring,  businesses become greener in their approach   to the tourism product, the tourist season  lengthens, perceptions of the country and of its  government become more sympathetic,  alternative energy at an appropriate scale  becomes far more likely, and interpretation      of our natural environment and adequate small  parking areas would become automatic (it is  essential here on Mull that visitors are drawn   to leave the road and enjoy what they see if we  are to encourage them to stay longer).  Arguments have always prevailed here about     a lack of funding to solve problems and to  create more opportunities, particularly for  young people. Many of our young people would  have the opportunity to become rangers in a  National Park, and from such a platform they  could work anywhere in the world in other  national parks and environmentally sensitive  places. Any product from our park would get  the official stamp of ‘Produced in The  Hebridean Islands National Park’, indicating        a premium product in potential customers’  eyes.  All fishermen understand the problems for their  industry today, and a park board would  encourage sensitive management for the  benefit of them and the general community.  The appalling coastal litter would no longer be  the problem of school children but inevitably  get far more attention and finance from              a national park board.  What of much‐needed wet weather venues  both in Oban and on the islands? Would it not  help Oban if they had the Gateway to the  National Park in the form of a world class  Oceanic Centre? Wouldn’t such an inspiring  building with so many exciting things to do not 


REPO RT

attract more off‐season visitors? Don’t the  islands including Mull also need wet weather  venues for visitors instead of only the one  significant venue which Mull has at present?  What does a young family do on a seriously  wet day here, except get on the ferry and go  somewhere else? 

work with communities. Our objective in the  immediate future is to engage with local  communities to ascertain the level of support  for a Hebridean Islands National Park and, on  the strength of that support, to engage with  whatever process the Government initiates to  fulfil their manifesto commitment.   

National park status would also allay so many  fears in the islands concerning the narrow band  of employment opportunities that we currently  have. In all of the world’s national parks work  opportunities have expanded as local people  have been able to take small business ideas to  a Park Board and get support.  

The Concept Group is fully aware of the  perceived drawbacks to a National Park, but is  confident that with the accruing experience of  the two existing National Parks these worries  can be overcome. The Group will carry out  detailed work over the coming months and  enlist the support of other organisations to  make a strong case for the designation of the  Hebridean Islands as a National Park that  Scotland can be proud of. 

For those concerned that national parks attract  too many visitors, we must remind ourselves  that visitors have to catch a ferry to get here.  This means that we are able to monitor and  even control numbers; something that no  other national park in Britain can do.  These are just a few of the obvious benefits of  national park status, and we are certain that  further ideas will flow if we take this forward.  We believe that national park status is the  obvious next step for Mull. Some don’t want  change, but it is certain that these islands will  change, not because we are a national park,  but because we are not.    There is if course also an ethical question that  we should all consider and that is that the  Island of Mull currently has little or no  protection at all. In fact it is more or less totally  open to the whim of market forces – surely  inappropriate for somewhere so special. Even  our spectacular National Scenic Area, of which  we are the guardians, has no management or  ranger service. 

Hebridean Islands Concept Group, Torr Buan  House, Ulva Ferry, Isle of Mull, PA73 6LY. Tel/ Fax 01688 5001212 email:  info@scotlandwildlife.com        References  Scottish Natural Heritage  ‘Advice on Costal and  Marine National Parks’ 2006  Scottish Executive ‘Scotland’s First Coastal and  Marine National Park’ 2006  Mayhew, John ‘Unfinished Business – ‘A  national Parks Strategy for Scotland’  Scottish  Campaign for National Parks and Association for  the Protection of Rural Scotland, 2013 

 

The Way Forward  The current Scottish Government’s 2011  manifesto made a commitment “to work with  communities to explore the creation of new  National Parks”.  It is expected that the  Government will take steps to fulfil this  commitment before the next Scottish  elections. The Concept Group has taken note  that the commitment requires government to  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

2015  31


REPO RT

Potential Benefits and Perceived Drawbacks of National Park Status   Potential Benefits     Active conservation management of land 



         

    

32  

and sea, preventing deterioration of the  landscape and the surrounding marine  environment  Millions of £s worth of additional resources  for creating jobs (e.g. Rangers), improving  sustainability of existing industries and  enhancing biodiversity etc.  Acts as a focus for biodiversity initiatives and  research  Co‐ordination of volunteer support leading  to optimum use of professional and  volunteer labour  Positive use of planning system to encourage  quality development  Promotion of sustainable tourism  Co‐ordination of flora, fauna, geological  actions  Co‐ordination of archaeological and  historical sites.  Promotion of sustainable marine  environment  Support for sustainable businesses  Support for sustainable agriculture and  forestry  Modern technology e.g. renewable energy,  energy conservation, waste re‐cycling and  high speed broadband introduced in an  environmentally sensitive way will enhance  the quality of life of residents without  seriously interfering with wildlife.  Local people will have a say in the running of  the national park by electing their own  representatives onto the management board  Business and products ‘badged’; status  allows high quality products to command a  premium in the market place  Co‐ordination and appropriate facilities  provided for physical recreation like walking,  biking, horse riding, sailing, kayaking etc.  Organisation of appropriate physical  competitions arranged to extend the tourist  season  Organisation of festivals of food, arts, music 

Perceived drawbacks     Concerns about increased bureaucracy   Restrictions on planning; some residents 

    

may fear restrictions on land use (ie  agriculture, forestry, fish farming, field  sports etc.) as well as on those  developments which require planning  permission.  Effect of increased numbers of tourists  Interested parties gain too much influence  and dominate conservation management  Restriction of funding by National  Government  Interference by National Government  There is a danger that the structure of a  National Park authority and its  responsibilities are ill‐defined. 


OPINION

David Woodhouse

Scotland's Green Gold Revisited I suppose that all of us at times 'reflect' on what  we thought were very sensible, helpful and  even valuable suggestions that we offered  our leaders in the past, and here I am doing just  that regarding the issues that I raised in Wild  Land News in 2012 about Ecotourism:  “Our wildlife and wild places have simply huge  potential to fuel the economy in all remote and  beautiful parts of the country, and there is an  increasing thirst for top environmental  experiences.In fact ecotourism has the potential  to bring billions into many remote parts of the  world. But our leaders live in a narrow‐minded  bubble, never understanding the real value of  ecotourism and its massive potential.”   The Government’s continuing lack of action has  underlined still further to me that they do not  at all understand the way that the country’s  rural economy has changed and is changing by  the minute. In 2014 there was a massive  demand for wild environmental experiences,  from across Europe and beyond ‐ whether  to climb a first Munro, walk on wild Hebridean  beaches, to sail Scottish waters or to cycle  around the Highlands and Islands. There is huge  interest in seeing our sea eagles, pine martens,  red deer, whales, dolphins, otters and maybe,  just maybe, a Scottish wildcat. I can personally  testify that demand was at times  overwhelming, with far too many visitors  unable to find accommodation. On one of my  own wildlife trips I had my usual 11 people  filling the vehicle but this time every single  person was from a different country! All  because our TV wildlife programmes are  travelling the world, as are more people in  search of wild experiences.   The Year of Natural Scotland and the year of  John Muir, along with other events, are  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

underpinning the world’s interest in our wildlife  and wild places. And yet Scotland's government  still does absolutely nothing regarding the  creation of further National Parks, when we  STILL have the fewest National Parks in the  whole of Europe. We have the unenviable  distinction of being the second‐last country in  the entire world to even create a National Park  in the first place. Is there any sign at all of a  glorious Ecotourism brochure and website  based on the seasons of the year, to encourage  more off‐season visitors? Will the west coast  and Hebridean islands EVER gain National Park  status, despite consecutive Argyll MSPs all  stating that ''National Park status is the biggest  single step forward that the area can make''?   In my opinion Oban needs to be an  upmarket gateway to such a National Park, with  a glorious glass structure on Oban waterfront (it  currently has no wet weather venue).  Instead on the suggested site of the Oceanic  Center Gateway, we now have a never‐used and  deserted bowling alley, a Wetherspoons and  a Costa Coffee!  Are more and more retail  businesses really the answer for the rural  economy here?    I repeat the question I asked in 2012: does our  government understand the rural economy and  its needs at all? Does it understand that the  west coast and the rest of us in the real world  have to speculate to accumulate? Or is it  simply, and as always with governments, about  the number of votes in a given region? We have  to assume it is the latter and that beautiful  places like the Hebridean islands will never be in  a book about the world’s National Parks, sitting  on people’s coffee tables, while our island  economies 'plod' on as they always have. 

2015  33


BOOK

REVIEW

John Milne

Book Review: Ramble On by Sinclair McKay I have just finished reading Ramble On by  Sinclair McKay (Published by Fourth Estate in  2012), The story of our love for walking in  Britain and probably the best book on the  subject I have ever read.   The range of this book, the ground it covers,  literally and metaphorically, is remarkable.  From "The Garden of England" via the  Yorkshire Moors to Rannoch Moor, from  Dartmoor via the Peak District to the  Cairngorms and the slopes above Kingussie,  from issues of access to the literature inspired  by the outdoors. You may well ask why the  readers of the journal of the Scottish Wild Land  Group would wish to read about the long  distance ways of Southern England. The answer  is simple ‐ it's a book which will be appreciated  by all who wander anywhere in our country.   So I introduce you to the tone of the book by  quoting a number of excerpts from the book  with some observations of my own.  "We are lucky to be in an age where  the walker at last has the moral high  ground. Our enthusiastic activity brings  health and happiness without side  effects. Our carbon footprints are  dainty. Where we walk, innkeepers  prosper."  It may well be that walking The Cotswold Way  or some such brings nothing but "health or  happiness without side effects". However even  the author knows only too well that it is not all  fun as revealed by his account of an outing on  Rannoch Moor ‐ "we spent the next ninety  minutes picking our way back across the moor  in the midst of a tempest so violent that even  King Lear would have had difficulty shouting in 

34  

it." And, from earlier in the book "...dedicated  walkers will look out upon stinging rain  whipping across bare moorland, take a deep  breath of pleasure, then stride forwards ‐ and  upwards, into the raging storm." "Pleasure"?  However, I am sure we know what he means.  "Walkers now have a moral duty to  roam as much, and as widely, as they  can. We live in an age of multiple  anxieties, but one remarkably constant  fear, stretching back decades, is that we  are in danger of losing the countryside  that we love."  "...the land....is regarded as heritage, needing  protection in the way that listed buildings  receive it. You will hear the argument with  increasing frequency: the land is our legacy.  And now, extraordinarily, walkers might be  viewed as the guardians of that legacy."  "a moral duty to roam"? Now there's a great  thought for us, the guardians of the land.  ".....ramblers are certain to be co‐opted  into a new battle for the soul of the  countryside. Our walking rights will  soon be labeled 'inalienable'. For the  more we appreciate local beauty spots,  and elevate them to attractions,  abundant with rare species, the harder  it will be for property developers to  move into such places."  But no problem for windfarm developers. Even  property developers have been welcomed into  the Cairngorms National Park at the invitation  of the Park Authority and with the blessing of  the Courts. But surely such ongoing desecration  can only encourage us to answer the call to  participate in the "battle for the soul of the 


BOOK

countryside." It is my hope that a reading of  this book will persuade many more to respond  to Sinclair McKay's call. But his call is no new  thing. Throughout the book there are  references to the struggles upon which our  predecessors embarked over access.  "...walkers have, over the decades and the  centuries, changed our entire national  approach to ideas of property and  ownership."  And so the first chapter of the book, Edale to  Kinder Scout: The Peak District and the First  Modern Rambling Battle is largely devoted to  the 1932 Mass Trespass of Kinder Scout, with  all its political and class overtones. (However in  his book The Wild Rover Mike Parker suggests  that the 1896 Battle of Coalpit Lane on the  moors above Bolton was of far greater  significance with 10,000 and a week later,  20,000, turning out, much to the amazement   of the organisers, the Bolton Socialist Party and  the Social Democratic Federation (Marxist).  Many resent the fact that the Kinder trespass  with its four or five hundred is the one that is  remembered and celebrated.)  And, may I suggest that the struggle is not yet  over and while we still have to do battle over  access in spite of the legislation, it is now  mainly with those landowners, developers and  politicians who are determined to industrialise  our wildest landscapes.   The author does not refer to wind turbines  other than to compare "hillwalkers [who] today  loathe the spectacle of vast white windfarms"  with Wordsworth who objected ("snobbishly"  the author suggests) to "five or six white  houses, scattered over a valley, by their  obtrusiveness, dot the surface and divide it into  triangles, or other mathematical figures,  haunting the eye, and disturbing that repose  which might otherwise be perfect....". Is Sinclair  McKay really implying that in due course wind  turbines will come to be seen as no more  intrusive than a few whitewashed houses?          Tell that to hillwalkers from all over the world  gazing on the Monadhliath from the  Cairngorms, should the despoilers get their  way.   Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

REVIEW

In relation to the Cairngorms themselves he  says that   "this region also continues to draw in those  who wish simply to listen to the sound of  their own breathing as they wander alone.  These hills and their paths have always  seemed especially attractive to the more  philosophical kind of rambler....This plateau  seems in some ways the perfect distillation   of what the modern rambler is looking for:  the implacable, unbeautified face of nature."   I wish to finish this review, with references to  the link between walking and literature which I  mentioned in my opening paragraphs.   "The Romantics looked at nature in her  extremity and found that such  sublimity could awaken a soaring  spirituality in the beholder; as long,  that is, as that person was completely  alive to what he was seeing.  Wordsworth and Coleridge drew their  deepest inspiration from the darkness  of the hills."  and  "..it is unsurprising that walking is also  threaded through British literature, like  a network of well‐trodden paths.  Celebrated trampers include  Wordsworth and Coleridge, the  countryman poet John Clare; Jonathan  Swift and Jane Austen; Charles Dickens  and W. G. Sebald. In many cases  walking is integral to their poetry and  their fictions. It brings to the fore far  wider truths about human nature. “  I would suggest that the list of celebrated  trampers ought to include John Buchan, himself  an enthusiastic and skilled mountaineer. Many  of you will have read The Thirty‐Nine Steps with  the famous chase over the Galloway Hills.  Richard Hannay again appears in The Three  Hostages with its less well‐known but equally  memorable chase this time over the more  rugged hills of the Highlands.   Buchan's first novel, Sir Quixote of the Moors,  was written when he was a nineteen year old  undergraduate at Glasgow University. The  narrative is again located in "the wild highlands 

2015  35


BOOK

REVIEW

of the place called Galloway, in the bare  kingdom of Scotland". The first paragraph of  the first chapter, On The High Moors, reads in  part  "Before me stretched a black heath,  over which the mist blew in gusts, and  through whose midst the road crept like  an adder. Great storm‐marked hills  flanked me on either side, and since I  set out I had seen their harsh outline  against a thick sky.....Sometimes the fog  would lift for a moment from the face of  the land and show me a hilltop or the  leaden glimmer of the loch, but nothing  more ‐ no green field or homestead;  only a barren and accursed desert."  

I could say so much more but I hope I have said  enough to encourage you to read Ramble On  for yourself, and, it goes without saying, John  Buchan.   My next review surely has to be Mike Parker's  book The Wild Rover from which I quote to  whet your appetite ‐ "The scenery of our  country has been filched away from us just  when we have begun to prize it more than ever  before" (James Bryce, who was to become the  British Ambassador to the USA, introducing his  Access to Mountains (Scotland) Bill in 1892).  Surely an appropriate sentiment for the second  decade of the 21st century.  

There's a young man, embarking on his writing  career, who knew the Scottish hills. 

James Fenton

The Wildness of the South Atlantic The great southern ocean, far distant and  encircling the globe, its eternal gales and  tumultuous seas a barrier to the ice‐calm sea  beyond. A sea of behemoths, of whales, of  seals, of penguins, of ice: of ice, certainly of ice. 

36  

Floes of ice, adding ceaseless interest to the  dullness of the open sea. Floating islands of ice,  no two the same, myriad and unmatched in  form. Waterfalls of ice, frozen in time, pouring  off the great plateau behind. Rivers of ice, 


OPINION

gashed by unfathomable and uncrossable  crevasses, ending abruptly and  unceremoniously at the sea. Cliffs of ice, tall and  vertical, impeding any hope of access to the  interior. The whole land a blanket of ice, of  pristine whiteness in the long winter months  and early spring, turning a dirty grey as the  summer progresses, or a dirty pink where life   on the snow makes the ice its home. For there is  little else on which to live. Only in a few  favoured flushes is greenery is to be found,  mosses hugging the soil, lichens hugging tightly  the rocks. But in the short austral summer this  land can be home to many, feasting off the  bounty of the sea, the sea itself feeding off the  land, from flour ground‐up deep beneath the  ice.  Algae beneath the floes that feed the krill that  feed the fish that feed the penguins that feed  the seals that feed the whales (although it is not  quite so simple). A rush to breed, racing against  time and weather (a gale from nowhere, sudden  snows, instant drifts, whiteout), colonies of  thousands, of millions even, not beholden to  mankind but acting when they want and where  they want. And if we have the audacity to  intrude, to clutter up the ice with our  infrastructure, cocooned in our shells of  civilisation, we have to build around the  colonies, walk around the sea elephants (for  they are certainly not going to move for us),  avoid the moss, tread carefully with every step.  The animals and plants were here first, and  there is an acceptance of this by us latecomers. 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

We are not in charge. Our ships, our huts, our  bases, miniscule, scaled down to nothing in the  vastness of it all.  As the summer ends, brought to heel by the dark  and ice of winter, the retreat begins until only  benthic life remains. The continent now  inaccessible, unreachable, surrounded by the  new‐formed ice, and by the great southern  ocean, encircling the globe, with its eternal gales  and tumultuous seas.  But if penetrated, glory is to be found, even in  the depths of winter: the rare calm, stillness  incarnate, clarity to end all clarities, the sky a  blue to end all blues, out of which diamond dust  gently falls to sprinkle the glistening and frozen  sea. Bergs, both small and massive, imprisoned  in the floes, to walk amongst them is to  experience heaven itself. And it is the same in  summer, drifting leisurely amongst the floating  ice on a mirror‐calm sea, whether in the clear  blue of the sun or with snow lightly falling,  hissing gently as it hits the sea, what greater  glory has the planet to offer?  And what of the islands that bound this frozen  south? South Georgia, gateway to the Antarctic,  its mountains, when they can be seen, soaring  high, bespattered with ice and snow, glaciers  pouring down to the sea –  and into the sea in  some places, leaving trails of brash along the  fjords. The land, when it can be seen through  mist and sleet and rain, fringed with tussac and  an oasis of wildlife, a tremendous oasis of  uncountable penguins, of albatross, of seals.      Of seals once hunted and now returned in their 

2015  37


OPINION

thousands, of crowded beaches, penguins  cheek‐by‐jowl with seals, of no space left for us  humans (which is as it should be). But when we  as tourists do find a space into which we can  squeeze, our faces shine in wonder: why had  no‐one told us that so much is going on? That  we are not needed – ignored even?  But glimpses can be had of the desolate remains  of human endeavour, rusting whaling stations,  long abandoned from a time when we were  south to plunder – but no longer in these  enlightened times (if only this were true, for the  seas abound with fish, and where fish abound 

so the fishing fleets are found).  And 600 miles on to the Falkland Islands, lonely  outposts of Britain with a landscape more  familiar, Dartmoor nine thousands miles south,  or the Hebrides trans‐shipped. Wide open moors  and blasted heaths, the wind never failing and  no shelter to be found. A land of rounded hills,  of rock, of peat – and of an expansive sky,  always the sky, which dominates the  horizontality of the land; with great clouds  bringing up the cold from the south, or with  bright blue bringing across the dryness of the  Patagonian desert. There is space, plenty of  space, the land empty of people; for unless you  look carefully you may miss the widely‐scattered  settlements, a few houses here and there  standing in defiance, four‐square to the wind.  The inland may be empty and quiet, apart from  the bleat of the sheep or the wind eternally  rustling through the white‐grass, but the coasts  are rich – rich with islands and rich with life.   For like all these southern parts, it is the plenty  of the sea which feeds the land: which feeds the  penguins (four in kind), which feeds the  albatross, the geese, the ducks.  Walking the coast, you are passed from territory  to territory by steamer ducks (who have lost the  will to fly) and by kelp geese (the males as white  as snow), both keen by their chattering to move  you on; you walk from beach to beach, beaches  of pure white sand, and water virginal in its  clarity, beaches never empty but crowded with  penguins and gulls and oystercatchers. The birds  show little fear for this is their home and we  have no part to play: they have been here for  thousands of years and there is space, plenty of  space, they can wander and breed where they  wish.  These three southern lands, all uncluttered by  our buildings and roads, where we can glimpse  back to a time when we were just one of many  sharing a planet rich with the myriad miracles of  creation: to a time before we took over and  crowded out the rest, wanting all the space for  ourselves …  The great southern ocean, far distant and  encircling the globe, its eternal gales and  tumultuous seas a protective barrier to all the  lands within. 

38  


MY

WILD

LA ND

Michael Burke

My Wild Land: Mountain Men and the Sea

I was reading the autumn edition of Wild Land  News and two things struck me. One was  resonance and the other was coincidence. In  his article on the Isles, John Milne quoted Geoff  Salt’s article from the summer edition "There  seems to be a fundamental link between some  mountain men and the sea”. I have had the  good fortune to be on the mountains of  Scotland from a young age. Over the last 30  years I also celebrate the privilege to have  kayaked the west coast of Scotland from the  Cumbraes to the Shetlands, and pretty much  everything in between. So Geoff’s statement  resonated strongly with me. Now  coincidentally, John Milne and I were bringing  in the New Year in Glenlyon and we discussed  his visit to St Kilda and other things ‘Island'.  This article from me is at his invitation.   So what is this sea kayaking and mountain  adventure about for me? It’s the excitement    of the journey, the people who travel with me,  and my encounters with the land, the sea and  the universe.   Last year I stood on the top of the much‐loved  Cobbler, resplendent in its winter coat of icy  snow and black rock, reflecting that I had first  stood there 50 years previously, when I was  aged 14. I was led there and encouraged by the  generations of Glasgow men that opened up '  the Arrochar Alps’ in the depression, when  mountain adventures were better than  unemployed lethargy in the City. On that day I  met again Bob Smith, not anywhere on the hill,  but at the Narnain boulders, the shelter stones  of my youthful experiences on our local  Alps. Bob Smith, one of those men that had  inspired me to take to the hills. Simply, for me,  Bob represented the mountain man I aspired  Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

to be. Competent, capable and modest.   A longtime member of the Arrochar Mountain  Rescue Team, which he led for 13 years,  receiving an MBE for his efforts.   To meet him there on that nostalgic  day?           A coincidence, or an experience provided by the  universe in the outdoors? Splendid in his gear,  aged 80 and every inch the mountain man, still  going strong. A ‘chance meeting’ that makes  you think, reinforces your purpose and inspires  you to more.  I join up with two friends Colin and Ian on   a Friday afternoon, from a hard won early finish  at work. Drive south of Oban and paddle the  kayaks out from Arduanie. Over the sound of  Luing and through the Grey Dogs.  Meet the big  Atlantic swell out on the West side. Beach up  on Guirasdeal off Lunga and camp on the grass  a few meters above the high tide mark, facing  north and west into a setting sun.   It's Friday night!  The delicious pleasure in  knowing that you actually were at work in  Glasgow earlier this day, and now you are in  this wonderful and remote place. It's Friday  night! With pals! Two whole days in front of  you, a fire of the kind that can only be made  from copious supplies of driftwood, sounds and  smells of sea and swell, surrounded by shipping  lights and marker beacons. Enlightenment in  the air, and rich conversation of shared trips  past and future. And the accumulation of it all  brings us closer to the edge.   Then out to the Garvellachs, the most  meditative of islands, return by the strange  Belnahua and the exciting Cuan sound.   A parting glass in the chart room at the  Arduanie Hotel overlooking the sunset whence  you came. What's not to like?  

2015  39


MY

WILD

LA ND

And a mountain journey when last year my  wife Linda and I went on a stravaig through the  Fisherfields. Out from Kinlochewe and along  the shores of Lochan Fada, we head over  A’Mhaighdean and Ruadh Stac Mòr.  Mist  swirling around the tops and opening up  dramatic views of Fionn Loch a long way down.  Set camp at 700m on the hillside of Stac a’  Chaorruinn in the company of a howling wind  to ensure you know you’re out there…on your  own. Continue the journey down lonely Gleann  na Muice and engage closely with the Queen   of the Hags in her challenging domain.  Up the Allt and onto the top of remote Beinn  a’Chlaidheimh, the heart of Scotland’s  wilderness. To think walkers might miss this  special experience because it has  been ‘downgraded’ from a Munro! Stand at  that wild camp at Loch a’Bhrisidh in  the evening light. Look over An Teallach, the  king of mountains. Ben Dearg Mòr, the finest   of mountains, over yesterday's hills to Slioch,  and round to  tomorrow's prospects ‐ Sgurr  Bàn, Mullach, Coire Mhic Fhearchair and Beinn  Tarsuinn.  Catch yourself and feel deeply that  this wild place is yours to roam. And in this  lonely wilderness over 3 days, in Scotland,       on Munros ‐ meet no one.   Do we "bag” these trips? That does not even  begin to describe the concept or purpose. We  live them with each other. With friends  you know you would die for if the sea or the  mountain asked it of you. Feeling grateful that  a rolling sea has returned us; or a clagged‐up  ridge has released us. Deeply enjoying the  understanding, the skill, the physical effort and  the emotional strength that allows us to do it. 

40  

Photo: I. Smith 

How far? How many?  How long? Who  cares!! We could have gone over the  Fisherfields quicker ‐ yes, more efficiently ‐ yes,  or taken longer ‐ oh yes please!   I understand very well the motivational nature  of the challenge and its completion. The Munro  classification has brought many people onto the  mountains and led them to achievements they  did not think possible for themselves. In these  days of obesity and mental health illnesses    I want our land open and welcoming to as many  of our people as is possible.  And for some the  competition with the elements is a most  compelling driving force.   I came to the sea when I gave  up competitive sport. I soon discovered that  on the sea measurements relate more to your  capacity to survive. How strong is the wind,  from which direction, how high are the waves,  how fast are they coming at us, how long can  we go on, how far to the nearest landing?   I think it is a folly to compete against the sea;  one travels with it and is thankful for a safe  return.   Often have I meditated on Chris Guthrie’s  mantra ‐ only the land endures. And with the  untimely death of Ian, my good friend of many  years with whom I have travelled so happily the  land and sea, my journey and that mantra are  only more keenly felt. It's about how one feels,  and how you feel often reflects where you are  in life. You see what is there but as time and life  passes, it is with different eyes and  understandings. The fundamental is being open  to it, to take the time to appreciate what is  around you and why you are here in it:  to see, 


MY

hear, smell, touch and above all to feel.  To walk in the soft rain on the mountain grass,  shimmering with the gossamer of the spiders'  webs.  Up close in a hammering downpour on a  flat sea surrounded by countless little saucer‐ shaped pools. To stand tall on the top of  Bidean taken by mountains stretching endlessly  into the sunlit mist, an experience redolent of  your journeys still to come. To sit in the kayak  on an open corner at Ardnamurchan  recognising some 20 islands as my gaze takes  me as far as the Western Isles. Or walking any  one of the hills around my house at Glenlyon,  hills that I know like old friends and to whom   I am closely connected.   Two years ago I went up Mont Blanc. It was  certainly challenging, required some serious  preparation and for me was a great personal  achievement. Would I regard it as my most  treasured experience? Not by a distance. These  times are reserved for the moments when  place, people and universe come together in  harmony and I am in the zone to feel it. It can’t  be pre‐planned. You travel in hope and in  expectation. It happens and you're there,  you’re in it. It’s embedded at the heart of why  we make the effort to be in these wild places.  How does it work with the islands? I think that  there is a feel and an attraction  to individual islands that is common with the  mountains, although perhaps in different ways.  When I talk about kayak journeys to the islands  it is certainly from the perspective of the  individual identity that I have made up for each  one, which depends of course on my  own perspective at that time. So I can express  it in terms of the attraction of Rona or the  achievement of the Shiants; the thrill of sitting  under the cliffs at St John’s Head in Orkney and  landing on the unattainable Old Man of Hoy;  I could never tire of engaging with all the  myriad islands of Mull from the Torrance rocks  of Kidnapped, the peace of Iona, the magic of  Fingal’s cave, and the fun of sitting on the  Dutchman’s Cap; seeing the amazing birdlife on  the cliffs of the Treshnish. I read recently  that many Munro baggers leave Ben More on  Mull to the last. I wonder why? 

Wild

Land

News,

SPRING

WILD

LA ND

For me Shetland must be one of the best  kayaking venues in the world. I recall standing  on the cliffs overlooking Esha Ness as an  Atlantic storm pounded the cliffs and  wondering how it was possible to kayak down  there. However, we did when it was calm and  experienced the many caves, the stacks, the  rock architecture that is the consequence of  these dramatic seas, and also that singular  feeling of being on the edge of the world.   I am taken by how easy it is in Scotland on the  hills, and even more so on the sea, to be on  your own if that is what you wish. However,  when I am out on the sea or the hillside, I do  make a habit of engaging with the people   I meet. Unless you are on Ben Lomond on   a Saturday or Ben Nevis on one of the charity  fundraising days, the numbers will be few.           I often leave these encounters richer and wiser.  It is a throwback to a time when we were  interdependent as a community. When  travellers and pilgrims relied on each other for  information and help.   On a day last June, where Gleann Mearnan and  Gleann Cailliche meet, a man approaches us  bearing a weighty rucksack. This is unusual  because there are no routes to be bagged here  in a conventional sense. An encounter and a  conversation is shared as we walk together to  see the Little People up at Tigh nam Bodach.       I was able to advise the traveller on the next  stage of his journey over Beinn Mhanach. As he  walked away up Gleann Cailliche I was left  somewhat curious. He was different, and             I did not know why. I now am glad to know him  as the Pilgrim who featured in the Autumn issue  of Wild Land News. A coincidence or  the intervention of the Little People?  These are some of the things that keep me  going on land and sea, connecting with the  universe, for some more years I hope. It’s about  the journey and the experiences it brings ‐ often  different, always enriching and the prospect of  new insights. So, thanks John. I enjoyed reading  the Autumn edition of Wild Land News. There  was a lot in it for me. 

2015  41


A D V E R T

42  


MEMBERSHIP REQUEST I wish to join SWLG: 

Individual £10           

Two at same address £15 

Corporate £50 

Reduced £5 (Senior Citizen, unwaged, under 18)

Name (s) : .......................................................................................................................................................................................    Address: .........................................................................................................................................................................................    ...............................................................................................................................................  Postcode:  . ………………………  Telephone: ....................................................................................................................................................................................     E‐mail:   ..........................................................................................................................................................................................      

  I wish to pay by standing order.     

To the manager of .........................................................................................................................................................................    Bank address:  ................................................................................................................................................................................    Please pay SWLG the sum of £ …………..…..  annually until further notice, starting on   .......................................................    Please debit my account :    

Sort code: ........................   Account number: ..................................................................... 

This supersedes any existing order in favour of SWLG.  Signed:   ................................................................................................................................. Date:  ............................................        FOR BANK USE: Payee sort code: 83‐15‐18 account: 00257494 .............................................     I wish to pay by cheque.  (Please make payable to “SWLG” and send it along with this form)  Yes, I would like to receive free copies of Wild Land News:       

   

   By E‐mail (this helps us keep our printing, postage costs and carbon footprint to a minimum)     By post  Please add me to the SWLG E‐mail mailing list and keep me posted about volunteering opportunities with SWLG 

 

Gift Aid Declaration – tax payers please sign  If you pay UK income tax, you can increase the value of your subscription to the group by completing a gift aid  declaration. Signing this does not cost you anything. If you pay tax at the higher rate, you can claim higher rate relief for  your subscription on your own tax return. You can cancel this declaration at any time.       I  want  the  Scottish  Wild  Land  Group  to  treat  all  subscriptions  and  donations  I  make  from  the  date  of  this  declaration until further notice as Gift Aid donations.    I confirm that I will pay an amount of Income Tax and/or Capital Gains tax for each tax year (6 April to 5 April) that is at least  equal  to  the  amount  of  tax  that  all  the  charities  or  CASCs  that  I  donate  to  will  reclaim  on  my  gifts  for  the  tax  year.    I  understand that other taxes such as VAT and Council Tax do not qualify.   I understand that the SWLG will reclaim 25p of tax  for every £1 I donate.     Signed:  .................................................................................................................................  Date: ..............................................      Please notify us if you want to cancel this declaration, or if you change your home address, or if you no longer pay sufficient  tax on your income or capital gains.  

Please post this form to:    Tim Ambrose, SWLG Treasurer, 8 Cleveden Road, Glasgow G12 0NT 

Wild

Land

News,

Join us, 2share in our work and help to protect Scotland’s wild land. 015

SPRING

 43


Scottish Wild Land Group Working to protect Scotland’s species, environment and landscapes

Photo: Torridon, A. Torode 

We campaign for:      

protection and promotion of Scotland’s wild land safeguards against inappropriate wind farm and other developments environmentally-sensitive land and wildlife management planning controls on the spread of hill tracks restoration of rare and missing species and environments connection of habitats and protected areas to allow ecological recovery and species movements

We are Scotland’s oldest and only volunteer-run wild land charity. Join us today at www.swlg.org.uk 44  


Wild Land News 87 - Spring/Summer 2015