Page 1


ARE YOU a square? Can you easily retrieve a gas bill from 1979? Do you pine for the return of spats? Do you chew each mouthful forty times while letting the bottle “breathe”? And when you watch TV, do you recoil from all murders except those committed on the village green? If so, these rounds are for you: they will loosen you up in all the right places. Squares aside, they may of course be sung by mixed groups of all ages. Should the range of any round seem daunting, turn to the final page for an explanation of “partnered voices”. Brian Kogler (b. 1954) lives on the sunny Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. He has been composing rounds for over forty years and now has a healthy cache from which to draw selections such as this. Brian was for many years a professional cartoonist with The Sydney Morning Herald, taking leave to study composition at the NSW Conservatorium of Music. He enjoys listening to Early Music, playing the family of recorders and setting crosswords.

Symbols

   

E

Entry points for each voice (or partnered group) Ostinato entry point (usually after all voices have entered) Not a true fermata, but a point of final “sustain” for the singers Suggested breath mark (not a pause in the music) Range indicator

B

Catalogue No. BKR-006 Copyright © 2017 by Brian Kogler All Rights Reserved bkogler@bigpond.com


3

1. Any Fish Will Do 3 parts Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER

(h = 58)

Unhurried

Œ

D

[

A

2 &2 ˙

Eel,

5

&

œ love

U

& #œ. œ do,

gar,

ling,

œ

you,

j Nœ

9

˙

the bream or the

13

j &Œ œ œ. #œ ˙. it’s

all

char: An - y

j #œ

the

same

œ

œ. #œ

mad - ly

œ œ

,

œ œ œ #œ

#œ œ #œ œ #œ ˙

, >

Nœ ˙ with

˙

in

you.

When I’m

Œ

blue wa - hoo.

œ œ œ œ

An - y fish you

U

nœ #œ œ ˙ I

love you!

Eel, gar, ling, char: Any fish will do When I’m in love with you, Madly in love with you. Any fish will do, the bream* or the blue wahoo. Any fish you care to name, it’s all the same When I love you! *Bream to be pronounced as brim

_________________________ Copyright © 2017 by Brian Kogler

in

,

œ œ #œ #œ œ

Ž

œ œ #˙

When

do

œ ˙

love with

U

œ

fish will

An - y fish will

j #œ. œ ˙ care

to

name,


4

2. Luke, I Am Your Father 4 parts Music by BRIAN KOGLER

After George Lucas

Majestically

[

D A

ΠU

2 & 2 ˙.

 U

,

te,

7

-

ci - us,

b œ-

œ œ œ œ œ œ Lu - ci - us,

,

j j œ & œ œ - œ œ œ œ œ

 U

j

& œ. Lu

-

œ œ

ci - us,

œ

sum

pa

sum

ip

,

j

œ

sum

œ œ œ œ œ

˙ -

œ.

Lu - ci - us,

O Lu - ci - us

te,

œ œ

œ œ œ.

Lu - ci - us,

Ž U

10

˙.

œ œ

Lu

4

(h = 46)

trem

sum

˙

œ

œ œ J -

se

œ

ip - se

œ

pa - trem

Ó

te.

Lucius, sum ipse patrem te. O Lucius, sum patrem te. (Luke, I am your father.) Lou-kee-oos, soom ip-say pah-trem tay.

________________________________________________ Towards the end of Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (1980) villain Darth Vader reveals his paternity to Luke Skywalker in words very similar to these. Director George Lucas had hoped to voice Vader using Orson Welles, but finally settled for the less recognisable James Earl Jones.

˙. te,

œ œ

pa - trem

œ

œ

pa - trem

,

#œ O


5

3. Curious Fly 3 parts Anon.

Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Quick

Œ

E

[D 3

12 & 8 Œ.

©

( . = 92)

œ œ ˙.

> .. # œ œ œ ˙ .

Cu - ri - ous fly,

cu - ri - ous fly,

>œ .

U œ œ œ œ œ #œ ˙. & vin - e - gar, vin - e - gar

5

. œ

Ž

& œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ-

9

e - gar, vin - e - gar jug,

& œ. Pick

bœ. -

led

U

Vin - e - gar,

Slip - per - y

‰ œ. #œ œ œ œ œ œ -

>

œ.

Cu

> ‰ œ œ #œ Slip - per - y

œ.

œ #œ œ

œ-

bug,

(Vin - e - gar

jug.)

œ œ œ

>œ œ œ œ.

Œ.

jug,

slip - per-y, slip - per - y edge,

7

,

U

>

ri - ous fly,

Vin

œ.

Œ.

œ #œ œ œ. -

edge,

˙.

œ.

-

edge,

> ‰ œ. œ œ ˙. Cu - ri- ous fly,

Curious fly, Vinegar jug, Slippery edge, Pickled bug.

____________________________________________________ Household hint: A jar containing a little cider vinegar makes a very serviceable trap for fruit flies. Cover the cup with cling film, then perforate the wrap with a toothpick.

..


6

4. Lost in London 2 parts (with optional ostinato) Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER Very evenly

Œ

E

[D

4 ˙ &2



& œ

lost

4

& œ feel

Ostinato (Alto)

-

œ

in

Lon

ing

˙

Room

œ

œ

U

˙

Tea

3

(h = 60)

clock

-

œ #œ it’s

Eal

% 4 &2 œ

-

wait,

˙

wrong,

Coach

U

œ

don,

who

œ

œ

ing;

it

œ

œ

could be

˙

tour

long

knows

œ nœ

where?

Œ

,

œ

gone. I’m

,

œ

œ

œ

œ I’ve

œ a

q

%

˙

Russ - el Square.

Ostinato begins at measure 4 of the round

[U]

.. ˙

I’m

& ˙

˙

˙

j Œ œ œ . œ œ œ-

out - side

j

a sta - tion:

[U]

Œ œ œ . œ œ œI’m

mis-tak - en.

I’ll

It’s

,

œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ -

Pic - ca - dil - ly

Cir - cus. No,

,

œ .. œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ -

ask these road - side

work - ers. I’m

Tea Room clock wrong, Coach tour long gone. I’m lost in London, who knows where? I’ve a feeling it’s Ealing; it could be Russel Square.

___________________________________________________ On average, nearly 100,000 tourists visit London every day. Some of them get lost.


7

5. In the Garden of Eden 2 parts (with optional ostinato) Anon.

Music by BRIAN KOGLER

©

( . = 120)

Lively

E

[D

# 12 Œ j . j & 8 œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œJ œ . In

3

&

qe

# œ.

Gar - den of

the

œ œJ œ œ œ J

One

U

%

cov - ered Ad - am’s and

E - den were

j

œ

œ nœ

the

oth - er

J

œ. œ œ ˙. J two

œ #œ

cov - ered

lit - tle leaves:

U

j

,

œ.

,

Eve’s.

j ..

œ

œ

In

the

Note: There are four places in the ostinato below for a final hold.

Ostinato

% ? # 12 œ .

Ostinato begins upon the return of the first voice

8

(Tenors)

There

œ

3 ? # œ.

œ œ.

J

Ad - am

œ.

5 ? # œ.

stor 7 ? # œ.

wind

and Eve

-

y

œ came

œ. goes,

œ œ.

J

a - long,

[U] , œ œ œ. œ œ œ #œ n œ œ œ. #œ. J J J

in

J

the Gar - den, as

œ.

nœ -

with

œ. one

œ bœ

bœ œ. J

blus - ter - y

œ came

œ

J and

nœ blew

œ

J

an - y

œ œ #œ J

[U] ,

œ

J

out - en

eve - ry - bod - y knows, Lived

J

clothes;

And as

the

[U] ,

œ œ

day,

A might - y

œ

œ bœ

J

the leaves

œ œ.

J

a - way.

__________________________________________________ This playful round and its extended ostinato take their words from the opening of a very bawdy folk poem, the only part of it fit to reproduce. Any singers who feel uncomfortable with these lyrics should bear in mind that they are being saved from something a good deal worse.

#œ J

J

U

œ


8

6. 7-Bar Blues 2 parts (with ostinato) Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER 3

qq q e =

Ostinato

Light swing



? # 42 .. œ

œ

Doo 4

(q = 94) Ostinato begins as a 7-bar solo

? # nœ doo

doo,

doo

doo,

œ-

,

j Nœ N œ J

œ

doo

doo,

doo,

œ

œ

doo

doo,

doo,

Ba - doo,

œ

doo - ba

ba

# œ-

-

..



dum:

The round  begins at the  symbol and repeats until an ending is wanted. The  symbol shows where all three parts must jump to the coda. 3

qq q e =

Round

Eb

[

C#

5

&

#

Light swing

(q = 94)

I’m feel - in’

œ bœ #œ bit want ble

-

off my and

 Coda

> more cake groan

# & 42

,

œ

do?

,

doo.

too my I

far, cake, grum -

..



U œ.

> U œ- b œ n œ œ .

blue.

I’m

ba

way want do

˙

œ-

Ba - doo,

j œ œ aœ J

chew. too. do?

I’m feel - in’

,

˙



than I could and eat it the way I

? # 42 j œ n œ # œ œ- J 

Ostinato

Went I Why

#  & 42 ‰ œj b œ n œ 



blue,

j œj b œ n œ

œ

>

j ‰ b œ >œ œ

 # 2 . & 4 . ‰ œj b œ n œ ˙

feel - in’

˙

-

doo.

blue.

Uœ .


9

7. Time to Go 3 parts Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER

(q = 126)

With a Calypso feel

Œ

I’ve had

2

œ

white

&b œ œ œ

home be - fore light,

6

> 2 b & 4 œ day

œ

wine,

œ -

o?

œ

nice

j j

& b 44 œ .

4

a

time,

and thank you for

 j

œ

but

j

œ

œ

œ

œ

it’s

time

to

go.

Ž

œ œ œ J

call

it

a

,

œ

night.

(Day

-

,

home

œ

œ

be - fore

4  &b 4 µ

,

Ž & b 44

,

o).

had

> U œ

light.

œ. white

µ

I’ve

˙

j U

œ

œ

wine.

U œ

œ

œ

(Day

-

o).

J J

________________________________________________ American singer Harry Belafonte (b. 1927) had a hit in 1956 with a Jamaican folksong, “The Banana Boat Song” (also known as “Day-O”). This round is a rhythmical nightmare, which comes together wonderfully with perseverence.

the

got - ta get

j nœ œ œ

Some oth - er

, 44 ‰ œj œ j œ œ œ œJ

4 4

œ œ œ œ J I

j ,

œ œ #œ œ

I think I’ll

4 Œ &b 4 œ Coda

j , œ >œ œ œ œ œ J

j

D b 44 œ œ œ 45 .. œ . & J [C

œ a

..

42


10

8. Lizzie Borden 4 parts (partnered voices) Anon.

Music by BRIAN KOGLER

(q = 68)

Darkly

E

[

A

# 4Œ & 4 Œ

> œ.

j

3

&

a final

 #

œ

œ

Liz - zie

5

&

#

Ž U œ.

U

œ



# & 44 n œ .

done,

œ

Bor - den took

,

whacks;

7

œ

œ

-

Liz

zie,

œ

œ-

an

axe

J

,

j

U

Bor

Œ

˙ -

den,

And gave her moth - er

43 œ .

J

she

j

œ œ œ # œ œwhat she

œ

Liz - zie

œ

And when

œ

‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

œ.

œ

œ

>

had done,

,

saw

j #œ œ what

she

for - ty

44

œ had

U

j 5 œ 4 nœ. œ œ. ˙ œ œ œ

She

gave her fa - ther for - ty - one.

Lizzie Borden took an axe And gave her mother forty whacks. And when she saw what she had done, She gave her father forty-one.

_______________________________________________ Lizzie Borden (1860-1927) was famously accused of murdering her father and stepmother with a hatchet on the morning of August 4, 1892 at their Fall River home in Massachusetts. This rather cruel verse greatly inflates the number of “whacks” dealt to the victims. Borden was one of the first defendants to undergo trial by media, and although she was acquitted, her darkened name has continued to surface—as a heavy metal band, a rock musical and a three-act opera.


11

9. Little Willie 3 parts Anon. (c. 1911)

Music by BRIAN KOGLER With bloodless indifference

Œ

Eb

[

Bb

b 4 &bb 4 Œ

32 œ

gore,

&

bbb

œ œ œ. -

lie nailed

-

J

with

lie,

a

œ œ œ œ 4 4 ˙

Nailed

his

sis - ter to the



j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ-

his ba - by

Ž bb b œ œ 4 & œ 4 ˙. quaint:

sis - ter to the door.

,

œ

“Now

U bb 3 j & b 2 œ. œ nœ œ œ œ

12

Wil - lie dear, don’t scar the

for

,

door,

,

œ

œ

thirst

8

with hu- mour

œ b˙

œ

U ,

b &bb ˙

6

j . œ. .

œ œ œ. Lit - tle Wil

3

(q = 126)

>

œ œ œ

Lit - tle Wil -

œ

32 œ œ

O

Moth - er

j

œ. œ œ œ

œ

œ œ-

,

U

œ

said,

œ

Wil - lie dear, now Wil - lie dear, now

44 b œ-

,

œ œ œ.

j œ ..

paint.” Lit- tle Wil - lie,

Little Wille, with a thirst for gore, Nailed his sister to the door. O Mother said, with humour quaint: “Now Willie dear, don’t scar the paint.”

3 2


12

10. With All My Heart 3 parts (with optional ostinato) Words & music by BRIAN KOGLER Quite slow

E

[D

### 2 Œ . w & 2 œ . With

5

###

&

&

all

,

###

,

˙. heart,

Ostinato (cello)

I

œ

With

love

my

˙.

my

heart,

own true

œ

œ

love my

œ

With eve - ry

œ

With

œ

cus - pid

˙ valve,

love

œ part:

eve - ry pal - pi -

U

Ž

œ ˙

œ œ œ œ my

% U

œ œ œ

œ with

œ œ œ œ œ sub - cla - vi - an

With

œ œ

˙

all

heart,

my

,

˙. -

um,

U , œ vein.

œ

heart.

œ

Per - i - car - di

,

˙.

all my moist, en - gorged and heav - ing

I

? ###

œ œ œ œ

j œ œ œœ . œ

nœ œ œ œ



U

œ

love with all

% Ostinatoœ begins at measure 12 ? ### 2 Œ œ œ .. ˙ . 2

? ### œ

,

w

œ œ nœ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ tat - ing part,

9

(h = 56)

tri -

œ œ I

____________________________________________________ Aristotle (384–322 BCE) maintained that the heart was the seat of the emotions; but why? Wild passions, such as anger or love, can make a demand on the body for more oxygen; increased respiration then leads to greater circulation of the blood and a surge in heart rate. So, for the ancients, everything pointed to the spongy organ.

œ

œ ..

love my

..


13

11. YYUR 3 parts Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Anon.

With vigour Eb

[

Bb

©

( . = 110)

Œ bb 12 œ .. œ . œ . œ . Uœ ‰ œ & 8 J J J Y

Too

Y

U

wise

you

œ.

œ.

œ.

R,

Y

Y

U

B,

are,

too

wise

you

be,

œ ‰ œj J I I

e 3



b . & b œ. œ œ. œ. C see

6

U

R

Y

you

are

too

98 œ . œ . œ . Y

4

me.

wise

for

me.

U 12 œ œ. œ. Œ 8 J œ. Y

Y

Too wise

j ‰ œj œ œ.

b j & b œ ‰ œJ œ .

œ.

œ.

4

me,

U may

B

too wise

for

me,

You may

be

Y

Y

œ.

4

me,

for

me,

j 9 8

œ

rath - er

rath - er

e 8

Ž U bb 9 j j & 8 œ . œ . b œ . 12 8 œ . œ . œ . œ ‰ œj œ . œ . œ . œ ‰ œj b & b œ.

Y

Y

4

1

like

me.

4

1

like

U,

It’s

too

wise

for

one

like

me.

For

one

like

you,

It’s

11

œ.

all

E

all

too

-

98 œ.

j

œ

œ œ.

E

E

T

eas - y

to

-

œ.

T

me.

tease

me.

j ‰ œJ .. œ

YYUR, YYUB, ICUR YY 4 me. YY 4 me, YY 4 me, U may B rather YY 4 1 like me. 4 1 like U, It’s all EE-E TT me.

Y

Too

Note: The final fermatas do not align in the usual way.


14

12. Piddle in Your Eye 3 parts Music by BRIAN KOGLER

Anon. (schoolyard chant)

Rollicking

(q = 94)

Œ

E

[

B

4 œ .. œ & 4 œ. Oh,

2

&

black

œ œ œ j œ œ

said, “Cor Bli - mey!”

& œ œ œ œ

œ

œ

pid - dle in your eye,

r

&≈ œ œ œ -

be- ’ind me,

to

≈ œ nœ œ

5

œ

œ.

œ

cat’s

eye,

The

œ œ œ œ œ

cat

U ,

œ

white cat

4

the

œ

pid - dled in

j

œ

“I’m

the white

,

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj œj œ -

sor - ry,

Sir,

Ž U

œ œ œ œ œ

to

œ œ œ œ œ

I did -n’t know you was be-’ind!”

to

≈ œ œ œ œ bœ

œ-

I did - n’t know

was

pid - dle in your eye,

U ,

pid - dle in your eye,

œ . œ .. Oh,

the

Note: The fermatas do not align in the usual way.

Oh, the black cat piddled in the white cat’s eye, The white cat said, “Cor Blimey!” “I’m sorry, Sir, to piddle in your eye, I didn’t know you was be’ind me!”

_______________________________________________ These lyrics have been heard in Australian and British schoolyards for over sixty years; they may have had their origin in nineteenth-century American plantation songs. “The Black Cat Piddled in the White Cat’s Eye” is also a fiddle tune, gathered from Cape Barren Island, Tasmania. This round should therefore be sung in “fiddle” style, with much gasping for breath.

you

J


Range: Half the rounds in this collection have a comfortable compass of a ninth. The rest extend the voice to an eleventh or a twelfth, intervals quite common to rounds of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. If this seems a stretch for your some singers, consider partnering the voices. Partnered voices: When dividing a group into its parts, it is wise to combine female voices “high-with-low” (SA) and male voices “high-with-low” (TB). Each compound “part” will therefore be comprised of both kinds of voice, ideally in equal numbers. The extremes of the melodic range will then be met by at least one strong voice:

Singing in fewer parts: It may be argued that the rounds and canons of earlier centuries can be performed effectively in fewer parts than demanded by the music. It must be stressed, however, that this set of 12 Rounds for Squares behaves differently: a three-part round is not satisfactory in two parts, just as a four-part round might seem wanting in three. Performance: Round-singing is most often a social or pre-rehearsal activity. However, due to their length and content, a good few of these rounds lend themselves to programmed performance. The duration of a round may be extended by (a) having a solo voice or instrument announce the melody, then (b) having the chorus or ensemble sing the round in unison, and finally (c) by performing the round harmonically for a few cycles, before concluding on a sustained chord. In some instances a coda or an ostinato are suggested.

Teaching Rounds Help sheets with advice on teaching rounds are available as a free .PDF on request to bkogler@bigpond.com Lizzie Borden (p. 10) A piano accompaniment for this round is also available as a free .PDF on request.


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Brian Kogler: Rounds for Squares  

Brian Kogler: Rounds for Squares