Page 1


THE VOICE of the English-speaking working classes is preserved in the rich body of song that developed in the centuries leading up to the Industrial Revolution and in the years surrounding the Great Depression. The songs abound with hope, despair, delight, passion and humour. This original collection of 12 folk-inspired rounds borrows lyrics from English and Scottish folksong, American blues and bluegrass, Afro-American spirituals and even traditional “charms”. Should the range of any round seem daunting, turn to the final page for an account of “partnered voices”. Brian Kogler (b. 1954) lives on the sunny Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. He has been composing rounds for over forty years and now has a healthy cache from which to draw selections such as this. Brian was for many years a professional cartoonist with The Sydney Morning Herald, taking leave to study composition at the NSW Conservatorium of Music. He enjoys listening to Early Music, playing the family of recorders and setting crosswords.

Symbols

   

E

Entry points for each voice (or partnered group) Ostinato entry point (usually after all voices have entered) Not a true fermata, but a point of final “sustain” for the singers Suggested breath mark (not a pause in the music) Range indicator

B

Catalogue No. BKR-009 Copyright © 2017 by Brian Kogler All Rights Reserved bkogler@bigpond.com


3

1. Bye and Bye 3 parts Afro-American Spiritual (adapted)

Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Slow, sustained

Œ # # 3 # D [D & 4 œ œ

.. œ .

Bye and

4

(q = 74)

bye,

### œ œ œ œ œ œ &

&

###

œ œ œ œ œ

heav - y

œ.

bur - den

œ

I’ll go

lay

J

44 œ .

and bye, I’ll go lay

6

œ œ

down,

down

œ

œ œ œ.

down

my

heav - y load,

U ,

Œ

j

œ œ œ œ œ

œ

œ.

my

I

long

j

œ œ O Lord,

, >

U

œ

bur - den;

œ

J

Bye

Ž œ œ œ to lay

my

U , 34 . ˙œ œ œ . ˙ (final)

œ œ

Bye and

bye!

Bye and bye, I’ll go lay down my heavy load*, Bye and bye, I’ll go lay down my burden; I long to lay my heavy burden down, O Lord, Bye and bye!

*The words “I’m goin’ to lay down my heavy load” may refer equally to a place in Heaven and eventual freedom from slavery.

_________________________ Copyright © 2017 by Brian Kogler

Bye and


4

2. Hallelujah, Fly Away 3 parts (partnered voices) Music by BRIAN KOGLER

After Alfred E. Bromley (1905–1977)

Broadly

(q = 92)

Œ

> b b 44 œ œ & J [Bb Some glad

3

&

 œ ˙ j œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ __

Lord, I’ll sure -ly

fly

œ

a - way,

Ž

b &b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ 7

œ

Some day I’ll walk by the

life

is

œ

œ œ

down there

,

j

œ

œ

wat - er - side,

>

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

morn - ing when this

>

bb

>

j œ œ œ

œ

F

j œ œ œ

o

in

-

,

-

œ œ ˙ Jor

-

b &b œ

Œ

> ‰ œ

___

O



b &b œ . œ œ œ œ

Ž

lu - ia, fly

b &b œ ,

Jor

J

Lord, I’ll

,

,

Coda

œ

œ

a - way!

œ

œ

-

dan;

,

j

œ

I'll

œ I'll

dan;

,

œ œ œ œ ˙

O Hal - le - lu - jah, fly a - way!

There is no satisactory final sustain for this round. Each part should either “run out” in succession or jump (at the , symbol) to the coda below.

,

ver,

œ œ œ œ fly

a - way.

œ œ œ œ fly

a - way.

œ œ œ œ

fly

a - way.

U ˙

U ˙

U ˙

_____________________________________________________ These lyics are based on those of Alfred E. Brumley, which begin: “Some glad morning when this life is o’er, I’ll fly away; / To a home on God’s celestial shore, I’ll fly away.”

,


5

3. O Waly, Waly, O! 3 parts Music & music by BRIAN KOGLER Slow, with expression

(q = 86)

Œ

Eb

[

Bb

b & b 44 ‰ . r œ œ œ œ . œ As I

3

b & b 45 œ

,

ly,

5

œ œ œ. And

ly

Ž

b 4 Uœ . b & 4

sigh,

9

did

 U

44 œ .

the green

I

j œ œ

“My

morn - ing

ear

-

œ J œ

val

-

ley

œ

I

gai

-

45 ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 44 œ

go,

,

one

œ J œ

a - long

b &b œ œœœ œ ˙ -

7

went out

45

œ œ ˙

j .. œ

œ

œ

own

b & b 45 œ .

j œ œ œ œ.

die,

O wa - ly, wa

œ

dear

heard

a

son,

j 4 j œ 4 œ- .

ly,

œ

œ U

-

moth - er

O!”

he’s

,

weep

œ

œ

sure

to

> r œ œ œ œ. œ

As

I

As I went out one morning early, And along the green valley I gaily did go, I heard a mother weep and sigh, “My own dear son, he’s sure to die, O waly, waly, O!”

and

went out

45

j . œ . one


6

4.  Sule Skerrie 3 parts Traditional Orkney

Music by BRIAN KOGLER

(q = 64)

Simply

E

[

C

## 5 Œ œ œ. œ nœ. & 4 ‰ J I

 U

# & # nœ œ nœ œ sil  - kie

&

##

J

__ own          coun     try,

up - on

a sil - kie

,

œ.

J œ œ

r

œ

œ

And when,

is

in

œ.

4

j #œ œ. I

œ

am

a

‰ j œ œ œ. œ

œ

j

And when I’m in

my

œ œ œ œ

œ

œ œ œ œ œ

O

in

my

## j , œ œ . # œ œ œ n œ n œ & œ J œ J it

,

land,

in the sea,

6

try, My home

the

j œ œœ œ œ œ n œ-

sea,

U

œ

a man

,

œ.

in the

œ œ nœ

am

2

Sule Sker-

when

I’m

own

U , j

. œ- Jœ œ œ n œ .

rie.

I am

a man

coun -

. œ J œ œ .

up - on the

I am a man upon the land, I am a silkie in the sea, And when I’m in my own country, My home it is in Sule Skerrie.

______________________________________________________ Child Ballad No.113 records a version of The Great Silkie [Selkie] of Sule Skerry, an  Orkney ballad about a “shape-shifting” grey seal that takes on the form of a man when  on dry land. The silkie tells a lamenting maiden that he is father to her son. He takes her  son from her, predicting that she will one day marry a fine gunner who will someday  go to sea and kill “both my young son and me.”


7

5. Comin Thro’ the Rye 3 parts Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Robert Burns (1759–96)

Quietly flowing

Œ

# 3 U & 4 œ.

E

[D

j

Com -

4

&

#

œ

,

rye,

7

&

&

œ

œ œ

œ.

in

thro’ the

rye,

in

#

œ

She

drag

œ bod

-

œ.

y;

,

œ œ

poor bod - y,

œ œ œ œ œ

œ

thro’ the

j

œ

 U -

gled

j

# œ œ œ œ œ -

10

(q = 93)

œ

at

j

œ

She

j

,

rye,

her

œ œ Oh,

œ

œ

drag - gled

œ -

pet

œ œ œ

her

œ

in

œ

œ

thro’ the

œ

ti - coat - ie, Com

Ž U œ

all

œ œ œ

Oh, Jenny’s all wet, poor body; She draggled her petticoatie.

________________________________________________ Adapted from the original lyrics by Robert Burns as they appeared (in the final year of the poet’s life) in James Johnson’s The Scots Musical Museum. Burns made nearly 200 contributions to this enterprising Scottish folk song collection, often composing new words to old songs.

œ

œ

wet,

œ

pet - ti - coat - ie.

Comin thro’ the rye, poor body, Comin thro’ the rye, She draggled at her petticoatie, Comin thro’ the rye.

draggle (from Scots trachle): to make wet and dirty by dragging.

-

Com

Jen - ny’s

œ

j nœ œ œ

œ.

,

poor

-


8

6. I Wish, I Wish 4 parts (with optional ostinato) Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Traditional English

Plaintively (q = 105)

Œ

Eb

[

Bb

4

b 3 &bb 4 œ

wish,

 bb b Uœ œ j , j & œ œ œ œ born,

8

.. ˙

I

bb

N final

U

& b ˙

knee,

12

&

bb b U ˙

,

And ly - in’

Ž And

,

&

U bbb

˙

me.

I

œ œ With

,

œ I

œ J œ

smil - in’

was

œ

œ.

green grass

..

up -

œ that

œ

% œ œ

œ

my

ba - by

was

˙

œ

œ

on

its

fa

œ.

j œ œ œ

dead

and lay - in’

j

j œ œ.

œ

a - grow - in’

all

œ

œ

œ

-

ther’s

j

œ œ.

œ œ

in

my

j œ œj œœ o

-

ver

I wish my baby it was born And lyin’ smilin’ upon its father’s knee, And I was dead and layin’ in my grave With green grass growin’ all over me.

Ostinato begins at measure 3

jœ œ ‰ œj œ œ .. œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ p ˙ final ˙˙ .. U œ bb b œ œ n g . j œ . ggg ˙˙ .. & œ œ œ œ œ g œ œ. ‰ Œ œ. ˙ %

Harp

wish

œ.



grave,

16

I

œ œ œ nœ œ

œ

œ

œ œ

b & b b 43 Œ


9

7. Cushy Cow, Bonny 4 parts Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Anon (18C English)

Gently pleading Eb

[

Bb

Œ

b 3 & b b 4 œ.

j œ œ

Cush

4

&

bb b U

,

˙

milk,

8

U ,

b &bb œ

silk;

13

&

bbb

 œ

œ-

thou wilt,

-

y

œ

cow,

bon - ny,



>

œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ

And

I

œ. œ I’ve

(q = 108)

J a

Ž

will

œ

˙

œ œ

gown

of

silk

and a

thou

wilt

let

œ œ œ œ

O

let

down

œ.

œ

a

down

œ

thy

Cushy cow, bonny, O let down thy milk, And I will give thee a gown of silk; I’ve a gown of silk and a bright silver tee, If thou wilt let down thy milk to me.

_____________________________________________

cushy: gentle. tee: a halter (rope).

of

N final

U

œ nœ œ

œ œ œ

˙

gown

,

˙

bright sil - ver

From Songs for the Nursery (1805). Milkmaids would use these words to charm milk from an uncooperative cow.

thy

œ J nœ

thee

˙

if

œ

œ

give

‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ

œ

tee,

œ.

milk

œ

If

j

U,

œ œ

to me.


10

8. I Am Weary (Let Me Rest) 4 parts Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Letta C. Lord (1864)

Slow and gentle

Œ

& b 44 ‰

D

[

A

2

j œ

œ

O

‰  U

&b œ

œ your

7

& b 43

œ. I

kiss

Lay my

œ

œœ

œ œ œ

lov - ing

arms

œ œ œ œ am wea

-

ry,

.. œ

œ œ me,

moth

-

er,

œ J œ

œ

head

up - on

your

œ œ a

œ let

œœ

44 œ

œ œ me

œœ

round

j

œ-

œ

kiss

your

Ž U

43 œ .

‰ œ

breast;

‰ U

-

,

œ.

œ.

‰ œ œ

& b œ œ œ. dar - lin’,

5

(q = 52)

Throw

‰ ‰

œ.

me:

U

œ.

3 j 4

œ

For

,

rest.

O kiss me, mother, kiss your darlin’, Lay my head upon your breast; Throw your loving arms around me: For I am weary, let me rest.

______________________________________________ In 1864, lyricist Letta C. Lord and composer George F. Root published a Civil War minstrel song Kiss Me Mother, Kiss Your Darling. More than a century later bluegrass songwriter Pete Kuykendall (b.1938) applied Lord’s lyrics to a melody of his own; it has now become a country classic. In the same way, this round has set Letta Lord’s tender words to new music. The entry points for voices 2 and 3 appear odd, or counter-intuitive, but with careful counting the harmonies will emerge.

j œ

œ

O

kiss

œ œ .. me,


11

9. Peace Like a River 3 parts Afro-American Spiritual

Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Slow

(h = 58)

Œ

Eb

[D 4

b & b 22 Œ

b & b œ.

j

œ œ

12

&

bb

˙ in in

my my

Like

a

a a

.. ˙

œ bœ

J

riv - er foun - tain

U ,

œ-

soul. soul.

er, tain,

-

O O

soul. soul.

œ.

-

Œ œ œ nœ œ

w

Ž U

Œ

˙

riv foun

 U

my my

b œ œ œ œ &b it’s like it’s like

œ

œ

riv - er in foun - tain in

8

˙

in in

I’ve got I’ve got

œ

w

my my

soul, soul,

˙

œ

Like Like

a a

..

Like a river in my soul, O I’ve got peace: Lord, it’s like a river in my soul. Like a fountain in my soul, O I’ve got joy: Lord, it’s like a fountain in my soul. Like an ocean in my soul, O I’ve got love: Lord, it’s like an ocean in my soul.

˙

œ

like like

a a

,

˙ peace: joy:

A˙ Lord, Lord,

Œ œ œ. j nœ a a

riv - er foun - tain


12

10.  Alarum Blues 3 parts (partnered voices) Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER Slow and weary

(q = 63)

Œ

5 &b 4 ‰ œ œ œ

F

[

Bb

Woke

2

U œ œ j b & œ œ

R

clock ___

I guess my

4

œ

up

,

œ

j œ- œ

this

mo’n - in’,

œ œ œ it jes’ fo’  -

was

a - roun’

U

Ž

œ œ œ git

to

&b œ Oh,

r ,œ

œ

wrong: I’m

œ #œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ.

I got the Wak - in’ Late A - lar - um

œ.

œ ’bout

twel’,

,

œ œ œ œ.

sound

it - sel’.

, U œ œ. j œ œ . nœ œ bœ bœ œ œ j œ &b - œ œ œ œ œ bœ lous - y no - good tim - er done me

6

bœ œ œ

,

j

œ

That

˙

ly - in’ here in my long johns.

œ-

Blues.

Note: The final fermatas are a sussestion only; they do not align in the usual way.   This round has the distinction of having several sets of notes suitable for a final sustain.

Woke up this mo’nin’, was aroun’ ’bout twel’, I guess my clock it jes’ fo’git to sound itsel’. That lousy no-good timer done me wrong: I’m lyin’ here in my long johns. Oh, I got the Wakin’ Late Alarum Blues.

_______________________________________________ In 1876 American clock company Seth Thomas was granted a patent for a  small bedside alarm clock, arguably the first of its type.  The mass-produced  programmable clock soon became vital to the working day.


13

11. Light Me Home 3 parts Traditional Cornish

Music by BRIAN KOGLER Light and airy

E

[

A

Π>j

## & # 43 ‰

(q = 50)

U

œ œ œ œ œ

œ

Jack,

Wad,

&

###

Who

tick - led the

>

œ œ œ œ œ œ

and __

made __

her

œ

œ-

Jack o’ the Lan - tern!

# # # j , r  œ Uœ œ œ. œ œ œ &

œ œ œ œ

maid,

Ž, œ

mad! ___

and

U

œ.

>

œ œ

Light me

> ≈ nœ œ

2

home,

Joan,

4

Joan the

j ,

œ

œ œ nœ œ

made

her

mad,

,

j œ j œ- œ- n œ- œ-

6

Jack o’ the Lantern! Joan the Wad, Who tickled the maid and made her mad! Light me home, the weather’s bad.

_______________________________________________ This is a “foul-weather” charm. In English folklore Joan the Wad is Queen of the Pixies, Jack-o’-Lantern the Pixie King. Each is a Cornish variant of “Will-o’-the wisp”, a phenomenon caused by the combustion marsh gas (ignis fatuus). The flickering night-lights were believed to be torches carried by the “Pisky” folk (“wad” is Cornish for torch), who were not beyond tickling or pinching people out of mischief.

the weath - er’s bad.


14

12. Zumbody Yah 4 parts (with optional ostinato) Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER Fast and rhythmic F [E & C

Œ% œ

œ œ œ

Zum -

3

&

, > . œ œ Way

6

& œ

,

yah!

œ I

Ostinato

-

bod - y

œ œ J

œ

œ œ

yah

gon - na

J

get

yah!

œ.

œ

 œ.

œ œ

hear

the

Lord

a - call - in'

?C p

J

œ œ œ

Œ Œ

zum.

Œ

U

œ

J

Glo

-

œ ry,

Ž

œ œ œ

-

œ

e - o,

zum - bod - y

œ œ ˙

zum - bod - y

U

œ œ œ

Zum

zum - a - zum

yah.

Œ œ œ œ

zum - zum zum.

œ

œ œ U

œ

œ œ ˙

Zum - zum, zum-ma zum,

? ˙-

to

œ

Ostinato begins with the first part

œ

up

Way

U

% œ

œ

œ œ œ

zum - bod - y

J

œ

U , > œ

œ

e - o,

a final

(h = 94)

Zum - zum - zum

˙-

ΠΠ..

zum.

Zumbody yah* gonna get up to Glory, Wayeo, zumbody yah! Wayeo, zumbody yah! I hear the Lord a-callin’ zumbody yah. 2. Zumbody yah goin’ way up the mountain, (etc). 3. Zumbody yah risin’ up in the mo’nin’, (etc). 4. Zumbody Yah gonna sing Hallelujah. (etc).

* “Zumbody yah” is pronounced zoom-buddy-yah. It means “somebody here”.


Range: Five of the rounds in this collection have a comfortable compass of an octave, ninth or tenth. Four rounds extend the voice to an eleventh and another three to a twelfth, intervals quite common to rounds of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. If this seems a stretch for your singers, consider partnering the voices. Partnered voices: When dividing a group into its parts, it is wise to combine female voices “high-with-low” (SA) and male voices “high-with-low” (TB). Each compound “part” will therefore be comprised of both kinds of voice, ideally in equal numbers. The extremes of the melodic range will then be met by at least one strong voice:

Singing in fewer parts: It may be argued that the rounds and canons of earlier centuries can be performed effectively in fewer parts than demanded by the music. It must be stressed, however, that this set of 12 rounds in the Folk tradition behaves differently: a three-part round is not satisfactory in two parts, just as a four-part round might seem wanting in three. Performance: Round-singing is most often a social or pre-rehearsal activity. However, due to their length and content, some of these sacred rounds lend themselves to programmed performance. The duration of a round may be extended by (a) having a solo voice or instrument announce the melody, then (b) having the chorus or ensemble sing the round in unison, and finally (c) by performing the round harmonically for a few cycles, before concluding on a sustained chord. The appearance of an ostinato late in performance will rekindle audience interest.

Teaching Rounds Help sheets with advice on teaching rounds are available as a free .PDF on request to bkogler@bigpond.com


Profile for Swirly Music

Brian Kogler: Hallelujah, Fly Away  

12 rounds in the folk tradition for mixed voices. Available from www.SwirlyMusic.org

Brian Kogler: Hallelujah, Fly Away  

12 rounds in the folk tradition for mixed voices. Available from www.SwirlyMusic.org