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MAY 2 017 FEATURES 010

NCAA DIVISION I PHOTO GALLERY by Peter H. Bick

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STANFORD’S JUST BEGINNING by Dan D’Addona, David Rieder and Annie Grevers It took Stanford 19 years to return as NCAA Division I swimming and diving champions, but it looks like the Cardinal is ready to stay at the top for a few more years to come.

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successful outcomes that span seasons of competition and even careers.

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TOTALLY TEXAS

by Rod Havriluk The above-surface hand recovery in breaststroke is very common and used by many elite swimmers. It is a misconception, however, that the above-surface recovery is more effective or faster than a belowsurface recovery.

by Dan D’Addona, David Rieder and Annie Grevers Coach Eddie Reese’s Longhorns simply did what they’ve been doing so well for the last three years: dominate the men’s NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Championships.

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BRING OUT THE BROOMS! by James Sica, Diana Pimer, Chandler Brandes and Taylor Brien That’s what the swimming and diving teams from Queens, Emory, Olivet Nazarene and Indian River did last March as they swept the women’s and men’s team titles at their respective NCAA-II, NCAA-III, NAIA and NJCAA Championships.

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AMERICAN SWIMMING TEAM (Part VI): FUTURE—THE TOP OF THE TEAM by Chuck Warner If the American Swimming Team is going to maintain its superior position in the future, it must continue to look for ways to improve.

COACHING 038

LESSONS WITH THE LEGENDS: SAM FREAS by Michael J. Stott

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SPECIAL SETS: TENNESSEE MID-SEASON SETS by Matt Kredich with Michael J. Stott

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Q&A WITH COACH JON SAKOVICH by Michael J. Stott

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HOW THEY TRAIN ARIEL SPEKTOR by Michael J. Stott

TRAINING 052

DRYSIDE TRAINING: GOT BODY POSITION? by J.R. Rosania

JUNIOR SWIMMER 050

GOLDMINDS: SEEING IS BELIEVING by Wayne Goldsmith To be the swimmer you want to be, you must see the swimmer you want to see.

STARTS AND BREAKOUTS by Michael J. Stott This is the first of a multi-part series on “trained behaviors” in swimming. When applied to starts and breakouts, some of the nation’s best practitioners have developed methods of their own to produce

SWIMMING TECHNIQUE MISCONCEPTIONS: BREASTSTROKE HAND RECOVERY

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UP & COMERS by Taylor Brien

COLUMNS

ON THE COVER The University of Texas men won this year’s NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Championships by more than 200 points. The victory was their third three-peat, having won the team titles in 1988-91 (a four-peat), 2000-02 and now 2015-17. It was also Coach Eddie Reese’s record 13th men’s NCAA-I national championship since taking on the job at Texas in 1978. (See feature, page 26.) [PHOTO BY PETER H. BICK] SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE (ISSN 0039-7431). Note: permission to reprint articles or excerpts from contents is prohibited without permission from the publisher. The publisher is not responsible for errors in advertisements. Microfilm copies: available from University Microfilms, 313 N. First St., Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Swimming World Magazine is listed in the Physical Education Index. Printed in the U.S.A. © Sports Publications International May 2017.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

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A VOICE FOR THE SPORT GUTTER TALK

PARTING SHOT


A VOICE for the SPORT

REFLECTIONS

OF MODERN MEDIA BY BRENT T. RUTEMILLER

SWIMMING WORLD P U B L I S H I N G, C I RC U LAT I O N A N D ACCO U N T I N G

Sitting in the media room at the men’s NCAA Division I Championships in Indianapolis, I observed the massive amount of work that goes on behind the scenes to bring photos, video interviews, articles, reports and results to the masses. The media works longer than any other group attending a championship event—including coaches, officials and swimmers! They arrive before warm-up and often stay hours after the last event has finished. They watch the event live and then relive each moment in transcribing, editing and writing. Those in the media who interview athletes and coaches and include video elements in their reports must be prepared to articulate thoughtful questions relating to the event. They must then review the captured content before editing, rendering and posting to the masses. Throughout the event, the media relays constant information to multiple demographics on various platforms such as Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and Facebook. The overlay of social media on top of writing featured articles and processing video interviews forces a reporter to multitask and interact in ways that most people do not appreciate or fully comprehend. The fact is that photographers and reporters relive every race at least twice. The first time, they watch it live; the second time via the editing and transcribing process. The process does not end there, as each photo and article needs to be uploaded to a database, where the editor marries the headline to a photo. Their relationship is symbiotic. When photos and words meet, the publishing process begins, followed by the marketing of the content. These two phases require technology and experience to reach a broad audience.

The publishing process includes formatting, meta tags, keywords, content channels and search engine optimization that ultimately determines how the content will be found on the internet and a website. The marketing process includes steps that determine how the content will be disseminated to other platforms and media outlets. Both steps are more crucial than the content itself. With a push of a button, the information is released, and core followers are often notified of new content. In most cases, the end user is on a mobile device and will decide within three to four seconds whether he or she will read the story. The fight for each “view” unfortunately comes down to a good headline and a good photo. Fifty percent of today’s readers judge an article by the headline, while the other 50 percent judge the article by the photo. The constant flow of real-time information and content is numbing to the casual observer. As publisher of Swimming World, I am proud of the dedicated staff that brought all the breaking news from the NCAA Championships on SwimmingWorld.com. I am equally proud of this issue of Swimming World Magazine, which takes a slower pace in bringing a classic approach to spectacular photos and in-depth content that has become a hallmark of Swimming World for more than 65 years. Put down your cell phones and enjoy the timelessness of a magazine that showcases the sport of swimming like no other. 

www.SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Publisher, CEO - Brent T. Rutemiller BrentR@SwimmingWorld.com Circulation/Operations Manager - Taylor Brien TaylorB@SwimmingWorld.com Advertising Production Coordinator Advertising@SwimmingWorld.com

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L CO R R E S PO N D E N T S Africa: Chaker Belhadj (TUN) Australia: Wayne Goldsmith, Ian Hanson Europe: Norbert Agh (HUN), Camilo Cametti (ITA), Oene Rusticus (NED), Rokur Jakupsstovu (FAR) Japan: Hideki Mochizuki Middle East: Baruch “Buky” Chass, Ph.D. (ISR) South Africa: Neville Smith (RSA) South America: Jorge Aguado (ARG)

P H OTO G RA P H E R S/S WTV

Brent T. Rutemiller Publisher of Swimming World Magazine

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


(PREVIOUS PAGE) In the very first event at the men’s NCAA Division I Championships, North Carolina State set an NCAA, American and U.S. Open record in the 800 yard freestyle relay. Soren Dahl, the lone senior, is ecstatic after anchoring the Wolfpack to 6:06.53. Making it happen were (inset, from left) Dahl, Andreas Vazaios, Ryan Held and Justin Ress.

(ABOVE) At the women’s NCAA Division I Championships, Simone Manuel won the 50 and 100 yard freestyles (21.17 NCAA record, 45.56 NCAA/American/U.S. Open record). Manuel’s time in the 100 was virtually the same as the men’s American record (45.6), set by Yale’s Steve Clark 52 years earlier at the 1965 AAU Nationals, where Clark received a 10-minute standing ovation. (TOP) Similarly, Stanford fans show their approval. May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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NCAA PHOTO GALLERY

(ABOVE) Cal’s Ryan Murphy (2014-17) joins USC’s John Naber (1974-77) as the only men to sweep the backstroke races all four years in college. Texas’ Brendan Hansen (2001-04) was the only breaststroker to do so, and Stanford’s Pablo Morales (1984-87) the only butterflyer. 12

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


NCAA PHOTO GALLERY

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


(PREVIOUS PAGE) Indiana’s Lilly King won both women’s breaststrokes (56.71, 2:03.18). For the second straight year, King has set an NCAA, American and U.S. Open record in the 200 at NCAAs. Her 100 breast split of 58.32 is the fastest all-time in a 200 race—and the Hoosier sophomore is the only woman ever to split a sub-59.0.

(ABOVE) Team USA’s 1-2 punch in distance swimming at Rio continued their knockout performances in Indianapolis. (From left) Stanford’s Katie Ledecky and Virginia’s Leah Smith placed first and second, respectively, in the 500 and 1650. While Ledecky is only a freshman, Smith finished her collegiate career as a four-time individual NCAA champion—the most by a Virginia student-athlete in any sport—and a 16-time AllAmerican. May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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NCAA PHOTO GALLERY

Senior Clark Smith of Texas set NCAA, American and U.S. Open records in both the 500 and 1650 freestyles (4:08.42, 14:22.41). He was all smiles after the 500 (top), but it was a different story after the mile. Smith had pulled a groin muscle during the 500, then endured an intense, grueling 1650 two days later in which the top four finishers bettered the previous record. (Middle and bottom) Smith pulled himself out of the pool and lay on the deck, totally spent, but victorious. His groin hurt so badly that he could not even walk off the deck without assistance. He also was unable to go to the podium for the awards ceremony!

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


It’s a special moment to share a championship meet with your sister—and even more special to make it to the “A” final together! That’s exactly what University of Kentucky sisters, Danielle and Ali Galyer, did in the women’s 200 back. Danielle (left), a senior, who became her school’s first NCAA swimming champion last year (200 back), finished fifth (1:50.49), while her younger sister, Ali, a freshman, took eighth (1:51.05). Kentucky actually had three top-8 finalists in the event, with freshman Asia Seidt taking third (1:49.63).

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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2 01 7 WO M E N ’ S N CA A s SPONSORED BY:

for full results, records, stories, photos and videos. 18

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


Stanford, 2017 women’s NCAA Division I champions

STANFORD’S JUST BEGINNING STORIES BY DAN D’ADDONA, DAVID RIEDER AND ANNIE GREVERS PHOTOS BY PETER H. BICK

It took Stanford 19 years to return as NCAA Division I swimming and diving champions, but it looks like the Cardinal is ready to stay at the top for a few more years to come.

TO P 1 0

— continued on 20

1. STANFORD

526.5

6. LOUISVILLE

194.5

2. CALIFORNIA

366.0

7. NC STATE

194.0

3. TEXAS A&M

292.5

8. INDIANA

185.0

4. GEORGIA

252.5

9. USC

176.0

5. TEXAS

252.0

10. MINNESOTA

168.0

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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2 01 7 WO M E N ’ S N CA A s

— continued from 19

TOTAL TEAM EFFORT (From left) Simone Manuel, Lia Neal, Ella Eastin and Katie Ledecky got things started for Stanford with an American, U.S. Open and NCAA record (6:45.91) in the meet’s first event, the 800 free relay. Ledecky went on to win three individual events, while Manuel and Eastin each won two. Neal, one of only three seniors on the Cardinal’s NCAA roster, scored in all seven of her events, including three winning relays.

Megan Byrnes and Leah Stevens finished third and fourth (15:50.87, 15:52.36). “We knew we could come in and do something special, for sure. That is what we worked for every day,” said Ledecky, a five-time Olympic gold medalist. “It is just a really special group to be a part of.” Ledecky’s first NCAA Championships was stellar. She also won the 500 free in 4:24.06—an American, U.S. Open and NCAA record—and tied with Louisville’s Mallory Comerford for the 200 free title in

FAST FAC T S

INDIANAPOLIS—As Katie Ledecky, Simone Manuel, Ella 1:40.36. Eastin and the rest of Stanford’s victorious women’s swimming Eastin won the 200 butterfly in 1:51.35—her second win of the team took their celebratory leap into the waters of Indiana Univermeet after her American record in the 400 IM (3:57.57) the night sity Natatorium, all the pressures and disappointments of the past before—and was second in the 200 IM (1:52.27). were washed away. The 800 freestyle relay (6:45.91) and 400 freestyle relay Gone was last year’s bitter memory of a runner-up finish after (3:07.61) bookended the competition with American, U.S. Open and disqualifying a relay. Gone was a streak of 19 years without a naNCAA records, while the 400 medley relay won in 3:26.35. tional title despite plenty of Olympian-studded rosters. The weight Stanford’s victory was definitely a group effort. Janet Hu and that these young swim stars had carried on their shoulders was fiAlly Howe each had multiple All-American finishes and were key nally lifted. relay swimmers. Kassidy Cook took third in 3-meter diving and At the women’s NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Chamearned two All-American finishes. In addition, Megan Byrnes, Allie pionships, March 15-18, Ledecky won three events, while Manuel Szekely and Kim Williams made consolation finals. and Eastin each won two. But it was the supporting cast of the mas“It is indescribable the feeling that you get knowing that you are terful trio that made the Cardinal one of the most dominating teams part of something now, but was incredible then and incredible in the in women’s swimming history, winning 10 events. future,” Eastin said. Stanford senior Lia Neal scored in all of her Cal’s runner-up finish included Kathleen events and anchored the final relay—a victory Baker being selected as the CSCAA Swimmer lap for the two-time Olympian and the Stanford Even with Virginia’s Leah of the Meet following victories in the 200 IM program. Smith becoming the second plus the 100 and 200 backstroke. Baker helped “This is the perfect ending,” Neal said. “Eswoman to break 4:30 in the Cal bounce back from an early relay disqualipecially to win for the first time in 19 years 500 yard free with her 4:28.9 9, fication, and was helped by Farida Osman (the just goes to show how strong of a program we Stanford’s Katie Ledecky only senior to win an individual swimming have.” now owns the 11 fastest event), who won the 100 fly and contributed Stanford finished with 526.5 points, a legs to the Golden Bears’ winning 200 medley stunning 160.5 points ahead of runner-up Cal times in history in the event— and 200 freestyle relays. (366). Texas A&M (292.5) followed in third— ranging from 4:28.71 in 2014 to Outside of the victories turned in by Stanits highest finish in school history—ahead of 4:24.06 at this year’s NCAAs. ford (10) and Cal (6), only swimmers from InGeorgia (252.5) and Texas (252). diana (Lilly King, who swept both breaststroke “That is the reason I came back: to get a naevents for the second straight year) and Loutional championship with this team,” Manuel isville (Comerford, who tied Ledecky in the 200 free) were able to said. “It is a surreal feeling to see your hard work pay off. We had stand atop the awards podium. so many great swims after great swims. There are so many emotions The diving national titles were split among Texas (freshman that go along with it, but I am sure we will reminisce about this for Alison Gibson, 1-meter), Minnesota (senior Yu Shou, 3-meter) and a long time.” Northwestern (sophomore Olivia Rosendahl, platform). Manuel, an Olympic gold medalist, broke her own American, With most of Stanford’s and Cal’s stars expected back next U.S. Open and NCAA record to win the 100 yard freestyle in 45.56. year—not to mention Comerford and King—this record-filled meet Neal finished fourth (46.76) in the final individual race of her coljust may turn out to be a prelude to the next golden era of women’s legiate career. Manuel won the 50 freestyle (21.17), and Neal was swimming. —D.D.  ninth (21.65). Ledecky won the 1650 in 15:07.70. Teammates 20

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


R E A D T H I S I S S U E O N L I N E TO V I E W V I D EO I N T E RV I E WS F R O M N CA A s .

NCAA CHAMPION AND A PIONEER IN SWIMMING

Farida Osman is a national and continental record holder. The Cal senior has been part of several NCAA winning relays and was a member of the Golden Bears’ championship team in 2015. Now, she can add another title to her growing list of accomplishments: NCAA champion. More importantly, she’s also been a pioneer in women’s swimming in Egypt. With her family traveling from Egypt to see Osman’s final collegiate swims, she won the 100 yard butterfly in 50.05, helping Cal to a second-place team finish. “We came here to Indiana because we were at the IUPUI dental school,” said Randa Elsalawy, Osman’s mother. “Farida was born here, but she left maybe three months later and went to Cairo, where she grew up. Coming back here and finishing her collegiate swim at the place of her birth is pretty exciting.” Elsalawy was in the stands with a “Go Farida!” sign, along with Farida’s father, Hisham Osman, and brother, Ozzy. “We came all the way from Egypt for the last time (for NCAAs),” Hisham Osman said. “We are extremely proud.” “It is definitely coming full circle,” Farida said. “I am really happy to come back here 22 years later. Honestly, that was my goal from the beginning of the season. I am really proud of how I finished it well. It was my last one—I just wanted to finish strong. I wanted to focus on my own race and get after it.” In Egypt, a country that has struggled with gender equality, Farida has also been a pioneer in women’s swimming. Her rise came at the same time of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, when her coaches left Egypt for safety reasons—leaving Osman on her own when her school was closed and the country had a 7 p.m. curfew. Prior to that, Osman began international competition at age 12, swimming in the African Games in Algeria against many swimmers a decade older—or more.

FAST FAC T S

Cal’s Farida Osman won her first NCAA individual title (100 fly, 50.05), finishing her collegiate career in Indianapolis—her birthplace before moving to Cairo with her family when she was 3 months old.

Only two women have swum faster times in the 100 yard fly than Farida Osman’s winning 50.05: Louisville’s Kelsi Worrell (49.43 in 2016 plus three other times under 50 in 2015-16) and Cal’s Natalie Coughlin (50.01 in 2002).

She trained for the 2012 Olympics with Coach Volodymyr Hutsu from Ukraine. After earning qualifying times, Osman found out that the quota of swimmers had been filled. The disappointment was only short-lived, though, as a spot opened up. Hutsu had returned to Ukraine and had to trust Osman’s work ethic since she trained alone. “He sent me practices through emails, but I had to practice alone,” Osman said. “I didn’t have anyone to coach me, so I was doing this for the month before the Olympics. I just told myself I’m going to go. It’s the Olympics, and I’m not going to miss such an experience.” Osman placed 41st out of 73 competitors in the 50 free in London. A year later, Osman became the first Egyptian ever to reach a World Championships final when she finished seventh in the 50 fly. Last year, she returned to the Olympics in Rio, still the lone female representing her country. She finished 18th in the 50 meter free (24.91) and 11th in the 100 fly (57.83), setting African records in both events. Not only is she a role model to young women from her country, but she also is an inspiration to her teammates at Cal. “I was in the locker room putting my suit on when Farida was swimming, but I heard the meet announcer say, ‘Farida Osman...here she comes,’ and then he announced she had won,” said Cal’s Kathleen Baker, a U.S. Olympian. “I had my suit halfway on and I was fist-bumping. (I finished putting on my suit) and ran just so I could see her reaction. It was super inspiring, especially with her being a senior and getting to win it—that’s pretty incredible.” —D.D. 

— continued on 22 May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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— continued from 21

THIS BAKER IS ONE TOUGH COOKIE

FAST FAC T S

“Honestly, I love to race. I treat every practice like it’s a meet Freshman year was a struggle for Kathleen Baker. She admits almost,” she said. “I’m super-excited to be there. It’s one of my fathat now, but it was clear watching her swim and seeing her results vorite things. My friends always joke that something was not right. around with me because I genuinely She had already been a World Championship As a freshman, Cal’s Kathleen Baker like swimming, and I like being there.” finalist before she first arrived at Cal, but at her finished second in the 200 IM and 13th in After that first NCAAs, she was first NCAAs, she did not make the championship both backstroke events. One season later driven to prove that freshman year was finals in either backstroke event—although she as a sophomore, she won all three. just an aberration. She would do just did manage a second-place finish in the 200 IM that. at that meet. Three months later, Baker swam in The year had been a challenge, even before the U.S. Olympic Trials final of the 100 she headed east to Atlanta for NCAAs. back, and after she finished, she saw “Going to college is always a huge adjustthe number “2” on the scoreboard next ment,” Baker explained. “Switching coaches, to her name—but only for a moment living in a dorm, a completely new lifestyle, the before she let out a scream of joy and stress with it. I struggled a little bit with my health barreled over the lane line to embrace my freshman year.” first-place finisher Olivia Smoliga. That health issue was Crohn’s disease, which A month after that, Baker won an Baker was diagnosed with years ago, but did not Olympic silver medal in the 100 back disclose until after she had made the Olympic and led the U.S. women to gold in the team in 2016. The stress of moving across the 400 medley relay. country to start college exacerbated the effects of Baker comes off to the world as Crohn’s. excitable and bubbly, but it’s her abilShe became more comfortable in Berkeley ity to maintain that positivity through and swimming for Cal head coach Teri McKeevthe toughest of times that won her two er—particularly in her sophomore season—but Olympic medals. She’s tough—nobody who knows the 20-year-old the fact that Crohn’s would never go away was something Baker has will ever argue with that. long since had to accept. “I think that’s something you’re born with,” she said, going on “Crohn’s is a daily thing,” she said. “There’s not a day when to recount the time she swam through a meet with a broken toe at 10 I don’t think about it, and I struggle with it all the time. I can be years old. “If something hurts, it really hurts. I don’t really like to healthy, but because I have Crohn’s, I might not have as much energy talk about something until it really hurts.” as a normal person. I have to struggle with that and guard my health Her Crohn’s-related limitations had not stopped her from wina lot more seriously ning two Olympic medals, and they would not prevent Baker from than most people do.” Kathleen Baker broke a pair of putting a hurting on the college swimming scene in Year 2. She won But through all high-profile Cal school records: NCAA championships in her three best events—the 200 IM, 100 that, Baker has kept Caitlin Leverenz’ 1:51.7 7 in the 200 back and 200 back—posting times (1:51.69, 49.84, 1:48.44) that on swimming. When rank her among the top-three all-time performers in each event. it comes to the physiIM (Baker 1:51.69) and Natalie After the meet, Baker chalked up her big time drops from freshcal effects of Crohn’s, Coughlin’s 49.97 in the 100 back man to sophomore year to much-improved turns, but there was much she tries to suck it up (49.80r). To break the school more to it. Between March 2016 and March 2017, Baker figured out and swim through it. record in the 200 back, she would how to make do with the hand she was dealt. She doesn’t let the rehave had to break the American Compared to all of the health and stress-related difficulties she alities of her situation record (Elizabeth Pelton, 1:47.84). had overcome, the DQ she and her Cal teammates dealt with in the wear her down men400 medley relay was merely a little annoyance—and one that they tally—or at least she would overcome the next day, winning the 200 medley relay in tries not to. NCAA and U.S. Open record time (1:34.10). “I try not to think about it so much,” she said. “I honestly wish Soon after NCAAs, Baker quickly returned to training with the I could be normal, and I think that’s what’s helped me succeed so next goal in mind. much with having Crohn’s, that I kept telling myself, ‘It doesn’t “I’ve only medaled one time internationally, at the Olympics, so matter. I’m going to do whatever a normal person can do.’” I’d love to be able to medal at a World Championships,” she said. In the pool, she can’t exactly be ‘normal.’ When Baker was in If Baker is determined to stand on the podium this summer in high school, doctors insisted that she cut back on her practice rouBudapest, there’s a good chance that neither Crohn’s or any other tine, so she now typically trains only once per day. Her opportunities obstacle will prevent her from achieving her goal. —D.R..  for improvement may be limited, but she embraces what she has.

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R E A D T H I S I S S U E O N L I N E TO V I E W V I D EO I N T E RV I E WS F R O M N CA A s .

AN UP-AND-COMER(FORD) FAST FAC T S

Her first opportunity to don the American flag cap Katie Ledecky may seem Besides her first-place tie in the came last December, when she was selected to represent unbeatable, but Mallory ComTeam USA at the FINA Short Course World Championerford proved, at the very 200 free, Mallory Comerford also ships in Windsor, Canada. Comerford proved ready for least, that the Stanford superfinished third in the 100 free in the international stage, coming away with two relay gold star is TIE-able! 46.35, making her the fourth fastest medals (anchoring both the 400 medley relay and 400 “There was nothing surall-time performer in the event. free relay) and one silver (800 free relay). prising about her race,” Only Simone Manuel (Stanford), “Being on relays with experienced swimmers like claimed University of LouAbbey Weitzeil (Canyons Aquatic Madison Kennedy, Amanda Weir and Kelsi (Worrell) isville head coach, Arthur Club) and Olivia Smoliga (Georgia) helped me grow as a swimmer and gain confidence in Albiero, following sophohave swum faster. what I’m able to do,” Comerford said. more Comerford’s 200 free at The 19-year-old has looked to Louisville alum WorNCAAs. rell as a role model since her high school days. The two Albiero and the rest of the became training partners and fast friends (pun intended) Louisville Cardinals may have when Comerford kicked off her college swimming career in the fall seen Comerford’s freight-train final 75 coming, but the rest of the of 2015. swimming community sure didn’t. “I’ve learned so much from her—how not to stress, how to get No one can chase down Katie Ledecky—she’s the best swimmer through tough situations—she’s someone with so much experience. on Earth; the indomitable one; the girl who never wilts at the end To be around her every day is such a blessing,” Comerford said. of a race. Worrell exhausted her NCAA eligibility in 2016, but she has stuck But as Comerford and Ledecky came to the wall with one 50 to around “The Ville” to train. “I love that we can still be teammates go, Comerford nailed her turn, pulling even with Ledecky. Then she with Team USA,” Comerford said, rightfully seeing more internasquarely beat the greatest freestyler of all time off the wall on the tional opportunities for herself in the future. final flip. It was a bizarre sight for swim fans...but an invigorating Worrell was on deck to present awards for her signature event, thing to behold. It led to an aquatic epiphany: Ledecky isn’t untouchthe 100 fly, the evening that Comerford pulled off her historic dual able. victory with Ledecky. Did Comerford think about the legend who was swimming be“She came over, crying, and gave me the biggest hug,” Comerside her? She gave Ledecky’s strategy some thought before the race, ford recollected. “I knew you could do this,” Worrell said through but when her body hit the water, she simply raced the way she had tears. been trained. “I didn’t really know where I was (in the final 75),” And the cool-as-a-cucumber Comerford knew she could, too. If Comerford admitted. Comerford has enough self-belief to tie the greatest swimmer in the Prior to NCAAs, Comerford sat down with Louisville assistant world right now, we cannot wait to see what she pulls out of her coach Stephanie Juncker to study how the best swimmers swam the magical cap this summer. —A.G.  200 freestyle. “Simone (Manuel) goes out fast, and Katie (Ledecky) — continued on 24 holds on,” Comerford said. “It’s a point of reference. I don’t strategize around them. I stuck to my own strategy—swimKatie Ledecky’s and ming with my heart and just going for it.” Mallory Comerford’s Comerford had made holding 25-highs in repeat 50s a (pictured) 1:40.36 habit in practice this season, which served her well in the in the 200 yard free actual race agains Ledecky. Remarkably, Comerford’s third ranks No. 3 all-time. 50 was faster than her second or last 50. Ask any 200 swimCal’s Missy Franklin mer, and they will tell you the third 50 is the most decepstill holds the top two tive—it’s commonly the slowest split. Comerford split the fastest performances: race perfectly: 23.95, 25.51, 25.37, 25.53 for a 1:40.36. 1:39.10 from 2015 “This year I really worked on the back half (of the 200); NCAAs and 1:40.31 I knew I needed to use my speed, but not overuse it,” Comfrom 2014 NCAAs. erford said. “I felt really good at the 100; I turned it on and thought, ‘I can do this.’” The girl from Kalamazoo, Mich. wasn’t exposed to premier racing in high school. “I raced in a lot of the same meets competing against the same people,” she said. Comerford’s fastest 200 yard free in high school was a 1:47.60. Upgrading to meets such as the 2016 Olympic Trials were what caused Comerford to extract a new caliber of swimmer from within. Comerford failed to make it beyond semifinals in the 100 and 200 free at Olympic Trials, but she pulled together a series of best times and came out of the meet hungry for more elite-racing experience.

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THERE’S NO “ME” IN MEEHAN In only his fifth season at Stanford, head women’s coach Greg Meehan led the Cardinal to their first team title since 1998, winning by 160.5 points—the largest margin of victory at NCAAs in 14 years. He was named Swimming Coach of the Year for the second time in his career.

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After his successful years coaching the Cal men, Meehan was offered the crown jewel of coaching jobs—head coach for the Stanford University women. He now shares the deck with another treasure trove of knowledge—head men’s coach Ted Knapp, who’s spent 33 years on “the Farm.” Right off the bat, Meehan snagged the nation’s top recruit—2012 Olympian Lia Neal. Flash forward to the 2017 women’s NCAA Division I Championships. Before the last relay, the Stanford Cardinal ladies knew they had won the meet. But that had no effect on the American-record-

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College coaches often play a game of musical chairs before settling into the permanent, hard-sought head coaching seat. Stanford women’s head coach Greg Meehan toured the country before reaching the perfect chair—in the highest echelon of college swimming. Meehan began his coaching journey at William & Mary, then he hopped to Princeton in 1999—helping the Tigers to an undefeated dual meet season and two consecutive Ivy League titles (2000, 2001). Meehan spent five seasons as assistant coach to Cyndi Gallagher at UCLA. The Bruins won the 2003 Pac-10 title and placed seventh at NCAAs in 2004. In 2005, Meehan got to hear the magical job title he’d awaited— “head coach” at the University of the Pacific. Thirteen school records and three conference records were broken during his 2005-08 tenure. In 2008, Meehan struck gold by scoring an assistant coaching role at the University of California-Berkeley alongside head coach Dave Durden. Meehan was promoted to associate head coach at Cal in 2011. Durden and Meehan led their charge of talent to two consecutive NCAA titles (2011, 2012). Meehan’s Golden Bear era was fruitful—swimmers gained speed, and Meehan gained knowledge. “I learned a tremendous amount from Dave during my time with him,” Meehan said. “He challenged me to be better in so many different ways—creativity, training, technique, etc. But I think the two biggest takeaways were how to build a program for sustainable success and how to look at an Olympic quad, not just an Olympic year.”

“(Meehan’s) belief and his ability to instill belief in everyone that he works with is unlike anyone that I have ever known. He has unfailing positivity and trust in his plan and our subsequent preparation. Being led by someone who has such confidence in you and the team as a whole has a major influence on the performances we see throughout the season.” —Ella Eastin


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to say, and says it at the right moment to help us succeed. He works writing effort put forth by Simone Manuel, Katie Ledecky, Janet Hu hard—just as hard as us—and he does a lot on and off the pool deck and Neal in the 400 free relay final. to see our dreams and goals come true.” “It hit me during the last relay. We really wanted to win that last Meehan has overseen the training of many world-class athletes, relay for Lia—give her a little victory lap. There is no better mobut none as gifted as the greatest swimmer on Earth at the moment, ment for a senior than to win your last race at the NCAA ChampionKatie Ledecky. Meehan’s approach to coachships. That is a storybook ending,” Meehan ing Ledecky isn’t paranoid or uncertain at all. said. “She set this thing in motion five years “A Meehan mantra: he says, “We are constantly working to find ways to ago when she committed to our program as ‘MOVE IT’ a lot because he help them improve and get faster. While Katie an Olympian out of high school. Everything wishes he were Jon Urbanchek. is the best swimmer in the world, she isn’t any just rolled from there. She legitimized our different in this regard,” Meehan said. “We program in that moment.” ‘Choo-Choo, baby’ was also aren’t trying to reinvent the wheel...just conNot to downplay any of the girls’ swims a big one for him this year. tinue to find ways to get better.” on that relay, but Neal is quick to point out I guess it means that he’s Meehan is confident in his philosophy, and Meehan’s tendency to shove credit away always looking forward while his belief ripples into the minds of his swimfrom himself. also being sure to savor special mers. Ella Eastin, 2017 NCAA champ in the “He always attributes his success to those moments.” —Lia Neal 200 fly and 400 IM, soaks in Meehan’s belief he surrounds himself with, but he’s the hardbefore her races. Meehan helps Eastin with her est worker,” Neal said. cap, then caps her with parting encouragement. Meehan’s humility keeps him grounded “He gives a strong and confident high-five, looks me in the eyes, and perpetuates his learning, but his X-factor can be seen in his face and tells me to go and do what I set out to do,” Eastin said. “Same after any one of his swimmers’ successes. Olympic champion sprintgoes for the team. Little needs to be said, but he hits home on every er Simone Manuel sums it up well: word.” “Greg has passion. He knows our stroke counts, breathing patAnd this year, Meehan and the Cardinal hit a home run, winning terns, kicks off walls and much, much more. He knows our trials and Stanford’s first NCAA team title in 19 years. —A.G.  tribulations. He knows how to challenge us. He knows exactly what

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for full results, records, stories, photos and videos. 26

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University of Texas, 2017 men’s NCAA Division I champions

TOTALLY TEXAS STORIES BY DAN D’ADDONA, DAVID RIEDER AND ANNIE GREVERS PHOTOS BY PETER H. BICK

Coach Eddie Reese’s Longhorns simply did what they’ve been doing so well for the last three years: dominate the men’s NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Championships. Winning this year’s meet by more than 200 points, it was their third three-peat, having won the team titles in 1988-91 (a four-peat), 200002 and now 2015-17. It was also Coach Reese’s record 13th men’s NCAA-I national championship since taking on the job at Texas in 1978.

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1. TEXAS

542.0

6. USC

237.0

2. CALIFORNIA

349.0

7. INDIANA

229.5

3. FLORIDA

294.5

8. GEORGIA

183.0

4. NC STATE

272.5

9. MISSOURI

179.5

5. STANFORD

242.0

10. ALABAMA

153.5

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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Texas senior Jack Conger won his first individual NCAA title in the final individual race of his career—an American record 1:37.35 in the 200 fly.

SOMETHING TO PROVE

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INDIANAPOLIS—It was one of the most lopsided meets in NCAA history, but the men’s championship meet, March 22-25, still provided some of the most exciting races in short-course swimming history. Texas cruised past its competition with a dominating performance that included a record-tying 11 event victories and a margin of victory that exceeded 200 points. The Longhorns scored 542 points, dominating a meet in which Cal finished second at 349, followed by Florida (294.5), North Carolina State (272.5) and Stanford (242). The top four teams finished in the exact same order as last year. The win gave Texas 13 national championships, breaking the tie with Michigan for the most all time. Texas senior Will Licon finishes his All of Texas’ titles collegiate career as an 11-time NCAA have come under champion—including one tie for first Coach Eddie Rethis year with Florida’s Mark Szaranek ese, who has won at in the 200 IM. Forty-two years ago least three titles in in 1975, there was a tie in the 200 IM each of the last four between Indiana’s Fred Tyler and decades. Tennessee’s Lee Engstrand. Both “It is pretty spetouched in 1:50.628, but a judge’s cial,” said Texas sedecision gave Tyler the win. nior Will Licon. “It is something that I could have never dreamed of happening. It is pretty crazy. We are just almost in disbelief. I remember setting foot on campus with these guys. We felt like we had assembled the best recruiting class in the country. I feel like no one else really thought so, and I think that has been driving us—just always having something to prove.” There were plenty of other swimmers with something to prove: • Florida’s Caeleb Dressel proved to be the fastest man in the pool once again, winning the 50 yard freestyle in 18.23 seconds, just 3-hundredths off his American record. He then overtook Joseph Schooling to win the 100 butterfly in 43.58 and capped his meet with a 40.00 in the 100 freestyle, both times the fastest in history. He was named the Swimmer of the Meet.

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• Cal’s Ryan Murphy won both backstroke events to complete a perfect 4-for-4 in both events, something that has only been done three other times by a swimmer in his primary stroke. • Georgia’s Chase Kalisz finished his college career with an American record in the 400 IM (3:33.42). • NC State won the opening 800 freestyle relay in an American record 6:06.53—one of 10 American records in the meet. The Longhorns finished the meet in record-setting fashion to highlight one of the most exciting nights of swimming in NCAA history. “We don’t ever come here to win,” Reese said. “I have three seniors who set four American records. Those are seniors who got better,” Reese said. “That is the name of the game. Look at their faces when they go fast. Winning is good, but fast is where it is.” Texas junior Joseph Schooling anchored the 400 freestyle relay to an NCAA and U.S. Open record (2:45.39). Senior Clark Smith, who pulled a groin muscle during his winning 500 freestyle earlier in the meet, stroked to a record-setting performance in the 1650, winning in 14:22.41 in one of the greatest mile races in history—the top four swimmers finished ahead of the NCAA, American and U.S. Open record. Smith got out of the water and had to be helped to the team area. The pain was so bad that he didn’t go up to the podium for the trophy ceremony! Licon then put his individual stamp on a stellar career by winning the 200 breaststroke in another American and NCAA record of 1:47.91, his third individual victory of the meet. Licon won the 200 breast for the third straight year and is the fourth swimmer in history ever to win four different individual events during a career. Senior Jack Conger followed that up with his first individual NCAA title in the final individual race of his career—an American record 1:37.35 in the 200 fly. Conger also was on the final relay, teaming up with Brett Ringgold, Townley Haas and Schooling, to put the exclamation point on the national championship. “It never gets old,” Conger said. “This has been our goal all year. I definitely wanted to end things on the right note. We kept the momentum going through the entire meet.” —D.D. 


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The numbers are simply astounding. 40.00. 18.23. Just 10 years after Albert 43.58. Subirats became the first Caeleb Dressel is breakNCAA champion to swim ing barriers that four years ago were thought to be ununder 45 (44.57) in the 100 breakable—and it seems to fly, Caeleb Dressel swam happen every time he dives almost a full second faster into a pool. (43.58) in becoming the The Florida junior put on first NCAA champion under a record-breaking show at 44. NCAAs with one of the best national meets anyone has ever had, easily earning the College Swimming Coaches Association of America Swimmer of the Meet award. Each swim was nothing short of spectacular, and each swim had an extra-impressive factor to it. Dressel started by winning the 50 yard freestyle in 18.23—just 3-hundredths of a second off of his own American, U.S. Open and NCAA record. The impressive part was that he also split 18.23 to lead off the 200 freestyle relay an hour earlier. Twice in 60 minutes, he swam the second-fastest time in history. “It has been pretty consistent,” Dressel said. “This is my third year doing NCAAs. You get used to going back-to-back-to-back. I was all right with the time. There are still a lot of areas to improve on. It is always nice to go a personal best, but it is all about having that perfect race, nailing some certain areas I need to get better

How would you react if you swam 18.23 for the 50 yard freestyle, 43.58 for the 100 fly and 40-flat for the 100 free? Florida’s Caeleb Dressel accomplished that feat, and this is exactly how you should react!

at—second breakout and being clean off my dive, and I completely missed my finish. It was a good swim—don’t get me wrong...just being picky. That’s part of the sport.” In fact, Dressel now holds all 10 of the fastest swims in the 50 freestyle. He is a Top 10 list unto himself. “He is just on another level, that guy,” said Florida teammate Mark Szaranek. “To go 18.2 time after time is amazing.” He wasn’t done. The next night, Dressel swam the fastest 100 yard butterfly in history at 43.58, knocking off Joseph Schooling, a former short course record holder and Olympic gold medalist in the long course event. It was the most stunning swim of the NCAA Championships. He was not expected to win the butterfly, yet he went out and broke every record to beat Schooling and unseat Tom Shields as record holder. Again, he wasn’t done. Dressel capped his meet by swimming 40-flat in the 100 yard freestyle, again the fastest in history. It is a time that wasn’t even thought possible by many of the top sprinters until the past couple of years, and it only came into play when Dressel began his assault on the 40-second barrier. The gasp by the crowd in Indianapolis was clearly audible as fans, swimmers and coaches saw “40.00” on the scoreboard. Looking a little closer at the race, the most impressive part was splitting 19.01 and 20.99. “It’s amazing. He couldn’t have split it better—that was awesome,” said Nathan Adrian, Olympic gold medalist in the 100 meter free. “Not only him, but there were a lot of fast guys in that race that were Americans. That has me excited. He is literally pushing the boundaries of what we think is possible. It is fun for everyone.” Dressel’s performances are also opening the door for others to see what is truly possible. “Well, if he can go 40.00, why can’t I be the next guy?” asks NC State junior Ryan Held. “It is the process of getting better. Having him kind of go where no man has gone before is great motivation for the rest of us.” —D.D. 

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GOOD GUYS FINISH...FIRST!

FAST FAC T S

Licon’s last-lap surge left him just 14-hundredths of a second behind Kevin Cordes. He would not go to Rio, even though his time of 2:08.14 would have been first at every previous Olympic Trials. • Less than three months later, the injury bug struck. “We were doing fast 100s,” Licon recalled. “I pulled out on my first one, kicked hard, and all of a sudden, I had this super-sharp pain down my left groin, and I was like, ‘That’s not good.’ It actually hurt walking afterward. I couldn’t kick—not just breaststroke, but free“Will (Licon) is just a style kick.” But Licon made the best of the situcrowd-favorite,” says ation, embracing a month’s worth of just pullhis coach, Eddie Reese. ing—which he thinks contributed to improved “Everybody on the deck upper body strength. likes him best. All the His increased speed and power left Reese coaches tell me what a with a decision to make for the NCAA meet: nice guy he is—and the put Licon in the 400 IM (the event that he won good part is...he is.” in 2015 and in which he was runner-up in 2016) or the 100 breast? Reese had been reluctant to make the switch, but Licon’s effort in a 100 breast time The Texas men won NCAA titles in the 400 medley relay in both trial at the Big 12 Championships (51.15) made 2015 and 2016, but in each of those wins, butterflyer Joseph Schoolthe decision a no-brainer. ing and freestyler Jack Conger had to make up big deficits—under“We know he’s not the fastest guy in the world,” Reese said. “If standably so, as Ryan Murphy handled backstroke duties for Cal and you had to race 25s, there would be three or four guys who would typically built a big lead. beat him, but he doesn’t slow down.” But this year, swimming the breaststroke leg for a third straight On the contrary, Licon sped up, using a 26.80 back half to come season, Will Licon had other plans. from behind and edge Missouri’s Fabien Schwingenschlogl to win “Licon was telling me, ‘We’re going to have the lead at the 200,’” the 100 breast, 50.68 to 50.77. That made him only the fourth man Schooling said. “I was thinking, ‘All right man, sure.’” ever to win NCAA titles in four different individual events. Licon promptly split 49.75 on the breaststroke leg—the fastest “All that means is his coach didn’t know where the heck to put split in history—giving the Longhorns a lead of nearly a second as him,” Reese said. Schooling dove into the pool, and Texas won in 2:59.22, becoming One day later, he won the 200 breast by 3.22 seconds—the largthe first team ever to crack the three-minute barrier in the medley est margin of victory in any event at the men’s meet—and lowered relay. his American, U.S. Open and NCAA record Before his final NCAAs, Licon had won to an astonishing 1:47.91. Will Licon joins Indiana’s Gary Hall four individual NCAA titles—two straight Combined with the 200 IM title he won Sr. (1970-73) and Mark Spitz (1969in the 200 breast and one each in the 200 IM earlier in the meet (in which he tied with and 400 IM. Not exactly known as a sprinter, 72) plus USC’s Roy Saari (1964-66) Florida’s Mark Szaranek in 1:40.67), LiLicon prompted Coach Eddie Reese to doubt con became one of only two triple winners as the only men to win individual what the Texas senior could do in a 100-yard at NCAAs. His seven individual titles from NCAA titles in four different event. the past three years are more than any other individual events over the course “He swam with a chip on his shoulder,” swimmer—man or woman—has won. of his career. Licon won the 100 Schooling said of Licon’s performance in the “When I chose to come to the Univerbreast (2017), 200 breast (2015-17), relay. “He wanted to prove a lot of people sity of Texas, I made it a goal that I don’t 200 IM (2016-17) and 400 IM (2015). wrong, especially Eddie. I’m glad he could.” just want to be another swimmer that comes As Conger came into the wall to give Texto the program,” Licon said. “I want to try as a two-second victory, Licon mounted the to contribute in any special way possible. I Lane 5 block, pointed at his teammates and screamed in exuberance. haven’t taken time to look back on everything yet, but I feel like I’ve He had been on national championship medley relays before, but done a pretty good job of doing that.” never like this. Never had the Longhorns been so dominant, never Licon’s eligibility is exhausted, but his legacy in college swimhad Licon, himself, played such a huge role, and never had he swum, ming is secure, both in the pool and outside of it. knowing that, as a senior, it was his last time in that position. “Will is everybody’s long-lost brother,” says Reese. “He is just a And in previous seasons, never had Licon faced such adversity: crowd-favorite. Everybody on the deck likes him best. Coaches tell • He had just missed making the Olympic team in the 200 breast. me what a nice guy he is—and the good part is...he is.” —D.R. 30

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R E A D T H I S I S S U E O N L I N E TO V I E W V I D EO I N T E RV I E WS F R O M N CA A s . With his 40.95 to finish second in the 100 free, Michael Chadwick became the fourth fastest performer ever behind Caeleb Dressel (40.00), Vladimir Morozov (40.76, 2013) and Cesar Cielo (40.92, 2008).

A FAIRYTALE COME TRUE 25, keeping Dressel in striking range. He told himself, “It’s OK if he’s ahead—in the next two 25s, I’ll beat him.” That’s some confident selftalk. Dressel beat Chadwick by half a second in the first 25, but “Chaddy”—as the swimming world knows him—edged Dressel by 6-hundredths in the second 25 to trail at the 50, 19.01 to 19.43. He tied Dressel’s third 25, then fell off Dressel’s pace in the final 25. Chadwick attacked the middle 50 and did everything he could to plow through water that felt like molasses in the final 10 yards. He hit the wall in 40.95—the fourth swimmer ever to break 41 seconds—and finished second to Dressel’s jaw-dropping 40-flat. “I’m in the habit of looking to the coaches before looking at the clock,” Chadwick said. He looked at the Mizzou staff—they were going wild. “Seeing Andrew Grevers’ happy face is so satisfying,” Chadwick said. After seeing his time, Chadwick’s first thoughts were selfless. “I kind of just fell back into the water...I didn’t know what to do,” Chadwick laughed. Then Dressel, a friend of Chadwick’s, reached across the lane line to embrace Chadwick. Olympic sprinting legend Nathan Adrian distributed the awards for the event. When he handed Chadwick his silver NCAA trophy, he said, “You got me.” Adrian’s fastest yards time is a 41.08. Chadwick’s international debut was in the 2015 Duel in the Pool. He set an American record when he teamed up with Adrian, Josh Schneider and Matt Grevers. “I idolized the guys I swam with. (As a kid), I stood in line for Lochte’s autograph. I watched Adrian win gold in 2012,” Chadwick recalled. At the time of the London Games, Chadwick did not even have a junior national cut. “All of a sudden, I’m on a relay with him (Adrian). That’s the beautiful thing about swimming—you have those opportunities. For me, a fairytale became reality. In 2012, it was such a far reach...four years later, I’m in a completely different place.” —A.G.  — continued on 32

FAST FAC T S

University of Missouri senior Michael Chadwick’s arm slipped out of a streamline and flew to his side as he hit the water ready to explode into his signature event, the 100 meter freestyle, at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials. Momentum is everything for a sprinter, and Chadwick had nil. His Olympic dreams were crushed. He finished 18th. No second swim. No Olympic berth. The day of the 100 free final, Chadwick time-trialed the event. He gutted out a 48.96—a time that would have finished seventh in the final. With adrenaline of an Olympic final, we can bet he would have had a real shot at making the Olympic team. Chadwick’s reaction to Trials: “I need to get away from the sport. I need to take a break and realize this is for me. I’m a people-pleaser. Making the Olympic team became my internal enemy—I didn’t have the same desire as people around me. Now I can confidently say I have those aspirations.” Chadwick was out of the pool for seven weeks after Trials. “When I came back to Mizzou, I was all in.” In his first four weeks of training, Chadwick was unstoppable. He ran a mile in 5 minutes and 10 seconds...and he’s not a runner. “I felt like I was 10 again; I just wasn’t hurting.” The feeling of invincibility eventually caught up to the senior— he was deadlifting too much one day and threw out his back. The next three weeks were excruciating. He swam at the FINA Short Course World Championships in Windsor, Canada, anchoring Team USA’s mixed 200 medley relay to a gold medal finish. But it hurt: “My back was killing me.” Shortly thereafter, Missouri head coach Greg Rhodenbaugh approached his star sprinter: “We can’t let this back be an issue. You need to slow down. You need to rehab it.” Chadwick took his coach’s words to heart. When his back had healed, it was training as usual. Chadwick trains IM with Rhodenbaugh on Monday and Friday mornings, and joins Andrew Grevers’ sprint group on Wednesday and Saturday mornings. “I probably could have been a good IMer,” Chadwick said. “But sprinting was more my thing. I hate IM—but by training it, I appreciate my events more.” At the 2017 NCAA Championships, all eyes were on Florida’s Caeleb Dressel in the 100 free. Would he break 40 seconds?! But few eyes were on the guy in Lane 3, Michael Chadwick. “I’ve swum next to Dressel a lot—I know how to swim next to him,” Chadwick said. The weakest part of Chadwick’s race happens to be the strongest piece of Dressel’s—the first 25. Chadwick breathed to his left (toward Dressel) during the first

“At NCAAs, I never got too worried, because I knew I was proposing the next week. Life with the person you love compared to swimming at NCs—there’s no doubt which is more important. I was way more excited to get on one knee the following week.” Michael Chadwick got engaged to girlfriend, Cassi Diya, in Laguna Beach on March 28.

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THE GREAT RACE This year’s 1650 at men’s NCAAs had a lot to live up to. In that same race one year earlier, three men all held sizable leads at some point—Texas’ Clark Smith on the first 500, Michigan’s PJ Ransford during the race’s second third and South Carolina’s Akram Mahmoud for most of the last 400 yards. None of them won the race. In a climactic finish, Penn’s Chris Swanson outsplit Mahmoud 24.38 to 27.17 on the last 50 to touch out the Egyptian-native by 14-hundredths. Swanson had graduated after that season, but Smith, Ransford and Mahmoud were all back for a shot at redemption in 2017. Also returning was Jordan Wilimovsky, who had redshirted the previous season before finishing fourth in the 1500 meter free and fifth in the 10K open water event at the Rio Olympic Games. But the top seed was none of those guys. Instead, it was a freshman from Michigan named Felix Auboeck, who had broken 14:30 for the first time at the B1G (Big Ten) Championships one month earlier. But he was about to go faster—much, much faster—and give the crowd in Indianapolis quite a show. The field in the mile was so deep that it took a seed time under 14:40 to book a spot in the evening heat. That left Ransford in Lane 1, Mahmoud in Lane 8 and Wisconsin’s Matt Hutchins, the third-place finisher from 2016, in an afternoon heat, where he blasted a time of 14:31.19. The story of the final heat quickly became one of legend. Few knew it at the time, but Smith was swimming injured. Two days earlier, while winning the NCAA title in the 500 free with an American record, he had strained his groin pushing off a wall. He scratched out of the 200 free to recover, but he would not back down from the mile. “I didn’t want to make any premeditated excuses,” Smith said. “I had to swim the race, no matter how I felt. I took yesterday off, which kind of makes me look like a wimp...just decided to suck it up today.” In typical Smith fashion, he set the pace early, but Auboeck and Wilimovsky were right on his heels. And then in typical Ransford fashion, the Michigan junior turned on the gas around the 500-yard mark and stormed into the lead, eventually opening up nearly a two-second advantage on the chase pack in the middle of the pool. But it did not last long, and it was Wilimovsky who got his feet on the wall first at the 1200 mark. Ransford began to fade, but on the other side of the pool, Mahmoud—in last place 900 yards earThe four fastest 1650s in history were swum in one race, with (from top to bottom) Clark Smith touching first, followed by Felix Auboeck, Akram Mahmoud and Jordan Wilimovsky. Only 1.04 seconds separated the history makers.

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R E A D T H I S I S S U E O N L I N E TO V I E W V I D EO I N T E RV I E WS F R O M N CA A s .

FAST FAC T S

lier—was right back in it. Sitting right above Lane 8, meet announcer Sam Kendricks was stunned. “When Ransford came back to the pack, I thought to myself, ‘I do not know what’s going on here anymore. I do not know how this going to shake out,’” Kendricks recalled. Over the final 500 yards, Kendricks convinced himself for brief moments that any one among Smith, Auboeck, Wilimovsky and Mahmoud was going to win the race. Wilimovsky was making his move, but would he have the speed at the end? Mahmoud had his shot at redemption, and Smith was not going away. But Auboeck simply looked relaxed, biding his time. “These are the things that are in my head that I can’t really explain to the crowd,” Kendricks said. “This is all going at 100 miles per hour in my head like, ‘How do I call it? What do I do?’ And I realWisconsin’s Matt ized now we were going to break the Hutchins finished record. Somebody was going to have the speed down the stretch...that all fifth in the 1650 with four of these guys are not going to a time of 14:31.19— crack.” faster than the What no one knew at this point winning time in the was how much pain Smith was feelevent from each ing—not exhaustion, but physical of the last two pain. seasons. “Around the 1200, it got really bad, and my ego kind of finished the race for me,” Smith said. “The last 10 lengths, I kind of just sucked it up because I knew no one would feel bad for me. Kinda had to put it together on my own.”

With 100 yards to go, Mahmoud led Smith by 2-hundredths. At the bell lap, Smith had the lead on Mahmoud by 4-hundredths. Wilimovsky started to fall off the pace, but Auboeck, finally, was making his move. “We had four ultra-competitors out there, and at this point, it’s not a question of training,” Kendricks said. “It’s a question of will... because they’re all dealing with pain and exhaustion.” Finally, after 66 grueling laps of battling, Smith got to the wall first in 14:22.41. Auboeck was second in 14:22.88, just ahead of Mahmoud (14:22.99) and Wilimovsky (14:23.45). All four surpassed what was previously the fastest time in history, Connor Jaeger’s 14:23.52. “We have the four fastest 1650s in history. I look at the board, and I look at my sheet like, ‘Am I reading this right?’” Kendricks recalled. Smith pulled himself out of the pool and lay on the deck, totally spent, but victorious. His groin hurt so badly that he could not even walk off the deck without assistance. “I didn’t care about the time,” Smith said. “I was just glad it was over. I haven’t looked at the splits...don’t ever plan to. I don’t want to think about that race again.” Mahmoud ended up dropping one place from the year before, but the time and the epic race was plenty of consolation: “It’s OK. I’m honored to be a part of this insane race. It took 14:22. I dropped nine seconds from last year, which is a huge drop for me.” Kendricks called it the greatest race he had ever witnessed in person. For those in attendance, few—if any—disagreed. “This is a race that’s going to ripple throughout the years,” he said. “People are going to talk about this race for a long time.” —D.R. 

䜀伀䰀䐀 䴀䔀䐀䄀䰀  倀䔀刀䘀伀刀䴀䄀一䌀䔀  匀吀䄀刀吀匀 圀䤀吀䠀  刀䔀匀䤀匀吀䄀一䌀䔀  吀刀䄀䤀一䤀一䜀 唀猀攀搀 䈀礀 匀眀椀洀洀攀爀猀 圀漀爀氀搀眀椀搀攀

一娀䌀漀爀搀稀⸀挀漀洀 簀 㠀  ⸀㠀㠀㘀⸀㘀㘀㈀㄀  May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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FOCUS ON RECRUITMENT (Part I) BY ANDREW TANG AND PATRICK HUNTER This is the first of a two-part article on the recruitment of officials. Part II, which will run in July, will offer specific ideas of what we can do to build, grow and develop our base of officials—for the sake of our swimmers. One of the areas that can heavily impact the athletes’ competitive experience is the size and quality of the officiating team. That’s because a well-staffed deck of well-trained officials can help ensure that the athletes have a fair competition. At local meets, a thinly stretched officiating team is all too common, where one stroke-and-turn judge might be responsible for observing four lanes (or more) simultaneously—not exactly the easiest task. At long course competitions, the referee oftentimes must decide whether to place officials at the ends of the pool or walking the sides of the pool. So, who needs all these officials? The answer is simple: the athletes. Using a long course meet as an example, it becomes clear why it’s advantageous to the athletes to have officials in both positions. For starters, it can be difficult to make an accurate touch or body position call from the side of the pool, but far easier to make that call by standing over the swimmers at the end of the pool. Yet, from the end of the pool, it can be challenging to call even the most obvious violations taking place in the middle of the course—say, butterfly kick during the breaststroke—which could easily be called when walking the side of the pool. Why is this important? First and foremost, the integrity of the competition is compromised. The swimmer who swims a legal breaststroke is at an obvious competitive disadvantage when the swimmer next to him is sneaking in a butterfly kick. More importantly, it is at our local age group competitions where swimmers learn and develop. When mistakes—such as an illegal kick—are caught early in the season and early in a swimmer’s career—they are easy to correct. Meanwhile, bad habits accumulated and solidified over time are far harder to modify. Nobody wants to be disqualified for the first time at a championship meet. But it’s not just about finding more officials—it’s about mentoring and educating all of our officials so that they may reach their full potential—and about finding strong candidates ready for advancement to the starter and referee positions. It’s about making it fun and building camaraderie so that our current officials will want to keep officiating. Although there will never be a magical, one-size-fits-all means to recruit, retain and better educate our officials, there certainly are some things that all of us can and should do to build, grow and develop our base of officials—for the sake of our swimmers. Be sure to check out “The Official Word” in the July issue of Swimming World for some helpful ideas.  Andrew Tang and Patrick Hunter are athlete representatives on the National Officials Committee. 34

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

DANA COVINGTON Dana Covington is a professional nurse, so you could say she’s always enjoyed helping others. That encouraging and caring attitude is also evident when she volunteers as a swimming official. She’s been with Sierra Nevada Swimming for six years, and is certified as a meet referee, starter and stroke-and-turn judge. In 2010, Covington received the Sam Uriu Award, given by her LSC to the stroke-andturn official who works the most sessions in the year and who is the most dedicated and most professional. In 2012, she began her starter training and has been asked to work as a starter 95 sessions since she first started saying, “Take your mark.” Two years later, she became an N3-certified starter. In 2013, she started her referee training and quickly became LSC-certified, working 29 sessions as a deck referee. Besides working local LSC meets, Covington has also officiated at U.S. Nationals and Arena Grand Prix meets.

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CO L L E G E R O U N D U P

BRING OUT THE BROOMS! STORIES BY JAMES SICA, DIANA PIMER, CHANDLER BRANDES AND TAYLOR BRIEN

That’s what the swimming and diving teams from Queens, Emory, Olivet Nazarene and Indian River did last March as they swept the women’s and men’s team titles at their respective NCAA-II, NCAA-III, NAIA and NJCAA Championships.

It only took Queens University of Charlotte (N.C.) four years to win its first women’s and first men’s NCAA Division II team championships (2015). With the program now in its seventh year, the Royals already have a three-peat. The Queens women withstood a hard-fought battle with Drury, as the two teams were virtually tied after the first and second days of the meet. But the Royals had a strong third day to increase their lead from 22 to 44 points, then pulled away on the final day to win by 82 points, 467 to 385. The Queens men took control from Day 1 and beat Drury by more than 200 points, 563.5 to 350. Twelve NCAA D-II records were broken—seven by the women and five by the men. West Florida senior Theresa Michalak was responsible for three of those marks: 100 yard free (48.44), 100 breast (59.51) and 100 fly (52.33). She also won the 50 free in 22.79 and was the clear choice for Female Swimmer of the Meet. Team champion Queens boasted a record setter in the women’s 200 back (senior Hannah Peiffer, 200 back, 1:54.48), while Drury’s Bailee Nunn, a freshman, won the 200 breast in record time (2:09.12) and anchored the Panther’s record-setting 200 medley relay (1:38.78). Freshman Georgia Wright of West Chester also set an NCAA D-II record with her win in the 1000 free in 9:48.87. The Male Swimmer of the Meet was Queens sophomore Marius Kosch, who won six events—three individual and three relay. He set a record in the 200 fly (1:42.04) and also won the 100 free (43.03) and 200 IM (1:44.36). His three relay victories were record-setting performances: 400 medley relay (3:07.38) and the 400-800 free relays (2:53.00, 6:18.46). Queens added a DII record in the 200 medley relay (1:25.89), giving the Royals all five men’s records. Kosch’s teammate, Paul Pijulet, a junior, also won six events, including three relays (200-400 medley, 800 free) and both backstrokes (46.58, 1:42.08) and the 100 fly (45.62). Senior Dion Dreesens (200 free, 1:33.85; 3 relays) and junior Nicholas Arakelian (400 IM, 3:45.01; 2 relays) also stood atop the podium, giving the Royals 12 wins in 21events. West Florida’s Monica Amaral was named Female Diver of the Meet after winning both the 1- and 3-meter competitions, and Grand Valley’s Brad Dalrymple, the men’s 3-meter champion, was named

Theresa Michalak, West Florida (NCAA Division II Female Swimmer of the Meet)

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS]

NCAA DIVISION II CHAMPIONSHIPS Birmingham, Ala. March 8-11 Women’s and Men’s Team Champions: Queens University of Charlotte

Male Diver of the Meet. Coaching honors went to Brian Reynolds of Drury for the Women’s Coach of the Year and Jeff Dugdale of Queens for the Men’s Coach of the Year. —J.S. NCAA DIVISION III CHAMPIONSHIPS Shenandoah, Texas March 15-18 Women’s and Men’s Team Champions: Emory University Before this year’s NCAA Division III Championships, there were two predictions that seemed guaranteed—Emory would win the women’s meet, and senior Andrew Wilson would win the men’s breaststroke events.

— continued on 36 May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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CO L L E G E R O U N D U P

— continued from 35

Emory’s chances at winning its first national championship on NAIA CHAMPIONSHIPS the men’s side, however, were not as certain. Columbus, Georgia That is, of course, unless you asked Wilson or any of the other March 1-4 members of his team. In December, Wilson told Swimming World Women’s and Men’s Team Champions: that he honestly believed he and his teammates could win this meet. Olivet Nazarene University With only 12 swimmers—compared to 16 for perennial powerhouses Kenyon and Denison (plus divers)—the Emory Eagles made Olivet Nazarene University has come a long way since the school history by joining Kenyon as the only teams to win the women’s and first opened its doors in 1907 in a house in east-central Illinois as men’s meets in the same season. For the men, it was their first title, Miss Mary Nesbitt’s Grammar School. Two years later, it became as they amassed 438 points to beat Kenyon (384), Denison (371), a university (Illinois Holiness), and in 1986 after three more name Johns Hopkins (295) and NYU (243.5). Emory’s women won their changes, it’s been Olivet Nazarene University ever since. eighth straight championship—and 10th of the last 13—with 645.5 Last year, ONU’s men’s team won their first NAIA title ever, points, ahead of Williams, (445), Kenyon (351), Denison (272) and while this year, the women not only captured their first champiMIT (165). onship, but, along with their men, turned in the school’s first-ever Wilson, who earned Male Swimmer of the Meet honors, won sweep. both breaststroke races (50.94, 1:50.80) and the 200 IM (1:44.18)— The Tiger women scored 639 points to edge last year’s chamall NCAA-III records. Throughout the three NCAA divisions, he pion, Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), by 6-1/2 points. finished with the third fastest time in the 100 and second best in Biola took third with 343 points, ahead of Brenau (264) and Lindsey the 200. Teammate Oliver Smith added the 50 free (19.55), and Wilson College (257). ONU’s men finished with a lot more breaththe Eagles won four out of five relays—200-400 MR and 200-400 ing room, scoring 685.5 points to outdistance SCAD (443) by 242.5 FR—setting D-III records in both medleys (1:26.14, 3:10.51), givpoints. Keiser (397), Cumberlands (321.5) and Lindenwood (298) ing Emory eight men’s titles. rounded out the top five. In addition to Wilson, Williams senior Ben Lin also won three Swimmers from Olivet Nazarene won 15 of the meet’s 40 events. events—100 fly (47.37) and the 100-200 back (46.62, a D-III record; Amanda Moran, who won Female Swimmer of the Year honors a 1:44.00). Kenyon’s Arthur Conover, swimming in his final colleyear ago, was named Female Swimmer of the Meet in 2017. She giate meet, won the 500 and 1650 freestyles, setting D-III records won both backstrokes (55.19, 1:56.87), setting an NAIA record in in both events (4:18.35, 14:59.56). Other records were turned in by the 200 back and winning the race by nearly four seconds! Evan Holder, Johns Hopkins (200 free, 1:36.42) and Brandon Lum, Teammates Tiffany Ray (200-400 IM, 2:05.07, 4:25.90) and Washington University, Mo. (200 fly, 1:44.56). Female Diver of the Year Vanessa VanOost (1- and 3-meter) also As expected, Emory stole the show on the women’s side, windoubled, and the Tigers topped the 200 medley and freestyle relays ning four individual events and all five relays—four in D-III rec(1:44.25, 1:34.69). ord time (400 MR, 3:39.57, and all three freestyle relays, 1:30.52, Olivet Nazarene’s men added seven wins: Magnus Poulsen (100 3:19.56 and 7:14.98). back, 49.22; 100-200 fly, 47.63, 1:47.38), who was named Male Cindy Cheng led the way individually for the [PHOTO PROVIDED BY EMORY UNIVERSITY] Eagles with wins in the 200 free (1:46.82) and 100 back (54.41). Fiona Muir (100 free, 49.28) and Julia Durmer (1650, 16:27.82) contributed one win apiece, giving Emory nine women’s titles. Williams College actually topped the list for most individual titles with five, including two double champions: Emma Waddell, Female Swimmer of the Meet (50 free, 22.69; 100 fly, 53.48) and Megan Pierce (200 fly, 1:59.76; 400 IM, 4:15.71). Olivia Jackson gave the Ephs their fifth victory with a D-III record-setting 1:55.83 in the 200 back. The top divers were Maura Sticco-Ivins of Wellesley for the women and Max Levy of Denison for the men. Both Andrew Wilson, Emory athletes won the two spring(NCAA Division III Male Swimmer of the Meet) board events. —D.P.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


Swimmer of the Year; Mag[PHOTO PROVIDED BY ONU ATHLETICS] nus Andersen (200 back, 1:46.94; 200 IM, 1:48.11); Daniil Kuzmin (400 IM, 3:55.88); and their 200 free relay team (1:20.90). Six NAIA records were also broken: Moran, SCAD’s Julie Woody (100 free, 49.24) and Biola’s Lisa Tixier (100 fly, 53.70) among the women; and SCAD’s Joel Thatcher (500-1650 free, 4:20.35, 15:18.39) and Joel Ax (200 free, 1:34.89) among the men. Tixier, who also won the 50 free (23.01), was awarded Female Swimmer of the Year. Ax, who added the 100 free (43.56) to his list of wins, was named Male Swimmer of the Meet for the Olivet Nazarene University (NAIA Women’s and Men’s Team Champions) second straight year. Biola’s Shane Brinson, who swept record—the only women’s record of the meet—and 55.20). Natalie the springboard events, received Male Diver of the Year honors. Grothe also won four individual events: 200 breast (2:21.83) and the Keiser’s Adam Epstein was named Male Coach of the Year, 100-200-400 IM (59.05, 2:05.95, 4:32.90). while Olivet Nazarene’s Scott Teeters took the award on the womIRSC’s women also had three triple winners: Courtney Perrett en’s side. —C.B. (200 free, 1:52.96; 50-100 breast, 29.28, 1:03.20); Ianthe Van Der Westhuizen (500-1000-1650 free, 5:00.13, 10:22.78, 17:21.29); and NJCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS Meagan Abad (50-100-200 back, 26.11, 56.05, 2:03.67). Morgan Buffalo, N.Y. Holt won the 200 fly (2:07.32). March 1-4 For the men, Nicholas Loomis, Male Swimmer of the Year, Women’s and Men’s Team Champions: claimed individual wins in the 50-100-200 fly, notching NJCAA Indian River State College records of 46.53p and 1:46.10 in the 100 and 200. His winning 50 time was 21.46. Forgive us if it seems like you’ve read this story before...or, at Teammate Luka Tomic won the most individual events (200the very least, have seen variations on a theme. The fact is that every 500-1000 free, 1:36.28, 4:26.78, 9:21.92; 200 back, 1:45.97), while year since 1974, Swimming World has dutifully reported the success John Fauteux took two (100 free, 44.46; 100 breast, 54.01). Nine of Indian River State College’s men’s teams at the NJCAA Chamdifferent IRSC men claimed at least one individual title. pionships. Adrianna Warning and Robby Costine swept the two springboard That success translates into 43 consecutive NJCAA championdiving events, with Costine setting an NJCAA record with 623.65 ships. And in 39 of those stories, IRSC’s women’s teams have also points in the 3-meter. Both were named Divers of the Year. And, won, with this year’s victory being their 35th straight! naturally, Indian River’s Sion Brinn and Dave Szuba, respectiveThis year’s version of perfection totaled 1,210 points for the ly, were named Swimming Coach and Diving Coach of the Year. women and 1,293 points for the men. Yes, there were other teams —T.B.  that competed, but they were light years behind IRSC. South Georgia State College managed 563 points for second place in the women’s competition to come within 647 points of IRSC, ahead of Iowa James Sica is an assistant coach for women’s and men’s swimming Central (498.5), Southwestern Oregon (480.5) and Monroe (396). at Carnegie Mellon University (Pittsburgh, Pa.). Diana Pimer is For the men, runner-up Southwestern Oregon was 736 points off the currently earning her master’s in sports journalism from Quinnipiac pace, yet it was still able to finish ahead of Iowa Central (486), South University (Hamden, Conn.). Chandler Brandes is a sophomore at Georgia State (450) and Iowa Lakes (365). the University of Vermont, where she is majoring in public commuTo score that many points, obviously IRSC would have to win nication and double minoring in coaching and sport management. a few events. How about 22 of 25 first-place finishes for the IRSC Taylor Brien is a Swimming World staff writer, online editor as well men...and 25 of 25 for its women?! The only swimmer to prevent the as the magazine’s circulation/operations manager. Pioneers from winning all 50 events was Hylton Colinson of Iowa Lakes, who captured the men’s 200 breast (1:59.92) and the 200-400 IM (1:49.64, 3:54.56). Osianna McReed, Female Swimmer of the Year, was a dominant for full results, records, force for the Pioneer women, taking home individual victories in stories and photos. the 50-100 free (23.13, 50.22) and 50-100 fly (24.62, an NJCAA May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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COACHING

LESSONS with the

LEGENDS

SWIMMING WORLD CONTINUES A SERIES IN WHICH TOP COACHES SHARE SOME OF THE SECRETS OF THEIR SUCCESS. BY MICHAEL J. STOTT

SPONSORED BY

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY JEREMY W. SCOTT, OBU PHOTOGRAPHER]

SAM FREAS

Dr. Sam Freas has been a winning head coach at the universities of Arkansas (64-12), Hawaii (40-0), Louisiana State (61-9) and Allegheny College (84-15). He also has been a ninetime conference coach of the year, athletic director at Kenyon, a U.S. Olympic Committee member, Olympic coach (South Africa), CEO of ISHOF, president of CSCAA, author and innovator. At Arkansas, his swimmers set seven U.S. and three world records. Eleven became Olympians and one a world champion. In all, 19 of his college swimmers have competed in the Olympics. Universally recognized as one of the world’s best sprint teachers, Freas currently coaches the men’s and women’s teams at Oklahoma Baptist University. His squads have won seven of the eight NAIA national championships in which they competed—four men’s titles (2012-13-14-15) and three women’s titles (2013-14-15) following a runner-up finish in 2012. OBU will transition to NCAA Division II for the 2017-18 season. Freas has had a colorful and, at times, controversial 40-plus-year career, all the while bringing energy, excellence and out-of-thebox thinking to the sport.

SAM FREAS IN HIS OWN WORDS:

I was classically trained in physical education, biomechanics and exercise science at Springfield College (Mass.) by coaching icons Joe Palone (soccer), Jack Ryan (swimming) and Charles (Red) Silva (swimming). Coach Silva emphasized the importance of the central and parasympathetic nervous systems and was an early pioneer in the use of taper. My parents were also great coaching influences. My father was a highly intelligent, scientifically-oriented, unsuccessful basketball coach, and my mother was a winning, people-oriented motivator of young men in track. They helped me understand the importance of a scientific and a people-approach in coaching. Early on, I bought into the “more-is-better” training approach and ruined everyone who swam distances of 100 or less. However, coaching soccer, swimming and track helped me develop a keen insight and appreciation for athletes’ nuances and personality differences, and confirmed my belief that each required an individual prescription for success. I did doctoral work at the University of Iowa before becoming the men’s coach at the University of Arkansas. In Fayetteville, we had only 90 minutes of daily pool time. Consequently, I used a supplemental and innovative dryland approach through which swimmers improved very quickly. I also recruited American River Community College swimmer Jerry Spencer, who, in less than a year, broke the world LC 50 free mark. I also developed other world-class sprinters. Later as women’s coach, thanks to diving and a few fast women, we were a perennial top-20 team. In addition, the Razorbacks—among them, future FINA world open water 25K champion Shelley Taylor-Smith (1991 Perth)—began training and setting records in open water swimming. What I learned was that high quality/less distance works. It took confidence and fortitude to go against the swimming establishment that fervently resisted decreasing volume and increasing intensity. I rejected the in-vogue specificity of training and concentrated—more out of necessity—on developing athletes to jump higher, be stronger, quicker and more aggressive. It paid off. Open water swimming was a great supplement for pool swimming and built considerable confidence.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


Bring the BOLD to your practice!

Bring the BOLD to your practice!

MICHAEL KLUEH

World Championship Gold Medalist

EMILY KLUEH

2 time Open Water World Championship Silver Medalist

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MICHELLE KONKOLY

2 Gold, 1 Silver, 1 Bronze Medal (Including a World and Paralympic record)


LEGENDS — continued from 38 At Louisiana State University, I was able to move the team from the bottom to first in the Southeastern Conference in three years. For the first time, I had the full use of a major aquatic facility and a wonderful staff of coaches, trainers and weight-and-conditioning gurus to help develop international, collegiate, Masters and age group swimmers. By concentrating on the five components of physical fitness—agility, strength, flexibility, cardiovascular and muscular endurance—we developed specific training for each athlete while confirming that starts, turns and finishes were game changers for elite athletes. Upon completing my doctoral studies, I became the athletic director at Kenyon College before serving for 15 years as president of the International Swimming Hall of Fame and later as an academic dean at Palm Beach State College. During a two-year sabbatical from the Hall of Fame, I became the men’s and women’s swim coach at the University of Hawaii (UH), where we hosted the first FINA World Open Water Swimming Championships. With the full use of the great Duke Kahanamoku Natatorium and an elevated dryland program, we quickly became a powerhouse. UH swimmers such as Bridge Athletics founder Nick Folker were products of these successful dryland-training methods. Unfortunately, controversy arose when many of our refereedocumented times—some of which were hand and semiautomatic (and permitted in the NCAA manual)—were denied for our national entry. Not coincidentally, the manual was changed the following year to disallow hand and semiautomatic times. My teams had made almost 100 NCAA “A” and “B” cuts. Few noticed the following week, when our full team was assembled, that our men’s 400 free relay won and set an American club record at the USA Swimming nationals. Interestingly, Hawaii teams were well represented at the 2000 Sydney Games.

In Hawaii, I foresaw the future that open water swimming held for FINA. I also learned that weight belts augment speed for sprinters and breaststrokers; and that activities on a horizontal bar that mimic swimming strengthen the neuromuscular system and increase in-water power. An unforgettable lesson was that you always defend yourself vigorously if a charge is levied, because the internet and the innuendos will never be accurate or kind. Ten years after my stay at Hawaii and out of coaching, Oklahoma Baptist University asked me to initiate a swimming and diving program. In my seven years here, I am reminded that college swimmers can truly be developed through teaching the fundamentals of stroke mechanics, instilling a championship mindset and enabling athletes to understand the importance of nervous, pain, cardiovascular, dynamic and power endurance. *** I hope some of my contributions in swimming will help others. For example: • Practical books for coaches:—Sprinting: A Coaches Challenge, Sprinting II: It Takes Guts and Aquatic Games; • Introducing tower diving and the 200 medley and 200 free relays into the collegiate program; • Introducing the no-false-start rule; • First use of the step-relay start; • Advising and helping coaches through my website sprintswimming.com. My journey in swimming has been fun and exciting. My standing piece of advice is: “Dare to be different.”  Michael J. Stott is an ASCA Level 5 coach whose Collegiate School (Richmond, Va.) teams have won nine state high school championships. He has been named a 2017 recipient of NISCA’s Outstanding Service Award.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


TRAINED BEHAVIORS

S TA R T S A N D B R E A K O U T S BY MICHAEL J. STOTT

This is the first of a multi-part series on “trained behaviors” in swimming, a concept advanced by Nation’s Capital Swim Club coach Bruce Gemmell. [PHOTO BY PETER H. BICK]

To begin, we explore how Coach Bruce Gemmell defines “trained behaviors.” When he first used the term, Gemmell was admonished that his notion did not meet the definition of classical trained behavior. “I countered by saying that I defined such a behavior as one that could be executed under pressure and in unusual circumstances. “As applied to Katie Ledecky, there were big and small aspects of her races in Rio that obviously were not accidental. Her behaviors were something that had been practiced over and over and over again in a variety of circumstances—including easy-load practices, hard training and races. When it comes to race time, she is very good at executing. That’s why when Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom pulled alongside of her in the 200 free final, I wasn’t worried,” said Gemmell. “Yes, she’s a little bit different. We can begin and end the discussion right there. She was just willing to take it to a whole other level. In many cases, I didn’t have to remind her or make it a part of a practice setting other than at the Olympic Games,” he says. So, essentially, the behavior Gemmell describes is a “practice-makes-perfect, prac-

tice-makes-permanent” philosophy on steroids. When applied to starts and breakouts, some of the nation’s best practitioners have developed methods of their own to produce successful outcomes that span seasons of competition and even careers. David Marsh, 2016 USA Olympic head women’s coach, produced a video series (Swimming Faster: Starts for All Strokes) while winning 13 NCAA team titles at Auburn. In it, he details start essentials that allow an athlete to be proactive by carrying the proper body line and power into the water and maintaining it through the breakout. “Off the blocks, the separate elements are pulling arms, attaining and maintaining the line, establishment of the kick, separation from the water and transition into the swim,” he says. “These days, no one should come up before 10 meters.” His swimmers do starts religiously, practicing in 10 feet of water, learning positioning, mastering angles and modifying techniques until comfortable. Marsh has beginners progress from the knee to the deck to jumping drills from the block. “These days, so many kids crawl to the blocks. They need to spend time getting comfortable there, standing tall, taking deep breaths, focusing on the other end and

getting ready to go,” he says. SPEEDING BULLET One of the demonstrators in the Swimming Faster video series is Bill Pilczuk, former Auburn swimmer. In 1998, Pilczuk became the 50 meter free world champion by being the first swimmer in 10 years to beat Alexander Popov. Pilczuk is now head coach at the Savannah College of Art and Design, and subjects his athletes to hundreds of starts and breakouts in practice. Such repetition paid huge dividends at the NAIA Nationals in March, where SCAD swimmers won seven of 10 relays and finished second in the other three. “There was nobody better in the world in the first 15 meters than Bill Pilczuk, and it all started with his reaction time,” says three-time Olympic gold medalist Rowdy Gaines. “If you don’t have good reaction time, you are not going to have a good 15-meters time. I’ve always felt that first breakout stroke was the most important because it sets the momentum for the length. That’s another reason he was so good. Bill had an explosive first stroke.”

— continued on 42 May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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STARTS & BREAKOUTS — cont'd from 41 Pilczuk’s keys begin with flexibility of the hips, legs and back. “If you can’t get into a start position and remain loose and ready to fire out, you will not get a good jump or fast reaction,” he says. “To do that, you need to work on jumping. And then it is all about power and velocity off the block with angle of attack on entry and transition holding speed. “Along with the wedge, side handlebars on platforms also help athletes with flexibility issues stay more open in the start position and develop more power through relaxed hips and low back positioning. A relaxed joint fires stronger than a tensed one.ˮ Pilczuk maintains drills for starts depend upon swimmer needs: “I like dryland starts and dive-and-glides. All swimmers older than age 14 should be able to make it to 15 meters with no movement. Drills that focus on the arm pull and back-foot push are also great. Runners, if done properly, help maintain the speed in the water. “We also do drills for learning body control in the air in order to hit a low angle of entry and not ‘rainbow’ start. Pencil, tuck and pike jumps and starts help teach body control and athleticism—the hallmarks of a good starter,” adds Pilczuk.

At Auburn under Marsh, Tiger sprinters did daily dives and breakouts in a 15-meter diving well. They also practiced reaction drills, sometimes slapping hands, sometimes using RJTs (Relay Judging Platforms), performed timed breakouts and the like. Pilczuk believes the wedge has somewhat altered the starting paradigm. “Reaction time isn’t nearly as important as velocity off the blocks—and even less so with the wedge,” he says. “Now you’ll find that everyone is about .5 to .6 on reactions at the top end with the wedge. Take the wedge away, and it’s a little more critical. The best starters need about .6 to develop the velocity with the pull without the wedge. Point-8 is considered slow for the big guys. Anything below .8 is good, .6 is great, .7 is average, but the key is holding a lot of velocity into the hole, then holding that speed through the transition. At breakout, swimmers need to hold transition speed and not slow down until they are actually about three strokes up. “Men and women have slightly different starts. Technique depends on an individual’s center of gravity (CG), how strong their arms and legs are so they can move that CG,” he says.

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SAGE ADVICE Sam Freas, head men’s and women’s coach at Oklahoma Baptist University, has been regarded as one of the globe’s best sprint coaches for more than three decades. He still prizes speed off the blocks. “I work on improving reaction time probably more than other coaches,” says Freas. “I do it through hand, foot and jumping reactions in a dryland situation. We do this before we even get in the pool. “My thesis is this: the average swimmer has a .7+ reaction time. I believe this can be improved to .5+. I have had several swimmers accomplish that, giving them a .2-second advantage before we even get on the blocks. “The technique of streamlining underwater off the start and properly using a dolphin-kick breakout and body position is paramount. We do many starts—timing 25s underwater with a freestyle breakout to a perfect finish. We do them with and without weight belts. The transition from dolphin kicking to flutter kicking cannot be assumed. For some, it is difficult without experiencing an inertial lag, so we practice this incessantly,” he says. “To be fair, I teach a breakout that is different from most folks. The back of the head has to be in line with the back—not

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


freestyle, but is also an important reminder for swimmers of all strokes that depth is important off the wall. “Another trained behavior is giving swimmers a push-up exercise if they do not finish with a full stroke during interval training. By reinforcing this, you guarantee their finishes are good, and relay pick-ups will be exact rather than a DQ when someone unexpectedly takes an extra stroke.” Once the basics have been mastered, coach and swimmer can modify techniques to individual swimmer skill set. Subsequent repetition and purposeful practice al-

lows a swimmer to progress from a reactive to proactive position. “The start is never going to be perfect,” says Gaines. “It is one of those things that you have to practice over and over.” Next month’s article on Trained Behaviors will focus on turns.  Michael J. Stott is an ASCA Level 5 coach whose Collegiate School (Richmond, Va.) teams have won nine state high school championships. He has been named a 2017 recipient of NISCA’s Outstanding Service Award.

[PHOTO PROVIDED BY SAVANNAH COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN]

Pilczuk’s keys begin with flexibility of the hips, legs and back. “If you can’t get into a start position and remain loose and ready to fire out, you will not get a good jump or fast reaction. To do that, you need to work on jumping. And then it is all about power and velocity off the block with angle of attack on entry and transition holding speed.” —Bill Pilczuk Savannah College of Art and Design head coach 1998 world champion, 50 meter free

lifting the head up. The head is not set in the freestyle position until the third stroke. We do many 15-meter timed breakouts. If a swimmer breaks out prior, it is OK, but I time from the start to when the head goes past the 15-meter mark. “Regarding breathing, a training behavior I emphasize is not breathing off the wall and pushing off properly. I do not want a swimmer to breathe on the first lap of a 50. Therefore, all starts are done no breath. Theoretically, any time someone rotates their shoulder, it slows them down because of resistance,” observes Freas. “In order to do this, I place surgical tubing 18 inches below water level at the five-meter mark, extending across the entire pool. Swimmers have to push off and go under the tubing and then do a breakout, breathing only at the third stroke. “To reinforce this, the swimmers invest in push-ups if they do not adhere to the behavior. This is particularly good for May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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COACHING

SWIMMING TECHNIQUE MISCONCEPTIONS: BY ROD HAVRILUK Many people believe that it is worth copying the technique of the fastest swimmers. In reality, even the fastest swimmers have technique limitations, but they offset them with strength and conditioning. The purpose of this series of articles is to address scientifically the technique misconceptions and related skill-learning strategies that have become “conventional wisdom,” and to present more effective options.

BREASTSTROKE HAND RECOVERY RATIONALE FOR ABOVE-SURFACE HAND RECOVERY

The above-surface hand recovery in breaststroke is a classic example of a technique element that has become popular because it is used by top swimmers, not because it is actually effective. The elite swimmers in Fig. 1 (below) are all recovering their hands mostly above the surface. The most commonly offered rationale for the above-surface recovery is based on minimizing resistance. The above-surface hand recovery is often associated with an undulating or wave style of breaststroke. Martens and Daly (2012) explained that “breaststroke swimmers with an undulating style...are hindered less by drag during recovery, probably because they are able to bring their arms forward above the water surface.” McCauley (2017) similarly explained that “in the wave style, the arms and upper body are thrown forward over the water.” Neither of these rationales holds up to scientific scrutiny.

This month’s article

LIMITATIONS OF ABOVE-SURFACE HAND RECOVERY

While it is true that body parts recovering above the surface generate less resistance than body parts recovering below the surface, there are trade-offs that negate any possible advantage. Specifically, an abovesurface hand recovery produces: • A longer time for the recovery due to a longer hand path distance; • Greater resistance due to a more severe torso angle. A longer hand path distance is one obvious characteristic of an above-surface recovery. A comparison of the recovery hand path is possible when using the same point to begin and the same point to end the recovery. In Fig. 2 (next page, top), the model completes the inward sculling motion with the fingertips touching and the hands just below the chest. From this point, she can very quickly recover the hands underwater along a straight line into the streamline position, as shown by the green arrow.

addresses the misconception that in breaststroke it is better to recover the hands

FIG. 1 > (BELOW) These images show four elite breaststrokers recovering their arms above the surface. The yellow lines show the surface of the water.

above the surface than below the surface. The rationale is that recovering the hands above the surface causes less resistance. In reality, an above-surface recovery is less effective because it increases the distance that the hands travel, which slows the stroke rate. In addition, the upward hand motion encourages upward body motion, which angles the body and causes more resistance.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

Fig. 1


FIG. 2 > (LEFT) The arrows show the hand path for a breaststroke hand recovery below (green) and above (red) the surface.

Fig. 2 With an above-surface recovery, the hands must travel a path that is at least 1.5 times longer, as shown by the red arrow. The longer path of the above-surface recovery requires more time for the recovery phase and, therefore, more time for a stroke cycle. A longer stroke cycle, in turn, produces a slower stroke rate. A second limitation of an above-surface hand recovery is that the upward motion of the hands (to be able to recover them above the surface) encourages upward motion of the shoulders, thereby increasing the angle of the torso and causing more body resistance. As examples, all the elite swimmers in Fig. 1 have their shoulders far above the surface with a rather severe angle at the torso. The swimmer in Fig. 3 (below, top) is also recovering his arms above the surface. The resistance caused by the severe torso angle is very apparent. A well-known swimming scientist, Dr. Ernie Maglischo (2003), recommends against an above-surface recovery and also makes the point that it is not appropriate to model a technique element of a fast swim-

mer just because the swimmer is fast: “I do not recommend this technique, despite the fact that it has been used by some very successful breaststroke swimmers.”

BENEFITS OF BELOW-SURFACE HAND RECOVERY

A below-surface recovery has a shorter path for the hands to travel and makes it less likely that the shoulders will rise above the surface and severely angle the torso. The main benefits are a faster stroke rate and less resistance. There are other benefits of a below-surface recovery. First, it is a relatively simple motion to learn. If a swimmer completes the inward sculling motion with the fingertips touching, it is relatively easy to move the hands forward into the streamline. Second, it is easy for a swimmer to increase hand speed throughout the stroke cycle with a very rapid and straight-line recovery. One additional benefit of a below-surface arm recovery is less obvious. A swimmer who stays relatively level and keeps the shoulders below the surface has the FIG. 3 > (LEFT, TOP)

Fig. 3

This breaststroker recovered his arms above the surface, and his hands are just re-entering the water (red circle). The yellow line shows a rather severe torso angle that produces considerable resistance.

FIG. 4 > (LEFT, BOTTOM)

Fig. 4

This breaststroker has his shoulders below the surface as his hands scull inward. The vertical gray lines are synchronized with the video image. The image shows that he continues to increase his hand force to a peak on the inward sculling motion.

arms in position to generate more propulsion on the inward sculling motion. The swimmer in Fig. 4 (below, bottom) has the shoulders below the surface and is generating his peak force during the inward sculling motion. In contrast, most swimmers suffer a force loss on the inward sculling motion because their hands are moving up toward the surface.  Dr. Rod Havriluk is a sports scientist and consultant who specializes in swimming technique instruction and analysis. His new ebook—“Approaching Perfect Freestyle + Science”—is available at the STR website: www.swimmingtechnology.com. You can contact Rod at info@swimmingtechnology.com. All scientific documentation relating to this article, including scientific principles, studies and research papers, can be provided upon demand. to learn more about the references for this article.

SUMMARY

The above-surface hand recovery in breaststroke is very common and used by many elite swimmers. It is a misconception, however, that the above-surface recovery is more effective or faster than a below-surface recovery. While it is true that a body part recovering above the surface causes less resistance than a body part recovering through the water, the above-surface recovery increases the hand path to decrease the stroke rate while also angling the torso to generate more resistance. A below-surface recovery is more effective, producing a faster stroke rate, less resistance and more propulsion.

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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AMERICAN SWIMMING TEAM:

FUTURE — THE TOP OF THE TEAM BY CHUCK WARNER

Beginning with the December 2016 issue and running through May 2017, Swimming World takes a look at the American Swimming Team past and present, and will provide some thoughts on the future. This month: Part VI—the series finale. The American Swimming Team’s consistent superior results at the Olympic Games are primarily because of the mass of American swimmers that fiercely and progressively compete through a system of age group, high school and collegiate swimming. But as we noted in our third article in this series (SW Feb), being the best swimming country on the planet is often by a much slimmer margin than it might appear. The steady progress of many training programs around the world challenges the AST to continue to lead and dominate at the Games. If the AST is going to maintain its position in the future, it must continue to look for ways to improve. The following are a few key areas: LSC PERFORMANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY Longtime leader, coach and servant to the sport of swimming, George Block, has advocated for disbanding the current LSC structure in the USA and replacing it with “conferences” of “likeminded clubs,” similar to the NCAA. Thus, club goals—rather than geographic borders—would become the bonding agent. Just as people are contagious in sickness, wealth and creativity, so are USA Swimming clubs in their level of excellence. We acknowledge the conundrum of whether to separate into conferences to let the strong benefit the strong or to continue in the current system. But in the interest of writing within this brief time and space, we would simply like to address how existing LSCs might measure improvement by joining a system of team goals for world-class achievement, and suggest that there be transparency of those results. If we examine the world swimming rankings between 2000-16, we see that the medal outcome at the Olympics in events the USA ranked 16 percent or less of the swimmers in the top 10, 25 or 100, compared to those events with rankings of 28 percent or more, were expectedly much different. The following chart depicts the differences for men and women: USA WORLD RANKINGS BETWEEN 2000-16

46

Top 10

16%<

28%>

Top 25

16%<

28%>

Top 100

16%<

28%>

Women

72% of events Olympic medals

89% of events Olympic medals

Men

75% of events Olympic medals

83% of events Olympic medals

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

On the basis of this data (and additional data not detailed here), if the AST could develop 28 (percent) of the top 100 swimmers in the world in each event, it would become the most dominant Olympic team in history. In every LSC, there are athletes with the ability to become a top-100 world-ranked swimmer. But to achieve this level of performance requires the clubs in the LSC to provide their athletes the opportunity. In order to do that, the conduct within the LSC of programming, cooperative competition, incentives and rewards is critical. If every LSC in America, every four years, added one net top100 world-ranked swimmer in any event, the American Swimming Team by 2024 would have 28 percent of the top-100 world-ranked swimmers. As has become its custom then, the AST would provide an even greater challenge to the rest of the world to keep up in developing their athletes. Based upon historical data, that chart of progress would look like this: 2016 '17

'18

'19

'20

'21

'22

'23

'24

Olympic Medals

33

Top 10 W

21%

22

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Top 100 W

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

Top 10 M

29

24

25

27

30

26

28

30

32

Top 100 M

15

16

18

20

22

21

23

25

28

36

40

By establishing goals such as these for the entire American Swimming Team, each LSC could annually recognize its swimmers who had earned a top-100 world ranking. The LSC could see its accountability to the goal of the entire, collective American Swimming Team. It could also use those results to be more thoughtful in its long-term planning, coach/parent education and how it serves the athletes’ experience in realizing their potential. As LSCs note their progress in their future contributions to the American world rankings, they would be very justified to celebrate Olympic results as the manifestation of their own acute role as part of the American Swimming Team because world-ranked swimmers and Olympic medal winners would more deliberately and consistently be the outcome of each LSC’s efforts. PROFESSIONAL SWIMMERS ASSOCIATION What would happen if the most interested and capable swimmers in America could earn a good living through their 20s by continuing to train and compete in swimming? What if all the top swimmers in


“The American Swimming Team can be argued to be the most accomplished sports team in the history of the planet by virtue of its extraordinary success on the primary international stage —the Olympics.”

[PHOTO BY USA TODAY SPORTS]

(Pictured: American Michael Phelps, the Greatest Olympian of All Time—23 Olympic gold medals, 28 medals overall.)

the world could? The entire sport would advance forward dramatically. Televised events would be more interesting because name recognition would heighten due to an athlete’s longevity. Swimming could then be more valuable to broadcasting companies and, therefore, present the probability of more dollars available for athletes. But today, more money in swimming doesn’t necessarily mean more money for the athletes—currently the money goes to event organizers (FINA, IOC, et al.). A good model for swimmers to follow to enhance their potential as professionals comes from examples set in other professional sports, especially the PGA. From the founding of the PGA in 1929—on through to 1968— the host clubs for the PGA golf tournaments reaped the financial rewards generated by the professional players who toured the various clubs that hosted the events. Those revenues included advertising and sponsorships. However, 50 years ago, the golfers changed the rules for the sharing of revenue. How did golf change? In 1968, the players, now fed up with seeing new television revenues also going into the pockets of host clubs, formed their own Professional Golfers Association. The new organization threatened to break away from the PGA, which without the well-known players—including now legendary names such as Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus—had no value. The result today is that about 33 percent of the approximately $1 billion of annual PGA revenues comes back to the players. While 33 percent is smaller than the NBA, NFL and MLB, which split 45 to 55 percent of revenue with the players, the PGA is actually a non-profit and donates considerable portions of it’s “profits” to charity.

By comparison, FINA—the international governing body for swimming based in Switzerland—which organizes its World Championships and plays a critical role in the conduct of swimming at the Olympics, only returns about 7 percent of its annual revenue of about $65 million to the athletes. Just like golf, the World Championships and Olympics are of little monetary value for FINA without the known swimmers who generate television revenue. An athletes’ strike is how baseball free agency was created, as well as how revenue-sharing materialized in professional basketball and football. If swimmers united to produce a fairer sharing of revenues with FINA, it would add years to the careers of many athletes, giving them a much better chance to realize their full potential. Coach Ira Klein, current general chair of Florida Swimming and formerly a VP of USA Swimming and president of the American Swimming Coaches Association, has long ago envisioned USA Swimming as a program for age group and senior swimmers. Coach Klein has advocated for a separate organization for the American Swimming Team’s interest in international and professional swimming. “The goals for organizing a sport for young kids are vastly different than putting on world-class events and serving professional athletes. We constantly see a political battle at our conventions of which group to serve, and, administratively, it is very inefficient for one organization to attempt to serve both.” Should a Professional Swimmers Association gain more control of the events in which they participate, they would also gain more control over administering those events with a trustworthy drug testing system. How could swimmers create such an organization? The skeleton plan has already been created—it is just a matter of swimmers having the courage to make a stand...not only for their own income, but for the future of both the American Swimming Team and the sport around the world. SERIES SUMMARY The AST can be argued to be the most accomplished sports team in the history of the planet by virtue of its extraordinary success on the primary international stage—the Olympics. An essential part of the AST experience is the challenge within a consistent set of rules to outperform one’s competitors, which is personally enriching and—quite simply—fun. This series has been an (abbreviated) effort to learn from our past, understand our present and look forward to how to have an even brighter future. The key is you. Everyone matters on a team. If you are reading this article, you are likely either an athlete, coach or volunteer. That makes you an indispensable part of the American Swimming Team. Fulfill your capacity to contribute, and you will make a big difference in the success of the American Swimming Team. 

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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SPECIAL SETS

TENNESSEE MID-SEASON SETS BY MATT KREDICH WITH MICHAEL J. STOTT · PHOTOS BY PETER H. BICK

One of the things our University of Tennessee swimmers like to do over holiday training is start to change the focus of our training more toward either aerobic power or anaerobic power. We spend the fall trying to develop what we refer to as aerobic or anaerobic capacity. I’m not sure how common these terms are, but Bob Bowman talked about this as capacity vs. utilization to great acclaim at the ASCA World Clinic in 2013. However, I believe that the people who originally brought this paradigm into exercise science—and specifically into swimming— were those in the Russian and German sports science programs back in the late ’70s and ’80s. Jan Olbrecht, the renowned sports physiologist, has been trying to quantify these qualities for many years. Capacity is increasing our ability to produce the energy in large quantities without regard to time. We put the structure in place for energy production. The focus of developing these brands of power is essentially that we want to be able to produce energy aerobically and anaerobically very quickly, so we take the capacity and build efficiency into it. The goal is to place high demands on these produc-

Matt Kredich, head men’s and women’s coach, University of Tennessee, gives some pointers to two of his Volunteer swimmers at the recent women’s NCCAs.

tion mechanisms and ask them to adapt. One of the best sets for doing this both aerobically and anaerobically is one where the swimmer does an all-out swim (100)...followed closely by another (100), followed by two to three more 50s, all on about 30 seconds rest. There are several benefits to this. A main one is that the swimmer is faced with a high level of fatigue, and deals with it again and again and again. All of the “shut down” mechanisms—which are very often the biggest impediments to energy production—are activated. It is obviously not entirely physiological, as there is a big interplay between mental allowance and physical ability in terms of pacing. We may do this set three times (once per week) in the lead-up to our championship season. If the athlete does this well, we would do this set—2 x 100, 3 x 50 @ 30 seconds rest—as two rounds the first time, one to two the second time and once the third time. We’ll also cut out the second 100 on the second round. The following progression shows where the adaptations are taking place. As an example, Christine Magnuson was a 23-time AllAmerican, two-time Olympic silver medalist at Beijing and 2008 NCAA 100 yard butterfly champion. In freestyle, her 2 x 100s were something like 58/1:04 LC (that first 100 is a shock to the system) in the first week, 59/1:02 (they protect themselves) in the second week, and then 57/59 in the third week (this shows a real adaptation on both the first and second 100). Other ways we train power are more specific to the races. We’ll do two to three broken 100s, 200s or 500s in a practice—although the total distance is always more—where they get a chance to repeat different segments of the race. For instance, in a 200, we’ll do a dive 75 (second and third 25s should be same pace and stroke count) right into three to four 50s at goal middle 200 pace, but negative-split and descend, focusing on 48

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


building the middle 50 of a 200, then practice a finishing segment. It[PHOTO BY MIKE ARON] could be two to three 25s (if we’re taking really short rest), a finishing 50 or a finishing 75. The goal of those swims is to reach a higher velocity than any other time during the race. Written out, the sets are: • 100—Dive 40 (25 + turn +15), rest ~15 sec; 3-4 x 25 from a turn to a turn at goal 100 tempo, stroke count and speed; 20-sec rest; then 1 x 50 from a turn—goal second 50 of a 100. • 200—Dive 75 at ~goal pace for a 200; rest :15; 3-4 x 50 @ :15 rest; negative-split and descend @ 200 pace; 3 x 25 @ 20-sec rest • 500—Dive 150, 4-6 x 100 @ 20-sec rest at goal 500 pace, 150 “finishing speed” Much of the swimming that University of Tennessee athletes do—as in the preceding sets—involves turn-to-turn work as opposed to going wall-to-wall.  University of Tennessee men’s and women’s coach Matt Kredich was educated at Duke and then employed at Harvard and Stanford. An outstanding technician, he is used to explaining concepts in an academic manner. As proof, he has coached four Olympians as well as 57 athletes to 378 All-American recognitions. His Volunteer teams have earned 12 Top 15 NCAA finishes. *** Michael J. Stott is an ASCA Level 5 coach whose Collegiate School (Richmond, Va.) teams have won nine state high school championships. He has been named a 2017 recipient of NISCA’s Outstanding Service Award.

Christine Magnuson became a Lady Vol in 2005, the first season that Kredich became the Tennessee women’s coach. Magnuson graduated in 2008 and went on to set an American record in the women’s 100 fly at Beijing. Kredich became head coach of both the women and men for the 2012-13 season.

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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JUNIOR SWIMMER [PHOTO BY MIKE ARON]

GOLDMINDS BY WAYNE GOLDSMITH

SEEING IS BELIEVING To be the swimmer you want to be, you must see the swimmer you want to see. Ever wonder how you can turn your dreams into reality? It’s easy. The first thing you need to do is to learn about visualization—which is also sometimes called imagery. Visualization is just a fancy word for “imagination”—and everyone has the ability to use his or her imagination. It’s one of the really cool things about being human: we can all imagine things we’d like to see, do and experience. Visualization in swimming could be called PERFORMANCE IMAGINATION...because it’s simply the learned ability to use your imagination to improve your swimming performance. A VISION IS A VISION...BECAUSE YOU CAN SEE IT! You often hear about people having a “vision” for the future. It’s a wish or a dream that people have for what they’d like to achieve or to happen. For some people, that “vision” is to be wealthy. Others may have a “vision” of traveling the world and seeing amazing places. 50

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

Swimmers have “visions” of winning gold medals, breaking world records, doing huge PBs and achieving other incredible competition performances. A GOAL IS A DREAM WITH A DEADLINE Everyone has a dream: swimmers, runners, football players, students and, yes, even coaches. It’s something that burns brightly in their hearts that inspires, motivates and drives them to do the things they do. Sadly, many people with dreams never see those dreams become reality. Their dreams remain just that—dreams. Two things separate those who realize their dreams and those who don’t: clarity of vision and commitment to a time frame. 1. People who realize their dreams SEE their dreams. They have a clear, detailed VISION for what it is they want to achieve. Successful people have the ability to SEE their vision with such clarity and such detail that it’s as if it’s already happened.


2. People who realize their dreams set a “deadline.” By adding a deadline—a time frame—to the realization of their dreams, successful people make them real...and goal-oriented. For example, your dream might be, “I wish I could swim faster.” Now, take that dream, add a deadline, and make it a goal: “I will swim 1:27.5 at the state championships on May 21, 2017.” Unsuccessful people rely on wishing, hope and luck. None of these are strategies for success. Once you have a clear vision—and you add a deadline to it— anything is possible. THE FIRST STEP IS TO SEE...THE LAST STEP! “Dreams” tend to be a bit vague and are often a combination of feelings, hopes, thoughts and emotions. Visualization is a lot more than just “dreaming,” “wishing” and “hoping” that something great might happen to you one day. It’s about clearly seeing yourself in the situation and seeing yourself doing the things that are at the heart of your dreams. For example, if you were dreaming of winning your race at the school swimming championships, try to find a quiet moment where you can go to the school pool, sit in the stands and imagine yourself standing on the blocks of Lane 4. Try to imagine the stands full of people—friends, family, other swimmers, spectators and coaches. See yourself taking your mark and try to imagine every detail of how it will feel to blast off the blocks and race fast—leading the field down the first lap. This “seeing-it-before-it-happens” technique is at the very heart of visualization and imagery. The better you are at “seeing” things, the more effective your visualization experience will be. YOUR BRAIN DOESN’T KNOW THE DIFFERENCE Some recent research into how the brain works during visualization and imagery exercises suggests that if you do it well—and you develop the ability to clearly “see” and feel the future event—your brain doesn’t know the difference between your imagined race performance and having done it for real. This has several benefits, including: • Confidence comes from “knowing.” If you “know” you can do something—because you’ve done it before—you’re less likely to be stressed or nervous about doing it again. By mastering visualization and imagery techniques, your brain believes you’ve done it all before. Therefore, when it comes time to actually race, you’ll be less anxious and less worried about your performance. • Mind practice is body practice. Some really interesting studies of mirror-neurons also suggest that incorporating visualization techniques into your training and preparation routines may even have the same effect as actually physically practicing your race skills and strategies. Whatever way you look at it, learning how to incorporate visualization into your training makes great sense! PRACTICAL, EVERYDAY VISUALIZATION TECHNIQUES 1. Start the way you want to finish. Every day at practice—just for a moment or two before you dive into the pool—pause and imagine that this first dive is the dive you will do at your next big meet. Close your eyes for a few seconds and see yourself stepping up to the blocks at the next school or state championships. Imagine the moment. As you settle down into your start position, think about how you’ll explode powerfully from the blocks, how you’ll streamline in the air, how you’ll slide into the water with the least amount of splash possible, and how you’ll kick with speed and power underwater at the start of your race.

This pre-practice visualization session sets your own personal standards for the remainder of the session—i.e., start the way you want to finish. Also, by “seeing” the start of your next big race every day in training, you’ll be relaxed when it’s time to race...and you’ll swim fast because you’ve already swum the race over and over again in your mind. 2. First thing—last thing. First thing in the morning when you wake up—even before you get out of bed—take three long, slow, deep breaths...and imagine your goal. Visualize yourself doing the things you’re dreaming of achieving. Then again at night—when you’re lying in bed and about to fall asleep—take three long slow, deep breaths...and once more see the swimmer you want to be. These two short visualization sessions are very powerful in establishing and reinforcing the “pictures” of yourself in your mind and are very effective in clarifying the details of your future success. 3. Ten Seconds Before. One of the best ways to learn how the techniques of visualization can help you achieve your long-term goals is to try some short-term visualization. During practice as you swim toward the wall for a turn, try to imagine yourself 10 seconds after that moment, swimming back in the other direction. See yourself swimming at high speed—easily and smoothly—with a powerful kick and long powerful strokes, accelerating on your next lap. A funny thing will happen. That amazing swimmer you saw just 10 seconds ago will be the swimmer who actually blasts off the wall and explodes back up the lane...effortlessly and quickly. See the swimmer to be the swimmer. *** There’s a wonderful saying: “Don’t die with the music still in you.” In other words, don’t miss the opportunity to achieve your dreams. Don’t miss the chance to realize your potential. By learning, practicing and mastering visualization techniques, you can take some huge steps forward toward turning your swimming dreams into your swimming reality. 

Wayne Goldsmith has worked with swimmers, coaches, swimming clubs, swimming parents, sports scientists and swimming organizations all over the world for more than 25 years. He has contributed to Swimming World Magazine for 16 years. He is one of the world’s leading experts in elite-level swimming and highperformance sport. Be sure to check out Goldsmith’s websites at www.wgaquatics.com and www.wgcoaching.com.

SUMMARY 1. Everyone has a dream...but very few people realize their dreams—no matter how desperately they want them to become reality. That’s because they don’t clarify what it is they want to achieve or when and where they want to achieve it. 2. SEE the swimmer you want to be! See your dream so clearly that it’s as if it’s already happened. See it with such clarity that you already know—with certainty—that it will happen. And you know when it will happen and where it will happen.

May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

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DRYSIDE TRAINING

GOT BODY POSITION? BY J.R. ROSANIA PHOTOS BY EMMI BRYTOWSKI DEMONSTRATED BY NORIKO INADA

Body position is probably one of the most important components to swimming fast. Body position is everything. Swim like a tug boat (legs low in the water), and you will have the speed of a tug boat (slow). Your kick will be most effective gliding on top of the water to enable maximum kick tempo when necessary. So how do you achieve this most efficient body position? Well it starts with a stable core and strong legs. It’s learning how to kick from the hips. It’s maintaining an engaged core and lower back, which will keep the hips elevated, enabling you to kick faster. This month’s article shows several exercises that will help target your low back and core. Begin by doing each exercise one time a week. Perform 10 to 15 repetitions per exercise. Each week, add another set until you’re doing three sets of 10 to 15 repetitions. Maintain that until you are two weeks away from a major competition, and then discontinue the program. Hopefully, in a relatively short period of time, you’ll feel more stable in the water as you ride higher on top of the water with enhanced kicking. 

2 1

SUPINE DUMBBELL STROKE ROMANIAN DEAD LIFT

Lying supine, tighten your core so your back is flat against the floor. Begin flutter-kicking and performing a straight-arm pullover, mimicking a backstroke cycle.

Standing on one leg and holding a dumbbell in your opposite hand, bend forward at the waist. Slightly bend the forward knee. Lower the dumbbell to the floor. Do all reps on the same leg, then alternate.

MEET THE TRAINER J.R. Rosania, B.S., exercise science, is one of the nation’s top performance enhancement coaches. He is the owner and CEO of Healthplex, LLC, in Phoenix. Check out Rosania’s website at www.jrhealthplex.net. MEET THE ATHLETE Noriko Inada, 38, swam for Japan at the 1992, 2000 and 2004 Olympics. She now swims Masters for Phoenix Swim Club, and owns Masters world records in the women’s 25-29, 30-34 and 35-39 age groups.

NOTICE All swimming and dryland training instruction should be performed under the supervision of a qualified coach or instructor, and in circumstances that ensure the safety of the participants.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

3

PRONE SHOULDER/SCAPULA FLYWHEEL VERTICAL LEG Lying prone with your arms outstretched in front of your head—and holding a very light weight in one hand—roll your arms down your side (higher than your body) until they meet at your lower back. Exchange the weight from one hand to the other and return to the starting position.

4

SUPINE HIP EXTENSION WITH LEG RAISE Lying supine, place both legs on top of a physio ball. Lift your hips several inches off the floor. Leave one leg on the physio ball and lift the other to a vertical position. Alternate the vertical leg.


COACHING

JON SAKOVICH

Q&A

BY MICHAEL J. STOTT

A distance swimmer by training, Bolles head coach Jon Sakovich continues to elevate his male and female athletes, regardless of stroke, to the pinnacle of club and high school success. Q. SWIMMING WORLD: Besides your swim coach parents, who else influenced your career? A. COACH JON SAKOVICH: For the longest time, I did not want to become a swim coach, but I had a hard time giving up swimming when my career was over, so I tried coaching. I found I could still be very competitive, be around the pool and work with great athletes and people. Plus, I did not have to wear a suit and tie to work. Rick Bishop, current assistant at Michigan, had a huge influence on me. He taught me much and was responsible for my career reality check. As a new, young coach, I was not doing the job well and had to be dismissed from my position. The situation taught me that one is replaceable, does not own the job and must continually reflect on self-performance. I won the job back, but I had to swallow my pride, keep an open mind, and realize I had a lot to learn. Rick and I are great friends. SW: How did you get to the University of Florida? JS: I was part of the 1988 Guam Olympic team. A teammate was swimming for Gregg Troy at Bolles. Coach Troy stopped by Guam on the way to the Seoul Olympics. He introduced me to Randy Reese, the head coach at UF. SW: You swam in Gainesville from 1989 to 1992, but graduated in 1997. JS: I changed my major a few times, had an internship, and the ’96 Trials interrupted graduation. After retiring from swimming in ’96, I got married and started working full time. I learned I could use my job as head age group coach for Clearwater Aquatics as my internship and finally graduated. SW: Who is responsible for the high expectations that Bolles has when it comes to competing for national championships? JS: Everyone! The swimmers, the coaches,

the parents and the school all want to be the best! SW: Bolles has won Swimming World’s boys’ national high school team championship four times between 2010 and 2015. What does it take to win the national title? JS: Winning the high school national title takes luck, timing and quality. You must have that one swimmer—like a Ryan Murphy or a Joseph Schooling—who can dominate multiple individual events and lift your relays to the top. You also need a few others to help relays place in the top three and score a point or two in individual events. You can win with one super swimmer and three or four great ones. It’s not the only way, but it is the best way. Winning the national title is on our list of goals for every year. SW: Your girls won the Florida 1-A state title in 2016, and the boys captured their 30th straight. Is there pressure to continue that streak? JS: Yes. Nobody wants to be “THE ONE,” but I don’t think about it. I can only coach the kids to the best of my ability. This past year is a perfect example. We had a very close state meet on the girls’ side: 14 points separated Bolles, Pine Crest and Lake Highland Prep. We had graduated a lot of points, and our team was extremely young. We coached, they swam...and we were fortunate enough to win. SW: Is Bolles a high-volume program? JS: Volume when we need it. I would say we are in the mid-to-upper range. We are not high by any means...but we DO WORK! SW: Ryan Murphy, Caeleb Dressel and Joseph Schooling—who all trained together at Bolles with Coach Sergio Lopez—tied for swimmer-of-the-meet honors at the 2016 men’s Division I NCAAs.

Coach Jon Sakovich Head Coach Head Coach/Aquatics Director The Bolles School | Jacksonville, Florida

• University of Florida, B.S., health and human performance, ’97 • Member of 1988 Guam Olympic team • His national records set in 1988 in 400 and 1500 meter freestyles (4:06.89, 16:26.77) still stand • Bronze medalist at 1995 Pan American Games in 400 free (3:57.37) • Seven-time NCAA All-American at University of Florida

Sakovich’s early swim training came from his parents and was conducted either in a Pacific Rim hotel pool or the ocean. After enrolling at the University of Florida, Sakovich was never far from the water. He took his first job at Florida Aquatics before being named Clearwater Aquatics’ head age group coach. He moved to Bolles in 2000 and assumed the head post in 2015. In his stellar career, he has coached numerous NAG Top 16 athletes, high school All-Americans, junior national, senior national and Olympic Trials qualifiers.

— continued on 55 May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

53


HOW THEY TRAIN:

ARIEL SPEKTOR STORY BY MICHAEL J. STOTT PHOTOS PROVIDED BY BOLLES SCHOOL

At

age 8, Bolles junior Ariel Spektor was compared to Michael Phelps. It helped back then that he was big physically and well-coached. These days at 6-0, 178 pounds, the excellent coaching and fast swimming continue. In fact, in the last 42 months, Spektor has trained under Germantown Academy’s Dick Shoulberg and Bolles’ Sergio Lopez and Jon Sakovich. While the coaching carousel and transition from Philadelphia to Jacksonville, Fla. presented some bumps in the road, Spektor’s resumé has not suffered all that much. Consider: he is a... • Two-time Florida high school state champion in the 100 yard fly (2016, 47.84; 2015, 47.85) • U.S. Olympic Trials qualifier • NAG record holder as part of a 15-16 boys 200 yard medley relay (22.26 fly leg) • Top-eight finisher in four individual events at the 2016 Speedo Winter Junior Championships-East last December. As of early March, he stood third in USA Swimming’s national rankings for 17-year-olds in the 200 yard IM (1:46.57), was fifth in the 100 fly (47.39), 10th in the 100 free (44.50) and 11th in the 200 free (1:37.21). “Ariel had a bit of a slump through his sophomore year,” says Sakovich, “but he has refocused and stepped up his game. As a junior team captain, he realizes that day-to-day training has an effect on end-of-season

competitions, so he is concentrating more on details rather than trying to power through everything. He has also gone back to working on his strengths, especially underwaters and racing. “He is well-liked and has a fairly laid-back personality. Ariel goes with the flow, tending to let things roll off his shoulders and not putting too much pressure on himself. However, underneath, he is fiercely competitive and hates to lose. He has learned to find that ‘next gear’ in competitions. “All in all, he has high expectations for himself and wants to be the best. It helps that he is enjoying the process,” says Sakovich.

SPEKTOR SAMPLE SETS

Long Course • 3 x 100 MS* on 20-sec. rest (hold within 20 sec. of best time) • 1 x 100 (25 scull-25 kick-25 drill-25 swim) on 2:30 • 3 x 100 MS on 25-sec. rest (hold within 18 sec. of best time) • 1 x 100 (25 scull-25 kick-25 drill-25 swim) on 2:30 • 3 x 100 MS on 30-sec. rest (hold within 15 sec. of best time) • 1 x 100 (25 scull-25 kick-25 drill-25 swim) on 2:30 • 3 x 100 MS on 35-sec. rest (hold best average) * MS = Main Stroke Short Course Yards • 6 x 50 on :55 (descend 1-3 from 200 pace +4 sec. – pace +1 sec. / descend 4-6 from 200 pace +2 sec. – pace) • 1 x 300 active recovery + 30-sec. rest • 6 x 50 at 200 pace on :50 + 1 x 100 ez on 2:00 } x4 • 60-sec. rest • 8 x 50 on :60 FAST 

PROGRESSION OF TIMES SCY

2013

2014

2015

2016

100 Fly

52.00

49.34

47.62

47.39

200 IM

1:55.82

1:52.49

1:50.81

1:46.57

58.91

56.19

54.01

55.04

LC 100 Fly

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


Q&A— continued from 53 JS: Caeleb Dressel did not go to the Bolles School, although he was a part of the club program. We are extremely proud and honored. To have these three swimmers on the team at the same time is highly unusual. Most programs are lucky even to have one swimmer close to that caliber. We had four —Caeleb, Ryan, Joseph and Santo Condorelli. SW: George Bovell, Gustavo Borges, David and Martin Zubero, et al.—how has Bolles become an international magnet for swimmers? JS: High expectations and results! Nobody wants to go to a program that says, “Hey, we are happy with eighth place.” SW: How is your season plan for the Bolles School Sharks club team different from your high school team? JS: Not much. There is a bit of a different feel for high school, but we look at everything on an annual basis. We expect to swim fast at the state meet. We put everything on paper and plan for it. SW: In 2014-15, your boys and girls topped the NISCA National Dual Meet Team Rankings for your class among independent schools. What percentage of Bolles club swimmers are on your high school team? JS: Our high school team is mostly yearround club swimmers. The NISCA National Dual Meet Team Rankings are a perfect example where depth comes into play. That is our strength—very different than the national title. SW: You adopted some of Bob Gillett’s underwater kick principles. JS: We are very thankful to the late Bob Gillett for coming to Bolles to share his thoughts, sets and techniques on underwater kicking. We do at least three sets per week that are strictly underwater kicking, and we add it in on other sets as well. Overall, we kick about 15 to 20 percent of our weekly totals. SW: When athletes think of quitting, how do you help them transition from sacrifice to commitment? JS: Passion, goals and execution. The first thing I ask them is if they enjoy swimming. I am a firm believer in “you have to find your passion!” We go back to learning how to enjoy swimming again, and why they chose this sport. Then we talk about goals, then execution of those goals. No matter what, athletes have to enjoy swimming first. I would rather they quit swimming and find

another activity that excites them than be miserable in the pool. Those who are passionate almost always do a better job! SW: How do you instill an honest effort in your swimmers? JS: By teaching them to be accountable. It has to be theirs—not mine, not their parents...just theirs. Most kids know when they are not putting in an honest effort. They are the only ones who can decide how hard to work or not work. The sets and the coach do not matter anywhere near as much as the swimmers themselves. You can have the best sets and the best coaches, but if you do not have committed swimmers, you don’t have much. SW: Coach Sergio Lopez was an out-ofthe-box thinker. Any day-to-day training examples? JS: We think for ourselves. We focus on what is best for our program and do not worry about others. In recent years, our

senior program has trained together with all abilities doing the same practice. Some days we split by gender, some days by distance. At some points in the season, we do upwards of six hours of dryland per week; other times as little as one hour, depending upon program needs. SW: As a former ranked world distance swimmer, do you still work out? JS: Regularly. I run, lift, play basketball— in an old man’s league—and swim on occasion. I am very competitive. I can’t just go run or swim for the fun of it. There has to be a purpose, a competition or race in the near future to really get me going. Otherwise I am bored.  Michael J. Stott is an ASCA Level 5 coach whose Collegiate School (Richmond, Va.) teams have won nine state high school championships. He has been named a 2017 recipient of NISCA’s Outstanding Service Award.

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JUNIOR SWIMMER

UP & COMERS AGE GROUP SWIMMER OF THE MONTH BY TAYLOR BRIEN

Claire Curzan

Claire Curzan, 12, of Raleigh Swimming Association, N.C., turned heads last December when she downed the national age group record in the 11-12 girls 100 yard fly with a sizzling 54.57. Since then, she has lowered the mark two more times—a 54.38 in February and a 54.00 in March. She also bettered the 50 fly NAG record twice in early 2017—24.66 and 24.39—giving her the top spots on USA Swimming’s All-Time Top 100 list for those two events. Brent St. Pierre, head coach of RSA, told Swimming World, “The one skill that stands out to anyone who watches Claire swim is how good she is underwater. The late (Hall of Fame coach) Bob Gillett (a pioneer of underwater swimming and extended underwater breakouts) would be proud—she hits her kick count off of every wall whether it’s a 50 or a 200 of fly, back or free.” When asked the best way to describe Curzan, St. Pierre doesn’t hesitate: “Her smile and youth simply light up any room she walks into—Claire is pure sunshine.” Curzan’s athletic ability comes as little surprise—both her parents were dual-sport athletes (dad: swimming and water polo; mom: U-19 national soccer team and NCAA lacrosse champion at Harvard). Outside of the pool, Curzan enjoys surfing, waterskiing and snow skiing, and she’s in an accelerated math program. While Curzan suffers from multiple allergies, she refuses to let it slow her down, so she designed and created an EpiPen sock in which she carries her injection device to treat serious allergic reactions.  SPONSORED BY

WHAT IS THE BEST THING YOU DO IN SWIMMING?

My underwaters and turns are what make my swimming strong. A few times a week, I practice in a 20-yard pool, so I have lots of opportunities to work on those skills.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE TOUGHEST WORKOUTS/SETS YOU’VE DONE? Pyramid set—100 free, 200 free, 300 free, 400 free, 500 free, 400 free, 300 free, 200 free, 100 free—all on a 1:15 interval (per 100).

WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS YEAR?

Going to my first summer junior nationals in my mom’s hometown of Long Island, N.Y. Hopefully, I will get to see some of my cousins!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT SWIMMING?

The camaraderie and friendships made in swimming make the sport very enjoyable. It’s a home away-from-home that I can be myself with people who enjoy doing what I do. Also, I love to compete and race.

WHO IS YOUR SWIMMING IDOL...AND WHY?

• Missy Franklin...I’ve watched “Touch the Wall” 29 times, and I love her free spirit and loving nature toward everyone. • Elaine Breeden...a fellow butterflyer. Her husband is an intern at Duke, where my dad trained, and they plan to meet next month. • Maya DiRado...her love of swimming shows in her smile. • Dana Volmer...multi-Olympian—she has the dedication to achieve world records and Olympic medals after having a son. to see more stories as well as race videos for Claire Curzan.

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017


COLUMNS

Sponsored by

guttertalk

HOW DO YOU DEAL WITH PARENTAL JITTERS WHILE WATCHING YOUR SON RACE AT NCAAs? STORY AND PHOTOS BY CATHLEEN PRUDEN

TERRIE LINKER / Mother of Adam Linker, North Carolina State senior

Being here is wonderful—nerves were much worse last year. This year, I’m just trying to enjoy it. It’s his last meet ever, so I’m not too nervous—maybe while he’s swimming...otherwise, it’s been good. He’s done so well—for him to make finals at this meet is just wonderful.

LORI HAAS / Mother of Townley Haas, Texas sophomore, NCAA champion and 2016 Olympic gold medalist

I don’t have a secret to the nerves. I think all parents are nervous when their children are performing—in the water, on the soccer field or at a piano recital. You just want your children to do well and have fun and do their best. It is nerve-racking, though. I’m more nervous this time because last year I didn’t have a clue what was going on or what to expect. We had never been to a collegiate meet, and we don’t come from a swimming family, so it was all new to us. This year, I knew a little bit more, so I was a little more nervous coming into this.

KATY MURPHY / Mother of Ryan Murphy, Cal senior and three-time Olympic gold medalist

Believe it or not, I think I was more nervous than I’ve been all four years, and I think it’s just because there’s been so much expectation right now with Ryan and his success. Everybody knows his name. Not everybody knew his name when he was a little freshman. When he was a freshman, he had goals, but other people didn’t have those same goals for him. This year, once the bar is set, everyone wants it set even higher. Ryan did everything right in 2016—his level of intensity and focus to make sure he ate right...that he slept well. I know it’s difficult to sustain that, so I was just happy to see him be a normal 21-yearold boy this year—being with his teammates and having fun. But he went through a bit of emotion this week. After the relay on Thursday night, I think just based on how he was working, he thought the clock would say something different. He reached out to me—if I don’t hear from Ryan, I know he’s good, so when he reached out to me, that made me a little nervous. I just want him to be happy and enjoy it. So, generally, the mantra of (the NCAAs last March) has been, “Ryan, you love to race, just have fun. Enjoy this. It’s almost over”... which is gonna make me cry because I love collegiate swimming.

BRENT PORTER / Father of Andrew Porter, KIM DUDERSTADT / Mother of Michael

Arizona State University senior

Duderstadt, Auburn University senior

It is really hard. There is a lot of talent, and you just have to let all of his training take over. He and his coaches know what they’re doing. This year, it’s a little bittersweet. Freshman year, I wanted him to do really well because I wanted him to feel good about being on the team. This year, I wasn’t so worried about what he did specifically—I just wanted his heart to be happy!

We always wish Andrew would be easier on himself. We try not to contact him a whole lot. He contacts us. So, we don’t really put ourselves out to him and get in his way—(at NCAAs), we allow him to be in his own world. As a parent, you just hope your swimmer is swimming relaxed and swimming at his best and not putting too much self-imposed pressure on himself.  May 2017 / SWIMMINGWORLDMAGAZINE.COM

57


PA R T I N G S H O T

Sponsored by The Subscription Box Service for Competitive Swimmers Take 25% off your first month of Swimfluence with code "SW" at www.swimfluence.com

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SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE / May 2017

Stanford senior Lia Neal (facing camera) gives teammate Simone Manuel a hug at this year’s women’s Division I NCAAs after the two combined with Katie Ledecky and Janet Hu to set an American record in the meet’s last event, the women’s 400 freestyle relay. Says her coach, Greg Meehan: “We really wanted to win that last relay for Lia—give her a little victory lap. There is no better moment for a senior than to win your last race at the NCAA Championships. That is a storybook ending. “She set this thing in motion five years ago when she committed to our program as an Olympian out of high school. Everything just rolled from there. She legitimized our program in that moment.” [PHOTO BY PETER H. BICK]

Swimming World Magazine May 2017 Issue  

ON THE COVER: The University of Texas men won this year's NCAA Division I Swimming and Diving Championships by more than 200 points. The vic...

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