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Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

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MAT Evidence 3: Unit Plan Cover Sheet Intern: Savannah Lee Windham

Title of Unit: “The Danger of a Single Story Africa”

Course/Level: Standard English II

Date Submitted: August 7th, 2013

Requirements for Evidence 3 include the UbD Chart (with all three stages); a Daily Lesson Plan for each day of the unit; and all major assignment sheets, assessment rubrics, and other materials as specified by the Subject Area Methods instructor. While the evidence of some of the performance indicators is easy to find, some of the indicators are more elusive, or may not have been included at all. This chart will let your evaluators know where you think you have included certain required aspects of the unit. If you have consciously NOT addressed an area, this is the means by which you can account for your decision not to include the element.

Performance Indicator Literacy Instruction

Interconnectedness of Content Areas/Disciplines • Note links within or across grades and subjects

Global Awareness

Integration with 21st Century Skills and Content

Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving

Where/How Addressed in the Unit (ex: UbD chart, DLP#, title of activity or product)

Literacy instruction is provided daily by devoting in-class time to reading main novel or secondary text as a whole class or in small groups. Support is also provided in mini-lectures and modeling exercises of SIFT method, theme, character analysis, and critical lenses. Class time is devoted to discussing history of British colonialism in Africa and the Caribbean, African art, African music, and current events. The unit also includes texts from a variety of genres including novels, short stories, folk tales, poetry, and informational texts. See days 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10. Variety of texts studied, mini-lectures on history, and current events all support global awareness. Students are frequently asked to consider aspects of foreign cultures and societies in the context of text and real life. Many writing prompts require students to empathize with characters from different cultures or compare and contrast American society with a foreign society. All days within unit plan address global awareness. Information literacy, media literacy, and ICT literacy are addressed through current event project (students must research current event article online and report to class) and with group project (students must read secondary text, research relevant background information, and create a PowerPoint presentation adhering to specific guidelines. Lessons also frequently incorporate a variety of different types of media and technology. Students are required to think critically for the projects and during in-class discussions. (see Group Project Handout and unit syllabus)

Many journal and “quick write” prompts require students to think critically to answer. Problem-solving is often employed in group activities, as with the group project where students have to collaborate and fill different individual roles within the group in order to create a final project. (See Group Project handout)


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Stage 1—Desired Results Established Goals (from NC Standard Course of Study, Common Core State Standards, etc.): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Understandings: Students will understand that . . . •

• • • •

• •

To get beyond the “single story” of a particular culture, we need to read a variety of literary and informational texts and consider different, often conflicting perspectives. (credit: Dr. Teasley) “African” literature is a broad term that encompasses many sub-cultures, realities, and perspectives. Morality is a subjective term that is influenced by cultural context, ideological beliefs, and learned ideas. Heroes possess both positive and negative qualities. Heroes, in the classical definition, often possess tragic flaws that lead to their downfall. Colonialism must be viewed from two perspectives. On the one hand, a culture may be “civilized” by a more “advanced” society; however, from that culture’s perspective, colonization could be a destructive and unwanted force. Folk tales serve as vehicles for communicating social and moral lessons and are often didactic in nature. Texts often transcend literal meaning to offer implicit meaning through symbolism and other rhetorical strategies.

Essential Questions: • • • • • •

What is the danger of a “single story”? Why is it important to view multiple perspectives of history? How do past experience and our own “cultural lens” influence our understanding? How can we determine what is moral or immoral? Does “morality” have a universal definition? To what extent is it defined by cultural contexts? What does it mean to be a hero? Are the protagonists in our texts meant to be thought of as heroes? Is colonialism just? How do cultures that are “civilized” by more “advanced” societies change as a result of this process? Why do we tell folk tales? What purpose do they serve, specifically in African culture and literature? What can we learn from them?


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

Students will know . . .

Students will be able to . . .

A brief history of British colonialism in Nigeria and the Caribbean; background information on the Igbo tribe, Achebe, Adichie, Kincaid, and other TBD authors. • The plot and characters of Things Fall Apart, Purple Hibiscus, and other accompanying texts including a selection of short stories and folk tales. • The meaning of and relationship between Yeats’ poem and the novel Things Fall Apart. • The components of the SIFT analysis method. • The meaning of a “critical lens” and how to analyze texts through different lenses. • The classical definition of heroism and how it applies to protagonists such as Okonkwo. Texts • Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart • Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, a selection from Purple Hibiscus • Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, “The Danger of a Single Story” (TED Talk video) • W.B. Yeats, “The Second Coming” (poem) • Jamaica Kincaid, “On Seeing England for the First Time” (short story) • Chinua Achebe, “Dead Man’s Path” (short story) • A selection of African folk tales TBD • One larger work chosen individually by the student for group project

• • • • • •

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Apply interpretive reading strategies and read critically to analyze character development, symbolism, point of view, setting, etc. Apply the SIFT method to several poems discussed within the unit. Relate historical information to the context of a novel. Analyze the various ways in which authors (of different formats/genres) convey theme. Identify basic literary devices and how they function in the text (i.e. metaphor, irony, simile, anecdote, proverbs/adage, etc.). Distinguish common themes among various texts of different formats (novel, short story, poem video). Analyze an additional secondary text for theme, symbolism, character development, and other TBD factors for the individual component of their group project (see handout).

Stage 2—Assessment Evidence Performance Tasks: •

Other Evidence:

Group Project – Students will select a secondary source/text (novel, short stories, collection of poems; suggestions will be provided) and create a PowerPoint presentation giving a brief summary, discussing symbolism and theme (etc.) of the work, and explaining how that source contributes to the “story” of Africa. NOTE: Students will also be assessed on an individual written component that will serve as a mini-essay on the work studied. Current Event – On a predetermined day of the unit, each student will bring to class 1 African current event to present to the class, discussing the 5 W’s + 1 H (as modeled from journalism) of the article.

• • •

Several quizzes (3) based on assigned readings from novel; focus on plot details, characters, and new vocabulary. Daily reflections or “quick writes” related to recent reading assignments. Cumulative unit test on Things Fall Apart and other texts studied.

Stage 3—Learning Plan Learning Activities: • Daily journal prompts or “quick writes” • Daily small group or whole group discussions • Frequent + / ! student feedback • Daily African current events: At the beginning of the course, students will sign up to bring 1 current even from Africa on one of the 11 non-test/presentation days of the unit. The mini-presentation of these events, reported in the journalistic style of the 5 W’s + 1 H, will be used as “energizers” for the class, in moments of downtime, or


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during transitions. 2-3 students will present per day. NOTE: Specific mention of the current events is not included in the daily lesson plans as their timing will be randomized.

Day 1: • KWL Activity (What do you know about Africa?) • Mini-lecture: History of British colonialism, Nigeria, Chinua Achebe, and introduction to Things Fall Apart • Read Ch. 1 aloud in small groups; complete character chart for Okonkwo/Unoka • Closing journal prompt Day 2: • “Umuofia’s Society” Jigsaw Activity • Mini-lecture: SIFT method • Yeats’ “The Second Coming” SIFT analysis activity (whole class) • +/! feedback Day 3: • Reading workshop, “Dead Man’s Path” (short story); to include a mini-lecture on theme, in-group reading of short story, small group discussion questions, free write response, and whole group discussion. • Group project introduced • Quiz review Day 4 • Quiz • Discussion activity: Ikemefuna’s death (fish-bowl style) • “After the Deluge” poem; SIFT analysis in pairs • Journal prompt • Closing: African art mini-presentation & discussion Day 5 • Revisit KWL • TED talk: “The Danger of a Single Story” by Chimamanda Adichie • Mini-lecture: Adichie, post-colonialism, Purple Hibiscus intro • Read aloud Ch. 1 Purple Hibiscus, discussion • Project mini-conferences Day 6 • Journal prompt • Read aloud Ch. 2 Purple Hibiscus • Jigsaw Activity: Purple Hibiscus • Quiz Review • +/! feedback • Project check-in Day 7 • Quiz • Mini-lecture: Critical lens and feminism • Close-analysis activity: Things Fall Apart with feminist critical lens • Journal prompt • Nigerian music (videos) and discussion Day 8 • Mini-lecture: heroism, heroes • Chinua Achebe “read aloud” video • Whole group discussion • Group quick write: Thesis & assertions • Journal prompt


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story • +/! feedback Day 9 • Mini-lecture: Antigua, British Colonialism (in Caribbean), Jamaica Kincaid • Read “On Seeing England for the First time” and discussion activity • Project worktime • Review, preview of end of unit, pass out final exam guide Day 10 • Finish KWL card • Mini-lecture: African folk tales • Jigsaw Activity: African folk tales • Small group presentations on folk tales (posters) • Project work time (with laptop cart available) Day 11 • Post-it Activity: reader reactions to final scene • Group discussion • Quiz, in-class grading, oral unit review • Final journal prompt (with laptop cart available) • Project work time Day 12 • Unit test • Final in-class project work time (with laptop cart available) Day 13 • Student presentations • Student feedback survey

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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 1

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others! ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: •

“African” literature is a broad term that encompasses many sub-cultures, realities, and perspectives.

Students will know: • • •

A brief history of African colonialism, Nigeria, and the Igbo people. The plot and characters of Things Fall Apart. Desired outcomes of the unit (timeline, schedule of readings, project information).

Students will be able to: • •

Recall prior knowledge of Africa or African literature Compare 2 major characters—Okonkwo and Unoka—from Things Fall Apart

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • • • • • • •

Cultural lens (African) Colonialism (process of colonization) Kola nut cowries Materials Notecards Syllabus Presentation handout PowerPoint presentation on history of African colonialism, historical context of Things Fall Apart Guided Reading questions for Chapter 1 handout Technology Needs Laptop Data projector

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) •

Teacher provides a VERY brief introduction to the new unit: “Today we will begin our unit of African literature. Over the next month, we’re going to explore a variety of texts such as novels, short stories, poetry, music, and art, all of which we will use to inform our understanding of the “story” of Africa from different perspectives. By the end of the unit, you will have produced several pieces of writing and a group project engaging in some of the essential questions from our texts. “Today we’re going to take a look at our own preconceived notions of Africa, explore the history behind the


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texts we will encounter, and read the first chapter of our new novel Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe.”

Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of Teacher will distribute notecards containing (listen) 15 Objective & KWL chart. min. Purpose

(incl. intro above)

Say: “Before we begin our unit, let’s get an idea of what we already know (K) and what we want to know (W) about Africa or African literature. One of the objectives of this unit is to identify how our own cultural lens, or unique perspective, influences how we see things, and examine the perspectives of different groups. First, let’s work on defining our perspective.”

Students write notes about any prior knowledge they have of Africa or African literature and what they want to learn about the topic.

Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

Guided Practice, More Instructional Input, and Checking for Understanding

20 min.

40 min.

Teacher will ask for student volunteers to share the information they have written in the “K” and “W” columns, recording their information in a word document/transparency at the front of the room (this document will be reviewed and additional information will be added throughout unit).

Student volunteers share information from “K” and “W” columns.

Teacher will collect KWL cards and distribute unit syllabus and guided notes handout for subsequent mini-lecture. Teacher will BRIEFLY discuss major performance tasks and deadlines, answering any student questions. Teacher will also introduce current even activity and distribute sign-up sheet (2-3 will present daily). Teacher gives mini-lecture on British Colonialism in Africa and historical/cultural context of Things Fall Apart. PowerPoint to include a short video showing Igbo tribe in Nigeria and conclude with “hook” introduction to Things Fall Apart.

(listen)

Following the lecture, teacher will use “No Opt Out” to ask questions based on the presentation.

(Students respond to questions)

Teacher will give directions for small group activity, …

In groups of no more than 5, students will read Chapter 1 of Things Fall Apart and work together to complete the chart comparing Okonkwo to his father, Unoka. They will also identify customs of the Igbo tribe.

… monitor students’ work…

… and review groups’ answers in whole

(listen)


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class discussion. Teacher will also show students (on data projector) unfamiliar objects mentioned in novel (i.e.cowries, kola nut), as well as discuss new Ibo words and phrases (point out Glossary of Ibo Words and Phrases at end of book).

After completing the reading and discussion, students will gather again as a whole glass for group discussion. (listen)

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

For homework, students read chapters 2 and 3 of Things Fall Apart.

(listen)

Closing/ Summary

10 min.

Teacher will place “quick write” topic on board.

Students will respond to “quick write” prompt in journal.

Assessment of Student Learning KWL note cards, guided reading group questions, oral participation, closing journal response. Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 2

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 1. The meaning of Yeats’ poem, “The Second Coming” 2. The SIFT method of literary analysis. Students will know: 3. The characters and plot of Things Fall Apart, chapters 1-3. 4. The steps of the SIFT method. Students will be able to: 5. Apply the SIFT method of analysis to a poem. 6. Relate the meaning of Yeats’ poem to Things Fall Apart, make predictions about why Achebe might have chosen to use it to introduce his novel and its role in the text. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • •

Proverb Epigraph SIFT Mysticism (Yeats) Materials

• • • • •

Discussion group handouts Handout with “The Second Coming” and SIFT chart + / ! transparency/word document Technology Needs laptop computer data projector


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LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) • Students will enter room and begin working on the following “quick write” in their journals: “Go back and review the first pages of chapter 2 in Things Fall Apart. What Igbo superstitions does Achebe mention? Can you think of any similar superstitions in our society? In your opinion, are superstitions valid fears or a waste of time? Share your thoughts.” Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 10 Teacher will monitor student work Write, volunteer students will Objective & min. during quick write, then ask for share responses to “Quick Purpose (incl. volunteers to share thoughts on write.” intro today’s question. above) Say: “Last night for homework you (listen) read Chapters 2 and 3 in TFA. Today we’re going to explore some themes from the text in a small groups, review the SIFT method for analyzing poetry, and take a look at the poem that Chinua Achebe used as the epigraph of the novel.” Guided Students will divide into groups 40 Teacher will distribute pre-prepared Practice min. cards (divided according to class size according to their cards. Each group will be given a part of the text upon to organize small groups) and give which to focus. The topics are as directions for small group activity. follows: Umuofia’s government, Note: Each group will be responsible for a single part of a larger handout. Later in the class, each small group (or “expert group”) will teach the class about what they have learned.

religion, agriculture, judicial system, and home life. In their small groups, students will review Chapters 2 and 3 and work together to answer the following questions: 1.

Teacher will monitor student work… 2.

… posing and answering questions as necessary.

3.

Create a 1-minute summary of new information presented on your topic in Chapters 2 and 3. What do we need to know? How does this new information relate to American society? What’s similar? What’s different? Create a drawing to illustrate how this element fits in with Umuofia’s society. (i.e. How is this element represented in the novel?


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Related categories on group handout: (topic), Comparisons to American Society.

After each group completes the task, the teacher will ask them to report their findings to the class.

Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

Students will report their group findings to the class, fill in notes on their respective charts, and listen.

10 min.

Teacher will provide a VERY brief introduction to W.B. Yeats and the historical context of his poem “The Second Coming” (and ideas of mysticism, the vortexes). Teacher will also briefly introduce the SIFT method that will afterwards be used to analyze the poem.

Students will take notes on provided handout on SIFT method.

20 min.

Teacher will guide students through an analysis of the poem using the SIFT method, modeling appropriate questions and taking volunteers to provide analysis. The poem will be projected using the data projector, and teacher will make annotations in real time.

Students will follow the SIFT process as modeling by the teacher. Volunteer students will help with poem analysis. Students will replicate analysis and annotations generated by whole class (and modeled by teacher) on their own handout of the poem.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

Closing/ Summary

5 min.

To sum up, teacher will pose the following questions to the whole class relating the poem to TFA: 1. Why do you think Achebe chose to put this poem as his epigraph? 2. What purpose might it serve? 3. What predictions can we make as to its relevance to the novel as a whole? For homework, students read chapter 4 and 5 in Things Fall Apart. Teacher will ask for student feedback via + / ! assessment of today’s class from volunteers. Teacher will record student answers on laptop computer screen (or transparency) as they are

(listen)

Volunteer students provide feedback for today’s lesson.


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given. (if extra time: read) (If extra time, students can begin reading Chapters 4 and 5 of TFA individually.) Assessment of Student Learning “Quick write” journal entry, small group handout, SIFT chart completion and annotation (and verbal participation), feedback on + / ! activity Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s):

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 3

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 7. The process of determining the theme of a text. 8. That the same theme can be conveyed across differing genres. Students will know: 9. The plot, theme, and characters of “Dead Men’s Path” (short story) and TFA chapters 1-5. 10. Definitions of “theme” and “hero.” Students will be able to: 11. Compare and contrast two different texts (of differing formats) with regards to theme, character development, and other elements. 12. Work together in small groups to communicate their ideas clearly, effectively, and with respect. 13. Reflect on prior readings and discussion. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • • •

theme protagonist hero Materials handouts (notes, discussion questions, project information) Elements of Literature: World Literature (textbook) Technology Needs laptop computer data projector

LESSON ACTIVITIES •

Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) Students will enter room and begin working on “quick write” in their journals. “Describe Okonkwo and Nwoye’s relationship (review Chapter 4). How is this influenced by Okonkwo’s relationship with is own father? What effects does it have on


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Nwoye?” Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 15 Teacher will monitor student (write) Objective & min. participation in quick write Purpose activity, briefly discuss student (volunteer responses) (incl. responses, and go over changes intro) made as a result of last class’s + / ! activity. (listen) Say: “Last night you read chapters 4 and 5 of Things Fall Apart. Today we’re going to take a look at another text—a short story called “Dead Man’s Path” by Chinua Achebe—and factor it in to our ongoing discussion of the novel. At the end of class, we’ll also discuss our unit project.” Input, Guided Practice, & Check for Understanding

60 min. (total)

Teacher will give directions for reading workshop, pass out books and handouts.

(listen)

Teacher will give mini-lecture on theme (Review of Yeats poem as example)

(listen)

Teacher will divide class into small groups or 3-4 and instruct students to read Chinua Achebe’s short story “Dead Man’s Path” aloud. As students read, teacher will monitor student work…

In their groups, students will read “Dead Man’s Path” aloud (pp. 997-999 in textbook) and answer a few guided questions to check for reading comprehension.

(10/60)

(20/60)

After finishing the short story, students will review/reread Ch. 4 of TFA.

(20/60) …answer and pose questions…

When reading is complete, students will work together to compare “Dead Man’s Path” to what they have read to far in TFA, focusing on the following elements: theme, protagonists, and imagery. The following questions will be posed: 1. Compare and contrast Michael Obi to Okonkwo. What aspects of their characters and similar? What are different? 2. Would you consider Michael Obi or Okonkwo a hero? What heroic qualities do each of them possess?


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

15 Justify your answer. 3. 4.

(cont.) (10/60)

Teacher will debrief reading workshop by reviewing ideas brought up in group discussion and posing additional questions.

Identify the theme of each piece. How are they related? How do the themes of “Dead Men’s Path” and TFA (so far) contribute to our developing understanding of Africa? What common themes or ideas do you see here?

Students will record reflect on the products of their discussion in their reflection journals. Students will rearrange for group discussion and contribute group findings.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

Read Chapters 6 and 7 of TFA. Prepare for reading quiz and brainstorm ideas for project.

(listen)

Closing/ Summary

10 min.

Teacher will hand out information on the unit project and discuss its details. Students will be asked to brainstorm their ideas for the next class.

(listen, ask questions)

(reading, if time) (If extra time, students can begin reading Chapters 6 and 7) Assessment of Student Learning Quick write activity, reading comprehension questions, handout on “Dead Men’s Path,” written reflection Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 4

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 14. How to employ the SIFT method while analyzing a poem. 15. The various factors that influenced Okonkwo to kill Ikemefuna. 16. How foreshadowing is used to signal future events in the novel Students will know: 17. The plot and characters of Things Fall Apart, chapters 1-7. 18. The SIFT method of poetry analysis. Students will be able to: 19. Analyze a poem using the SIFT method working with a partner. 20. Participate in small group and whole group discussion of previous readings. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • •

foreshadowing Materials Handouts (quiz, small group discussion questions, copies of poem) Technology Needs none

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) The Daily Bellringer for the first few minutes of class will be for students to review their notes and the text to prepare for the reading quiz. Before the quiz, there will be a quick verbal review of last night’s reading using “Pepper.” Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 15 Teacher will VERY quickly have a Students will listen/participate Objective & min verbal review of last night’s reading in the review.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Purpose

Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

(incl. intro)

assignment. After, teacher will hand out reading quiz and monitor students. *Quiz will cover chapters 1-7.

30 min.

Teacher will direct students to break into small groups where they will have to answer a series of questions about last night’s reading with their peers.

Teacher will monitor student performance and participation during group activity…

After small group activity, teacher will direct students to return to seats for whole group discussion. Volunteers will share

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Students will take quiz. (listen) Students will break into small groups for discussion. Together they will discuss the following questions and be ready to participate afterwards in whole group discussion: 1. Briefly skim chapter 6. What is the role of women in the wrestling match? How does this relate to the overall role of women in Umuofia’s society? 2. “And then the locusts came” (p. 54). Pay attention to the locusts since they provide foreshadowing for future visitors of Umuofia. How do the people of Umuofia respond to the locusts? How does this differe from other representations of locusts you’ve encountered in your life/other texts?* 3. In chapter 7, Okonkwo is asked to participate in a difficult task. As a reader, how did you respond to Umuofia’s decision? Why do you think Okonkwo went along with the village’s decision?* 4. “That boy calls you father. Do not bear a hand in his death” (p. 57). Why, do you think, Okonkwo goes against this advice (p. 61)? The narrator gives a reason, but expand on this. Imagine you are Okonkwo in that situation—what do you think he saw in Ikemefuna as he ran toward him? (Try to make symbolic connections here)* *These questions taken/adapted from Elaine Baker’s TFA materials. Volunteer students will participate in discussion while other students listen.


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what they have discussed in small group. NOTE: Group discussion here may be converted into fishbowl activity. Rearrange seats for this configuration. 30 min.

Teacher will read the poem “After the Deluge” by Wole Soyinka with students (Elements of Literature pp. 1004-1005). Teacher will employ SIFT method (as learned and practiced in the previous lesson), and ask students to work in pairs to discuss poem. Going step by step, teacher will annotate poem on overhead projector according to student comments. After analyzing poem, teacher will pose questions to whole class relating poem to Things Fall Apart and our evolving answer to the question, “What is [the story of] Africa?” Finally, students will respond to short “quick write” prompt related to poem.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

Closing/ Summary/Guided Practice

10 min.

For homework, students will read chapters 8 and 9 of Things Fall Apart.

In pairs, students will reread and discuss “After the Deluge.” Following the pacing of the teacher, they will go step by step through the SIFT method to analyze the poem and make annotations on their own handout. When prompted, volunteer students will help teacher annotate poem and work through SIFT method. (listen, volunteer students participate in whole group discussion)

(write)

(listen)

Teacher will give mini-presentation (listen, participate in on African (if possible, discussion) Igbo/Nigerian) art, posing brief questions, gauging class opinions of pieces shown. Assessment of Student Learning Reading quiz, small group participation and participation in whole group discussions, poem annotation, daily journal prompt Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 5

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 21. Adichie’s argument against the “single story” Students will know: 22. Basic facts about Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Purple Hibiscus. 23. The text/source that will be used for their group project. Students will be able to: 24. Recall additional knowledge learned from the unit in order to update their KWL cards. 25. Participate in small group discussion to reflect on the major themes of Adichie’s TED talk. 26. Plan/discuss plans for their project with their group, choose their medium of presentation, and discuss additional materials/resources needed to complete the task. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • •

none Materials powerpoint introducing Adiche and Purple Hibiscus Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “The Danger of a Single Story” (TED Talk video + transcript) Purple Hibiscus (text) Technology Needs laptop data projector

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) Revisiting of opening KWL activity: Teacher will hand back the note cards that students filled out on the first day of the unit. For a warm-up activity, they will update their cards to add any additional information they feel that they have learned about Africa and its story to the “L” column. Students will also be given a playing card that will be used to divide them into small groups later on in the class.


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Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 10 Say: “Today we’re going to begin a (listen, watch) Objective & min. short detour within our study of Purpose (incl. Things Fall Apart to take a look at a intro) more contemporary view of African literature. Over the next 2-3 classes, we’re going to focus on Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and her novel Purple Hibiscus. We’ll begin today’s class by watching her TED talk, ‘The Danger of a Single Story.’” Input, Teacher will provide a BRIEF (1-2 Students will watch video and 20 Modeling, & minutes) introduction to Adichie and her respond to guided questions that min. Check for Understanding

work. After, teacher will show Adichie’s TED Talk on data projector.

go along with video on additional handout.

While students watch and respond to guided questions, teacher will monitor student participation.

20 min.

Teacher will give directions for small group activity… …monitor student work…

… and pose whole class questions. Guided Practice

Independent Practice/ Homework

20 min.

5 min.

Students will divide themselves into small groups according to their playing card (directions will be shown on data projector). Next, students will be given a plastic cup containing 4-5 discussion questions for their group relating to the video. After approx. 10-15 minutes in small groups, students will return to whole group to review.

Teacher will pass out Purple Hibiscus Students will read along with books and read chapter 1 (or part of teacher. Volunteer students will Chapter 1, given time constraints) read aloud. aloud with students (pp. 3-16).* *Discussion of this reading will be delayed until the next class period when students will continue reading Purple Hibiscus. For homework, students will read chapters 10 and 11 of Things Fall Apart, as well as finish reading Chapter 1 of Purple Hibiscus.

(listen)


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Closing/ Summary

15 min.

21

Teacher will have “check-in” session with students on group project. Students must have chosen a text/source and identified how they will present their information by this day.

Students will break into their project groups for a “check-in” session and to collaborate. By this day, students must have identified their text/source and the medium in which they will present.

Teacher will be available for questions and mini-conferences during this time.

Students ask questions to teacher as needed.

*If students need any additional materials or resources from teacher, today is the day to request them. Assessment of Student Learning KWL card update, guided questions with TED talk video, small group participation; Teacher will also record student responses for their group project plans. Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 6

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 27. The function of various preselected topics within Purple Hibiscus (see Jigsaw activity). 28. How the reading of secondary texts can influence the reading and interpretation of primary texts. Students will know: 29. The plot and characters of chapters 1 and 2 of Purple Hibiscus. 30. Brief information on a variety of topics related to both Purple Hibiscus and Things Fall Apart (see Jigsaw activity). Students will be able to: 31. Analyze differences and similarities between 2 texts. 32. Cite specific examples in the text to support their conclusions. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • •

“jigsaw activity” Materials Powerpoint presentation (with journal prompt, slides needed for jigsaw activity) Small group handout, pre-prepared small group questions Purple Hibiscus text. Technology Needs laptop data projector


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LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) Students will answer the following journal prompt in their notebooks: “The first sentence of Purple Hibiscus is as follows: ‘Things started to fall apart at home when my brother, Jaja, did not go to communion and Papa flung his heavy missal across the room and broke the figurines on the étagère.’ Based on what we read and discussed from Chapter 1 yesterday, how do you see things falling apart for Kambili and her family? What might be causing this? Why do you think Adichie is so openly referencing Things Fall Apart at the beginning of her novel?” As students come in, teacher will also hand them a playing card that will correspond to their small group and discussion topic for the jigsaw activity later in the lesson. Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of After giving time for students to (write) 15 Objective & complete the journal prompt, teacher will min. Purpose (incl. say: intro) “Today we’re going to continue our look (listen) at Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche’s Purple Hibiscus, paying attention to how it informs our understand of African (or more specifically Nigerian) society. After reading the second chapter together, we’re going to break down into small groups to explore some of the themes raised in the text. Although we won’t explicitly be discussing the reading from Things Fall Apart, please make sure that you have read up to chapter 13 (all of part 1) by next class when we will have a quiz over the reading. We’ll take a more in-depth look at Part 1 of TFA during next class period.”

Input, Guided Practice, & Check for Understanding

15 min.

Teacher will read Chapter 2 of Purple Hibiscus with students, modeling critical reading strategies during process.

Volunteer students will read aloud, all will listen.

20 min.

Teacher will give directions for small group jigsaw activity,…

Students will draw their assigned topic and accompanying questions from a cup. Students will then work together to answer questions to prepare to present their information to the class. The themes will be as follows: • father/children relationships • mother/children relationships • role of women • family traditions • religion/religious traditions • Okonkwo v. Papa

…monitor students’ work…


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

… and pose the common questions when students have finished part 1 of the activity.

20 min.

24 Having selected their theme and accompanying questions, students will discuss how these themes operate within Purple Hibiscus. Each group will work to answer the questions on their card (everyone must record answers on individual sheet). Students must cite textual evidence to support their conclusions. Afterwards, all groups will answer the following common questions: • Compare and contrast your topic in Purple Hibiscus with how it appears in Things Fall Apart. What similarities do you see between the novels? What differences? Cite particular instances in both novels. • How does your investigation influence our on-going discussion of the “story” of Africa? How has a more contemporaneous viewpoint influenced your understanding?

After students have completed both parts of the Jigsaw activity, teacher will have class regroup and facilitate a group discussion on all the topics. Each group will present their ideas/findings. Teacher will pose whole class questions to check for understanding.

Students will then present their portion of the jigsaw to the class. Every group member must contribute to each group’s presentation. Other groups will be encouraged to ask each group several questions to “test” for their understanding of the topic.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

For homework, students will read chapters 12 and 13 of Things Fall Apart.

(listen)

Closing/ Summary

15 min.

Teacher will briefly review the previous class’s assigned readings, posing review questions to the whole class in preparation for the quiz.

Volunteer students answer/ask questions during review.

Teacher will do whole class + / ! activity and record student feedback on a transparency/word document. Teacher will save this document, make appropriate changes, and review at the beginning of the next class.

Volunteer students give comments about “what works for them” and “what they would like to change” about the last few classes.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Teacher will allocate the remaining ~5 minutes for students to meet with their project groups and ask teacher questions regarding project.

25 Students will meet with project groups and ask teacher questions if necessary. *More sustained work time devoted to group projects will be given in future classes.

*If additional time remains, students may begin reading chapters 12 and 13 in Things Fall Apart. Assessment of Student Learning Journal entry, small group questions/handout, participation in presentation (“everyone talks”), feedback given during + / ! activity.

Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single Story Africa

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 7

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 33. The same text can be analyzed through different “critical lenses” to consider the points of view of different people or groups. Students will know: 34. the definition of “feminism” and “critical lens” 35. the role of women in Umuofia’s society Students will be able to: 36. Revisit the text of Things Fall Apart through the feminist critical lens. 37. Write a reflection from the point of view of a woman in Things Fall Apart. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • •

feminism critical lens feminist lens Materials

• • •

PowerPoint presentation Handouts (lecture notes, quiz) Things Fall Apart books Technology Needs

• •

laptop data projector

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) Students will have 2-3 minutes to review handouts and novel text before quiz. Teacher will provide a 2-3 minute “Pepper” style review before passing out quiz. Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 15 Teacher will give quiz to students. Students will take quiz. Objective & min. After quiz, teacher will review + / ! Purpose (incl. activity and any changes that have (listen) intro) been made.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

40 min.

27

Teacher will deliver mini-lecture of (listen, take notes) feminism as a critical lens. (Idea credit: Elaine Baker). The idea of “critical lens” will be discussed, as well as the idea of analyzing literature from a feminist perspective. Major theories of feminism, stereotypes, and modern examples will be included. [mini-lecture: 15 min.] Teacher will then transition into discussion. Students will first discuss questions in partners, and after share ideas with group.

After sharing ideas, students will be asked to write a quick thesis statement identifying the role of women in Things Fall Apart. Teacher will ask students to find specific passages in the novel that support their argument.

As students share their ideas, teacher will reread several key passages that are mentioned by students that illustrate the role of women in Umuofia’s society, modeling the incorporation of textual evidence into an argument.

First working with a partner, students will discuss the questions displayed on the data projector. One student will be the speaker and the other will be the note taker. 1. Consider the descriptions of Okonkwo’s compound and daily life there. What are the duties and expectations of his wives/daughters? See especially pages 14, 20, 40-45, 52, 55… these are only suggestions! 2. Think about the villages festivals we have witnessed (the wrestling match, the New Yam festival, the egwugwu ceremony). Describe the role of women in these events—what is expected of them here? 3. In Chapter 8 (pp. 7074), Obierika negotiates with his son’s suitor’s family to negotiate the “bride-price.” What does this passage imply about women in Umuofian society (i.e. how are they talked


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

Guided Practice

20 min.

Teacher will give directions for journal prompt activity and monitor student work.

28 about/treated in this conversation?)? 4. Write a quick “Bill of Rights” for women in Umuofia’s society based on what you have just read. What rights do they have in society? How would this compare to a “Bill of Rights” for men? Students will respond to the following prompt in their journals: “Imagine you are Ekwefi, Okonkwo’s wife. Describe your reaction to the events at the end of Part 1—how do you feel about being exiled for your husband’s crime? What are your general opinions about your role in Umuofia’s society? If you could change anything about your life or the laws of Umuofia, what would you change? Put yourself “in her shoes” and try to see the story of Things Fall Apart from her perspective.”

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

For homework, students will read chapters 14 and 15 of Things Fall Apart.

(listen)

Closing/ Summary

10 min.

Teacher will play YouTube video of popular Nigerian music as a “preview” for the next class. Teacher will pose whole group questions to gage reactions.

Students will watch video, and then briefly discuss reactions. -Do you like it? Why or why not? -Is this style similar to any music that you listen to? -Would you download this song to your iPod if you had the chance?


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Assessment of Student Learning Reading quiz (chapters 8-13), discussion questions, journal prompt. Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 8

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 38. That heroes often possess [tragic] flaws that subvert our contemporary notions of heroes. 39. The criteria for a well-written thesis statement. Students will know: 40. A classical definition of “hero.” 41. The plot and characters of Things Fall Apart up to Chapter 16. Students will be able to: 42. Evaluate the character of Okonkwo in terms of the classical definition of hero. 43. Write a thesis statement drawing on class discussion and past reading. 44. Cite specific textual examples to support their thesis/argument in discussions and writing. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • •

Hero Materials PowerPoint presentation (including “hero” presentation, discussion questions, and Chinua Achebe video) Small group activity resources (names of potential “heroic” characters from pop culture) Things Fall Apart text Technology Needs laptop computer data projector

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) Students will enter to find a quick-write question projected on the board: “What is a ‘hero’? What qualities do you associate with heroes? Do you have any heroes in your life? If so, describe them.” Note: Opening will serve as segue into mini-lecture and activity.


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Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 10 Teacher will discuss answers to quick (volunteer responses) Objective & min. write activity with students, recording Purpose the qualities they mention to be heroic on an overhead transparency. Say: “Today we’re going to take a (listen) closer look at Okonkwo’s character to see if he measures up against our notions and the classical notions of ‘hero.’ We’ll start by thinking about the literary definition of ‘hero.’ Later we’ll listen to a special guest reader read an excerpt of the text, which we will later use to inform our discussion about Okonkwo.” Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

20 min.

20 min.

Teacher will give mini-lecture on heroes/heroism [5-10 min.]

(listen)

After a brief explanation and example of what it means to be heroic [in literature], teacher will quickly divide students into small groups. Each group will draw a name of a well-known character and evaluate their heroism based on the newly learned criteria.

Students will quickly divide into small groups and chose the name of a wellknown character (from books, films, shows, etc.). They then must evaluate whether or not this character can be considered heroic based on the definition that they recently learned. A list of focus areas will be provided in the PowerPoint presentation. After being given time to brainstorm their ideas, one student from each group will present about their character and what they determined about his heroism. Students from other groups will be invited to challenge their opinion.

Teacher will transition students back to whole group and introduce “guest reader” (i.e. Chinua Achebe).

(listen…

Say: “We’re going to watch a clip of Chinua Achebe as guest reader for The National Library. In this video, Achebe states that he selected this passage because, after many years, he thinks that it has a different meaning than he originally thought. While we watch this video, I want us all to be thinking about two things: 1. What could this secondary meaning be? And 2. Does this passage support or negate the notion of

…take notes,

… and read along with Achebe in their own books)


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Okonkwo as a hero? Jot down notes as we listen and be prepared to answer these questions at the end of the video.” Note: Achebe’s reading starts at beginning of Chapter 14.

Guided Practice

15 min.

Teacher will give students 2-3 minutes to summarize their thoughts to the previously posed questions. After, teacher will facilitate group discussion, posing the following questions: 1. Review: What could the secondary meaning of this passage be? What examples from the text support this conclusion? 2. To what extent do we consider Okonkwo a hero? What qualities, character traits, and specific events in the novel point to this conclusion? - Okonkwo’s tragic flaw = singlemindedness? 3. Do heroes have to be likable? Do you think that Okonkwo is a likeable character? If you knew him in real life, would you be friends? 4. Can Okonkwo still be considered heroic after the crime that he committed?

(write, listen, participate in discussion)

15 min.

As a whole class, teacher and students will construct the first paragraph of an essay answering the question “Is Okonkwo a hero?” Teacher will ask students to help develop a thesis argument with assertions. Potential evidence that can be used for the essay (examples from the text) will also be discussed.

Students will help create the first paragraph of an essay responding to the question “Is Okonkwo a hero?” Students will write as the teacher writes, recording paragraph in their journals.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

Note: all students will write intro paragraph in their journals. For homework, students will read Chapters 17-19 for Things Fall Apart.

Closing/ Summary

5 min.

Teacher will get student feedback with + / ! activity.

(listen)

Students will contribute positive feedback and suggestions for change based on today’s activities.


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Assessment of Student Learning Quick write responses, small group and whole group participation, journal response. Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


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Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 9

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 45. How to apply the DIDLS method to a short text (in this case, a personal essay). 46. The relationship between British colonialism, Antigua, and Kincaid’s attitude toward her Britishinfluenced upbringing. Students will know: 47. The geographical location and basic facts about the island of Antigua. 48. The definition of “colonialism” and how it applies to Kincaid’s text. 49. The main argument and ideas behind Jamaica Kincaid’s essay “On Seeing England for the First Time.” Students will be able to: 50. Critically analyze the argument of “On Seeing England for the First Time” within the DIDLS framework. 51. Relate the above essay to works they have already studied within the unit. 52. Successfully collaborate in their project groups to advance on their presentation.

Key Vocabulary for this Lesson •

(British) colonialism Materials

• • • • • • •

student journals PowerPoint Elements of Literature books (OR if possible, photocopies of the text to facilitate annotation) handouts (small group discussion questions) Technology Needs laptop computer data projector Laptop cart (request ahead of time)


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LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) In their journals, students will answer the following “Quick Write” prompt: “Imagine yourself as a member of Igbo society. How might you react to the foreign missionaries coming to settle in your community? Would you be inclined to accept them? Would you feel hostile toward them? Or, even, would you join them? Write down your ideas from an Igbo perspective.” Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of Teacher will quickly review “quick write” (write) 10 Objective & activity with students. After, teacher will min. Purpose revisit + / ! feedback from the previous class (listen) (incl. and review any changes that have been made. intro)

Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

10 min.

30 min.

Say: “As we near the end of our novel Things Fall Apart, today we’re going to examine another perspective of British colonialism through the writing of Caribbean writer Jamaica Kincaid. Through her short essay “On Seeing England for the First Time,” we’ll examine her complex relationship to ‘England’ and her strong feelings toward the colonization of her island of Antigua.” Teacher will give mini-lecture on Antigua and facts about British Colonialism presented on Day 1 of the unit. Teacher will also read aloud “Cultural Points of View: Before you Read” on page 1016 to introduce background information on Jamaica Kincaid.

(listen)

After lecture, teacher will pose oral questions about the presentation to test for understanding.

(listen, respond to questions)

Teacher will read aloud (with student volunteers) “On Seeing England For the First Time” (EOL pp. 1017-1019).

(read)

After finishing essay, teacher will lead group discussion of text centered on the following questions (more or less following the DIDLS method): 1. How could we describe Kincaid’s diction in this essay? What words or phrases stand out as particularly important (why?)? 2. What imagery is present here? Which senses does it evoke? 3. How does Kincaid use details to create meaning? Are any details omitted that would have affected meaning? 4. In general, how does Kincaid use language? Formal/clinical/jargon/ conversational? What does her style

Students will participate in group discussion. Teacher will utilize “coldcalling” to maximize student participation.

(listen)


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suggest? How does sentence structure/syntax affect the reader’s attitude? 6. What is Kincaid’s tone in this piece? What feelings/opinions are evident in her writing? *As students give answers, ask for them to point to concrete examples in the text. *These questions will be on a PowerPoint slide so that students can have “think time” before answering. 5.

Guided Practice

20 min.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

Closing/ Summary

10 min.

Teacher will give students this time to Students will work on collaborate on group projects. If developing their project necessary, teacher will reserve laptop presentation in groups. computers for students to use. *If previous activities take less time, time will be added to project prep. During this time, teacher will monitor student work and be available for group consultation and questions. Note: Laptop cart will be available for student use. Students will read chapters 19-21 in TFA.

(listen)

Teacher will verbally review events (listen, ask questions as of last night’s TFA reading with necessary) students and preview the next few days of class leading to unit exam. Assessment of Student Learning “Quick Write” journal prompt, participation in group activities Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

37

Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single Story Africa

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 10

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 53. That folk tales often communicate moral advice/are didactical in nature. 54. That meaning in folk tales is often conveyed through symbolism. Students will know: 55. A variety of different African folk tales and background information pertaining to them. 56. The definition of “folk tale.” Students will be able to: 57. Independently read and develop a short presentation related to their African folk tale. 58. Determine relevant information pertaining to their topic from several informational texts. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • • • •

folk tale Materials pre-assembled packs of folk tales + informational texts Large Post-It paper (or poster sized paper) Markers KWL cards from earlier in unit Technology Needs Laptop Data projector Laptop cart (must reserve ahead of time)

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) For opening activity, students will make the final revision to their Africa KWL note card, adding information that they have learned in the ‘L’ column. Teacher gives each student a playing card as they complete the KWL activity.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

38

Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of After students have finished the final update Students will update the “L” column 10 Objective & of their KWL cards, teacher will state of their KWL cards. min. Purpose objectives of today’s class. (incl. intro) Say: “Today we’re going to take a look a (listen)

Input, Modeling, & Guided Practice

5 min. 25 min.

several different African folk tales. We’re going to begin by dividing into groups for a “jigsaw” activity. Once in your groups, you must read your folk tale together. Each folk tale is from a different region of Africa. Accompanying your folk tale text will be additional informational text that you can consult in order to create your 3-5 minute mini-presentation. Within your group, you need to assign the roles of: presenter, writer, reader, and researcher (if 5 ppl, there will be 2 researchers). Your job is to create a presentation that includes the following information: 1. A basic summary or outline of the folk tale. 2. Identification of major symbols, themes, and how they contribute to the story. 3. Inclusion of appropriate information from informational text on the region or people from where the folk tale originates (i.e. situate the folk tale in an historical or cultural context for the audience). 4. Answer the question: Are there any similar folk tales from our society? *Question will remain projected on board for duration of activity. Teacher will give extremely brief explanation of folk tales, referencing several well-known examples in our culture. Teacher will give directions for jig-saw activity. At the beginning, teacher will walk around to ensure that every student in each group has been assigned a role. As class progresses, teacher will give time indications of where students should be with their groups. As students read and work, teacher will monitor student work and be available for group consultation.

Students will move into small groups based on cards distributed at the beginning of class. Each group will elect one student to come to the front of the class and chose their assigned folk tale from a cup. That student will take the necessary materials back to the group where they will begin the activity. Students will divide into groups, chose individual roles, and begin activity. They will read the folk tale aloud together. After, they will begin to answer the questions necessary to


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

39 create their presentation. Researchers will pursue accompanying informational texts to include relevant information. Students will have the ability to use various materials, such as large poster paper, markers, etc. if desired.

Check for Understanding

20 min.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min. 20 min.

Closing/ Summary

5 min.

Teacher will give directions for student presentations. (MUST adhere to time schedule!) For homework, students will read chapters 22-24 of Things Fall Apart to finish the novel.

In their small groups, students will present about their folk tale and background information. (listen)

Remaining time will be given to students to work on group project in groups. Teacher will hand out unit test guide, review objectives for group PowerPoint presentations (provide examples of “good” slides), and briefly review for tomorrow’s quiz.

Students will work on group presentations. (listen, ask questions as necessary)

*If extra time, students can begin reading the last chapters of Things Fall Apart. **If all groups do not have sufficient time to present, remaining group(s) will present at the beginning of the next class period in lieu of a warm-up activity. Assessment of Student Learning Completion of KWL card, participation in small groups, group presentation (and accompanying poster) Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

40

Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 11

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-onone, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 59. How things have “fallen apart” in the novel and the various factors that have influenced this process. 60. How Achebe foreshadows the demise of the Ibo tribe. Students will know: 61. The plot and characters of Things Fall Apart in its entirety. 62. The guidelines for the unit test. 63. Criteria for evaluating the group project. Students will be able to: 64. Reflect on the meaning of Yeats’s poem “The Second Coming” and its relation to Things Fall Apart. 65. Reflect on how “things fall apart” in the novel through a journal prompt. 66. Advance toward the completion of their group project. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson • • • • • • •

(none) Materials post-its handouts (discussion questions, quiz, final exam review) PowerPoint (to project journal prompt) Technology Needs laptop data projector laptop cart (reserve in advance)

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) For opening activity, students will use post-its to write their reactions to the final scene of Things Fall Apart, placing them on the board when finished. (Teacher will place directions on board via data projector and Post-its at the front of the room). Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 5 After giving students time to complete (write) Objective &


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Purpose

min. (incl. intro)

the warm-up activity, teacher will state objectives of today’s class and segue with post-it activity into final discussion of Things Fall Apart. Say: “Today we’re going to have our final discussion and journal prompt for Things Fall Apart (hooray!). After wrapping up our final ideas and revisiting Yeats’s poem as promised, we’ll take our final quiz. The remaining time will be yours to work on your group presentations and consult me as needed.”

Input, Modeling, & Check for Understanding

30 min.

41

Teacher will facilitate group discussion on the final chapters of Things Fall Apart. Before the discussion, the teacher will provide students with time to think about and briefly answer the questions on their own. Some questions that may be discussed are as follows: 1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Summarize the events of part 3 of the novel. At the beginning of Part III, we learn of Okonkwo’s plans for his triumphant return, yet things don’t go exactly as planned when he and his family move back to Umuofia. Why is Okonkwo so disappointed (in his own situation and for the clan)? (Look at the last paragraph on p. 182-183)* “He has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart.” Reread the last paragraph on the bottom of p. 176. How has the ‘import’ of a foreign religion, economic system, school and government driven a wedge among the Ibo people? Are the changes good/bad? Why?* “You can stay with us if you like our ways. You can worship your own god. It is good that a man should worship the gods and the spirits of his fathers” (p. 190). How do the approaches of Mr. Smith and the egwugwu differ?* Notice how Achebe uses foreshadowing on page 187: “It seemed as if the very soul of the tribe wept for a great evil that was coming—its own death.” What do you predict might happen?* Discuss the death of Okonkwo. Why do you think he chose to kill himself?

(listen)

(listen, participate in discussion)


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

7.

42

What reactions did you have to this scene as a reader? Revisit Yeats’s poem “The Second Coming.” Having finished the novel, why do you now think he chose to use this as the epigraph for Things Fall Apart? What additional meaning does it now carry/how does it inform the meaning of the novel?

*Questions taken from Elaine Baker, Discussion Group Day 10 guide. 10 min.

At conclusion of discussion, teacher will distribute final quiz to students.

Students will take quiz.

15 min.

After students finish quiz, teacher will go through answers to quiz with students together. Teacher will also distribute handout explaining guidelines for unit test, answering student questions and reviewing as questions are raised by students.

Students will correct their own quiz. After, they will review guidelines for unit test and ask questions for review as necessary.

10 min.

Teacher will instruct students to respond to the final journal prompt: How do things fall apart in Things Fall Apart? Draw from today’s discussion.

(write)

Guided Practice

15 min.

Teacher will monitor students’ work on their group projects and be available for conferences/questions as necessary.

Independent Practice/ Homework

5 min.

For homework, students will prepare for unit test and do any necessary work for group project.

In their groups, students will continue to work on their projects, asking for teacher input as needed. (listen)

Closing/ Summary

5 min.

Teacher will review guidelines for unit (listen, ask questions as test and presentation project necessary) (referencing rubric), answering student questions as necessary. Assessment of Student Learning Quiz (assessment of group project will be completed on last day of unit) Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

43

Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single African Story

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 12

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 67. The criteria necessary for creating an acceptable group project. Students will know: 68. The plot and characters of Things Fall Apart and other texts read during course of unit. 69. The criteria of the group project rubric. Students will be able to: 70. Take unit test. 71. Finish all work necessary for group project. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson •

none Materials

unit exam

Technology Needs laptop cart (must request in advance)

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) (None for this class period) Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 5 The teacher will distribute the unit (listen) Objective & min. test and explain the various parts and Purpose requirements to students


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Check for Understanding

45-55 min.

Guided Practice

(all other time)

Teacher will monitor student work as they complete the unit test.

44 Students will take unit test.

Teacher will monitor student work on Students will work on group group projects, answering questions projects. and being available for conferences as necessary. Independent 5 Teacher will briefly review (listen) Practice/ min. requirements for group presentation Homework, due during the next class period. For Closing homework, students will complete their group projects. Assessment of Student Learning Unit test (group project assessment with take place during the next class period) Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

45

Daily Lesson Plan Course Name: English II Unit Title: The Danger of a Single Story Africa

! Standard Day/Date: DAY 13

Relevant NC Standard Course of Study Goal(s): CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Specific Lesson Objectives Students will understand: 72. How to provide appropriate peer feedback. Students will know: 73. Guidelines for appropriate peer feedback and self-assessment pertaining to their group project. Students will be able to: 74. Reflect on the unit and their performance as a whole. 75. Reflect on their own performance with the group project. 76. Present their group project to the whole class. Key Vocabulary for this Lesson •

none

• • •

Project evaluation rubric Peer evaluation rubric Student evaluation survey

• • •

Technology Needs laptop data projector Other technology needs as dictated by student projects

Materials

LESSON ACTIVITIES Opening (Hook, Warm-Up, Anticipatory Set, Review, etc.) (there will be no opening activity for today’s lesson) Procedure: Include all sections that apply to this lesson; combine as necessary. Section Time What the Teacher will do: What the Students will do: Statement of 5 Teacher will give directions for (listen) Objective & min. project presentations, specifically Purpose about peer feedback process.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story Check for Understanding

60 min.

Independent Practice/ Homework

15 min.

Closing/ Summary

10 min.

Teacher will watch student presentations, provide feedback, facilitate transitions between groups.

Teacher will hand out student feedback survey of unit and monitor students’ work as necessary.

46 Students will present group presentations. Meanwhile, other students will watch their peers’ presentations. Small groups of students will provide peer feedback according to the rubrics devised by the teacher. After their presentation, each student will be asked to evaluate their own performance. Students will complete feedback survey.

Teacher will facilitate a “wrap-up” (listen, volunteer students will discussion on the unit, particularly contribute to the discussion) considering what “stories” of African we have learned (referencing Adichie’s TED Talk). Teacher will also preview the next unit to the class. Assessment of Student Learning Group project presentations, individual performance assessment, peer feedback survey Differentiation Strategies How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate student READINESS? Struggling Students: Gifted/Advanced Students: English Language Learners: N/A

N/A

N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ LEARNING PROFILES? N/A

How will you adjust aspects of the lesson to accommodate students’ INTERESTS? N/A


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

47

SYLLABUS: THE DANGER OF A SINGLE AFRICAN STORY Dates: Days 1 - 13 TEXTS • Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart • Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, Purple Hibiscus (excerpt) • W.B. Yeats, “The Second Coming” (poem) • Wole Soyinka, “After the Deluge” (poem) • Jamaica Kincaid, “On Seeing England for the First Time” (short story) • Chinua Achebe, “Dead Man’s Path” (short story) • A selection of African folk tales TBD • One larger work (or collection of shorter works like short stories or poems) chosen individually by student for group project As of ___________, we will begin our 13-day unit focusing on African literature. Our main text will be Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, which we will supplement with the above secondary texts. Instead of a longer essay, we will have daily in-class writing prompts, one current event assignment, and a group presentation project. For the group presentation, I will evaluate you both on your group’s effort and presentation as well as an individual written component. For more information regarding the current event and group project assignments, see below. Throughout our reading, we will focus on a variety of themes and issues that are raised in the texts. Below are a list of essential questions that will guide us through our African literature unit. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS • What is the danger of a “single story”? Why is it important to view multiple perspectives of history? • How do past experience and our own “cultural lens” influence our understanding? • How can we determine what is moral or immoral? Does “morality” have a universal definition? To what extent is it defined by cultural contexts? • What does it mean to be a hero? Are the protagonists in our texts meant to be thought of as heroes? • Is colonialism just? How do cultures that are “civilized” by more advanced societies change as a result of this process? • Why do we tell folk tales? What purpose do they serve, specifically in African culture and literature? What can we learn from them? CURRENT EVENT ASSIGNMENT On one day within the unit, each student will be required to bring in an African current event for discussion. Two to three students will be asked to present each day at random times throughout the class. The current event can be found online (recommended) or in magazine, newspaper, or other print media. The article must be dated from this year within the last 3 months of the assignment date. On the first day of the unit, each student will sign up for their current event day.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

48

Requirements: • Attach a print copy of the article to the back of the written assignment. If you do not have access to a printer, speak with me. • Create a “twitter summary” of the article, summarizing its content in 140 characters or less. • On a separate piece of paper, answer the following questions about your current event using the “5 Ws and one H” framework: o Who is your article about? Who does the issue affect? o What happened? Provide details and background information as possible. o When did it take place? Provide as specific date and time if possible. o Where did it take place? Be specific—don’t just say “Nigeria.” o Why did it happen? What factors contributed to this event? Is there a history leading up to its occurrence? If this information is not provided, can you make an educated guess? ALSO: Why should we care about this event/issue? Why is it important to us? o How did it happen? • At end of paper, include a citation in MLA format. (For questions regarding MLA formatting, I suggest visiting the Purdue OWL website, an excellent resourse: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/) • When you speak about your current event in class, your presentation should last no more than 2-3 minutes. Be prepared to say quickly and concisely the answers to the 5 Ws + 1 H and why this event should matter to us. GROUP PROJECT PRESENTATION During this unit, each student will be required to chose a secondary text from the below list and create a group presentation evaluating the work with the class. The list is as follows: • •

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus (novel) o Other potential novel selections TBD A selection (3-5) of poems from one of the following anthologies: o The Penguin Book of Modern African Poetry: Fifth Edition (Penguin Classics) o Angles of Ascent: The Norton Anthology of Contemporary American Poetry o If you are interested in a specific poet, see me to discuss potential project options. A selection (2-3) of the following short stories/folk tales: o In Elements of Literature: World Literature textbook: ! “Why We Tell Stories About Spider” (folk tale, p. 508) ! “The Five Helpers” (dilemma tale, p. 510) ! “Talk” (folk tale, p. 511) ! “Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali” (epic, p. 519) ! “Life is Sweet at Kumansenu” (short story, p. 986) ! “The Train from Rhodesia” (short story, p. 1006) ! “The Prisoner Who Wore Glasses” (shorty story, p. 1023) o A short story selected from the book African Short Stories: Twenty Short Stories from Across the Continent (Chinua Achebe)


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story • •

49

A selection (3-5) of songs (lyrics) from a prominent African musician or folk song. Selection TBD. Other ideas for secondary texts will be considered. If you have another idea for a secondary text, schedule a meeting with me to discuss options.

The group project will consist of three elements: (1) the group presentation (2) the individual writing component and (3) a reflection of individual performance at the conclusion of the project. (1) Group presentation – Your group’s presentation will be assess for content, organization, overall group preparation, and delivery. Each student must speak during the presentation. (see rubric for specific presentation guidelines) (2) Individual writing component – Each student will have to provide a 1 page (or more!) individual response answering the following questions about their secondary text(s). This document must be completed and turned in BEFORE the first day of in-class group work time. Must be typed. • Give a brief summary (or summaries) of your text(s) for the project (3-5 sentences per text). • Who is the author? Where are they from? What other works have the written? Provide any relevant background information. • What symbols are present (if any) in the novel? How do they influence the overall meaning of the text? If you believe there are no symbols, state that and explain how this contributes to the overall meaning of the text. • What is the theme of the work? What literary devices or techniques work to convey this? • Do you recommend this/these text(s)? If so, what about it/them did you find appealing? If not, what negative aspects of the work(s) influenced your decision? (3) Reflection – After each group presents on the last day of the unit, every student will respond to a survey prompt critiquing their own performance in the group portion of the project.


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story

50

UNIT SYLLABUS DAY 1 KWL Read Chapter One of Things Fall Apart in Class. • Syllabus, Rubrics. • HW: Read Ch. 2-3 of TFA DAY 3 • Theme, “Dead Man’s Path” • Reading Workshop • HW: Read Ch. 6-7 of TFA, secondary text for group project DAY 5 • TED Talk, Purple Hibiscus • Project check-in • HW: Read Ch. 10-11 of TFA, finish Ch. 1 of PH, secondary texts DAY 7 • Critical lens, feminism • Critical reading activity • Nigerian music • HW: Read Ch. 14-16 TFA, secondary texts, ***individual writing component of group project*** DAY 9 • Antigua, British Colonialism, Jamaica Kincaid • “On Seeing England for the First Time” • Project work time HW: Read Ch. 20-22 of TFA INDIVIDUAL WRITING COMPONENT FOR GROUP PROJECT DUE DAY 11 • Quiz • Unit Test Review • Project work time • HW: Study for unit test, group project DAY 13 GROUP PRESENTATIONS • Reflections • Feedback surveys • •

• • •

• • • • • • •

• •

• • • •

• • •

DAY 2 Umuofia’s society jigsaw activity SIFT method, Yeats poem HW: Read Ch. 4-5 of TFA, choose group project secondary texts for next class DAY 4 Quiz Ikemefuna’s death: Fish bowl “After the Deluge” poem HW: Read Ch. 8-9 of TFA, secondary texts DAY 6 Ch. 2 PH in class PH jigsaw activity HW: Read Ch. 12-13 TFA, prepare for quiz, secondary texts DAY 8 Heroism, “read aloud” with Achebe HW: Read Ch. 17-19 of TFA, secondary texts, ***individual writing component of group project*** DAY 10 Folk tales Jigsaw activity & mini-presentations Project work time HW: Read Ch. 23-24 (finish book) of TFA, group projects DAY 12 Unit test FINAL project work time HW: Finish all work for group project


Windham, English II, The Danger of a Single African Story “The Second Coming� BY WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS Turning and turning in the widening gyre The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The ceremony of innocence is drowned; The best lack all conviction, while the worst Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand; Surely the Second Coming is at hand. The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert A shape with lion body and the head of a man, A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun, Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds. The darkness drops again; but now I know That twenty centuries of stony sleep Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle, And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

51


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54 GROUP PROJECT RUBRIC

Individual Component: ___/30 Incomplete/Missing (0-6) ! Does not respond to all questions OR does so in an unclear manner. ! Many grammatical/stylistic errors; clearly not edited. ! Analysis contains few to no textual quotations or references. ! Little to no background information provided. ! Response demonstrates little to no student understanding. ! Student does not complete reflection after presentation.

Comments:

Proficient (6-14) ! Responds to all questions. ! A few grammatical or stylistic errors, but otherwise readable. ! Analysis references text with quotations. ! Background information provided. ! Response demonstrates student understanding. ! Student completes reflection after presentation.

Meets Expectations (14-22) ! Responds to all questions to demonstrate knowledge of text(s) studied. ! Very few grammatical or style errors. ! Analysis of text contains quotations and textual references with in-text citations. ! Relevant background information is provided. ! Response is organized and demonstrates student understanding. ! Student thoughtfully completes reflection after presentation.

Exceeds Expectations (22-30) ! Responds to all questions to demonstrate knowledge of text(s) studied in a complex, insightful manner. ! Virtually no grammatical or style errors. ! Analysis of text includes ample quotations and textual references, complete with in-text citations and explanations. ! Relevant background information is provided and contextualized. ! In general, response is well-organized, thorough, and demonstrates student understanding. ! Student thoughtfully completes reflection after presentation.


!

54

Group Component:___/20

Content

Organization

4

Content is exceptionally in-depth, insightful, and well-supported with textual examples. Makes connections between works. All required questions answered. Demonstrates excellent understanding of works read.

Presentation is exceptionally clear and easy to follow. Thorough and complete. Ideas are fluid, sophisticated, and logically flowing.

Final product is the result of exceptional collaboration, planning, and rehearsal. Each student contributed in a meaningful way. Group had excellent use of in-class work time to discuss and further ideas. Teamwork clearly evident.

Presentation is exceptionally rehearsed, informative, and engaging. Information is delivered clearly and articulately. Students adhere to time requirements. All students speak during presentation.

3

Content is generally well explained and well-supported with textual examples. Makes basic connections between works. Most required questions answered. Demonstrates clear understanding of works read.

Presentation is generally clear and easy to follow. Complete. Ideas are fluid and logically flowing.

Final product is the result of collaboration, planning, and rehearsal. Each student contributed. Group had adequate use of inclass work time to discuss and further ideas.

Presentation is generally rehearsed, informative, and engaging. Information is generally delivered clearly and articulately. Students mostly adhere to time requirements. Most students speak during presentation.

2

Content lacks depth and conclusions not supported with textual examples. Few connections made between works. Less than half required questions answered. Demonstrates limited understanding of works read.

Presentation lacks clarity and is difficult to follow. May contain missing elements; ideas do not flow or are illogically presented.

Final product is unrehearsed or lacks planning. Not all group members contributed equally. Group had limited use of in-class work time to discuss and further ideas.

Presentation is ill-rehearsed or not informative. Information is unclear. Students do not adhere to time requirements. Half or less than half of the students speak during the presentation.

1

Content is unclear or illogical. Conclusions not supported with textual examples. No clear connections made between works. Few or no required questions answered. Does not demonstrate understanding of works read.

Presentation is unclear, impossible to follow. May contain a substantial amount missing elements; ideas do not flow or are illogically presented.

Final product is unrehearsed and illplanned. Not all group members contributed. Group had poor use of inclass work time to discuss and further ideas.

Presentation is ill-rehearsed and not informative. Information is unclear. Students do not adhere to time requirements. The majority of the group members do not speak.

0

Missing or incomplete.

Missing or incomplete.

Missing or incomplete.

Missing or incomplete.

Comments:

Process

Delivery


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