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SEPTEMBER 2 017 FEATURES 010

028

by David Rieder Carmel High School (Ind.) once again won Swimming World’s girls’ national high school championships—for a fifth straight year and for the sixth time in the last seven years.

A RED, WHITE AND BLUE DANUBE WALTZ

by David Rieder, Brent Rutemiller, Taylor Brien and John Lohn Team USA danced circles around its competition in Budapest’s (Hungary) beautiful Duna Arena at the 17th FINA World Championships, July 23-30. Beginning nine days earlier on July 14, the city came alive, supporting all the aquatic sports—open water, diving, high diving, synchronized swimming and water polo.

020

036 EMBRACING THE CHALLENGE

COACHING

by Annie Grevers Men who have been fortunate enough to be a part of the legendary St. Xavier High School swimming tradition in Cincinnati, Ohio know what it means to belong to the “The Long Blue Lane.” But the members of the exclusive group also realize how instrumental their years as St. X Aquabombers were to their character development.

032 THE X FACTOR

by Annie Grevers St. Xavier swimmers knew they could do something pretty impressive during the 2016-17 high school season. By “doing the work and putting in the time,” Coach Tim Beerman’s Aquabombers won Swimming World’s boys’ national high school championships, securing its fourth title to go along with team victories in 1973, 1992 and 2001.

046

SWIMMING TECHNIQUE MISCONCEPTIONS: STROKE COUNTS

by Rod Havriluk This month’s article addresses the misconception that a lower stroke count represents a more effective technique. While stroke counts can provide meaningful feedback about technique, swimmers often make technique adjustments that lower their stroke count, but do not necessarily make their technique more effective.

With an awe-inspiring performance this season, St. Xavier High School of Cincinnati, Ohio—coached by Tim Beerman—was crowned Swimming World’s 2016-17 boys’ national high school champions. The school’s winning tradition spans over the decades: not only have the Aquabombers captured four national titles since their first in 1973, but the team has also won 38 of the last 47 Division I Ohio State High School Championships and has never lost a district meet since 1959. (See feature, page 32, and a related story, page 28.) [PHOTO PROVIDED BY ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL]

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE (ISSN 0039-7431). Note: permission to reprint articles or excerpts from contents is prohibited without permission from the publisher. The publisher is not responsible for errors in advertisements. Microfilm copies: available from University Microfilms, 313 N. First St., Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Swimming World Magazine is listed in the Physical Education Index. Printed in the U.S.A. © Sports Publications International September 2017.

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

HOW THEY TRAIN: TANNER SONNEK

by Michael J. Stott

DRYSIDE TRAINING: THE IM STROKE SERIES— BREASTSTROKE by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER 053

UP & COMERS

by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS 008

A VOICE FOR THE SPORT

048

MOMS AT MEETS

054

GUTTER TALK

056

PARTING SHOT

032

ON THE COVER

6

050

043

SPECIAL SETS: TRAINING FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

by Michael J. Stott This is the first of a two-part series on training for the individual medley, which requires time, sacrifice, incredible endurance and speed to achieve world-class status. This month, Coaches Ted Knapp and Jeff Kostoff share “the Stanford way” of training their IMers. Next month: North Baltimore Aquatic Club coach Paul Yetter will provide some of his IM training secrets.

POISE AND CONSISTENCY IN THE LONG BLUE LANE

Q&A WITH COACH JON CARLSON

TRAINING

by Michael J. Stott

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS PHOTO GALLERY

049

by Michael J. Stott

040 LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: BOB KIPHUTH 044

010


A VOICE for the SPORT

THE END OF SOMETHING GOOD AND THE START OF SOMETHING NEW BY BRENT T. RUTEMILLER September usually marks the end of a swim season and the beginning of the next. We are proud of this expanded issue that crowns the high school national team champions from last season and showcases all the great accomplishments at the FINA World Championships in Budapest, Hungary. Budapest was an incredible host to the world of aquatics. It is an amazing city—rich in history, architecture and scenery—that was formed in 1873 by the union of the city of Buda on the west bank of the Danube River and the city of Pest on the east. Public transportation modes throughout the city and along the river are first class, with bus, light rail, train and boat taxis that were all interconnected and running on time. For a country that broke from the Soviet Union 28 years ago, Budapest appears to be thriving. There is something for everyone in this eastern European city—from hot thermal spas surrounded by modern renaissance buildings to a bustling nightlife on city rooftops that overlook ancient castles. The Hungarians’ love affair with water was obvious with diving and competitive swimming in venues on the Pest side of the river, high diving along the Buda side, and water polo on an island in the middle. To watch the daredevil high divers spinning off 27-meter platforms and reaching speeds of 62 miles per hour before landing feetfirst into what looked like a puddle, was nothing short of breathtaking. All of this with the majestic Hungarian parliament building not far off in the background made the experience unforgettable. Fans should mark their calendar and athletes should set their goals because the next opportunity for the world swimming community to assemble in Budapest will

8

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

be in 2024 for the FINA Short Course World Swimming Championships. When that date rolls around seven years from now, we are almost certain to see new stars emerge. It is not too far-fetched to think that some of those athletes will mature from the two teams that Swimming World Magazine has crowned as national high school team champions within this issue. History has been kind to those who have won this honor with many of these athletes going on to excel in the sport on a national and international level. Carmel winning its fifth straight girls’ national high school team championships and sixth out of the last seven years is nothing but amazing...and a true testament to the community support and coaching skills of Chris Plumb and his staff. Not too far down the road, St. Xavier of Cincinnati claimed the boys’ title with its long history of motivating athletes to high achievement. St. Xavier, a Jesuit Catholic school for boys, has been in the national hunt with teams every decade since Swimming World has been announcing team titles. This year was especially rewarding for Coach Tim Beerman and his experienced staff as they reclaimed the title they last won in 2001. Congratulations to all the athletes who have concluded their swimming seasons— and good luck as we start the next round.

P U B L I S H I N G, C I RC U L AT I O N A N D ACCO U N T I N G www.SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Publisher, CEO - Brent T. Rutemiller BrentR@SwimmingWorld.com Circulation/Operations Manager - Taylor Brien TaylorB@SwimmingWorld.com Advertising Production Coordinator Advertising@SwimmingWorld.com

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L CO R R E S PO N D E N T S Africa: Chaker Belhadj (TUN) Australia: Wayne Goldsmith, Ian Hanson Europe: Norbert Agh (HUN), Camilo Cametti (ITA), Oene Rusticus (NED), Rokur Jakupsstovu (FAR) Japan: Hideki Mochizuki Middle East: Baruch “Buky” Chass, Ph.D. (ISR) South Africa: Neville Smith (RSA) South America: Jorge Aguado (ARG)

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17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Caeleb Dressel, USA

A RED, WHITE AND BLUE

DANUBE WALTZ STORIES BY DAVID RIEDER, BRENT RUTEMILLER, TAYLOR BRIEN AND JOHN LOHN PHOTOS BY SIPA USA

10

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


BUDAPEST, Hungary—Team USA danced circles around its competition at Budapest’s (Hungary) beautiful Duna Arena, a brand new indoor natatorium built on the eastern bank of the Danube, Europe’s second longest river (1,770 miles) located in Central and Eastern Europe.

Country

No matter how anyone analyzed the meet, everyone agreed: it was a total domination by the Americans...just as they had done the previous year at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro: • Gold Medals: 18— more than four times more than the next nation • Silver Medals: 10—twice as many as its nearest pursuer • Bronze Medals: 10—six more than the runners-up

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Total

18

10

10

38

2T. China

3

3

4

10

2T. Russia

3

3

4

10

4. Australia

1

5

4

10

5. Hungary

2

4

2

8

6. Great Britain

4

1

2

7

1. United States

7. Japan

0

4

3

7

8. Italy

3

0

3

6

9. Brazil

1

4

0

5

10. Sweden

3

1

0

4

11. Canada

1

0

3

4

12. Netherlands

0

3

1

4

13. Spain

1

2

0

3

14T. France

1

0

1

2

14T. South Africa

1

0

1

2

16. Ukraine

0

1

1

2

17T. Germany

0

1

0

1

• Total Medals: 38—nearly four times more than China, Russia and Australia with 10

17T. Poland

0

1

0

1

19T. Belarus

0

0

1

1

• World Records: 6—three times more than runner-up Sweden and Great Britain

19T. Denmark

0

0

1

1

19T. Egypt

0

0

1

1

19T. Singapore

0

0

1

1

42

43

43

128

For extensive day-by-day reports and complete results of the Budapest World Championships, check out Swimming world’s online coverage at -

Total

*= chart reflects medals won in pool swimming only (not open water)

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS SWIMMING MEDAL STANDINGS

17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

swimmingworldmagazine.com/meet/2017-fina-world-championships

THE BIRTH OF A SUPERSTAR BY DAVID RIEDER

C

aeleb Dressel had shown signs that he might have something special up his sleeve for the summer of 2017. Hyped as the future of U.S. sprinting, he had been thrown into the crucible of an Olympic relay final for his first major international swim and thrived before returning home to dominate the collegiate and domestic circuits. The next step was imminent. Contending for individual medals at the World Championships? That seemed well within the realm of expectation for Dressel in 2017. But becoming the most dominant sprinter in the world? That seemed a little far-fetched. Twelve months earlier, Dressel was 19 years old when the U.S. coaching staff entrusted him to lead off his country’s men’s 4x100

meter freestyle relay at the Rio Games. With his explosive start and power off the walls, the American coaching staff saw no one more equipped to do the job. That decision paid off in gold. Dressel would later finish sixth in the individual 100 free Olympic final—not bad, but just a hint of the swimmer he would become in one year’s time. In Budapest, at his first World Championships, Dressel announced his presence right away. In his first final of the week on opening night, he again provided the leadoff leg for the men’s 4x100 meter free relay, and in the process, he took down an eight-year-old American record in the men’s 100 free. In one fell swoop, he had knocked down his best time from

— continued on 12

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

11


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS - continued from 11 47.91 all the way to 47.26, breaking David Walters’ American record of 47.33 from 2009. Dressel gave the American team a full-second lead after 100 meters that proved critical when Brazil made a run on the final leg. U.S. anchor Nathan Adrian (47.25) ended up having just enough to hold off Bruno Fratus (47.18) for the gold medal (3:10.06 to 3:10.34). Four days later, heading into the final of the men’s 100 free, it was clear that anything close to Dressel’s outstanding relay leadoff would be enough to win the individual gold medal. But could he again deliver that kind of performance with a world title on the line? Well, yes, he could...most definitely. Dressel dove in and built a huge lead. No one would come close. He won gold by a whopping 7-tenths of a second, lowering his American record to 47.17 and becoming the seventh fastest performer in history. The 100 free marked Dressel’s third win of the week after the men’s 4x100 free relay and the mixed 4x100 medley relay (3:38.56 WR/49.92 fly). He had also finished fourth in a tight 50 fly final (22.89, 14-hundredths behind gold medalist Ben Proud of Great Britain). All excellent efforts, but it was on the meet’s seventh night when Dressel became a legend! That night, he swam in three finals—all within two hours: the 50 free, 100 fly and mixed 4x100 free relay. He won gold in all of them. No swimmer, woman or man—not even Michael Phelps—had ever before won three titles on the same night at either the World Championships or Olympics. The win in the 50 free came in an American record 21.15. In the 100 fly, Dressel beat a world-class field that included Olympic gold medalist (and his own former Bolles swim club teammate) Joseph Schooling by almost a second. He nearly broke Phelps’ world record in the process, coming in at 49.86 and missing by just 4-hundredths. Finally, to end the night, he led off the world record-setting mixed 4x100 free relay (3:19.60) in 47.22, just 5-hundredths slower than he had swum in the individual 100 free final when he was fresh. After all that, how was Dressel feeling? “Very tired,” he responded. Meanwhile, all those in attendance that night at the Duna Arena were in awe. “It’s awesome seeing the birth of a superstar,” U.S. teammate Matt Grevers 12

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

CAELEB DRESSEL - USA

BEST MALE SWIMMER OF THE CHAMPIONSHIPS 7 GOLD:

Caeleb Dressel, USA

said. “He had a great Trials, but this meet just blows Trials out of the water. Pretty incredible to see him hunting down that 100 fly record—which is one of the most ridiculous records—just to be that close. “That was phenomenal,” Schooling said, minutes after Dressel defeated him in the 100 fly. “There are no words to describe how fast that is.” Fresh off the best night of his career and the most breathtaking single-day effort any swimmer had recorded, Dressel credited what had gotten him to that point: his grueling, volume-heavy training with Florida head coach Gregg Troy. “I don’t think there’s any accidents in this sport,” Dressel said. “I had three swims within an hour-and-a-half of each other tonight, and I had to be on my A-game for all of them. It wasn’t an accident what happened tonight. I work well with Coach Troy, and we were ready for it. It was very hard—it definitely wasn’t easy—but I’m just glad he has a plan for me with everything we do.” The plan worked. On a night when Katie Ledecky had won her fifth gold medal of the meet and the 14th title of her career at World Championships, Dressel was the main story and Ledecky the sidebar. And he was not done. He returned to the pool the next day in the meet’s final event to swim the butterfly leg for the American men’s 4x100 medley relay. He entered the water virtually tied

50 Free 21.15 NR 100 Free 47.17 NR 100 Fly 49.86 4x100 Medley Relay 3:27.91 (49.76 fly) 4x100 Free Relay 3:10.06 NR (47.26 NR leadoff) Mixed 4x100 Medley Relay 3:38.56 WR (49.92 fly) Mixed 4x100 Free Relay 3:19.60 WR (47.22 leadoff) with Great Britain, but made quick work of James Guy, who had tied with Schooling for bronze in the individual 100 fly the day before. He clocked 49.76, finishing a full second ahead of Guy, and Adrian cruised home for the gold. Dressel had his seventh gold medal. Yes, seven—tied with Michael Phelps for the most all-time at a World Championships. Still, the always-modest Dressel pointed out that he had a key advantage that Phelps didn’t have when he won seven gold medals back in 2007. “I have mixed relays helping me out, so I think it’s a bit different situation,” he said, regarding the two mixed relays that were just added to the World Championships schedule in 2015. “But it’s an honor to do it, even with mixed relays.” No, given the extra relay opportunities, it’s not fair to compare Phelps’ seven gold medals to Dressel’s. But consider this: Dressel did win three individual golds in Budapest—more than any other man had won at this meet or at either the 2016 Olympics or 2015 World Championships. And for all the relays on which Dressel did swim, he delivered in each one— his explosive splits giving his American teammates decisive leads all four times. Not bad for a 20-year-old in his first World Championships. Not bad. Always regarded as immensely talented, Dressel had put all the pieces together. 


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

SARAH SJOSTROM - SWEDEN

BEST FEMALE SWIMMER OF THE CHAMPIONSHIPS 3 GOLD:

50 Free 23.69 (23.67sf WR) 50 Fly 24.60 100 Fly 55.53

1 SILVER: Sarah Sjostrom - Sweden

100 Free 52.31 (51.71r WR)

BUDAPEST ABUZZ WITH EXCITEMENT... AND WORLD RECORDS! T

BY BRENT RUTEMILLER AND TAYLOR BRIEN

he 2017 World Championships were not supposed to happen in Budapest. The meet was awarded to Guadalajara, Mexico back in July of 2011. They had five years to plan the event. However, money issues forced Mexico to withdraw its bid in February 2015. The organizers said they could not afford the $100 million price tag that goes with hosting the multi-sport aquatic event. With only 28 months to plan, Budapest took the reins and never looked back. One hundred eighty-one nations were welcomed to this historic city on the Danube River that is only 214 kilometers (133 miles) downstream from Vienna. The two sites were linked during the Austrian-Hungarian Empire before World War I. Budapest is a historic city with remnants of its two thousand years all around. The Romans still have ruins here. The Huns and the Mongols conquered the countryside. Of course, the Holy Roman Empire had its influence over the crowned kings and a feudal system of government throughout the Middle Ages from the 5th to the 15th century. Hungary has had a long history of being independent, sparking a number of revolutions along the way. It was one of the first to create a two-tier parliamentary system that predated the Magna Carta in 1215. The Soviets crushed a revolution in 1956 and controlled the country up until 1989 when communist rule ended and the country was renamed the Republic of Hungary. Today, Budapest is a vibrant city with modern public transportation via boat, electric rail, bus, subway and train. *** The people of Hungary are passionate about swimming and water polo. The stands were filled every night with fans cheering, “Ary, Ary, Hungary!” every time their athletes competed. For 17 days, July 14-30, the city came alive, supporting all the aquatic sports. The swimming events, July 23-30, began with great expectations

from Day 1, courtesy of Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom. The multiple world record holder had inched closer and closer to sprint world records in the past few months. Sure enough, during the finals of the women’s 4x100 meter freestyle relay, she broke the world record for the women’s 100 free by leading off in 51.71. Sjostrom’s flame would continue to burn brightly throughout the meet, as she powered to three individual gold medals—50 fly (24.60), 100 fly (55.53) and 50 free (23.69)—while also adding a second world record, a 23.67 in the 50 free semifinals. The 23-yearold was also named the best female swimmer of the Championships. By meet’s end, 11 world records had been broken, including four in breaststroke—two by Great Britain’s Adam Peaty (50 breast, 26.10p and 25.95sf) and two by the USA’s Lilly King (50 breast, 29.40; 100 breast, 1:04.13). Another four global standards were set in relays—all by the United States: women’s 4x100 medley (3:51.55), mixed 4x100 medley (3:40.28p and 3:38.56) and the mixed 4x100 free (3:19.60). Canada also joined in the world record parade, with Kylie Masse clocking 58.10 to win gold in the women’s 100 back. Although not setting an individual world record, it was Caeleb Dressel who was named the best male swimmer of the Championships, collecting seven gold medals (three individual, four relay—including both mixed relay WR squads) to tie Michael Phelps’ seven golds at Worlds in 2007 at Melbourne. The 20-year-old also delivered the world’s fastest textile times in winning the 50 free (21.15 American record) and 100 fly (49.86 behind Phelps’ techsuit-aided 49.82 in 2009), and added ARs with a first-place 47.17 in the 100 free and a semifinal time of 22.76 in the 50 fly before placing fourth in the final at 22.89. Dressel also became the first swimmer at an Olympics or World Championships to win three gold medals in a single day, winning the 50 free, 100 fly and mixed 4x100 free relay in a two-hour span on Day 7. 

— continued on 14

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

13


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS - continued from 13

T

he look on her face was one KATIE LEDECKY - USA only the most accomplished individuals wear. It was the expression of a straight-A student who just received an A-minus, and was having a difficult time digesting that familiar letter since 5 GOLD: there was a strange symbol behind it. Considering Katie Ledecky 400 Free 3:58.34 is the ultimate A-plus performer 800 Free 8:12.68 in the sport—alone in a personal 1500 Free 15:31.82 honor society—she displayed an unmistakable distaste with the 4x100 Free Relay 3:31.72 NR results she produced at her third visit (53.83 3rd leg) to the World Championships. 4x200 Free Relay 7:43.39 For anyone else, to walk away (1:54.02 anchor) from Budapest with a six-medal haul—five gold and a silver—would 1 SILVER: be viewed as a career-defining 200 Free 1:55.18 (tie) week. For almost all others, to manage some of the fastest times Katie Ledecky, USA in history would generate a wide grin. To become the most-decorated female in World Champs history would almost surely be cause for BY JOHN LOHN celebration, right? But for Ledecky, the 20-yeargoing to unleash a career-best time. old freestyle ace who has rewritten what is possible in the distance “I’m still learning over the years and over the months how to realm, there was a sense of displeasure. manage those expectations, but I don’t think any of that had any “I always wish there was more,” Ledecky said. “I’ve never walked effect on me,” she said. “I didn’t really set my goals as high as last away from a season completely satisfied—even last year (after an year’s, and I didn’t really have the same motivation. (I’ve been) exquisite showing at the Olympic Games in Rio). You always are going through a lot of transitions and changes this year. Knowing looking and moving forward—I’m happy with five golds and a that I’ve gone through that year now, I can take what I’ve learned this silver...but there’s a lot of room for improvement for me, as crazy as year and apply it moving forward.” that sounds. Moving forward, I’m going to be really motivated. I’m The truth is, Ledecky dealt with a testing campaign on the really looking forward to working toward 2020 now.” road to Budapest. Following her Olympic exploits, there was a So, what does a “subpar” competition look like for the Stanford University sophomore? Well, it means a third consecutive World cross-country move from her Washington, D.C. base to her new Champs sweep of the 400-800-1500 meter freestyles, along with home in northern California as a Stanford student. That transition a silver medal in the 200. It included gold medals as part of two simultaneously called for an adjustment from the coaching methods American relays, and her gold quintet raised that career total to 14, a of Bruce Gemmell to the tutelage of Cardinal coach Greg Meehan. And with academics a prime focus for Ledecky, there was the need to record among females at the World Championships. A glance at her specific performances might have revealed adapt to her course load while living alone for the first time. she was not exactly Ledecky-esque, as she failed to set any world Through it all, Ledecky remained a superior force for Team records—something that hadn’t happened since 2012. But her times USA, her six medals part of 38 pieces of hardware mined by the in the distance events remained untouchable for her foes. While her Red, White and Blue. In this post-Michael Phelps era, Ledecky will winning time of 3:58.34 in the 400 free was the second fastest of undoubtedly be a leading light of the United States’ charge toward all time, her 8:12.68 mark in the 800 ranked 10th historically, with Tokyo and the next Olympiad. And let’s face it: what just unfolded in Ledecky owning the fastest 15 efforts ever produced. As for the 1500 Budapest and what will transpire over the next two years (Pan Pacific free, she won the 30-lapper in 15:31.82 (No. 4 all-time), good for a Championships in 2018 and World Championships in 2019) will be 19-second triumph. nothing more than building blocks for the 2020 Games. In the distance world, everyone else seems to be competing in a In a way, too, the emergence of Caeleb Dressel might prove separate race. beneficial for Ledecky, as she’ll have a partner in the spotlight Even the 200 freestyle—in which Italian Federica Pellegrini department, and will not have to carry the expectations of United (1:54.73) clipped both Ledecky and Australia’s Emma McKeon States Swimming all by herself. Then again, Ledecky is far from (tied at 1:55.18)—brought perspective. The fact the American has gone back-to-back World Champs with medals in four solo freestyle afraid of dealing with expectation and hype. “If that was my bad year for the next four years, then the next events speaks to her range and ability to handle a daunting workload. There was relay duty, too, of course, and coming off Rio, Ledecky couple of years are going to be pretty exciting,” Ledecky said. faced almost unrealistic expectations. Simply put, she’s not always And Ledecky can get back to earning those A-plus grades. 

STILL AT THE HEAD OF HER CLASS

14

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

LILLY KING - USA

4 GOLD:

50 Breast 29.40 WR 100 Breast 1:04.13 WR 4x100 Medley Relay 3:51.55 WR (1:04.48 breast) Mixed 4x100 Medley Relay 3:38.56 WR (1:04.15 breast) Lilly King, USA

STAND AND DELIVER Y

BY DAVID RIEDER

ulia Efimova was out for revenge, looking to turn the tables on Lilly King after King beat her for gold in the 100 meter breaststroke final at the Olympic Games. But it was more than just what happened in the pool that had Efimova irked. King had called out Efimova for her checkered history with banned substances, and she had wagged her index finger. The rivalry, conceived out of nowhere the day before the 100 breast final, fueled King, who went on to win Olympic gold. It fried Efimova, who was caught on camera breaking down in tears in the days after the 100 breast final. But this year, as the two finally met again in the 100 breast at the World Championships in Budapest, Efimova looked to have the upper hand. She came into the meet with the world’s top time of 1:04.84, faster than King had swum in Rio. And then, in the 100 breast semifinals, she almost broke the world record. She touched in 1:04.36, just 1-hundredth slower than the global standard Ruta Meilutyte had set in 2013. The gauntlet was laid, and this time it was Efimova stirring the pot a little bit. She wagged her index finger at the camera as King sat in the ready room awaiting her semifinal swim.

King ended up qualifying second for the final in a lifetime best 1:04.53, and when she arrived at the Duna Arena the next night for the final, the pressure struck. The time that Efimova had put up in the semis had King worried. “I was actually really freaking out when I got to the pool,” King said. “That race—it’s always going to be a showdown, and it’s always going to be an exciting one...especially after the time Yulia put up yesterday, which was very, very impressive. It was going to be a dogfight.” That it would be. By the time King walked out behind Lane 5, she was composed, good to go. Perhaps it’s something about the highest-pressure races that brings out the best in King. “That’s what I love about swimming,” King said. “I love having pressure, and I love being competitive. That’s why I’m in the sport. I thrive off that. My favorite thing about swimming is walking out of the ready room to a crowd of screaming people.” As she walked out to a packed house at the Duna Arena for the 100 breast final, King was ready to step up. For Efimova, things went off the rails immediately. Efimova got off to a terrible start and was

— continued on 16 September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

15


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS - continued from 15

[ PHOTO PROVIDED BY VAUGHN RIDLEY/SWIMMING CANADA ]

instantly a half-body length behind Meilutyte on one side of her and King on the other. Efimova scrambled to catch up, but she never got close to King. King pulled away and won the race in 1:04.13, edging Meilutyte’s world record in the event by 22-hundredths. King smashed the water before paddling away from a thoroughly-beaten Efimova to embrace American teammate Katie Meili, who had touched out Efimova for second. With all the pressure on, King had again come through and delivered the best swim of her career, an effort she “absolutely” knew that she was capable of swimming. Don’t be mistaken—this was the most pressure she had ever experienced. A World Champs final may not be an Olympic final, but before she swam in Rio, King was a rookie, the one chasing Efimova, the reigning world champion. This time, the target was on King’s back. No, she didn’t come into the meet as the fastest seed or with the fastest time in the world this year, but she was the defending Olympic gold medalist. That won’t change for another four years, and certainly the favorite status doesn’t disappear after less than 12 months. Still, she delivered.

“It’s amazing,” Meili said. “1:04.1 speaks for itself, and it’s just an honor to share the pool with her. She’s an incredible breaststroker, and it’s amazing to see her get in and go faster every time she races.” Amazing? Incredible? You bet. Not only did King take control of the 100 breast, but she also added three more gold medals and world records: 50 breast (29.40), 4x100 medley relay (3:51.55, 1:04.48 breaststroke split) and mixed 4x100 medley relay (3:38.56, 1:04.15 breaststroke split). As for Efimova, her defeat in the 100 did not crush her—she went on to earn gold in the 200 breast three days later. King, certainly a sprint specialist, ended up fourth in the 200. On the final day, Efimova finished a close second in the 50 breast (29.57), just 17-hundredths behind King, and produced a huge 1:04.03 split on the 400 medley relay to lead Russia to a surprise silver medal. But at this point, it seems like a stretch to call King vs. Efimova a “rivalry”—at least in the 100 breast. To fit that bill, each of the two parties has to win, at least occasionally, and Efimova has never beaten King in that event in a major championship meet. Once again, in a huge moment with the pressure on, Lilly King stepped up and delivered. 

SYDNEY PICKREM - CAN

1 BRONZE:

400 IM 4:32.88

Sydney Pickrem, Canada

SECOND CHANCE PAYS OFF

H

BY DAVID RIEDER

aving to surrender the chance that you figured could be your big breakthrough? Heartbreaking. Spending the next five full days sitting around and thinking about what happened while watching your friends and teammates achieve their lifelong dreams? Gut-wrenching. Getting a second chance and having everything fall into place perfectly? That’s a fairy-tale ending, too good to be true, right? Not for Sydney Pickrem—not with the week she experienced at the World Championships in Budapest. She wanted a medal—an honor she’d never earned while competing internationally for Canada—and the 200 meter IM seemed like the perfect event in which to break through. She arrived 16

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

in Hungary seeded fourth in the event, and won her semifinal heat in a Canadian record of 2:09.17 to qualify third for the next night’s final. Even a repeat of that time would have been good enough to earn some hardware. But as soon as she dove in for the championship heat, Pickrem choked on water. She could barely breathe, let alone swim 50 meters of each stroke at world-class speed. She made it through the butterfly leg, but could do no more, so she got out of the pool. Her big opportunity gone to waste, Pickrem was crushed. In tears, she called Randy Reese, her coach from her high school years in Florida. “I’m like, ‘I got out. I messed up. I don’t know what I’m supposed to do,’” Pickrem recalled. “He’s like, ‘You choked on water. What are you supposed to do? You can’t swim through that. You have to get out. What, do you want to finish 25 meters behind? Your 400 is

better anyway.’” Reese helped console her, but Pickrem had five days to wait until she would get another chance at racing. All she could do was practice and think. She fixated on her upcoming 400 IM, but Pickrem had never actually qualified for an international final in that event. Super-focused on that race, Pickrem envisioned what it would be like swimming next to Great Britain's Hannah Miley in her heat during the meet’s final morning session. “I’ve been thinking about that constantly and probably overanalyzing it more than I should have,” Pickrem admitted. Her teammates, with both the Canadian national team and Texas A&M, never lost their confidence in Pickrem.


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

“She’s tough as a nail,” Aggie teammate Bethany Galat said on the day before she captured silver in the women’s 200 breast. “She’s ready to go for the 400 IM. She’s going to kill it.” When that 400 IM finally came around, Pickrem was ready. She won her prelims heat in 4:36.25, good for the fourth seed in the final. She knew she had something left in the tank. In the final, she made it through the start unscathed, and when she turned sixth at the halfway point, it was Pickrem’s time to make a move. On the breaststroke leg, Pickrem shined. Her 100-meter split of 1:16.17 was tops in the field, and she propelled herself all the way to second. Her dream of getting on a World Championship podium was about to be realized. Spain’s Mireia Belmonte would go by Pickrem on the freestyle leg, but no one else was going to catch her. She hit the wall in 4:32.88—under her own Canadian record by nearly three seconds—

and she would stand on an international podium for the first time. “It means the world. It’s the first kind of international-level 400 IM final I’ve ever made,” Pickrem said, “and I know when I went in and made the final, I just had so much left at night, so just to finally be able to get in at night and give it all I’ve got, a result like that...it means the world.” Pickrem, grateful for the outpouring of support from all corners over the previous week and almost in disbelief at what she had accomplished, could not hold in her emotions any longer. “I already cried in my last interview,” she said. “It definitely has taken a toll, and it’s been a learning process, and luckily it came out in the most positive comeback I could have had. I felt like I let down Canada a lot with the 200 IM, so to be able to go there and get on the podium for them means the world.” 

“UNBELIEVABLE FEELING...UNBELIEVABLE EMOTION”

N

BY JOHN LOHN

ot long after he raced his pet event at the World Championships 200 fly on the heels of an upset Olympic title in London in 2012. in Budapest, the tears streaming down his face were tears of Meanwhile, a crisis in his family quickly put his gold-medal effort elation. The scene was in stark contrast to the one nearly 12 months in perspective. earlier, when his tears stemmed from heartache and unfulfilled “It was an emotional race—before the race, after the race, during expectations at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio. the race,” le Clos said. “I knew it was going to be difficult.” Now, as 2017 begins to fade into memory, the latest quadrennial To understand fully why le Clos’ most recent world title held such 25-percent complete on the Road to Tokyo and the 2020 Olympic meaning, it’s essential to examine le Clos’ ups and downs of the past Games, the 25-year-old le Clos has reclaimed his baby. With a gutsy five years. At the 2012 Olympic Games, few viewed le Clos as a performance that left the remainder of the field on a desperate chase, gold-medal possibility in the 200 fly. Although Michael Phelps was the South African tucked the 200 meter butterfly back into what he faking his way through a less-than-thorough preparation for London, believes is the event’s rightful Mr. Olympia was still fully expected place: under his watch. to garner a third consecutive gold There was no mystery to medal in the event. le Clos’ approach to the 200 But in a reversal of history and fly at the World Champs, and with le Clos tearing a page out of his opposition surely knew the “Phelps Swimming Manual,” the game plan: “All right, the South African reeled in his idol boys,” he seemingly said, “I’m over the last lap—and particularly going to blast this thing as the final few meters—to secure a far open as I can and hold on. stunning championship. It was a Come and get me.” Indeed, le torch-passing moment of sorts, with Clos’ tactic worked, a 53.21 le Clos paying tribute to Phelps as a midway split supplying a onemotivator and reason for his success plus second margin and the in the sport. cushion he needed as he faded A year later, le Clos backed and others charged. In the end, up his Olympic gold with a world it was le Clos who wore the championship, and his consistency gold medal for a 1:53.33 effort, as a worldwide force did not waver. with longtime foe Laszlo Cseh Even when he finished as the silver of Hungary earning silver in medalist to Cseh in the 200 fly at the 1:53.72. 2015 Worlds in Kazan, le Clos won CHAD LE CLOS - S. AFRICA gold in the 100 fly and appeared on When it was time for the South African national anthem pace to put up a formidable defense to play, le Clos was overcome of his Olympic title. by emotion on the podium, tears Truthfully, the final of the 200 unable to be stifled. For one, fly at the Rio Games was bizarre it was his first global crown in even before the finalists walked out 1 GOLD: the event since the 2013 World to the blocks. With the athletes in 200 Fly 1:53.33 Chad le Clos, South Africa Champs, where he won the the ready room, cameras captured

— continued on 18 September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

17


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS - continued from 17 le Clos performing a shadow-boxing routine right in front of Phelps—at times with le Clos very much in Phelps’ personal space. Not surprising, Phelps wore a look of disgust and anger, feelings certainly used in the ensuing moments as motivation. By the time the event was over, Phelps had reclaimed his No. 1 status in the 200 fly, wearing gold for a third time in the discipline. Meanwhile, le Clos finished off the podium in fourth place, 7-tenths back of Phelps and more than a second off his personal-best time. It was a devastating defeat, a loss that a shared silver with Phelps and Cseh in the 100 fly couldn’t temper. “Losing last year was the lowest moment of my career,” le Clos said. “I tried to pretend like it wasn’t, but I was in a very bad place last year. I tried to be strong, and I tried to lie to the media and say, ‘Ah, I’m good, I’m good.’ But I was down and out.” As if the pressure to repeat in Rio wasn’t enough, le Clos also carried the weight of difficult family circumstances. As Rio beckoned, both of his parents were diagnosed with cancer and forced

Chad le Clos, South Africa

18

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

to engage in a battle far more important and daunting than anything that unfolds in a 50-meter pool. Le Clos was obviously on a mission in Budapest, his sole focus to again sit atop the world in the 200 fly. So important was that objective that he scratched out of the 200 freestyle, an event in which he won silver in Rio. More, he shockingly failed to advance out of the semifinals of the 100 fly. But with gold secured where it mattered most, all was right. “I’m very humbled to come out on top and reclaim the medal that I lost last year,” le Clos said. “Like I said last year, my family’s health is more important than gold medals. I make no excuses for what happened last year. I said it was the worst performance of my life in the 200 fly, and I vowed to come back stronger and try to win the gold medal, so that’s what I did tonight. “I said I would come back and try to respond, and I did. Unbelievable feeling...unbelievable emotion.” 


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

REWARDING REBOUND BY DAVID RIEDER

E

mily Seebohm felt helpless. In her once-every-four-years sport, Seebohm had fallen way short of expectations at an Olympic Games. Worse, something was physically wrong, and Seebohm was almost positive she knew what, but there was nothing she could do about it. Outside of her parents and her boyfriend (world champion backstroker Mitch Larkin), there was no one she could tell. In the months before her third Olympic Games, Seebohm had been sick, dealing with headaches, cramps, back pain and fatigue. In June, less than two months before she would head to Rio de Janeiro, doctors determined that she might be dealing with endometriosis, but the only way to know for sure would be surgery. That was not an option—not in June of 2016. Surgery Emily Seebohm, Australia would have taken Seebohm out of an Olympic Games, the once-every-four-years meet circled on every swimmer’s calendar. She would press on—but that came with a cost. 1 GOLD: “I was in bed almost every day before Rio between 200 Back 2:05.68 NR sessions, just to let my body try to recover to try to get up to do a good session that night,” she said. “I didn’t have any fun, 1 SILVER: and when I got to Rio, I was so flat and down. I was just in 4X100 Free Relay 3:32.01 that dark hole, and it was just because I couldn’t say anything. (54.32 leadoff/prelims-only EMILY SEEBOHM - AUS I didn’t have any freedom. All I had done was swim and lie swimmer) down in my bed, and that’s all I did in Rio, too.” Seebohm arrived at the Olympics as the reigning world 2 BRONZE: champion in both the 100 and 200 back, and she ended up 100 Back 58.59 finishing seventh in the 100-meter event and 12th in the 200. 4x100 Medley Relay 3:54.29 She did earn a silver medal at the end of the week for her role (58.53 back) on Australia’s 400 medley relay. Still, after what had happened in her individual swims, of Seebohm. much of the world just assumed Seebohm had succumbed to Instead, Seebohm’s moment came in the final of the 200 back, the pressure and choked. “I felt like that was the hardest part, because I felt like that was an event in which she had never won an international medal before an attack on me as a person,” Seebohm said. “I think that was really 2015. In that WC final in Kazan two years earlier, Seebohm had hard, but I knew that I had a reason why I wasn’t doing what I was stormed from out of nowhere to pass Missy Franklin and secure the supposed to be doing. Instead of making an excuse for it, I wanted gold medal. In the Budapest final, Seebohm was fourth with 50 meters to go, to be a tough person.” But during the Games and after, Seebohm would not share nearly a full second behind race leader Katinka Hosszu. But her last the issues she was dealing with beyond her inner circle, not until lap surge was coming, and no one could keep up. With 15 meters to a December surgery confirmed the diagnosis she had expected all go, it was clear to all watching that Seebohm was going to win gold. She touched the wall in 2:05.68— an Australian record and quicker along. In the aftermath, Seebohm’s symptoms abated. It was a gradual than she had swum to win gold at the previous World Championships. process, not immediate, but she began to feel like herself again. The In the midst of a rough meet for Seebohm’s Australian team, that race health issues dealt with—at least for the time being—she turned turned out to be its signature moment—its only gold medal. Seebohm saw the scoreboard, pumped her fist, smacked the water her attention back to the pool and toward her return to the World Championships, where she hoped to stand on the medal podium for and almost immediately broke down in tears. “It was such a fast field tonight, and I was going to be proud of an individual event. As it turned out, that meet in Budapest went even better than myself whether I won or came last, because getting back in the pool Seebohm could have imagined. Just seven months after surgery, after Rio was really hard,” Seebohm said. “Everything that I’ve gone through, it just proves to myself that it wasn’t me, that Rio was just Seebohm was once again a world champion. The win did not come in the 100 back, the event that had long one of those things that happens in life, that sometimes you’ve got to been her bread-and-butter. She finished third in that one, her first go down to go back up.” Seebohm paused and choked up again. Sure, she had won World final of the meet, behind a world record performance from Canada’s Kylie Masse (58.10) and an impressive effort from American Championship titles before (one in 2007 and three in 2015), but after Kathleen Baker (58.58), who finished a hundredth of a second ahead the toughest year of her life, this one meant so much more.  September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

19


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

2017 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS PHOTO GALLERY PHOTOS BY SIPA USA

Kylie Masse, Canada (Above) 1 Gold: 100 Back 58.10 WR 1 Bronze: Mixed 4x100 Medley Relay 3:41.25 tie NR (58.22 back)

Gabriele Detti, Italy (Right) 1 Gold: 800 Free 7:40.77 European Record 1 Bronze: 400 Free 3:43.92

20

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Simone Manuel, USA (Above) 5 Gold: 100 Free 52.27 NR, 4x100 Medley Relay 3:51.55 WR (52.23 anchor), 4x100 Free Relay 3:31.72 NR (52.14 anchor), Mixed 4x100 Medley Relay 3:38.56 WR (52.17 anchor), Mixed 4x100 Free Relay 3:19.60 WR (52.18 anchor) 1 Bronze: 50 Free 23.97 NR

Sun Yang, China (Below) 2 Gold: 200 Free 1:44.39 Asian Record, 400 Free 3:41.38

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

21


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Mireia Belmonte, Spain (Below, Left) 1 Gold: 200 Fly 2:05.26 2 Silver: 1500 Free 15:50.89 NR, 400 IM 4:32.17

22

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

Katinka Hosszu, Hungary (Below, Right) Chase Kalisz, USA (Above) 2 Gold: 200 IM 1:55.56, 400 IM 4:05.90

2 Gold: 200 IM 2:07.00, 400 IM 4:29.33 1 Silver: 200 Back 2:05.85 NR 1 Bronze: 200 Fly 2:06.02


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Evgeny Rylov, Russia (Above) 1 Gold: 200 Back 1:53.61 European Record 1 Bronze: 4x100 Medley Relay 3:29.76 NR (52.89 back)

Federica Pellegrini, Italy (Below) 1 Gold: 200 Free 1:54.73

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

23


[PHOTO BY ROBERT DEUTSCH, USA TODAY SPORTS]

17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Steve LoBue, USA (Above) 1 Gold: High Diving 397.15

24

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

(From left) Rachel Fattal, Kiley Neushul and Coach Adam Krikorian, USA (Below) 1 Gold: Women’s Water Polo Tournament (Gold Medal Game: USA 13-Spain 6)


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

OPEN WATER Country

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Total

1. France

4

1

1

6

2. Italy

0

2

3

5

3. United States

1

2

0

3

4. Brazil

1

0

2

3

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS MEDAL STANDINGS WATER POLO Country

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Total

1T. Croatia

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

1

5. Netherlands

1

1

0

2

1T. United States

6. Ecuador

0

1

0

1

3T. Hungary

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

1

3T. Spain

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

1

7T. Great Britain 7T. Russia

0

0

1

1

5T. Russia

TOTAL

7

7

8

22

5T. Serbia

0

0

1

1

TOTAL

2

2

2

6

DIVING

ALL AQUATIC SPORTS (including Swimming—see page 11)

1. China

8

5

2

15

2. Russia

1

2

2

5

1. United States

21

12

13

46

3. Great Britain

1

2

0

3

2. China

12

12

6

30

4. Canada

0

1

2

3

3. Russia

11

6

8

25

4

3

9

16

5. Malaysia

1

0

1

2

4. Italy

6T. Germany

0

1

1

2

5. Australia

3

5

4

12

6T. North Korea

0

1

1

2

6. Great Britain

5

3

3

11

6

1

2

9

0

0

2

2

7. France

9T. Australia

1

0

0

1

8. Hungary

2

5

2

9

9T. France

1

0

0

1

9. Japan

0

4

5

9

0

2

7

9

8. Italy

11. Mexico

0

1

0

1

10. Ukraine

12T. Ukraine

0

0

1

1

11. Brazil

2

4

2

8

12T. United States

0

0

1

1

12. Canada

1

1

5

7

39

13. Spain

1

5

0

6

14. Netherlands

1

4

1

6

15. Sweden

3

1

0

4

TOTAL

13

13

13

HIGH DIVING 1T. Australia

1

0

0

1

1T. United States

1

0

0

1

16. Germany

0

2

1

3

1

0

1

2

1

0

1

2

3T. Czech Republic 0

1

0

1

17T. Malaysia

3T. Mexico

0

1

0

1

17T. South Africa

5T. Belarus

0

0

1

1

19. Mexico

0

2

0

2

0

1

1

2

5T. Italy TOTAL

0

0

1

1

20. North Korea

2

2

2

6

21. Belarus

0

0

2

2

22. Croatia

SYNCHRONIZED SWIMMING

1

0

0

1

1

0

1

1. Russia

7

1

0

8

23T. Czech Republic 0

2. Ukraine

0

1

5

6

23T. Ecuador

0

1

0

1

3. China

1

4

0

5

23T. Poland

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

1

4. Italy

1

1

0

2

26T. Denmark

5. Spain

0

2

0

2

26T. Egypt

0

0

1

1

6T. Japan

0

0

2

2

26T. Serbia

0

0

1

1

26T. Singapore

0

0

1

1

75

76

77

228

6T. United States

0

0

2

2

TOTAL

9

9

9

27

TOTAL

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

25


17th FINA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Adam Peaty, Great Britain 2 Gold: 50 Breast 25.99 (26.10p WR, 25.95sf WR), 100 Breast 57.47 1 Silver: 4x100 MR 3:28.95 NR (56.91 breast)

26

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


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1977 state championship team

1989 team meeting

POISE AND CONSISTENCY IN THE

LONG BLUE LANE

1955 swim team practice

BY ANNIE GREVERS

MEN WHO HAVE BEEN FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BE A PART OF THE LEGENDARY ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TRADITION IN CINCINNATI, OHIO KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO BELONG TO THE “THE LONG BLUE LANE.” BUT THE MEMBERS OF THE EXCLUSIVE GROUP ALSO REALIZE HOW INSTRUMENTAL THEIR YEARS AS ST. X AQUABOMBERS WERE TO THEIR CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT.

Coach Jim Brower in 1993

Coach Mike Arata in 1975 28

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


T

he first Ohio State High School Championship was held just two years prior to the Cincinnati St. Xavier High School swim team’s inception in 1930. Though not a powerhouse from the get-go, St. X worked through adverse conditions to find its way on the runner-up podium at states in 1945. The swim team borrowed pool space for the first 40 years of its existence. “We were vagabonds when it came to training,” Tom Keefe, a long-time coach at St. X and a member of the Class of ’68, said. Bill Behrens, a high school English teacher and St. X’s head coach in the 1960s, laid the intangible groundwork for what would become a storied program. “He brought passion, focus, planning and consistency,” Keefe recalled. “While he was not there for the championship runs, his influence on the program is indisputable.” Coaches preceding Behrens had not been swimming enthusiasts. Ohio’s high school swimming records note each year’s top two state finishers with the coaches’ names listed beside the team’s finish. There is one year in which a coach is not listed beside a program. That’s St. Xavier’s runner-up finish in 1945. The St. X men likely

[PHOTO BY TIM MORSE ]

willed themselves to that podium in ’45! A HOME TRAINING BASE St. Xavier’s habit of winning state championships began in 1970. Before that season, St. X had the right mentality, but lacked a home training base. Brothers Charles Jr. and William Keating were St. Xavier alums, deeply influenced by the formidable years they spent on the St. X swim team. Charles and William both went on to swim at the University of Cincinnati—Charles even won an NCAA title in the 200 Two swimmers from St. Xavier became Olympians. Charles breaststroke in 1946...finishing Keating, Class of ’73, represented the United States at the 1976 just ahead of none other than Olympics, and Joe Hudepohl (pictured), Class of ’92 and the 1992 future coaching legend James high school swimmer of the year, won two gold medals and a “Doc” Counsilman! William’s bronze medal while swimming for Team USA in 1992 and 1996. son, William Jr.—or “Bill,” as he was known—upheld the $600,000 to their high school to build a Keating precedent with an outcompetition pool. Coach Keefe recalls this standing swimming career at the University momentous event in St. X history: of Cincinnati. In 1969, the Keating brothers donated “They wanted to make it more than a

— continued on 30

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

29


HISTORY OF ST. X — continued from 29 facility—they wanted to make it a home...a home for St. Xavier and a home for quality swimming in this part of the state,” Keefe said. Charles Keating Jr. funded the Cincinnati Marlins, a club team that operated out of the Keating Natatorium. The Marlins produced six Olympians in 1980—most notably Mary T. Meagher, aka Madame Butterfly. But it was Charles’ nephew, Bill Keating Jr., who made it one of his life’s missions to keep the alumni forever rallied around the

NOTABLE ST. X GRADS • Joe Hudepohl (Class of ’92) won three Olympic medals (two gold, one bronze) between the 1992 and 1996 Games. • Jayme Cramer (Class of ’01) accumulated five World Championship medals (two gold, one silver, two bronze) between 2005 and 2007. • Grant House (Class of ’17) became the most decorated swimmer in Ohio Swimming (OHSAA) history by winning 13 individual state championships over four years. House will be continuing his swimming career under the direction of Bob Bowman at Arizona State University.

St. X swimmers. The Aquabombers lovingly refer to Bill Keating Jr. as “The Keeper of the Flame” because of the way he’s nurtured the program and upheld its values. Bill Jr. was a freshman in 1968, when Keefe was a senior on the team. “He has been the single most influential person in St. X history,” Keefe said. “I’m not sure the pool would still exist without Bill.” WORKING TOWARD A COMMON GOAL In 1988, the Cincinnati school hired Jim Brower as the new swim coach. “I was 23 years old and naive enough to think all I needed was a technical and tactical competence in swimming to be successful,” Brower said. “I was wrong.” Brower had landed at the base of a steep learning curve, but it didn’t take the young coach long to figure out what made a good program great. “Success comes from nurturing relationships and doing whatever is necessary to ensure that each individual on the team worked toward a common goal,” he said. That common goal quickly became winning state titles. The team took third during Brower’s first season, then won five straight state titles (1990-94). After a four-season hiatus from coaching (with St. Xavier adding two more championships in 1995 and 1997), Brower returned and led the Aquabombers to nine straight state titles (19992007)...then seven straight from 2009 through 2015. Brower accrued 21 state titles in his 23 years as head coach.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

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TRAINING TOGETHER In 2015, Brower stepped aside, allowing for assistant coach Tim Beerman to take the reins as interim coach, then head coach in April 2016. But according to Coach Keefe, St. X operates much like a college program—each coach carries equal weight. “We train together as a team,” Keefe said—all 86 young men. “With few exceptions, that’s how it’s always been.” And the coaching staff operates as a unit, too—each is responsible for a specific stroke or distance group. “On any given day, you could walk on deck and not know who the head coach was,” Keefe said. “We’re all in it together.” The dynamic is not accidental. Brower laid the groundwork for an environment that harnessed each coach’s and swimmer’s strengths. “My greatest assets were the coaches I worked with, and the realization could not be all things for everyone,” Brower recalled. “I had people for that.” “RIDE THE WAVE” Bill Keating Jr., one of the team’s greatest supporters, spoke to the St. X team before their 2017 district championship. The 63-year-old was near the end of his battle with brain cancer, so his voice wavered, but his message did not: “We (the 1970 team that first won a state title) were the ripple. You, the 2017 team, are the wave. Ride the wave.” Keating’s words stuck with the St. X team, ultimately propelling them to clinch this year’s national championship. Bill Jr. was surrounded by family and friends when he watched St. X—via Facebook live—capture the state title in February. The swimming buff knew the team had likely captured the national title as well with their dominant performance. A month after St. X’s triumphant state meet, “The Keeper of the Flame” had passed away, but his heart for others continues to pulsate through the waters of St. X. A common thread found throughout the (extensive) St. X coaching staff is humility, yet great pride in the team’s collective quest. “After decades of coaching, I found the pursuit of excellence to be quite noble, and the ultimate goal of the program had little to do with swimming,” Brower said. “We wanted to make our guys better men.” And en route to becoming better men, many St. X athletes have grown into exceptional swimmers.


NATIONAL DECK

UNIFORM TO CHANGE Beginning later this year on Dec. 1, the uniform for national deck events—junior nationals, Arena Pro Series and national championships—will change.

WADE KOJIMA

The shirts will remain the same: white meet officials polo and blue meet officials oxford). The pant color will change from khaki to black. In addition, part of the change will be to black shoes and black socks.

Wade Kojima has been a tireless supporter for officials in Mississippi Swimming for nearly 10 years since moving from Illinois. He is currently the LSC’s officials chair and is highly regarded by Mississippi officials for his ability to mentor everyone to a higher standard—and he does so with extraordinary patience, thoughtfulness and endless encouragement. He also serves as a role model for taking the time to do things right—no matter how long it takes—and he always does it with a smile on his face. Wade participates at all levels of meets, whether it includes novice swimmers just learning to race or experienced senior swimmers who are preparing for nationals. He has taken his own personal time and finances to travel outside the state to learn officiating techniques from veteran officials, and he returns to teach those tips to officials in his LSC. Family, faith, integrity and character are important to Wade...and it shows.

The current national deck uniform was adopted in 2004. Originally, both the shirts and the pants were specified even down to the manufacturer’s stock number! That level of specification quickly proved impractical, as manufacturers frequently changed styles. Inertia took over, and we continued with khaki pants/skirts even with all the myriad shades of khaki. Of course, khaki, when wet, took on different looks as well. Observing all the different shades during the recent Nationals/WCT in Indianapolis, the decision was made to change to black pants/skirts, black socks and black shoes. Hopefully, there are fewer shades of black with which to contend! Also, for some of us, there’s the hope that black is a better color. So, why change after all these years? We finally mustered the energy to overcome the inertia of the original decision. This change does not affect LSC-level uniforming or meets below junior nationals—specifically, futures or sectionals. Currently, LSCs use both khaki and navy blue (and perhaps others) at their own discretion and will continue to control their own uniforms for officials.

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September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

31


[ PHOTO PROVIDED BY ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL ]

BOYS' NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS St. Xavier High School (Cincinnati, Ohio): 2016-17 boys’ national high school champions

THE X FACTOR

BY ANNIE GREVERS

ST. XAVIER SWIMMERS KNEW THEY COULD DO SOMETHING PRETTY IMPRESSIVE DURING THE 2016-17 HIGH SCHOOL SEASON. BY “DOING THE WORK AND PUTTING IN THE TIME,” COACH TIM BEERMAN’S AQUABOMBERS WON SWIMMING WORLD’S BOYS’ NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS, SECURING ITS FOURTH TITLE TO GO ALONG WITH TEAM VICTORIES IN 1973, 1992 AND 2001.

S

aying that St. Xavier High School of Cincinnati, Ohio has “a winning tradition” would be a gross understatement. Consider:

In one of the country’s most competitive districts, St. Xavier’s boys’ swimming team has not lost a district meet since 1959.

St. X has won 38 of the last 47 Division I Ohio State High School Championships.

The team won its ninth straight state title this year, scoring the most points in state swimming history (434)—261 points ahead of runner-up Cleveland St. Ignatius. And with an awe-inspiring performance this season, St. Xavier was crowned Swimming World’s 2016-17 boys’ national high school champions by eight-and-a-half points, 140 to 131.5, ahead of Carmel High School (Ind.), the nation’s top public school. When asked, head coach Tim Beerman struggled naming leaders on the team because the depth of talent this season was virtually immeasurable. Grant House was the first name off Beerman’s tongue, and how could it not be? House became the most decorated swimmer in Ohio high school history (OHSAA) by amassing 13 individual state titles over four years. At the state championships in February, he set two individual state records in the 200 and 500 yard free (1:34.59, 4:19.15), which ranked fourth and third, respectively, in the country. He also helped St. X break two relay state marks—200 free (1:21.44, the nation’s third fastest time) and 400 free (2:58.13, first). 32

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

House, who will be attending Arizona State this fall, was definitely his team’s most versatile swimmer, ranking among NISCA’s top 100 in the nation in eight of the 11 events—including top three in four of them. But the talent board only starts with House... Coach Beerman said Luke Sobolewski wasn’t an immediate contributor his freshman season, but as a senior, he won two individual events at state and was “key in relay wins.” His 48.23 100 back ranked ninth in the nation. Junior Justin Grender contributed his sprint free and backstroke prowess to Xavier’s three relays. St. X’s 400 free relay was the fastest in the nation by more than a second—a truly commanding performance by House, junior Nicholas Perera, Sobolewski and Grender. Senior Charles Leibson lent his talents to the state recordbreaking 200 medley relay (1:29.66, fifth in the nation) and Perera won the state title in the 200 IM and contributed to three state relay wins. Eleven of Xavier’s 19 swimmers were seniors, and all 11 ended up scoring at state. Beerman attributes his team’s remarkable tradition of success to Xavier’s long-intact, team-first philosophy. “It’s living out the philosophy established over the past 30 years,” Beerman said. “If there’s anything unique about the team this season, it was the buy-in the swimmers had from Day 1. They came in knowing they could do something pretty incredible. And they were willing to do the work and put in the time.” 


September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

33


HEAT SHEET

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE’S BOYS’ NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS BY BOB KLAPTHOR

* =

NATIONAL PUBLIC SCHOOL RECORD

FOLLOWING IS A MOCK HEAT SHEET OF THE BOYS’ MYTHICAL NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS, BASED ON THE TOP TIMES SWUM DURING THE 2016-17 HIGH SCHOOL SEASON.

** =

NATIONAL INDEPENDENT SCHOOL RECORD

p = PRELIM TIME r

= RELAY SPLIT TIME

KEY

EVENT #1 200 YARD MEDLEY RELAY

EVENT #3 200 YARD INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Chesterton—Chesterton, Ind. (3-1-14)..................1:29.64

David Nolan—Hershey, Pa. (3-18-11)....................1:41.39

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Aaron Whitaker, Jack Wallar, Blake Pieroni, Gary Kostblade

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

Caeleb Dressel—Clay, Fl. (9-28-13)............................45.89

EVENT #5 100 YARD BUTTERFLY

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

Curtis Ogren—St. Francis, Ca. (5-18-14) ..............1:44.90

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

Baylor—Chattanooga, Tenn. (2-14-14)...............1:27.74

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

Joseph Schooling—Bolles, Fl. (11-8-13)......................45.52

Luke Kaliszak, Dustin Tynes, Sam McHugh, Christian Selby

LANE 1 John Larson, Sr.—Mn Online, Mn............1:46.30

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 2 Trent Pellini, Sr.—Dana Hills, Ca..............1:46.14

LANE 1 Jarod Hatch, Sr.—Ann Sobrato, Ca.............. 47.42

LANE 1 Peddie—Hightstown, NJ............................ 1:30.27

LANE 3 Sam Iida, Sr.—Glenbrook South, Il..........1:46.02

LANE 2 Ryan Hoffer, Sr.—Chaparral, Az....................46.97

LANE 2 St. Xavier—Cincinnati, Oh.........................1:29.66

LANE 4 Reece Whitley, Jr.—Wm. Penn, Pa.............1:44.91

LANE 3 Bryce Mefford, Sr.—Oak Ridge, Ca..............46.85

LANE 3 Bolles—Jacksonville, Fl..............................1:29.36

LANE 5 Sean Lee, Sr.—Loyola, Ca............................1:45.90

LANE 4 Nicolas Albiero, Sr.—Christian, Ky...............46.29

LANE 4 Memphis Univ.—Memphis, Tn..................1:28.58

LANE 6 Brennan Pastorek, Sr.—Savannah CD, Ga..1:46.06

LANE 5 Camden Murphy, Sr.—Novi, Mi.....................46.63

LANE 5 Minnetonka—Minnetonka, Mn. (3-4-17).1:29.20*

LANE 7 Paul DeLakis, Sr.—EC Memorial/No., Wi..1:46.18

LANE 6 Cody Bybee, Jr.—Bellbrook, Oh....................46.97

Erik Gessner, Corey Lau, John Shelstad, Sam Schilling

LANE 8 Alex Liang, Sr.—Palo Alto, Ca....................1:46.68

LANE 7 Sean Lee, Sr.—Loyola, Ca................................ 47.07

LANE 6 Zionsville—Zionsville, In. (2-25-17)... 1:29.44*

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 8 Alex Margherio, Jr.—Brother Rice, Mi........ 47.51

Tyler Harmon, Brock Brown, Andrew Schuler, Jack Franzman

LANE 1 Spencer Lehman, Sr.—Northridge, In.... 1:47.35

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 7 Oak Ridge—El Dorado Hills, Ca..............1:30.08

LANE 2 Chris Jhong, Jr.—Amador Vly., Ca............. 1:47.34

LANE 1 Ariel Spektor, Jr.—Bolles, Fl........................... 47.84

LANE 8 Carmel—Carmel, In......................................1:30.46

LANE 3 Shane Blinkman, So.—Hudson, Wi......... 1:47.12

LANE 2 Jacob Mullin, Sr.—So. Pasadena, Ca............ 47.79

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 4 Tanner Olson, Sr.—Saugus, Ca................. 1:47.01

LANE 3 Jack Levant, Jr.—Carroll, Tx............................. 47.64

LANE 1 Carroll—Southlake, Tx................................1:31.32

LANE 5 Matt Willenbring, Jr.—Westlake, Tx........ 1:47.06

LANE 4 Brendan Santana, Sr.—Univ. City, Ca.......... 47.57

LANE 2 New Trier—Winnetka, Il............................. 1:31.07

LANE 6 Michael Zarian, Sr.—Fairview, Co............ 1:47.25

LANE 5 Jian Mao, Sr.—Maryknoll, Hi.......................... 47.61

LANE 3 Patriot—Nokesville, Va...............................1:30.91

LANE 7 Trenton Julian, Sr.—Glendale, Ca............. 1:47.35

LANE 6 Michael Zarian, Sr.—Fairview, Co................ 47.75

LANE 4 Fossil Ridge—Ft. Collins Co.....................1:30.69

LANE 8 Jack DalMolin, Sr.—No. Forsyth, Ga........ 1:47.59

LANE 7 Alvin Jiang, Sr.—Byron Steele, Tx................ 47.81

LANE 5 North Allegheny—Wexford, Pa...............1:30.79

LANE 8 Ethan Hu, Fr.—Harker, Ca............................... 47.86

Shaine Casas, Jr.—McAllen, Tx.................. 1:47.59

LANE 6 Lyons Township—Western Springs, Il... 1:30.91 LANE 7 Dana Hills—Dana Point, Ca......................1:31.26 LANE 8 Baylor—Chattanooga, Tn...........................1:31.33

EVENT #4 50 YARD FREESTYLE

EVENT #6 100 YARD FREESTYLE

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

EVENT #2 200 YARD FREESTYLE

Caeleb Dressel—Clay, Fl. (11-9-13)............................19.29

David Nolan—Hershey, Pa, (3-19-11)......................42.34r

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Ryan Murphy—Bolles, Fl. (11-10-12).......................19.54r

Jack Conger—Good Counsel, Md. (2-9-13).............42.81r

Maxime Rooney—Granada, Ca. (5-14-16)............1:33.70

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

LANE 1 Jack Blake, Sr.—Brophy, Az............................20.09

LANE 1 Matt Willenbring, Jr.—Westlake, Tx............43.99

Grant Shoults—Santa Margarita, Ca. (5-14-16).1:33.26

LANE 2 Mason Gonzalez, Jr.—No. Allegheny, Pa....19.99

LANE 2 Mason Gonzalez, Jr.—No. Allegheny, Pa....43.62

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 3 Bryce Mefford, Sr.—Oak Ridge, Ca..............19.90

LANE 3 Alexei Sancov, Jr.—Northgate, Ca................43.46

LANE 1 Mike Taylor, Sr.—Johns Creek, Ga............1:35.16

LANE 4 Ryan Hoffer, Sr.—Chaparral, Az....................19.34

LANE 4 Drew Kibler, Jr.—Carmel, In...........................43.02

LANE 2 Jake Sannem, Sr.—La Salle, Pa.................1:34.76

LANE 5 Jack Franzman, Jr.—Zionsville, In................19.85

LANE 5 Jack Franzman, Jr.—Zionsville, In................43.44

LANE 3 Cody Bybee, Jr.—Bellbrook, Oh................1:34.55

LANE 6 Timothy Bobo, Jr.—Stratford, Tx...................19.95

LANE 6 Timothy Bobo, Jr.—Stratford, Tx...................43.56

LANE 4 Drew Kibler, Jr.—Carmel, In. (2-24-17) 1:33.30p*

LANE 7 Alberto Mestre, Sr.—Hill, Pa..........................20.00

LANE 7 Jack Levant, Jr.—Carroll, Tx.............................43.94

LANE 5 Alexei Sancov, Jr.—Northgate, Ca............1:33.93

LANE 8 Sam Disette, Sr.—Blue Vly. No., Ks..............20.09

LANE 8 Sam Schilling, Sr.—Minnetonka, Mn..........44.02

LANE 6 Grant House, Sr.—St. Xavier, Oh..............1:34.59

CONSOLATION FINAL

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 7 Trey Freeman, Jr.—Baylor, Tn.....................1:34.92

LANE 1 Tommy Hallock, Sr.—Oakton, Va..................20.28

LANE 1 Nate Biondi, Sr.—Sierra Cyn., Ca.................44.38

LANE 8 Parker Neri, Sr.—Upper Arlington, Oh...1:35.23

LANE 2 Nate Biondi, Sr.—Sierra Cyn., Ca.................20.27

LANE 2 Tommy Hallock, Sr.—Oakton, Va..................44.24

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 3 Trey Freeman, Jr.—Baylor, Tn.........................20.21

LANE 3 David Madej, Jr.—Broadview Hts., Oh.......44.17

LANE 1 Eben Krigger, Sr.—No. Allegheny, Pa......1:36.85

LANE 4 Sem Andreis, Jr.—New Philadelphia, Oh..20.16

LANE 4 Brennan Pastorek, Sr.—Savannah CD, Ga..44.12

LANE 2 Justin Nguyen, Sr.—Fountain Vly., Ca....1:36.65

LANE 5 Shaine Casas, Jr.—McAllen, Tx......................20.17

LANE 5 Sam Disette, Sr.—Blue Vly. No., Ks..............44.15

LANE 3 Jarod Hatch, Sr.—Ann Sobrato, Ca..........1:36.45

LANE 6 Tenny Chong, Sr.—Arcadia, Ca......................20.22

LANE 6 Tenny Chong, Sr.—Arcadia, Ca......................44.24

LANE 4 Sam Schilling, Sr.—Minnetonka, Mn......1:35.82

LANE 7 Cameron Auchinachie, Sr.—Suffield, Ct....20.28

LANE 7 Andy Thomas, Jr.—Hatboro-Horsham, Pa..44.28

LANE 5 Alex Zettle, Jr.—Carroll, Tx.......................... 1:36.27

LANE 8 Maclean Crossley, Sr.—Watertown, NY.....20.30

LANE 8 Jonah Cooper, So.—Foothill, Ca...................44.38

LANE 6 Andy Thomas, Jr.—Hatboro-Horsham, Pa..1:36.47 LANE 7 Michael Lincoln, Sr.—Henry M. Gunn, Ca..1:36.78 LANE 8 Aldan Johnston, Jr.—St. Xavier, Ky...........1:36.89

34

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

2016-17 BOYS' NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS


EVENT #7 500 YARD FREESTYLE

EVENT #9 100 YARD BACKSTROKE

Bolles—Jacksonville, Fl. (11-10-12)........................2:54.43 Ryan Murphy, Santo Condorelli, Josh Booth, Joseph Schooling

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Jeff Kostoff—Upland, Ca. (5-14-83)........................4:16.39

David Nolan—Hershey, Pa. (3-19-11)........................45.49

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

LANE 1 Minnetonka—Minnetonka, Mn................3:01.59

Grant Shoults—Santa Margarita, Ca. (5-14-16).4:12.87

Ryan Murphy—Bolles, Fl. (11-10-12)......................45.34p

LANE 2 Peddie—Hightstown, NJ............................ 3:01.47

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 3 Carmel—Carmel, In......................................3:00.06

LANE 1 Alex Liang, Sr.—Palo Alto, Ca....................4:21.89

LANE 1 Gianluca Urlando, Fr.—McClatchy, Ca.......48.19

LANE 4 St. Xavier—Cincinnati, Oh.........................2:58.13

LANE 2 Jake Sannem, Sr.—La Salle, Pa.................4:21.63

LANE 2 Destin Lasco, Fr.—Mainland Reg., NJ........ 47.67

LANE 5 Carroll—Southlake, Tx................................2:59.39

LANE 3 Grant House, Sr.—St. Xavier, Oh..............4:19.15

LANE 3 Nicolas Albiero, Sr.—Christian, Ky............... 47.23

LANE 6 Baylor—Chattanooga, Tn...........................3:01.21

LANE 4 John Larson, Sr.—Mn Online, Mn............4:16.92

LANE 4 Mike Taylor, Sr.—Johns Creek, Ga................45.53

LANE 7 Loyola—Los Angeles, Ca............................3:01.53

LANE 5 Zachary Yeadon, Sr.—Reagan, Tx.............4:19.13

LANE 5 Jonah Cooper, So.—Foothill, Ca...................46.96

LANE 8 Saugus—Santa Clarita, Ca........................3:01.65

LANE 6 Alex Zettle, Jr.—Carroll, Tx..........................4:20.46

LANE 6 Glen Cowand, Sr.—Cinco Ranch, Tx............ 47.49

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 7 Calvin David, So.—Foothill, Ca.................4:21.66

LANE 7 Jolen Griffin, Sr.—Campolindo, Ca..............48.15

LANE 1 Bolles—Jacksonville, Fl..............................3:03.01

LANE 8 Robert Finke, Jr.—Countryside, Fl...........4:21.93

LANE 8 Noah Henry, Jr.—Belton, Tx............................48.20

LANE 2 Northgate—Walnut Creek, Ca.................. 3:02.97

CONSOLATION FINAL

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 3 Cheyenne Mtn.—Colo. Springs, Co......... 3:02.67

LANE 1 Colter Carman, Sr.—Carroll, Tx.................4:24.10

LANE 1 Alex Margherio, Jr.—Brother Rice, Mi........48.45

LANE 4 Mainland Regional—Linwood, NJ..........3:02.31

LANE 2 Aaron Apel, Sr.—Pinnacle, Az....................4:23.68

LANE 2 Wyatt Davis, Fr.—Carmel, In..........................48.43

LANE 5 Suffield Academy—Suffield, Ct............... 3:02.37

LANE 3 Michael Brinegar, Jr.—Tesoro, Ca............. 4:23.57

LANE 3 Gavin Olson, So.—Columbine, Co...............48.35

LANE 6 Zionsville—Zionsville, In...........................3:02.88

LANE 4 Parker Neri, Sr.—Upper Arlington, Oh...4:23.03

LANE 4 Luke Sobolewski, Sr.—St. Xavier, Oh..........48.23

LANE 7 New Trier—Winnetka, Il.............................3:03.00

LANE 5 Spencer Lehman, Sr.—Northridge, In....4:23.10

LANE 5 Jack Dahlgren, Jr.—Chanhassen, Mn..........48.28

LANE 8 North Allegheny—Wexford, Pa...........3:03.20

LANE 6 Sam Iida, Sr.—Glenbrook South, Il..........4:23.63

LANE 6 Spencer Walker, Jr.—Lyons Twp., Il..............48.36

LANE 7 Santiago Corredor, Sr.—B. Verot, Fl.........4:23.90

LANE 7 Dan Whisenant, Sr.—Univ. School, Tn........48.43

LANE 8 Lane Stone, Sr.—W. Springfield, Va.........4:24.31

LANE 8 Jacob Mullin, Sr.—So. Pasadena, Ca............48.47

TEAM STANDINGS: THE TOP 10 COMBINED 1.

Cincinnati St. Xavier, Ohio..........................140.0

2.

Carmel, Ind....................................................131.5

3.

North Allegheny, Pa.......................................86.0

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

EVENT #10 100 YARD BREASTSTROKE

4.

Loyola, Calif....................................................84.0

Hershey—Hershey, Pa. (3-18-11)..............................1:21.01

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

5.

Peddie School, N.J..........................................82.0

David Nolan, Ben Bauchwitz, Shota Nakano, Jeff Young

Chandler Bray—Avon, Ind. (2-26-16)..................52.65p

6.

Southlake Carroll, Texas...............................81.0

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

7.

Oak Ridge, Calif..............................................80.0

Bolles—Jacksonville, Fl. (11-10-12)....................... 1:19.27

Jacob Molacek—Creighton, Neb. (2-28-14)..........52.92p

8.

Minnetonka, Minn..........................................78.0

Ryan Murphy, Joseph Schooling, Emiro Goossen, Santo Condorelli

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

9.

Zionsville Community, Ind............................74.0

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 1 Keefer Barnum, Sr.—St. Xavier, Ky...............54.36

LANE 1 Saugus—Santa Clarita, Ca........................1:22.72

LANE 2 Paul DeLakis, Sr.—EC Memorial/No., Wi..54.08

LANE 2 Loyola—Los Angeles, Ca............................1:22.13

LANE 3 Trent Pellini, Sr.—Dana Hills, Ca..................53.40

LANE 3 St. Xavier—Cincinnati, Oh.........................1:21.44

LANE 4 ReeceWhitley,Jr.—Wm.Penn,Pa.(2-25-17)....51.84**

2.

North Allegheny, Pa.......................................86.0

LANE 4 North Allegheny—Wexford, Pa. (3-18-17).1:20.95*

LANE 5 Tanner Olson, Sr.—Saugust, Ca....................53.18

3.

Southlake Carroll, Texas...............................81.0

EVENT #8 200 YARD FREESTYLE RELAY

10. Saugus, Calif...................................................72.0

PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1.

Carmel, Ind....................................................131.5

Jack Wright, Rick Mihm, Maxwell Gonzalez, Eben Krigger

LANE 6 Jonathan Cook, Jr.—Jackson, Wa..................53.91

4.

Oak Ridge, Calif..............................................80.0

LANE 5 Carmel—Carmel, In......................................1:21.21

LANE 7 James Daugherty, Sr.—Bolles, Fl.................54.33

5.

Minnetonka, Minn..........................................78.0

LANE 6 Peddie—Hightstown, NJ............................1:21.99

LANE 8 Sterling Smith, Sr.—DeMatha, Md................ 54.4

6.

Zionsville Community, Ind............................74.0

LANE 7 Hinsdale Central—Hinsdale, Il................1:22.24

CONSOLATION FINAL

7.

Saugus, Calif...................................................72.0

LANE 8 Oak Ridge— El Dorado Hills, Ca.............1:22.74

LANE 1 Jason Mathews, Jr.—Pickerington No., Oh..54.83

8.

Northgate, Calif..............................................59.0

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 2 Matt Jerden, Sr.—Bloomington So., In......54.66

9.

Dana Hills, Calif..............................................36.0

LANE 1 Lyons Township—Western Springs, Il... 1:23.52

LANE 3 Spencer Rowe, Sr.—Patriot, Va.....................54.56

10. Chaparral, Ariz................................................34.5

LANE 2 Bolles—Jacksonville, Fl..............................1:23.45

LANE 4 William Chan, Jr.—Wm. A. Hough, NC........54.47

LANE 3 Huntington Beach—Hunt. Bch., Ca.......1:23.34

LANE 5 William Myhre, So.—St. Charles No., Il.....54.50

LANE 4 Northgate—Walnut Creek, Ca..................1:22.93

LANE 6 Charlie Scheinfeld, Jr.—New Trier, Il..........54.63

2.

Loyola, Calif....................................................84.0

LANE 5 Baylor—Chattanooga, Tn...........................1:23.03

LANE 7 Eli Fouts, Jr.—Quince Orchard, Md.............54.77

3.

Peddie School, N.J..........................................82.0

LANE 6 Newport Harbor—Newport Bch., Ca....1:23.40

LANE 8 Ryan Geheb, Sr.—Lake Travis, Tx.................54.86

4.

Baylor School, Tenn.......................................65.0

5.

Bolles School, Fla...........................................59.0

LANE 7 Eden Prairie—Eden Prairie, Mn...............1:23.49 LANE 8 Westlake—Austin, Tx...................................1:23.59

to view NISCA's 2016-17 All-America lists.

EVENT #11 400 YARD FREESTYLE RELAY

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS 1.

Cincinnati St. Xavier, Ohio..........................140.0

6T. Memphis University School, Tenn................40.0 6T. William Penn Charter School, Pa.................40.0

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

8.

Christian Academy of Louisville, Ky.............36.0

Granada—Livermore, Ca. (5-17-14).........................2:59.00

9.

La Salle College High School, Pa.................28.0

Nick Silverthorn, Bryce McLaggan, Trent Trump, Maxime Rooney

10. Savannah Country Day, Ga............................24.0

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

35


[ PHOTO PROVIDED BY PETER H. BICK ]

GIRLS' NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS

Embracing the

Challenge

“The feeling never gets old—that’s for sure,” exclaimed head coach Chris Plumb after his Carmel High School (Ind.) girls’ swimming and diving team celebrated their 31st straight state championship last February. When the high school season ended, the Greyhounds also learned they repeated as national champs!

BY DAVID RIEDER

CARMEL HIGH SCHOOL (IND.) ONCE AGAIN WON SWIMMING WORLD’S GIRLS’ NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS—FOR A FIFTH STRAIGHT YEAR AND FOR THE SIXTH TIME IN THE LAST SEVEN YEARS.

T

he margin was much closer than last year’s 86-point victory, but Carmel High School (Ind.) is still Swimming World’s No. 1 girls’ high school swimming team in the country. Despite the losses of Claire Adams, Veronica Burchill and Kendall Smith to graduation, the Greyhounds tallied 158 points in the meet based on this season’s top high school times. Santa Margarita Catholic School (Calif.), which finished as the top independent school in the country, was second overall with 126. Oh, and as far as their actual competition went at the Indiana high school state meet, Carmel won for a 31st consecutive year. “The feeling never gets old—that’s for sure,” head coach Chris Plumb said. “The program is working from top to bottom. The Carmel Swim Club is continually producing top athletes, and the senior group and the high school are able to take those athletes and make them into national champions.” The tone was set at states when senior Sammie Burchill, younger sister of Veronica, took down an Indiana record that she had just missed one year earlier and had been gunning for all this season. She ended up posting this season’s fastest prep time in the 200 yard IM, 1:56.67. “Her commitment level to say, ‘Hey, I’m getting that record next year,’ and then to go do it...it’s just so cool to see an athlete on a mission like that and then to see it come to fruition,” Plumb said. Two events later, junior Trude Rothrock came from behind to 36

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

touch out Crown Point’s Hannah Kukurugya to win the state title in the 100 fly. Rothrock clocked 52.97, the fourth fastest time in the country this season. Additionally, sophomore Kelly Pash posted the nation’s fifth fastest time in the 100 free (49.17), senior Emma Nordin blasted a 4:45.32 in the 500 that was good for sixth nationally, and all three of Carmel’s relays ranked among the top four in the nation this season (400 FR, 3:19.10, second; 200 FR, 1:33.01, third; 200 MR, 1:41.23, fourth). “This group really stepped up and helped us fill the void left by those great athletes (from previous years),” Plumb said. “They weren’t intimidated—they embraced the challenge that was in front of them.” Undoubtedly, the winning will continue. Even after some key departures—Sammie Burchill is headed off to join sister, Veronica, at Georgia, and Nordin to Arizona State—it should be no surprise if Carmel is right back in the mix for a national title next season. And considering the Carmel girls more than doubled the point total of their closest competition at the Indiana state meet this year, anything less than a 32nd straight win next year would be a stunner. 

to learn the secrets behind Carmel's swimming success.


HEAT SHEET

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE’S GIRLS’ NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS BY BOB KLAPTHOR FOLLOWING IS A MOCK HEAT SHEET OF THE GIRLS’ MYTHICAL NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS, BASED ON THE TOP TIMES SWUM DURING THE 2016-17 HIGH SCHOOL SEASON.

EVENT #1 200 YARD MEDLEY RELAY

EVENT #3 200 YARD INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

* =

NATIONAL PUBLIC SCHOOL RECORD

** =

NATIONAL INDEPENDENT SCHOOL RECORD

p = PRELIM TIME r = RELAY SPLIT TIME

KEY

EVENT #5 100 YARD BUTTERFLY

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Carmel — Carmel, Ind. (2-14-15).............................1:39.25

Dagny Knutson — Minot, N.D. (11-13-09)......... 1:53.82p

Beata Nelson — Verona/Horeb, Wis. (11-15-14)....51.62

Sammie Burchill, Alex Clarke, Veronica Burchill, Amy Bilquist

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

Ella Eastin — Crean Lutheran, Ca. (5-16-15).......1:53.90

Katie McLaughlin—SantaMargarita,Ca. (5-16-15)..51.53

Sacred Heart Acad.—Louisville, Ky. (2-27-16).....1:40.61

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

Tonner DeBeer, Kennedy Lohman, Asia Seidt, Brooke Bauer

LANE 1 Emma Muzzy, Jr.—Cave Spring Va..........1:59.22

LANE 1 Kristen Romano, Sr.—Long Beach, NY......53.13

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 2 Mikki Thompson, Jr.—Ayala, Ca................1:59.19

LANE 2 Tonner DeBeer, Jr.—Sacred Heart, Ky.........53.02

LANE 1 Harpeth Hall—Nashville, Tn.....................1:41.84

LANE 3 Hannah Kukurugya, Sr.—Crown Pt., In..1:57.99

LANE 3 Alexis Margett, Sr.—Glendora, Ca...............52.74

LANE 2 Ventura—Ventura, Ca..................................1:41.76

LANE 4 Sammie Burchill, Sr.—Carmel, In............ 1:56.67

LANE 4 Dakota Luther, Jr.—Westlake, Tx..................52.27

LANE 3 Crean Lutheran—Irvine, Ca...................... 1:40.77

LANE 5 Isabel Ivey, So.—Oak Hall, Fl.................... 1:57.31

LANE 5 Eva Merrell, Jr.—Crean Lutheran, Ca..........52.51

LANE 4 Fossil Ridge—Ft. Collins, Co.....................1:39.40

LANE 6 Chloe Clark, So.—Granite Bay, Ca...........1:58.33

LANE 6 Trude Rothrock, Jr.—Carmel, In....................52.97

LANE 5 Southwest—Lincoln, Neb..........................1:39.68

LANE 7 Olivia Paoletti, Jr.—Avon Grove, Pa........1:59.20

LANE 7 Hannah Kukurugya, Sr.—Crown Pt., In.....53.06

LANE 6 Carmel—Carmel, Ind...................................1:41.23

LANE 8 Grace Zhao, Sr.—Palo Alto, Ca..................1:59.26

LANE 8 Coleen Gillilan, So.—Fossil Ridge, Co.......53.15

LANE 7 Woodlands—Woodlands, Tx.....................1:41.83

CONSOLATION FINAL

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 8 Upper Arlington—Up. Arlington, Oh.....1:41.88

LANE 1 D. Della Torre, Sr.—Oconee Cty, Ga.........1:59.90

LANE 1 Whitney Hamilton, So.—Patrick Henry,Va.53.51

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 2 Carley Lowe, Sr.—Lake Highland, Fl.......1:59.65

LANE 2 Lillian Nordmann, Fr.—Woodlands, Tx......53.48

LANE 1 Westlake—Austin, Tx...................................1:42.86

LANE 3 Nikol Popov, Sr.—Valencia, Ca..................1:59.52

LANE 3 Emily Reese, Sr.—Woodlands, Tx.................53.35

LANE 2 Penn—Mishawaka, In..................................1:42.65

LANE 4 Lillie Hosack, Jr.—Cedarsburg, Wi........... 1:59.47

LANE 4 Lauren Green, Sr.—Pioneer, Ca.....................53.20

LANE 3 Buchholz—Gainesville, Fl.........................1:42.53

LANE 5 Margaret Aroesty, Sr.—Long Bch, NY.....1:59.51

LANE 5 Megan Glass, So.—Ursuline, Oh..................53.34

LANE 4 Wayzata—Plymouth, Mn...........................1:42.21

LANE 6 Crile Hart, Sr.—Hawken, Oh......................1:59.58

LANE 6 Jessica Nava, Jr.—Westminster, Fl...............53.45

LANE 5 Monte Vista—Danville, Ca........................1:42.34

LANE 7 Abby Richter, Sr.—Green Vly., Nv.............1:59.80

LANE 7 Kara Eisenmann, Sr.—Lewisville, Tx...........53.48

LANE 6 Sacred Heart Acad.—Louisville, Ky.........1:42.64

LANE 8 Zoie Hartman, So.—Monte Vista, Ca......2:00.05

LANE 8 Phoebe Bacon, Fr.—Stone Ridge, Md........53.54

LANE 8 Rio Americano—Sacramento, Ca............1:43.06

EVENT #4 50 YARD FREESTYLE

EVENT #6 100 YARD FREESTYLE

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

EVENT #2 200 YARD FREESTYLE

Abbey Weitzeil — Saugus, Ca. (5-16-15)...................21.64

Abbey Weitzeil — Saugus, Ca. (5-16-15)..................47.09r

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Maddy Schaefer — St. Francis, Ca. (5-22-10)...........22.24

Missy Franklin — Regis Jesuit, Colo. (2-13-10).....48.39r

LANE 7 Bloomington So.—Bloomington, In.......1:42.71

Dagny Knutson — Minot, N.D. (11-14-08)............1:42.81

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

LANE 1 Grace Countie, Jr.—Leesville Rd, NC..........22.59

LANE 1 Izzi Henig, Jr.—Menlo-Atherton, Ca...........49.25

Katie Ledecky — Stone Ridge, Md. (2-7-15).........1:41.55

LANE 2 Amalie Fackenthal, Jr.—Country Day, Ca..22.45

LANE 2 Kelly Pash, So.—Carmel, In............................49.17

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 3 Lauren Green, Sr.—Pioneer, Ca.....................22.40

LANE 3 Lucie Nordmann, Jr.—Woodlands, Tx.........48.85

LANE 1 Ella Ristic, Fr.—S.Margarita, Ca................1:45.76

LANE 4 Katherine Douglass, So.—Pelham, NY......22.21

LANE 4 Julia Cook, Jr.—Bryan, Tx.................................48.44

LANE 2 Dakota Luther, Jr.—Westlake, Tx..............1:45.68

LANE 5 Julia Cook, Jr.—Bryan, Tx.................................22.32

LANE 5 Katherine Douglass, So.—Pelham, NY......48.54

LANE 3 Courtney Harnish, Sr.—W.York, Pa...........1:44.73

LANE 6 Isabel Ivey, So.—Oak Hall, Fl........................22.43

LANE 6 Alexandra Crisera, So.—Mira Costa, Ca.....48.87

LANE 4 Morgan Tankersley, Jr.—Plant, Fl.............1:44.31

LANE 7 Miranda Donley, Sr.—Columbus/Girls, Oh.22.49

LANE 7 Amalie Fackenthal, Jr.—Country Day, Ca..49.21

LANE 5 Brooke Forde, Sr.—Sacred Heart, Ky......1:44.68

LANE 8 Marta Ciesla, Sr.—Pine Crest, Fl..................22.61

LANE 8 Taylor Ruck, Jr.—Chaparral, Az......................49.29

LANE 6 Alex Walsh, Fr.—Harpeth Hall, Tn...........1:45.24

CONSOLATION FINAL

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 7 Samantha Shelton,Jr.—S.Margarita,Ca. 1:45.76

LANE 1 Ilea Doctor, Jr.—E.Grand Rapids, Mi...........22.73

LANE 1 Olivia Calegan, Sr.—Southwest, Neb.........49.48

LANE 8 Kyla Valls, Sr.—Ransom Everglades, Fl. 1:45.96

LANE 2 Grace Haskett, Sr.—Bloomington So., In..2 2.68

LANE 2 Emma Cole, Sr.—Walton, Ga..........................49.45

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 3 Rachel Wittmer, Sr.—Edina, Mn...................22.65

LANE 3 Cathy Teng, Jr.—AB Mitty, Ca.........................49.43

LANE 1 Emma Cole, Sr.—Walton, Ga......................1:46.73

LANE 4 Emma Wheal, So.—Westlake, Tx..................22.62

LANE 4 Miranda Donley, Sr.—Columbus/Girls, Oh.49.41

LANE 2 Mary Smutny, So.—S.Fla. HEAT, Fl...........1:46.62

LANE 5 Kylee Alons, Jr.—Fossil Ridge, Co................22.64

LANE 5 Anicka Delgado, Fr.—S.Margarita, Ca........49.43

LANE 3 Cathy Teng, Jr.—AB Mitty, Ca.....................1:46.31

LANE 6 Elise Garcia, Jr.—Crean Lutheran, Ca.........22.66

LANE 6 Morgan Scott, Jr.—Pennridge, Pa................49.43

LANE 4 Taylor Ruck, Jr.—Chaparral, Az..................1:46.00

LANE 7 Talia Bates, So.—Buchholz, Fl......................22.69

LANE 7 Ashley Volpenhein, Sr.—Mason, Oh...........49.46

LANE 5 Erica Laning, Sr.—Hardin Vly., Tn............1:46.26

LANE 8 Olivia Livingston, Fr.—Gateway, Pa............22.73

LANE 8 Elise Garcia, Jr.—Crean Lutheran, Ca.........49.52

LANE 6 Sinead Eksteen, Jr.—McLean, Va..............1:46.53 LANE 7 Georgia White, Jr.—Oswego East, Il........1:46.69 LANE 8 Morgan Scott, Jr.—Pennridge, Pa............ 1:46.77

38

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

2016-17 GIRLS' NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CHAMPIONSHIPS


EVENT #7 500 YARD FREESTYLE

EVENT #9 100 YARD BACKSTROKE

Crean Lutheran — Irvine, Ca. (5-23-15)..................3:20.03 Ella Eastin, Tianna Jorgenson, Emily Eastin, Elise Garcia

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

Dagny Knutson — Minot, N.D. (11-14-08)............4:34.78

Olivia Smoliga — Glenbrook So., Ill. (11-17-12)....51.43

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

LANE 1 Rio Americano—Sacramento, Ca............ 3:22.97

Katie Ledecky — Stone Ridge, Md. (2-6-15)..... 4:26.58p

Ally Howe — Sacred Heart Prep, Ca. (5-17-14).......51.54

LANE 2 Harpeth Hall—Nashville, Tn.....................3:22.01

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 3 Woodlands—Woodlands, Tx.....................3:21.06

LANE 1 Sinead Eksteen, Jr.—McLean, Va..............4:45.44

LANE 1 Kristen Romano, Sr.—Long Beach, NY......53.36

LANE 4 Santa Margarita—RS Margarita, Ca.......3:18.26

LANE 2 Kaitlynn Sims, So.—Montgomery, Tx.....4:44.08

LANE 2 Phoebe Bacon, Fr.—Stone Ridge, Md........53.14

LANE 5 Carmel—Carmel, In......................................3:19.10

LANE 3 Miranda Heckman, So.—Granada, Ca....4:41.53

LANE 3 Eva Merrell, Jr.—Crean Lutheran, Ca..........53.03

LANE 6 Edina—Edina, Mn.........................................3:21.89

LANE 4 Morgan Tankersley, Jr.—Plant, Fl............. 4:37.60

LANE 4 Lucie Nordmann, Jr.—Woodlands, Tx.........52.48

LANE 7 Fossil Ridge—Ft. Collins, Co.....................3:22.45

LANE 5 Brooke Forde, Sr.—Sacred Heart, Ky...... 4:39.87

LANE 5 Alex Walsh, Fr.—Harpeth Hall, Tn...............52.80

LANE 8 Sacred Heart Acad.—Louisville, Ky.........3:22.98

LANE 6 Taylor Ault, Sr.—Sonora, Ca.......................4:43.09

LANE 6 Samantha Shelton, Jr.—S.Margarita, Ca....53.04

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 7 Emma Nordin, Sr.—Carmel, In..................4:45.32

LANE 7 Tea Laughlin, Fr.—Ventura, Ca......................53.14

LANE 1 Clovis West—Clovis, Ca..............................3:24.44

LANE 8 Courtney Harnish, Sr.—W.York, Pa...........4:45.74

LANE 8 Chloe Clark, So.—Granite Bay, Ca...............53.37

LANE 2 Upper Dublin—Ft. Washington, Pa........3:24.41

CONSOLATION FINAL

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 3 Mason—Mason, Oh......................................3:24.21

LANE 1 Danielle Hawkins, So.—California, Ca... 4:47.49

LANE 1 S.Krivokapic-Zhou, Sr.—Santa Clara, Ca...53.60

LANE 4 Plant—Tampa, Fl...........................................3:23.80

LANE 2 Lindsay Stone, Sr.—Pittsford Cent., NY4:46.80

LANE 2 Alexandra Crisera, So.—Mira Costa, Ca.....53.54

LANE 5 Notre Dame—Park Hills, Ky......................3:23.83

LANE 3 Isabella Rongione, Sr.—Langley, Va.......4:46.19

LANE 3 Carly Quast, Sr.—Wayzata, Mn......................53.39

LANE 6 Buchholz—Gainesville, Fl.........................3:24.28

LANE 4 Joy Field, Sr.—Magnolia, Tx.......................4:45.76

LANE 4 Caitlin Brooks, So.—Buchholz, Fl................53.38

LANE 7 Walton—Marietta, Ga..................................3:24.44

LANE 5 Courtney Tseng, Sr.—Sunny Hills, Ca.....4:45.92

LANE 5 Grace Haskett, Sr.—Bloomington So., In..5 3.38

LANE 8 Saline—Saline, Mi.................................. 3:24.44 

LANE 6 Nicole Olivia, Fr.—St. Francis, Ca............4:46.75

LANE 6 Alex Summer, Jr.—Episcopal, Pa..................53.41

LANE 7 Paige Madden, Sr.—UMS-Wright, Al......4:46.98

LANE 7 Aria Bernal, Jr.—Cinco Ranch, Tx.................53.57

LANE 8 Haley Yelle, Sr.—Mansfield Legacy, Tx... 4:47.54

LANE 8 Jennifer Lathrop, Sr.—Oak Ridge, Ca..........53.62

1.

Carmel, Ind....................................................158.0

EVENT #8 200 YARD FREESTYLE RELAY

EVENT #10 100 YARD BREASTSTROKE

2.

Santa Margarita Catholic, Calif..................126.0

3.

Fossil Ridge, Colo.........................................122.0

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

4.

The Woodlands, Texas.................................103.5

Carmel — Carmel, Ind. (2-14-15).............................1:30.72

Lindsey Horejsi—Albert Lea, Mn. (11-19-15)......58.56p

5.

Harpeth Hall, Tenn.........................................84.0

Veronica Burchill, Claire Adams, Kendall Smith, Trude Rothrock

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

6.

Sacred Heart Academy, Ky.............................80.0

NATIONAL RECORD: INDEPENDENT SCHOOL

Sarah Haase — Good Counsel, Md. (2-11-12).....1:00.05

7.

Crean Lutheran, Calif.....................................71.0

Baylor — Chattanooga, Tn. (2-11-12).....................1:31.18

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

8.

Edina, Minn.....................................................70.0

Kristen Vredeveld, Bria Deveaux,

LANE 1 Grace Zhao, Sr.—Palo Alto, Ca..................1:00.66

9.

Plant, Fla.........................................................58.0

Kimberlee John-Williams, Ashley Yearwood

LANE 2 Allie Raab, Jr.—Brentwood, Tn..................1:00.55

10. Austin Westlake, Tx........................................51.0

TEAM STANDINGS: THE TOP 10 COMBINED

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL

LANE 3 Zoe Bartel, Jr.—Fossil Ridge, Co...............1:00.22

LANE 1 East Grand Rapids—Grand Rapids, Mi..1 :33.89

LANE 4 Emily Weiss, So.—Yorktown, In....................59.37

1.

Carmel, Ind....................................................158.0

LANE 2 Middleton—Middleton, Wi.......................1:33.72

LANE 5 Margaret Aroesty, Sr.—Long Beach, NY....59.85

2.

Fossil Ridge, Colo.........................................122.0

LANE 3 Carmel—Carmel, In......................................1:33.01

LANE 6 Nikol Popov, Sr.—Valencia, Ca..................1:00.24

3.

The Woodlands, Texas.................................103.5

LANE 4 Santa Margarita—RS Margarita, Ca.......1:32.33

LANE 7 Zoie Hartman, So.—Monte Vista, Ca......1:00.59

4.

Edina, Minn.....................................................70.0

LANE 5 Edina—Edina, Mn.........................................1:32.89

LANE 8 Ema Rajic, Jr.—U of Ill. Lab School, Il.... 1:00.77

5.

Plant, Fla.........................................................58.0

LANE 6 Walton—Marietta, Ga..................................1:33.50

CONSOLATION FINAL

6.

Austin Westlake, Texas..................................51.0

LANE 7 Clovis West—Clovis, Ca.............................. 1:33.77

LANE 1 Olivia Paoletti, Jr.—Avon Grove, Pa........1:01.49

7.

Ventura, Calif..................................................50.5

LANE 8 Fossil Ridge—Ft. Collins, Colo.................1:33.92

LANE 2 Emma Lezer, So.—Albertville, Mn...........1:01.43

8.

Lincoln Southwest, Neb................................50.0

CONSOLATION FINAL

LANE 3 Jacqueline Clabeaux, Sr.—Chantilly, Va.1:01.03

9.

Long Beach, New York...................................48.0

LANE 1 Westlake—Austin, Tx...................................1:34.28

LANE 4 Alicia Harrison, Sr.—Ventura, Ca..............1:00.80

10. Palo Alto, Calif................................................41.0

LANE 2 Monte Vista—Danville, Ca........................1:34.19

LANE 5 Bailey Bonnett, So.—Natrona Hts., Pa..1:00.84

LANE 3 Valencia—Santa Clarita, Ca...................... 1:34.07

LANE 6 OliviaJack,Jr.—Scotia-GlenvilleCen.,NY.1:01.33

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS 1.

Santa Margarita Catholic, Calif..................126.0

LANE 4 Palo Alto—Palo Alto, Ca.............................1:33.93

LANE 7 Halle Morris, Sr.—Terra Linda, Ca............1:01.44

2.

Harpeth Hall, Tenn.........................................84.0

LANE 5 Southwest—Lincoln, Neb..........................1:33.95

LANE 8 H.MacCausland,So.—Downington E.,Pa..1:01.49

3.

Sacred Heart Academy, Ky.............................80.0

4.

Crean Lutheran, Calif.....................................71.0

EVENT #11 400 YARD FREESTYLE RELAY

5.

Oak Hall School, Fla.......................................32.0

6.

Sacramento Country Day, Calif..................... 27.0

NATIONAL RECORD: PUBLIC SCHOOL

7.

Columbus School for Girls, Ohio..................22.0

Carmel — Carmel, Ind. (2-14-15).............................3:15.38

8.

Stone Ridge, Md.............................................14.5

Veronica Burchill, Claire Adams,

9.

Notre Dame Academy, Ky..............................14.0

LANE 6 No. Canton Hoover—No. Canton, Oh....1:34.14 LANE 7 Henry M. Gunn—Palo Alto, Ca................. 1:34.27 LANE 8 Pittsford Central—Rochester, NY...........1:34.34

to view NISCA's 2016-17 All-America lists.

Kendall Smith, Amy Bilquist

10. Archbishop Mitty, Calif..................................12.0

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

39


COACHING

LESSONS with the

LEGENDS SPONSORED BY

SWIMMING WORLD CONTINUES A SERIES IN WHICH TOP COACHES SHARE SOME OF THE SECRETS OF THEIR SUCCESS. BY MICHAEL J. STOTT

[ PHOTOS PROVIDED BY INTERNATIONAL SWIMMING HALL OF FAME]

BOB KIPHUTH

L

ong before Eddie Reese, Richard Quick, Dave Marsh, Mark Schubert, even George Haines, there was Bob Kiphuth of Yale. Never a college student, he was an avid reader, possessed an astounding book collection and became such a student of life and his aquatic vocation that his storied institution made him a full professor. He coached at Yale from 1917-59. After taking over the reins from hall of fame coach Matt Mann, he compiled a dual meet record of 528-12, won 38 Eastern Intercollegiate titles and four NCAA national championships. He was part of the Mann (Michigan)-Mike Peppe (Ohio State)-Kiphuth triumvirate whose teams won every NCAA swimming title from 1937 to 1959! Kiphuth coached four U.S. Olympic teams (women in 1928, head coach in 1932 and 1936, and men in 1948). He was also named head coach in 1940, but the Olympics were not held due to war. In 1948, his swimmers won every Olympic event. His squads also earned 14 AAU national team championships. By all accounts, once in his training facilities, Kiphuth was a “taskmaster.” No one pursued calisthenics and dryland with more zeal, and he is universally credited with cementing dryland and running as staples of out-of-the-pool swim training. Originally a gymnastics and physical education instructor, he did not like weight lifting, but believed in weights on pulleys and on the feet. Med balls were a huge component of his training that 40

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

concentrated on building a strong core. Kiphuth was not a stroke technician in the Doc Counsilman-Nort Thornton sense, and he did not write workouts in advance, unlike his successor, Phil Moriarity, who painstakingly mapped workouts for each stroke and distance group. Among other benefactors to those on-the-fly workouts were All-Americans, Olympians and world champions Jimmy McLane, Alan Ford and Jeff Farrell. In New Haven, Kiphuth also served as a counselor to his athletes away from the pool. That behavior was in stark contrast to the tough demeanor he showed athletes inside the Bulldog’s spectator-friendly Yale Exhibition Pool, which he helped design and which ultimately produced many world records. Within PayneWhitney Gymnasium, Kiphuth introduced poolside (rather than end) guttering, tractionfriendly end wall tiling, pool bottom markings, crosses and larger lane lines made of cork. Into the 1960s, the Yale Exhibition Pool hosted countless AAU national A prodigious author himself, Bob Kiphuth holds up the book, “The Art of Swimming” by Sir Everard Digby, published in championships and 1587—considered to be the first English written work on was regarded as the swimming. nation’s preeminent competitive swimming facility. Not content with training and fast swimming, the Yale coach also brought spectacle shortly after the pool’s 1932 opening in the form of the Yale Carnival. For more than 30 years, it became a revenue-producing aquatic exposition, replete with almost every conceivable water activity as well as skits, clown acts, diving extravaganzas and world record attempts by Eli and visiting swimmers. The Yale coach traveled globally, often at the behest of the AAU, to share his swimming views and absorb the thoughts of fellow coaches. He wrote prodigiously, authoring a half dozen books (notably “Swimming,” “Basic Swimming,” “How to Be Fit,” etc.) and countless articles on physical education in general. In 1951, he became the first editor and publisher of Swimming World. Standing just 5-6, Kiphuth was a presence in the world of sport. He was founder of the Council for National Cooperation in Aquatics; a charter vice president of the International Swimming Hall of Fame; a director of the Boys Clubs of America, the National Art Museum of Sports and the President’s Fitness Council; and the national swim chairman of the AAU. He also served in a host of other executive-administrative positions within sport organizations. Kiphuth is a member of the International Swimming and American Swim Coaches Association halls of fame, and in 1963, he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

A MAN FOR THE AGES In many ways, the Yale coach was ahead of the times—not only in coaching and kinesiology, but also in regard to the sport’s future. “It is fascinating that Kiphuth was a genius in so many areas,” says Jack Geoghegan, 1964 Villanova graduate and for-

— continued on 42


LEGENDS — continued from 40

Bob Kiphuth coached at Yale for more than 40 years from 1917-59. The Bulldogs amassed a 528-12 dual meet record and won four NCAA titles.

mer American record holder in the 100 yard freestyle (49.7) when swum in a 50-yard configuration. Geoghegan, a three-time NCAA

All-American, multi-time USMS national champion and legal counsel for 14 years, recalls a conversation with Kiphuth following the 1964 NCAA meet in which the legendary coach envisioned the future. It was a time when Minnesota senator Hubert Humphrey was advancing the need for an aquatic national training center in Colorado. Kiphuth told Geoghegan that he supported the concept, but thought American swimming could do well without it. He further postulated that in Geoghegan’s lifetime, he would see a sub-40-second 100 yard freestyle. The Villanova swimmer reminded the coach that the fastest 50 to date was Steve Clark’s 20.9. “We can’t accelerate like a track athlete; we decelerate. So, how is that going to be possible?” Geoghegan asked. “Many factors,” responded Kiphuth, citing pool construction, bigger, stronger, fitter athletes and diet. “Interestingly, Kiphuth did not foresee the advent of goggles, which I think has built our capacity to do workouts...but the fact remains: the man was prescient,” says Geoghegan. Fast forward to 2017 and the men’s NCAA Division I Championships. Florida junior Caeleb Dressel clocked a 40-second 100 free (19.01/20.99) whose final split was as fast as Clark’s record 50 free time. Could it be the future is now?  Michael J. Stott is an ASCA Level 5 coach whose Collegiate School (Richmond, Va.) teams won nine state high school championships. He has been named a 2017 recipient of NISCA’s Outstanding Service Award.

吀栀攀 伀刀䤀䜀䤀一䄀䰀 刀攀猀椀猀琀愀渀挀攀 匀圀䤀䴀 吀刀䄀䤀一䤀一䜀 䜀䔀䄀刀  唀猀攀搀 戀礀 䄀琀栀氀攀琀攀猀 圀漀爀氀搀眀椀搀攀

刀攀猀椀猀琀愀渀挀攀 吀爀愀椀渀椀渀最 吀漀漀氀猀 䐀攀猀椀最渀攀搀 琀漀 䤀洀瀀爀漀瘀攀 匀琀愀洀椀渀愀Ⰰ  倀漀眀攀爀Ⰰ 䘀漀爀洀Ⰰ 匀琀爀漀欀攀 愀渀搀 䤀渀搀椀瘀椀搀甀愀氀 䴀攀搀氀攀礀 吀椀洀攀猀 

一娀䌀漀爀搀稀⸀挀漀洀 㠀  ⸀㠀㠀㘀⸀㘀㘀㈀㄀  42

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


DRYSIDE TRAINING

1

TRX KNEE TUCK Place your feet into the TRX straps. From a push-up position, alternate legs, bringing one knee at a time in toward your chest.

THE IM STROKE SERIES: BREASTSTROKE BY J.R. ROSANIA PHOTOS BY EMMI BRYTOWSKI DEMONSTRATED BY NORIKO INADA

2

HORIZONTAL PULL-UP ON STABILITY BALL While lying on your back in a horizontal position with your feet positioned on top of a stability ball, perform pull-ups.

3

DUMBBELL SQUAT WITH OVERHEAD PRESS While holding a dumbbell in each hand just above your shoulders, squat down. On the way up, press the dumbbells overhead.

4

SCAPULA TUBE ROW Perform a standing row, squeezing the scapular areas (shoulder/ shoulder blade) together.

The third stroke in the individual medley event is breaststroke. This stroke is probably the most unorthodox stroke of the four. Its unnatural movement relies heavily on leg power for forward propulsion. The hands are up front to help stabilize the upper body and initiate the forward movement. The legs create the explosive forward movement as the swimmer drives the legs together. This month’s article features four exercises that strengthen the core, which is necessary to help stabilize the mid-body and create the necessary body position. These exercises should enhance each area of your body for a stronger breaststroke. Perform the workout two to three times per week. As always, discontinue this routine seven to 10 days before your main competition.  MEET THE TRAINER J.R. Rosania, B.S., exercise science, is one of the nation’s top performance enhancement coaches. He is the owner and CEO of Healthplex, LLC, and has finished the Ironman Triathlon 18 times. He also serves as Swimming World Magazine’s fitness trainer and was named one of “America’s Top Trainers” by Men’s Journal and Vogue magazines. Check out Rosania’s website at www.jrhealthplex.net. MEET THE ATHLETE Noriko Inada, 39, swam for Japan at the 1992, 2000 and 2004 Olympics. She now swims Masters for Phoenix Swim Club, and owns Masters world records in the women’s 25-29, 30-34 and 35-39 age groups.

NOTICE All swimming and dryland training instruction should be performed under the supervision of a qualified coach or instructor, and in circumstances that ensure the safety of the participants.

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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COACHING SPECIAL SETS

TRAINING FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY BY MICHAEL J. STOTT [ PHOTO BYYIFAN LIANG ]

This is the first of a two-part series on training for the individual medley, which requires time, sacrifice, incredible endurance and speed to achieve world-class status. This month, Coaches Ted Knapp and Jeff Kostoff share “the Stanford way”of training their IMers. Next month: North Baltimore Aquatic Club coach Paul Yetter will provide some of his IM training secrets.

T

hese days, Stanford alums Ted Knapp and Jeff Kostoff are united once again—Knapp as head men’s coach and Kostoff as his assistant. Knapp completed his Cardinal career in 1981 as an NCAA All-American and senior captain before joining Skip Kenney’s staff. From 1983-2017, Stanford men won nine 200 IM and four 400 IM NCAA titles. Kostoff won two of those 400 IMs and also snared three 1650 freestyle titles. Kostoff’s other enduring fame is holding the American national high school record in the 500 yard free (4:16.39) for nearly 30 years (May 1983 to February 2013). In tandem, Knapp and Kostoff are directing Stanford to continuing excellence in the individual medley. David Nolan, American record holder in the 200 IM (1:39.38, 2015), is just the latest example.

Goldman Family Director of Men’s Swimming Ted Knapp (far left) and assistant coach Jeff Kostoff (far right) pose with Stanford swimmers (from left) junior Abrahm DeVine (200 IM) and sophomore True Sweetser (1500), who both represented Team USA at the 2017 World Championships in Budapest, Hungary.

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44

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017


KNAPP AND KOSTOFF APPROACH TRAINING THE IMs WITH THE FOLLOWING INSIGHTS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: • The 200 IM requires 50 speed and great underwater • The 400 IM requires 500 endurance • Transitions are key—“so you need to swim a ton of IM in practice” • Work drills into warm-up and main sets • Create sets to negative-split portions of 400 IM • Vary the distance of strokes in different transition combinations (see the following sample sets)

MAIN SETS • 3x {4 x 50 STROKE, 200 IM, 4 x 50 FR, 200 FR (swum as 50s STROKE @ :50, 200 IM @ 2:40, 50s FR @ :45, 200 FR @ 2:30) - Round 1 STROKE=FL, Round 2 BK, Round 3 BR - Descend 200s—also for 400 IM, do set with 100s instead of 50s and 400s instead of 200s • 5 x 400 FR @ 4:30 White (144/156 Heart Rate) to Pink (156/162 HR) • 200 Recovery @ 3:30 • 5 x 200 IM @ 2:30 all Red (162-168 HR) • 200 Recovery @ 3:30

WARM-UP SETS • 7 x 100 Transition IM (100 FL, 50 FL-50 BK, 100 BK, 50 BK-50 BR, 100 BR, 50 BR-50 FR, 100 FR) @ 1:30 same pattern with 50s (from Coach Ed Spencer) • 3 x 300 (25 FL-50 BK-75 BR-150 FR) @ 4:15—sample of varying stroke distance; cut fly to make easier, add fly to make it harder; add free to make it a distance/IM set—i.e., 50 FL-50 BK-50 BR-250 FR to get a 400 • Use IM in warm-up for all swimmers whether they swim IM or not: - 4 x 125 (25 FL-25 BK-25 BR-50 FR) is a regular warm-up set - IM Ladder—10 x 50: FL, BK, BR, FR, BR, BK, FL, BK, BR, FR...play with different intervals - Any number of 100s or 200s as FR/BK/BR/FR FRIM or FL/BK/BR/FL FLIM

• 8 x 75 @ 1:15—descend 1-4, 5-8 White (144) to Blue (174 HR) • 200 Recovery • 2x {3 x 300 (#1 50 STROKE-250 FR, #2 100 STROKE-200 FR, #3 150 STROKE-150 FR hold same time adding stroke or IM progression @ 4:00) • 8 x 150 100 cruise free, breathe every 4, hand touch 200 feel pace 50 @ 2:05 • X Rounds: - 3 x 200 IM @ 2:30 (descend 1-3) - EZ 1 x 100 choice @ 1:30 - 1 x 100 IM @ 1:30 FAST - EZ 1 x 100 choice @ 1:30 

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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COACHING

SWIMMING TECHNIQUE MISCONCEPTIONS: BY ROD HAVRILUK Many people believe that it is worth copying the technique of the fastest swimmers. In reality, even the fastest swimmers have technique limitations, but they offset them with strength and conditioning. The purpose of this series of articles is to address scientifically the technique misconceptions and related skill-learning strategies that have become “conventional wisdom,” and to present more effective options. This month’s article addresses the misconception that a lower stroke count represents a more effective technique. While stroke counts can provide meaningful feedback about technique, swimmers often make technique adjustments that lower their stroke count, but do not necessarily make their technique more effective. For example, the swimmer in Fig. 1 is in a classic “catchup” stroke position, where the entry arm is held in a position parallel to the surface. Many swimmers will glide in this position to reduce their stroke count. However, the count reduction does not indicate a more effective technique. 46

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

STROKE COUNTS GUIDELINES FOR MEANINGFUL STROKE COUNTS

One of the first objectives in making the counts meaningful is to achieve consistency from lap to lap. There are two guidelines that will make stroke counting more consistent, more accurate and, consequently, more meaningful. • First, the swimmer should push off from the pool wall the same way every time—same force, same depth, same streamline, same number of underwater kicks, etc. • Second, the swimmer should use a continuous arm motion—i.e., no hesitating or gliding. Pushing off as hard as possible and kicking as hard as possible underwater every time can help produce consistency. A swimmer will then surface at the same point so that the swim distance is the same. Stroke counts can vary tremendously from lap to lap depending on how long after completion of the arm entry the backward arm motion begins (in freestyle and butterfly). Eliminating delay in beginning the pull can help make stroke counts consistent, with the additional benefit of improving the index of arm coordination (as explained in “Misconceptions,” SW November and December 2015). A swimmer must develop technique consistency so that he/she can replicate the same stroke count at a given effort level for an entire swim, such as 400 meters or

500 yards. Once a swimmer can maintain a consistent technique (based on stroke count), variation in counts can provide meaningful information about changes in technique.

VARIATIONS IN STROKE COUNT WITH TECHNIQUE

Generally, a decrease in stroke count indicates a more effective technique, assuming that the swimmer is following the aforementioned guidelines. For example, an improvement in the push phase of freestyle can often make a substantial decrease in stroke count. Swimmers typically drop two or three strokes with relatively limited instruction. For example, James “Doc” Counsilman conducted a study in 1980 in which university swimmers’ freestyle strokes were counted before and after a technique treatment. After a single lecture about increasing hand speed throughout the underwater arm motion, these elite swimmers dropped their stroke counts by an average of one stroke per 25 yards. Unfortunately, there are few other studies that report variations in stroke count with technique effectiveness. Sometimes, an improvement in technique can increase—rather than decrease—the stroke count. For example, if a swimmer improves his/her freestyle or butterfly arm entry so that there is a downward angle, some wasted motion and gliding is

FIG. 1 > (BELOW) This swimmer is maintaining the entry arm in a position parallel to the surface (yellow line). Gliding in this position will decrease the stroke count, but will also decrease propulsion and swimming velocity.

Fig. 1


Fig. 2

FIG. 2 > (LEFT) A swimmer can reduce the number of strokes for a breaststroke length by assuming an optimal streamline position after each stroke. The yellow triangles show the arm and leg positions to minimize resistance.

Fig. 3

FIG. 3 > (RIGHT) For both safety and performance, it is vital that a swimmer count strokes after passing under the flags so he knows the location of the pool wall for a turn or finish.

tive technique. If the counts increase more than one per 10 percent increase in effort level, it likely means that the swimmer is not maintaining as effective technique. In some cases, swimmers focused on technique maintain the same stroke count from 60 to 80 percent, and then only increase their count by two or three more strokes at 100 percent.

SUGGESTIONS FOR EACH COMPETITIVE STROKE

usually eliminated, resulting in a stroke count increase.

VARIATIONS IN STROKE COUNT WITH EFFORT LEVEL

After a swimmer has a new stroke count based on improved technique, the next challenge is to maintain the improved technique with an increase in effort level. The stroke count will increase with effort level—mostly due to slightly less elbow extension on the push phase—but only by a minimal amount if a swimmer maintains his/her technique. For example, the freestyle stroke count might increase by one stroke with each 10 percent increase in effort—15 strokes at a 60 percent effort level, 16 at 70 percent, 17 at 80 percent, 18 at 90 percent and 19 at 100 percent—while maintaining effec-

Regularly counting strokes for each pool length is most beneficial for freestyle and butterfly. If a swimmer is using a constant effort on each lap, an increase of just one stroke can indicate a less effective technique. The count increase provides feedback for the swimmer to refocus on specific technique elements and eliminate the extra stroke. Generally, gliding is not recommended when counting strokes. Breaststroke is, however, an exception. Minimizing stroke count by gliding after each stroke reinforces an optimal streamline (as shown in Fig. 2), as well as maximizing propulsion from both the arms and the legs. During a stroke count exercise, even young teenagers can swim 25 meters with as few as two strokes (after the underwater pull and kick). It is not recommended that a swimmer count his/her own strokes for a length of the pool in backstroke. For safety as well as performance, it is far more important that a swimmer count strokes after passing under the flags (see Fig. 3) so that he/she knows the location of the pool wall for a turn or finish. Counting strokes for an entire pool

length can interfere with the stroke count from the flags to the wall. Dr. Rod Havriluk is a sports scientist and consultant who specializes in swimming technique instruction and analysis. His new ebook—“Approaching Perfect Freestyle + Science”—is available at the STR website: www.swimmingtechnology.com. You can contact Rod at info@swimmingtechnology.com. All scientific documentation relating to this article, including scientific principles, studies and research papers, can be provided upon demand.

to learn more about the references for this article.

SUMMARY

A common misconception is that a lower stroke count indicates a more effective technique. However, a swimmer must comply with the guidelines for a standard push-off from the pool wall and a continuous arm motion for a stroke count to be representative of technique effectiveness. Once a swimmer develops a consistent stroke count at a given effort level, variations in the stroke count can provide meaningful information about technique effectiveness.

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

47


SWIM PARENTS

M O M S AT M E E T S

SWIMMING WORLD PRESENTS A QUARTERLY SERIES THAT SHOWCASES MOMS AND DADS OF SWIMMERS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY.

ERICA WORRELL

SPONSORED BY

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PICTURED > Kelsi Worrell with mom, Erica

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SWIM. WASH. RINSE. REPEAT.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE WORRELL FAMILY]

W W W. S B R S P O RT S I N C . C O M

BY ANNIE GREVERS

rica Worrell just competed in her first Masters swim meet, where she learned the value of having a secure, comfortable pair of goggles. Erica became aware of “the goggle situation” by first wearing her pair too loose, then too tight. She was able to identify firsthand with her six children, who are all swimmers and have all had goggle struggles in their careers. Of her four daughters and two sons, the name, Kelsi Worrell, may sound familiar. You know—the American record holder/first woman under 50 seconds in the 100 yard fly? In addition to her swimming prowess, the 2016 University of Louisville graduate is also known for reaching the hearts of fans, competitors and coaches with her heartfelt gratitude and humility. Those qualities can be attributed to her parents, Erica and Bob Worrell, who are always encouraging and leaving the competing to their kids. Here, Erica gives Swimming World a glimpse into the mind of an Olympic mom: How has swimming shaped Kelsi’s character? Kelsi has always been Type A and very athletic, with a “let’sget-’er-done” attitude. Swimming has taught her really good time management skills. And she became much more intentional when she started college swimming. For example, she used to eat when she was hungry; now she eats to fuel her body. Before practice, she thinks, “What am I going to focus on today?” She’s not just swimming lap after lap. She’s also taught me compassion for other competitors. What advice do you have for new swim parents? Let the coach coach. Leave swimming at the pool. Encourage them and love them. Volunteer—either on deck or behind the scenes. When my 7-year-old complains about her goggles, I now know to help her find some goggles that don’t hurt. I don’t want her to hate the sport. There are certain things I can fix. If I can try to make her enjoy the sport more by fixing a little thing, I want to do it. Encourage your swimmers to make friends with their competitors. If they’re in it for the long haul (e.g., through college), it’s nice to see familiar faces when they’re away from home. How do you handle competitive swim siblings? Taylor (her younger sister) didn’t even talk to Kelsi at one point! It was right around the New Jersey State Championships. Taylor won the 500, but Kelsi won something else...and Taylor felt like it was her event. My next son, Kyle, is similar to Kelsi, and our youngest, Jared, is similar to Taylor! Both are good swimmers. There is just so much pressure... I’ve really tried to make sure they know swimming is not their identity. As a Christian family, we remind them that their identity is in Christ. My value for them is not dependent on how they do. If they decide not to swim, that’s fine by me. 

“Moms at Meets” and “Dads on Deck” is a quarterly feature sponsored by TRISWIM about swim parents for swim parents. Check out the website at: www.sbrsportsinc.com to download the complete Q&A with Kelsi Worrell’s mom, Erica.


COACHING

BY MICHAEL J. STOTT

Coach Jon Carlson has coached champion Gustavus Adolphus College swimming, diving and tennis teams for a combined 57 seasons— 28 with swimming and diving, 29 with tennis. Q. SWIMMING WORLD: You were an outstanding three-sport athlete (football, swimming, tennis). How did you end up as a swim coach? A. COACH JON CARLSON: My father was a longtime high school coach. He took me everywhere. I’ve always loved the sport of swimming and admired what my dad did with his athletes. I was better at tennis, and I took the women’s tennis job after spending a year at a tennis academy in Florida. We won the national championship my first year! I told Gustavus I’d stick around if they gave me the swimming and diving program. I coached all three teams and taught three classes each semester—for $16,000! I was in heaven! SW: Who were your coaching influences? JC: Mainly my Minnesota Swimming and Diving Hall of Fame father, but also his opposing hall of fame coaches. I met Minnesota hall of fame coaches Tim Johnson, Mike Chopp, Art Downey and Carl Allison, just to name a few. As a kid, I listened to them talk in the coaches lounges at invitationals. The stories inspired me to hopefully impact swimmers like they did. SW: Why keep a large roster? JC: We’ve had as many as 105 because I value swimming as a team experience very highly. In the women’s 50 free, I have several swimmers at 23-low and a girl who broke 30 for the first time last season. Each adds value to the other’s experience. Learning to compete as a team and how to be a good teammate—especially in an individual sport—is a skill that will serve the student-athletes well in their future jobs and in life. I work hard to make sure every student-athlete on our team knows they are valued and important. SW: You are also a tennis coach. How do you keep track of so many athletes? JC: It’s fun! I enjoy being a small part of

each student-athlete’s story. This requires lots of time and energy, as well as having outstanding assistant coaches. SW: What’s the attraction of Gustavus Adolphus for athletes? JC: I think it’s our team culture of caring, servant leadership and taking care of each other and knowing that there are many invested in taking care of you. SW: Your 2014 women’s team was seventh at NCAAs and has fallen on harder times, while the men are experiencing a resurgence. Any rhyme or reason to that? JC: Nope! I really admire programs that are consistently finishing in the Top 5 every year. Ten to 12 years ago, our men’s program finished fifth while the women were placing somewhere in the pack. It is a combination of which borderline Division I or II student-athlete chooses us and the educational opportunities we can offer over some sort of athletic scholarship; and developing talented, but raw, swimmers into the swimmers they can truly become. SW: Alissa Tinklenberg was a multi-time All-American and Gustavus’ 2013 and 2014 Student-Athlete of the Year. Where does the next superstar come from? JC: Like most of our All-American stories, hers is a classic. Alissa was from a small farm town in west central Minnesota. I had known her since eighth grade. She was just a solid high school swimmer, but I knew she had a burning desire to be great. Through hard work—and reminders of her potential greatness—Alissa blossomed to become one of our all-time best swimmers. SW: What does it take to return Gustavus aquatic teams to elite championship levels? JC: Improving strength and flexibility is as important as anything we do in the water. We do the usual strength training and yoga

— continued on 50

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS COLLEGE]

JON CARLSON

Q&A

Coach Jon Carlson Head Men’s and Women’s Swimming & Diving Coach Gustavus Adolphus College St. Peter, Minnesota • Gustavus Adolphus College, B.A., physical education, ’88 • Starting 28th year as Gustie swim coach • Swimming dual meet record is 95-68 (men), 96-63 (women) • 44 swimmers (27 men, 17 women) have earned 119 All-American recognitions (90 men, 29 women) • MIAC Men’s Swimming Coach of the Year (2004, 2005) and Women’s COY (2002, 2010, 2014) • Won 17 MIAC swimming and diving crowns (seven men, 10 women) Carlson, a four-year varsity tennis athlete at Gustavus, also begins his 29th year as the school’s women’s tennis coach. During that time, the Golden Gusties have compiled a 579-193 dual meet record, have produced 29 tennis All-Americans and have won 22 MIAC titles. Coach Carlson, a member of the NCAA Division III Women’s Tennis Committee, is an eight-time MIAC Coach of the Year and a two-time ITA Division III Coach of the Year (1994, 2002). His women won the 1990 D-III national title in tennis.

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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Q&A — continued from 49 at least twice a week. Our gymnastics team has taught our swimmers how to tumble and improve spatial awareness! Many swimmers are very good athletes in the water. We also want them to be the best land athletes they can be.

ming journey as a fun puzzle rather than a short-term, outcome-based mentality, she did the work and got better. Alissa embraced the fact that some days are great, some days are not, but with each day, the puzzle continued to frame the athlete she wanted to be.

got lucky to have our diving coach, Alissa Lager, get a solid job at a bank in town. Her family lives close, and this is where she wants to be. Having that consistency in the diving coach position makes a huge difference!

SW: How many All-Americans have you had with a bad attitude? JC: Zero All-Americans...but I’ve addressed attitude at my swim camps. Alissa Tinklenberg wasn’t an All-American her freshman year, and she didn’t have the greatest attitude. When she began viewing her swim-

SW: To what do you attribute improved diving recruiting? JC: When you’re a small school outside of a big-city metro area, it’s hard to keep a coach on staff for any length of time. They usually have other jobs or are going to graduate school to take off for other jobs. We

SW: How valuable are your summer swim camps as a recruiting tool? JC: They produce probably a third of our team. Our camp goal is to help swimmers improve and have fun. I think they remember the fun they had at camp, and want to have that atmosphere in their

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY GUSTAVUS ADOLPHUS COLLEGE ]

HOW THEY TRAIN:

BY MICHAEL J. STOTT

PROGRESSION OF TIMES SCY

2015

2016

2017

100 Breast

58.53

56.69

54.81

200 Breast

2:07.25

2:04.06

1:58.98

200 IM

1:57.24

1:55.51

1:53.06

SAMPLE SET • 4 x 50 breast @ :35 • 100 ez choice @ 2:00-2:30 • 6 x 50 breast @ :35 • 100 ez choice @ 2:00-2:30 • 8 x 50 breast @ :35 • 100 ez choice @ 2:00-2:30 • 10 x 50 breast @ :35 Coach Carlson: “If you miss, you move the 50 interval to :40. Tanner is an amazing ‘glider.’ We didn’t want to force his turnover. We wanted more explosiveness from each stroke. Once he was able to do this all the way through on the :35, we knew he could go under 2:00. We combined that set with a lot of timed 25s. Once we got him hitting under 11.0, we felt we were on track for both a fast 100 and 200 breast.”

50

TANNER SONNEK

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

It would take “blood, toil, tears and sweat” to be triumphant, intoned Winston Churchill back in 1940. More than 75 years later, he could have been talking about Gustavus Adolphus breaststroker Tanner Sonnek. A latecomer to the sport, Sonnek started swimming as a ninthgrader at Mankato (Minn.) West High School. His senior year, standing 5-11 and weighing 165 pounds, he finished fourth in the Class A state meet in both the 100 yard breast (58.53) and 200 IM (1:57.24), and clocked free and breast relay splits of 21.64 and 26.52 to help the Scarlets to a fourth-place team finish. “One of my biggest regrets is not starting earlier than I did,” says Sonnek. After ninth grade, he joined the Mantas Swim Club, sending him on an upward trajectory. “The reason I chose Gustavus was the team feeling of family I felt on my recruiting trip. Gustavus has helped me improve an incredible amount in just two years.” Just how much has been evident in his performance in year-end meets. This past season, he was chosen as Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) Male Swimmer of the Year for his wins in the 100 and 200 yard breast (55.10, 2:02.12) and the 200 IM (1:53.06). He also swam on four all-conference Gustie relays. “Tanner had an amazing meet, stepping up big time. The honor is well-deserved,” says Coach Jon Carlson. At the NCAA Division III Championships, Sonnek finished his season by blasting personal bests of 54.81 in the 100 breast (seventh) and 1:58.98 in the 200 (fifth). In a fitting coda, he was named Gustavus Adolphus Male Athlete of the Year. “First and foremost, Tanner loves his teammates,” says Carlson. “His favorite time of the day is practice, where he has the chance to see his friends. Tanner loves the opportunity to work hard, and teammates love training with Tanner! He always brings great intensity, and he takes time to cheer and encourage his teammates during tough sets. He’s the guy that tells everyone that they are going to make it.” The camaraderie Sonnek saw as a recruit was borne out his freshman year when he received a royal welcome after surging the last 25 to win the MIAC conference title in the 200 breast. He repaid them during senior night 2017: “I cry pretty rarely, but seeing all the seniors who would be leaving the program gave me a pretty good hug/cry session with them.” 


collegiate experience.

yards than that, going as high as 2,500.

SW: What does a weekly in-season practice schedule look like—in-water and dryland? JC: We have morning practices from 6:15 to 7:30 three times per week. It is when we do strength training with all groups, get distance swimmers some extra yards, and middle distance and sprint people some extra speed work. In the afternoons, athletes can pick from two or three practices (12:30, 2:30 or 4:30). The sessions allow me to get in quality coaching with each swimmer. We also do yoga after practice one to two days a week. On Fridays, the team is absolutely crazy and loud. It’s like the chaos of an open-pool session with a bunch of 12-year-olds! I have them all practice together and try to trick them into 4,000 to 5,000 yards and get them out of there.

SW: You are an advocate of cupping. How often do your athletes avail themselves of that therapy? JC: I’m an advocate of whatever keeps my athletes healthy and pain-free! Cupping does help. We have an athletic trainer who is very good at the science of cupping. It is an important part of the recovery/healing process for some of our swimmers.

SW: So, weekly volume is...? JC: Depending on the training group, we do about mid-5,000s to mid-6,000s each day most of the year. Distance gets in at least 10,000 between two practices on the days they have mornings. We usually try to kick at least 1,000 yards, and on many days, more

SW: What was the motivation for the “Race 4 Grace”? JC: Grace Goblirsch swam at Gustavus starting her freshman year in the fall of 2011. She was diagnosed with leukemia during her sophomore season and passed away in August of that year. She was everything I look for in a swimmer: hard-working and full of smiles. Grace was someone who enhanced everyone’s experience in the program. I try to keep her memory alive by having her former teammates come down and speak about Grace to the team. We have an invitational and a bone marrow drive on campus in her honor. Two of my swimmers have been bone marrow donors. “Race 4 Grace” simply means race for each other. Compete as hard as you can when it’s time to race...then smile

and have fun with your teammates the rest of the time. SW: You have coached women’s tennis at Gustavus for 29 years and are perennial winners. In the early ’90s, you won a national championship. What has changed? JC: Other teams have gotten better. We had a streak from the early ’90s until around 2009 when we finished in the top eight in Division III every year. Title IX has helped develop the many Division II programs in our area by offering a lot more athletic scholarship money to balance out their football programs. More and more, players are opting for a Division II program due to that scholarship money. 

Michael J. Stott is an ASCA Level 5 coach whose Collegiate School (Richmond, Va.) teams won nine state high school championships. He has been named a 2017 recipient of NISCA’s Outstanding Service Award.

to download the final article of the series that started in May on “Trained Behaviors” by Michael J. Stott.

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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JUNIOR SWIMMER

UP & COMERS AGE GROUP SWIMMER OF THE MONTH

Ryenne “Rye” Ulett, 12, of the Dynamo Swim Club has been quickly following in her older sister’s footsteps. Tristen, 14, was featured in Swimming World in April 2016 as an “Up & Comer” for her record-setting prowess in the girls 13-14 age group. Now, it’s Rye’s turn! She holds eight Dynamo team records, including two that were previously held by Tristen! Rye also recently set three Georgia state 11-12 age group records while swimming at the YCF Summer Solstice Invitational, June 16-18, in Orlando. Competing in the girls open division, she won the 100 and 200 meter back (1:05.90, 2:19.05) and placed fourth in the 100 fly (1:04.40). Rye also holds state records in the 10-and-under age group: 50 and 100 meter free (29.13, 1:04.61) and 200 IM (2:38.92). “Rye loves to race,” says her coach, Beth Winkowski. “She was eager for more competition, so we worked out a plan where she raced some meets as an 11-12 and some meets as open.” Her parents, Dane and Tina, added, “She’s very comfortable in who she is, and she knows what she wants to accomplish. She’s a go-getter, over-achiever, a great encourager and very determined.” 

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY THE ULETT FAMILY]

RYE ULETT

BY TAYLOR BRIEN

PICTURED > Rye Ulett and her chihuahua, Rico

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WHAT IS THE BEST THING YOU DO IN SWIMMING?

a nice treat for me. And I’m looking forward to going to Winter Junior Nationals in December.

Definitely, racing...and I also enjoy chasing and getting records—it helps me to set high goals for myself.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE HOBBIES?

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TOUGHEST WORKOUTS/SETS YOU’VE DONE?

I enjoy running and pretending to be a gymnast at home—I do a lot of crazy stunts. I also enjoy baking and DIYs (do-it-yourself projects).

IM sets with tons of butterfly and breaststroke are the toughest. I also remember doing a long course freestyle set on a 1:15 base—that was tough.

WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS YEAR? Actually, I am looking forward to playing the violin in the fall. Having played the piano for six years, I think I am ready for a change. But I am also excited about championship meets in swimming, and I am hoping to get a few Summer Junior Nationals cuts—that would also be

WHO IS YOUR SWIMMING IDOL...AND WHY? I don’t have any idols in swimming, but I admire my sister, Tristen, who raises the bar high for me in the sport. I always want to go faster than she did at my age. I think it’s what younger sisters should do. My sister is definitely a great role model for me, and I love her so much. I also admire all Olympians because I know that there is a lot of discipline, training and hard work that goes into swimming fast.

September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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COLUMNS

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guttertalk

WHY ARE HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMERS TODAY CHOOSING TO COMMIT TO A COLLEGE PRIOR TO THEIR SENIOR YEAR/OFFICIAL RECRUITING TRIP? HOW DO YOU RECRUIT DIFFERENTLY THAN YOU DID FIVE TO 10 YEARS AGO TO CATER TO THIS TREND? BY ANNIE GREVERS

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JONTY SKINNER / Associate Head

DAVE SALO / Head Coach, University of

ray looze jr. / Head Coach,

Coach, University of Alabama

Southern California

Indiana University

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA]

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY USC ATHLETICS]

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY INDIANA UNIVERSITY]

With so many sports out there that get commitments from athletes as young as freshmen in high school, this was always going to slide in that direction. It just took a few early commits to get the herd a little panicked and, over time, it will change the recruiting landscape a lot. Coaches are making take-it-or-leave-it offers very early, and athletes are making the trips to college campuses on their own in order not to miss out on the offers. The biggest impact will be on budgets. Instead of bringing in 40 recruits and signing 10, you’ll now bring in maybe 10 to 20 on official visits, and half of those will be kids who have committed already. It will help swimming in the long run because recruiting is a fairly large nut in the budget, and with that going down, it will increase the longevity of some programs. It doesn’t make sense to go too young— since we see the problems that causes in the other sports—but to be honest, with some, it’s a no brainer at the sophomore/junior level.

I would be most curious about the fallout of this surge in early commitments. I am not convinced these kids have fully vetted their choices. They have not experienced an official visit, which can be important to experience time with future teammates, etc. These kids are also making commitments to schools before the schools have even admitted them. Coaches—both club and college coaches—fear that once kids make a decision and have verbally committed to a financial agreement through the NLI, will assume the work is done, and slack off. That will be up to the kids to keep making progress, but any evidence of this will trigger a call back to that athlete that might sound something like this: “Sorry to have to tell you this, but the university is not going to admit you.” Kids seem to be making these decisions sight unseen, and I think there will be a spike in kids transferring after a year or two. This is an important decision these kids are making, and they should be sure where they intend to go is somewhere they would go with or without swimming.

Schools outside of the NCAA top five introduced this approach over the last few years in order to gain more access to top American talent. It has been very effective for universities, such as NC State, because competition is not as stiff. Fewer schools recruiting that class equals a better chance at success. Now, everyone is doing it—and for the most part, the kids are still going to the same places, but making that decision at a less mature age. Basically, coaches are now recruiting 365 days a year, which takes more time away from on-deck coaching. Swimming is in need of a recruiting calendar in order to bring things under control. Otherwise, we will be recruiting 8th graders before we know it, like volleyball and soccer.

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

to read more responses.


SWIM MART

McGEE MOODY / Head Coach, University of South Carolina [PHOTO PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA]

I think it takes us in a scary direction. There are a couple of sports that have taken it over the top. Our softball coach introduced us to a recruit who was in 8th grade—she was on her fifth college visit and already had offers from every school. I was talking to Mark Bernadino (associate head coach at South Carolina), saying, “This is where we’re going if we’re not careful.” I don’t know a single coach who likes this, but we can’t afford not to do it. We already have two junior days locked down—one in the fall and one in the spring. If we don’t start early, we get left behind. I think the trend started because there were high school juniors who liked the spotlight of committing in their junior year. Then coaches were saying, “We have to protect our program, people are committing earlier and earlier, and we’re not sure what we’ll be able to offer later on.” I’m on the CSCAA board. I think we’re going to have to propose legislation that puts a drop-dead date on it. But I don’t think we can go back on recruiting the juniors. We’ve opened Pandora’s box on that. It’s not good for our sport, our families, our coaches. These young people are being asked to make a decision sight unseen—this is the biggest decision young people have had to make to date. It’s a scary trend. We have to figure out a way to put our foot down and stop the momentum; otherwise, it will continue to snowball. Club coaches see firsthand the effects of the pressure on their swimmers. It’s a lot more work on the college coaches to do this right—in some cases, you’re still 18 to 24 months from a kid setting foot on campus. You don’t even know if that kid will still be swimming. I know there are coaches selling something they’re not in order to stay in the game with a recruit to see it pan out. If they’re misled, they’re going to transfer anyway. 

䜀伀䰀䐀 䴀䔀䐀䄀䰀 倀䔀刀䘀伀刀䴀䄀一䌀䔀 匀吀䄀刀吀匀  圀䤀吀䠀 刀䔀匀䤀匀吀䄀一䌀䔀 吀刀䄀䤀一䤀一䜀

一娀䌀漀爀搀稀⸀挀漀洀 㠀  ⸀㠀㠀㘀⸀㘀㘀㈀㄀

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September 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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[ PHOTO BY SIPA USA ]

(From left) Team USA’s Kevin Cordes, Caeleb Dressel and Matt Grevers cheer on teammate Nathan Adrian (in the water) to an exciting finish in the men’s 4x100 meter medley relay at the FINA World Championships in Budapest, Hungary. The Americans clocked 3:27.91 to win by a second over Great Britain (3:28.95) and come within 63-hundredths of the 3:27.28 world record set at the World Championships in Rome in 2009 during the height of the high-tech swimsuit era. See related stories, pages 10-26. For extensive day-by-day reports and complete results of the 2017 World Aquatics Championships, check out Swimming World’s online coverage at swimmingworldmagazine.com/meet/2017-fina-world-championships. Sponsored by The Subscription Box Service for Competitive Swimmers Take 25% off your first month of Swimfluence with code "SW" at www.swimfluence.com

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / September 2017

Swimming World Magazine September 2017 Issue  
Swimming World Magazine September 2017 Issue  

ON THE COVER: With an awe-inspiring performance this season, St. Xavier High School of Cincinnati, Ohio—coached by Tim Beerman—was crowned S...