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THE LIFE OF A

PROFESSIONAL SWIMMER

> jessica FROM HEARTBREAK TO MOTIVATION:

hardy

REALITY AT WORK: A SWIMMER’S GUIDE TO ACHIEVING GOALS (PART II)

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CULLEN JONES

TYLER CLARY

JESSICA HARDY DANA VOLLMER

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CHAMPIONS WEAR SPEEDO 速

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JUNE 2013

FEATURES 010 Turning Negatives into Positives

011

by Shoshanna Rutemiller Jessica Hardy’s Olympic experiences— both good and bad—have been, needless to say, extreme. Yet, she still remains competitive and continues to challenge herself with lofty goals, including earning a spot on her third Olympic team in 2016.

013 Survive and Thrive

by Chloe Sutton and Rebecca Ejdervik Chloe Sutton and Rebecca Ejdervik share their experiences as pro swimmers.

018 AthleticFoodie/Let’s Live a Healthier Life by Garrett Weber-Gale

020 Dryside Training: Summer Swim Shape-up! by J.R. Rosania

022 Reality at Work: A Swimmer’s Guide to Achieving Goals (Part II) by Michael J. Stott The second of a two-part article about goal setting shows how coaches work with swimmers and teams to quantify and execute goals.

024 Q&A with Coach Greg Meehan by Michael J. Stott

026 How They Train Felicia Lee by Michael J. Stott 6

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013

DEPARTMENTS 008 A Voice for the Sport 009 Twitter Talk 027 Up & Comers 029 Gutter Talk

020

032 Parting Shot

ON THE COVER Life for Jessica Hardy post-Olympics has included a red carpet appearance at the 2013 Grammy Awards as well as an opportunity to race a car in the 37th annual Toyota Pro/ Celebrity Race as part of the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach. At the same time, the former Swimming World female High School Swimmer of the Year in 2005 has mapped out a number of professional goals—both in and out of the pool. (See stories, pages 10 and 30) cover photo credits: Dress by RVN (rvnnyc. com). Bracelet by Ela Rae (elarae.com). Earrings by Amna Ismail. Fashion Stylist: Amna Ismail. Makeup Artist: Samelia Miller (samelia.com). Special thanks to Nurielle (Nurielle.com) in Las Vegas, NV.

by john m c gillen ]

015 The Life of a Professional Swimmer

008

[ photo

by Shoshanna Rutemiller Teenager Tyler Fowler, who swims for the Tsunami Swim Team of Kansas City, has persevered through multiple surgeries to become an incredible swimmer.

SWIMMING WORLD MAGAZINE (ISSN 0039-7431). Note: permission to reprint articles or excerpts from contents is prohibited without permission from the publisher. The publisher is not responsible for errors in advertisements. Microfilm copies: available from University Microfilms, 313 N. First St., Ann Arbor, MI 48103. Swimming World Magazine is listed in the Physical Education Index. Printed in the U.S.A. © Sports Publications International, June 2013.

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Look at our covers from the past six issues!

K I C K- S TA R T

YO U R

N E W

Y E A R

TOP AQUATIC MOMENTS OF 2012

+

THOMAS SMITH: TRUSTING IN HOPE

JANUARY 2013-VOLUME 54 NO. 1

4

WAYS TO BOOST YOUR POST-HOLIDAY FITNESS!

ANT HONY

ERVIN M E E T

YO U R

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU!

S E V E N WAY S TO E AT H E A LT H I E R IN 2013

> O N WA R D

M OT I VAT I O N

& U P WA R D

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I N S I D E COAC H PAU L GRAHAM’S SUCCESS

FEBRUARY

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T I P S TO S TAY ON T R AC K

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K ATI N K A

MOVE... O N T HE

LEARN

THE “DO”-NUTS A N D B O LT S O F SWIMMING

THOUGHTS FROM THE FRONT LINE

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DAG N Y KNUTSON’S AND GEMMA SPOFFORTH’S BAT T L E S

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TOM SHIELDS LEADING THE B E A R S TO V I C TO R Y

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SWIM LIKE A CHAMPION

BY E AT I N G LIKE A CHAMPION

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2012 TO P 1 2 WORLD MASTERS SWIMMERS OF THE YEAR

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KEVIN CORDES: ARIZONA’S RISING STAR

THE

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THE SWIMMER’S GUIDE TO AC H I E V I N G G OA L S

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FINDING SUCCESS FOR AQ UAT I C AND LIFE O U TC O M E S

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Swimming World is now one voice that can be heard on many levels. by brent t . rutemiller

WHAT’S NEXT FOR

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A Voice for the Sport

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OVERCOMING THE ODDS: T YLER FOWLER’S RISKY SURGERIES

The June issue represents the best of what we have to offer our sport, and we could not be more proud. We have invested in a new generation of writers, designers and marketing people to bring you a product that only a niche magazine can showcase. Look at our covers (at left) from the past six issues! Six months ago, SwimmingWorld Magazine presented to the swimming community a totally redesigned magazine. From the look of the cover to the direction of the contents, Swimming World Magazine was ready for an update. With up-tothe-minute results now available online through SwimmingWorld.com, the magazine has evolved to encompass the lifestyle that comes with aquatic sports. Swimming World Magazine’s content is centered on timeless personality features and aquatic lifestyle articles that couldn’t be found on a Twitter feed or live stream. Readers now enjoy articles about swimmers outside of the pool once the cap and goggles are removed. However, readers still rely on the magazine for educational pieces about training, strength and nutrition. The staff at Swimming World Magazine feels an overwhelming sense of accomplishment because the responses from our readers regarding the redesign have been extremely positive. And while we continue to grow and learn with each new issue, these past six months indicate that the only direction for the magazine to go is up. Jessica Hardy graces the cover of the June 2013 issue of Swimming World Magazine. She represents triumph due to perseverance: the title of the 2012 Golden Goggle award she received at USA Swimming’s annual awards ceremony. Commitment is one of the key components to perseverance. Just as Hardy committed herself to striving for Olympic gold at the 2012 London Olympics, Swimming World Magazine is committed to bringing swimming fans the most accurate information available. We have committed to this standard in all of our platforms: in the print magazine and digitally through SwimmingWorld.com and SwimmingWorld.TV. v

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THE LIFE OF A

> jessica

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E D I TO R I A L, P RO D U CT I O N, M E RC H A N D I S I N G, M A R K E T I N G A N D A DV E RT I S I N G O F F I C E 2744 East Glenrosa Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85016 Toll Free: 800-352-7946 Phone: 602-522-0778 • Fax: 602-522-0744 www.SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Edito rial and P ro ducti o n e-mail: Editorial@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Senior Editor — Bob Ingram e-mail: BobI@SwimmingWorld.com Managing Editor — Jason Marsteller e-mail: JasonM@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Graphic Arts Designer— Kaitlin Kelly e-mail: KaitlinK@SwimmingWorld.com Staff Writer — Shoshanna Rutemiller e-mail: ShoshannaR@SwimmingWorld.com Fitness Trainer — J.R. Rosania Chief Photographer — Peter H. Bick Staff Writer — Michael Stott SwimmingWorldMagazine.com WebMaster e-mail: WebMaster@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com M ark e ting and A dv e rtising Advertising@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Marketing Coordinator — Tiffany Elias e-mail: TiffanyE@SwimmingWorld.com M U LT I - M E D I A Writer/Producer — Jeff Commings e-mail: JeffC@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com swim sh o p Product Manager — Richard Krzyzanowski e-mail: swimshop@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com

I N T E R N AT I O N A L CO R R E S PO N D E N T S Africa: Chaker Belhadj (TUN); Australia: Wayne Goldsmith, Ian Hanson; Europe: Norbert Agh (HUN), Camilo Cametti (ITA), Federico Ferraro (ITA), Oene Rusticus (NED), Steven Selthoffer (GER), Rokur Jakupsstovu (FAR), Tom Willdridge (GBR); Japan: Hideki Mochizuki; Middle East: Baruch “Buky” Chass, Ph.D. (ISR); South Africa: Neville Smith (RSA); South America: Jorge Aguado (ARG), Alex Pussieldi (BRA)

official magazine of:

REALITY AT WORK: A SWIMMER’S GUIDE TO ACHIEVING GOALS (PART II)

8

Chairman of the Board, President — Richard Deal e-mail: DickD@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Publisher, CEO — Brent T. Rutemiller e-mail: BrentR@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Circulation/Art Director — Karen Deal e-mail: KarenD@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Circulation Assistant — Judy Jacob e-mail: Subscriptions@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com Advertising Production Coordinator — Betsy Houlihan e-mail: BetsyH@SwimmingWorldMagazine.com

Peter H. Bick, USA Today Sports Images, Reuters, Getty Images

FROM HEARTBREAK TO MOTIVATION:

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P.O. Box 20337, Sedona, AZ 86341 Toll Free in USA & Canada: 800-511-3029 Phone: 928-284-4005 • Fax: 928-284-2477 www.SwimmingWorldMagazine.com

P H OTO G RA P H E R S/S WTV

PROFESSIONAL SWIMMER

hardy

P U B L I S H I N G, C I RC U LAT I O N A N D ACCO U N T I N G O F F I C E

Brent T. Rutemiller Publisher, CEO

endorsed by:

publisher:

P.O. Box 20337 Sedona, AZ 86341 Phone: 928.284.4005 Fax: 928.284.2477 www.SwimmingWorldMagazine.com

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twitter >

Jessica Hardy @ s w imha r d y

Photo shoot for @SwimmingWorld. Fun to get glammed up!

>

talk @SW IMMINGWORLD

SwimFoundation

@SwimFoundation

Great story about Greg Burgess, Natâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Team Alum and Olympian, stepping up to help a local club@ via @SwimmingWorld

>

Erin Quinn

@ Er inQuinn11

OK tried out new #Dryland exercises from @SwimmingWorld magazine yesterday. #CantMoveToday! Lol. Got a little crazy with the med ball! #Ouch

>

John Lohn

@ JohnLohn

Now calling @swimvortex my new home. Excited to be writing for what was formerly swimnews. Thanks to @ SwimmingWorld for a great 13 years.

>

Eve and Candace @ Eve a nd Ca nd a ce

@SwimmingWorld @ swimhardy 2013 has been pretty epic so far w/ the covers! June 2013

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turning negatives into positives

by shoshanna rutemiller photos by john m c gillen

Jessica Hardy’s Olympic experiences—both good and bad—have been, needless to say, extreme. Yet, she still remains competitive and continues to challenge herself with lofty goals, including earning a spot on her third Olympic team in 2016. “I’ve been through a lot,” Jessica Hardy said, addressing a crowd of nearly 1,000 people, her hands clasped around a heavy circular goggle-shaped statue plated in gold. Moments before, Hardy was presented the 2012 USA Swimming Golden Goggle Perseverance Award. She was nominated for the award along with Tyler Clary, Anthony Ervin and Davis Tarwater. “A lot” understates everything 26-year-old Hardy has gone through following the 2008 Olympic Trials. She earned spots on the Beijing U.S. Olympic team in the 100 breaststroke, 50 freestyle and 400 freestyle relay. Then, weeks before the Games, Hardy learned that her “A” and “B” Trials blood samples had tested positive for the banned substance clenbuterol. Crushed and confused, Hardy bowed off the U.S. Olympic team. 10

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“I had no explanation for my positive test for over a year. (But) I knew with 100 percent clarity that I was an innocent athlete and didn’t intentionally do anything wrong,” she said. Hardy watched swimmers she had beaten less than a month earlier win Olympic medals in Beijing. But instead of hanging up her cap and goggles and calling it a career, Hardy decided to turn her heartbreak into motivation. “The second they told me I couldn’t swim anymore, a switch turned on (inside) me, and that was all I wanted to do,” says Hardy. “I knew that I deserved to keep going, and I knew that I deserved to go to the Olympics.... It made me work really, really hard.” Hardy threw herself into proving to the World AntiDoping Agency (WADA) that the positive test result came from a tainted supplement. She succeeded: her suspension was reduced to a single year, and the IOC allowed Hardy to compete for a spot on the 2012 U.S. London Olympic team. She qualified for the team in the 50 and 100 free, winning gold and bronze Olympic medals in the women’s 400 medley relay and 400 freestyle relay, respectively. TIME FOR SOME FUN With her medals in tow, and years of dedication finally rewarded, the thought of immediately returning to training

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was unappealing. So Hardy raced her way around the world, competing in the European and Asian legs of the 2012 FINA World Cup circuit. “I didn’t have the dedication to put my head down and do lap after lap,” she says. “I can count on two hands the number of practices I’ve been to. After such a long eight years, I needed a little bit of fun!” And she’s been having fun. Hardy dove into planning her wedding to longtime boyfriend, Swiss Olympian Dominik Meichtry. “(Wedding planning) never really feels like it’s going to be done, but we’ve definitely made a good dent,” she said. And she’s already picked out a dress for the October 2013 wedding, but won’t reveal any specific details because “...we’re keeping it kind of private.” However, Hardy will willingly talk about her experience attending the 2013 Grammy Awards. She walked the red carpet with the stars back in February, adorned with the ultimate accessory: her Olympic gold medal. “It was a blast,” she said. “Going is one of the perks that comes with being an Olympic medalist. I still had to pinch myself when I was out on the red carpet, especially because I got there because of swimming. “I met all of these people who were thanking me for representing my country and for all of my hard work. It’s almost surreal because I listen to their music on the radio on the way to practice,” Hardy said, adding, “It shows how much America appreciates its athletes.”

SCION), although she admits she was “a little scared.” Hardy quickly righted her car, got back on the course, and finished the race—which is all she wanted going into the event: “I just wanted to have fun with it and finish.” PROFESSIONAL PURSUITS Life for Hardy post-Olympics hasn’t been all fun, games and celebrity appearances. Before she attempts to earn a spot on the 2016 Rio U.S. Olympic team, Hardy has mapped out a number of professional goals. “My goal is to write a book leading up to Rio, exposing the depths of the adversity I had to overcome and how I overcame it,” she said. “I want (the book) to be about overcoming adversity and finding strength through struggle.” Although it is still early on in the writing process, Hardy wants to develop the book as part memoir, part self-help tutorial. “My mom is a psychotherapist,” she said. “It has always been an interest of mine—finding the best in yourself.” Hardy relied heavily on sports therapy to get back into the pool after she left the 2008 U.S. Olympic team. “Because it happened during the Olympic period, it was blown into huge proportions...it was crazy. I had never made the Olympic team before, so (I didn’t) know what it was like to be in the spotlight for something positive, let alone something so shockingly negative.” Known for turning negatives into positives, Hardy has spent a lot of her time post-London doing motivational public speaking appearances. “I talk about goal setting, nutrition, training—pretty much anything that applies to swimming and how I got to where I’m at as an athlete,” she said. “I try to speak as often as I can, and it’s been pretty steady since the Olympics—at least two a month.”

“I knew that I deserved to keep going, and I knew that I deserved to go to the Olympics...It made me work really, really hard.”

BREAKNECK SPEED After the Grammy Awards, Hardy spent a month training to race a car in the 37th annual Toyota Pro/Celebrity Race as part of the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach weekend at Long Beach, Calif. “(The race) was something that wasn’t even on my radar, but they called me up, and I decided to do it—even if it was a little out of my comfort zone.” The racetrack is a 1.97-mile looping course that runs through the streets of Long Beach. Hardy, a Long Beach native, remembers watching the event every year as a kid: “I grew up watching the race, and it’s one of the biggest weekends in Long Beach. I’ve been watching the race since I can remember.” Training involved long hours of classroom work to learn how to race the course safely at breakneck speeds. Hardy said some sessions lasted from 6 in the morning until 10 at night! “They were teaching us to actually drive for real. It was still scary—you never get used to going 140 miles per hour in a car!” Come race day, 140 MPH proved a little hard for Hardy to handle. About halfway into the race, she spun out and crashed into the wall. There wasn’t any serious damage (except for a big dent on the left side of Hardy’s Toyota

BIG GOALS Nevertheless, Hardy recognizes that she needs to step up her competition schedule if she wants to continue competing with the world’s best. “I have to get back in there. The Grand Prix in Mesa (April 11-13) was my first on the Grand Prix circuit, and I have big goals for (World Championships in) Barcelona.” One of those goals is lowering her world mark in the 50 breaststroke: “I hit a plateau. I haven’t done a best time (in the 50 breaststroke) since 2009, which is a long time.” Hardy was the first woman to break the 30-second barrier in the 50 meter breaststroke. She set a 29.95 world record at the U.S. Open on Aug. 6, 2009. The following day, she lowered the mark to a 29.80. Hardy is superstitious about sharing her goals in any event, including the 50 breast. “(That’s) an event I’ve been —continued on 12 June 2013

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kind of superstitious about sharing my goals because it’s an event I’ve been traditionally successful in,” she said. “I’ve been about a tenth off the world record for the past couple of years, but if I could get under that 30 mark, that would be wonderful! It’s been fun to kind of push myself in practice, and to have some goals that I’m passionate about.” That doesn’t mean Hardy is giving up on the sprint freestyle events that got her on the London Olympic team—she’s just learning how to balance both strokes. “They are very different strokes, so I have to approach them differently,” she said. “With breaststroke, I have to be cognizant of my technique all the time. Freestyle is more about power and body position. It’s dynamic training every day, mixing it up and challenging myself.” COACH -ATHLETE RELATIONSHIP Hardy trains with Dave Salo as a post-grad at the Trojan Swim Club in Southern California. Salo first coached Hardy in 2003, when she began making waves as a top-ranked high school swimmer. She was named Swimming World Magazine’s female High School Swimmer of the Year in 2005, earning the honor for becoming the first scholastic female to break the minute barrier in the 100 yard breaststroke (59.20). Following her incredible high school career, Hardy swam for the University of California at Berkeley for the 200506 and 2006-07 seasons, and won the 100 breast at the 2006 NCAAs. After her second season, Hardy left college swimming to turn pro, moving back to Southern California to train again with Salo. After so many years together, Hardy can now see how their coach-athlete relationship evolved. “I think our relationship started out as a dictatorship in the beginning. I did what I was told because he knows what he was doing,” Hardy said. “But over the years, it has kind of evolved into a friendship, and I’m willing to give more feedback. It’s a good relationship for me now as an adult swimmer.” MOVING FORWARD Even though her evolution from a high school swimmer to a professional athlete was anything but seamless, Hardy has persevered. She wants to prove herself again on the world stage, reclaim world records and break the ones she already owns. She’s proven her mental fortitude by overcoming the biggest obstacle an Olympian can face: having her Olympic dream stripped from her because of circumstances out of her control. Because of that, Hardy knows she can only control herself. But that’s not stopping her from looking ahead to the next big dream, whether it is in or out of the pool. “If I start getting my butt kicked pretty bad, I will gladly take a step back and call it a career and keep my dignity,” she says. “But as long as I’m still competitive and having fun, I’ll keep challenging myself and hope to go to Rio.” v 12

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Survive AnD Thrive by shoshanna rutemiller

N

Teenager Tyler Fowler, who swims for the Tsunami Swim Team of Kansas City, has persevered through multiple surgeries to become an incredible swimmer.

photo

( at

left ) provided by proswim visuals

obody suspected that the 18-year-old swimmer surging ahead of the field in the final heat of the 1650 yard freestyle at the recent NCSA Junior National Championships was once fighting for his life. Less than two years earlier, Tyler Fowler was on an operating table as surgeons opened his skull to remove a massive blood clot that covered most of his brain. “When we got (to the hospital), they said I had the better half of a three-two flip, which meant I had a 60 percent chance of living,” Fowler said. His problems began six months earlier, about halfway into his sophomore year of high school. Fowler suffered from severe headaches that disrupted his schoolwork and swim training. “We kept going into the hospital, and they kept saying, ‘We can’t find anything—it might be migraines,’ ” Fowler explained. Then one day, he returned to the hospital in a far more severe condition. His body had turned white. “They sent me to a bigger hospital and found out that I had a blood clot in my brain. It was covering most of the veins on the right side of my brain and a little bit of the left.” Unfortunately, the surgery to remove the blood clot was unsuccessful because the clot was too structured. Doctors put Fowler

on blood thinners to boost his body’s natural healing abilities. “I was under intensive care until that was sustainable,” he said. But the blood clot was just the beginning of Fowler’s health troubles. Soon, his vision began deteriorating. “About six months being out of the hospital, my eye doctor kept saying, ‘Your vision is getting worse, (and) I don’t know why it’s getting worse.’ ” The doctor discovered that Fowler had elevated levels of cerebral fluid pressure in his skull. The fluid was pressing against the back of his eyes, causing his eyesight to deteriorate. Fowler needed another surgery to correct the problem. “They put in a thing called a VP (ventriculoperitoneal) shunt,” he explained. “It’s just this tube that runs from my brain to a cavity in my stomach. It drains excess fluid and relieves that pressure on my eyes.” The shunt surgery involves inserting a small tube connected to a valve into a person’s brain. When extra pressure builds up in the brain, the valve opens, draining the excess fluid into the peritoneal cavity. The cavity is located in the stomach, allowing the fluid to be absorbed naturally. Fowler will have his VP shunt the rest of his life. “It’s pretty dangerous to take it out because of where it —continued on 14 June 2013

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survive and thrive—continued from 13

is,” Fowler said. “So they are going to leave it in.”

[ photos

provided by curt fowler ]

BACK IN THE WATER Fowler’s health scares and frequent trips in and out of the hospital meant that his swimming training suffered. When he finally returned to training with Kansas City-based Tsunami Swim Team, Fowler noticed that his teammates and coaches were extraattentive.

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“I was out of the water initially for two-and-a halfmonths. I had to build back from nothing. I kept on going back to the hospital. For the shunt surgery, I was out for a few more weeks.” “When I came back, I got in the water about 45 minutes after my teammates because there was no way I was going to get up early,” Fowler said. “I kind of felt that all eyes were on me. It was really awesome because I felt like my team was there supporting me the whole way.” “Tyler is the most courageous swimmer I have ever been around,” said Thomas Kleiboeker, head coach of the Tsunami Swim Team. “He has always done what we’ve asked him to do. He’s one of the most committed swimmers, and he’s one of the best leaders I’ve had on the team in 10, 12 years.” Fowler has swum for Tsunami for more than a decade, and he holds team records in distance freestyle and IM at every level—from 8-and-under all the way to 15-16 and open. “He’s been with us since he was an 8-and-under age group swimmer,” Kleiboeker said. “It’s very special when a coach can coach somebody like Ty because he’s been with us the whole time.”

When Fowler finally returned to the pool after shunt surgery, it took some time to adjust to swimming with the shunt. However, now he feels that it does not interfere with his training or competitions: “Initially, it did because I would feel a pinching in my stomach. I would have to get out of practice. But I got used to it.” Fowler has seen monumental success in the pool ever since. The distance stud won the 1650 at the NCSA Junior Nationals in Orlando, Fla., in March with a remarkable come-from-behind swim. His 15:12.54 clocking was 10 seconds under his previous best from a month earlier. He also captured the bronze medal in the 1000 free. NEVER GIVE UP Fowler’s story is exceptionally moving because, after the failed attempt to remove the blood clot in his brain, doctors believed he would never swim again. But Fowler knew he wasn’t done. And that kind of attitude keeps him pursuing bigger and bigger goals. He’s committed to swimming next fall for the University of Arizona, which finished third at the recent NCAA Division I Championships. Fowler has a number of personal expectations for his first season under Coach Eric Hansen: “(I want to) make NCAAs my freshman year for Arizona,” he said. “And just get used to the college life and practices...and get to class.” “He’s come so far,” Kleiboeker shares. “He’s experienced some major roadblocks in life—forks in the road, so to speak. He’s committed himself to persevering through all of those down times, and through all of that, he’s become an incredible swimmer.” Through the adversity, Fowler recognizes that he couldn’t have done it alone. He credits his success to a number of people: “I think it was a combination of my team and my friends and my coach, my parents. A lot of people think that swimming is not a team sport, but it definitely is.” v

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The Life of a Professional Swimmer by chloe sutton and rebecca ejdervik

[ photos

by peter h . bick ]

B

eing a professional swimmer involves much more than eat- sleep - swim, and the following perspectives from two athletes prove that notion. Chloe Sutton is a two -time USA Olympian who made the decision to skip college swimming and be a teenage professional swimmer. Sweden’s Rebecca Ejdervik turned pro after completing her eligibility at Arizona State University. Here are the first- person accounts of their experiences.

at 17 had nothing to do with financial gain. The first reason was that I was an open water swimmer who had to spend a lot of time training and traveling internationally in order to get the necessary experience to compete at the elite level. Having to maintain the high yardage, busy travel schedule and ocean practices, I felt that adding college to the mix would be overwhelming and take away from my swimming. The other reason was that I had found my coach. My father was in the military during my upbringing. We moved about every year-and-a-half, which never allowed me to have a team to call my own. When I found Coach Bill Rose of the Mission Viejo Nadadores, I wanted to stay with him. He figured out what worked for me very quickly, and he had already put me on one Olympic team (Beijing 2008, women’s 10K, 22nd). I yearned for consistency and I wanted to stay put for a while. My dad retired from the military, I became a professional swimmer, and I started taking college classes at an online university. I know that this was the right decision for me. I believe that I would not have been on the 2012 Olympic team (in London) without Coach Rose. —continued on 16 pictured > chloe sutton

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and

below )

CHLOE SUTTON When making the transition to becoming a professional swimmer, there are basically two paths from which to choose. First, you can decide to forego your NCAA eligibility and begin your professional career right out of high school. Or you can turn pro after you complete your NCAA eligibility. Naturally, athletes in both groups have to find a way to fund their training. My main reasons for becoming a professional swimmer June 2013

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ejdervik

( above

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next page )

pro swimmer—continued from 15

provided by rebecca ejdervik ]

[ photo

pictured > rebecca

The paychecks that you get for swimming professionally come from a variety of places. First, as a professional athlete you have the opportunity to qualify for the USA Swimming Athlete Partnership Plan. This is a relatively new program that pays $3,000 a month for living and training expenses in exchange for doing two appearances for USA Swimming and attending two Grand Prix competitions. We can also earn prize money if we place well at certain competitions such as World Cups and the Arena Grand Prix. Sponsors will also pay an athlete to endorse their company. These contracts range from just receiving gear to being paid very large amounts of money. Finally, professional swimmers can do a range of different types of appearances, including clinics, speaking engagements, charity events and autograph signings. For many, their financial ability to continue in the sport depends entirely on how well they perform. Some crumble under this pressure, some rise to the challenge, some thrive in it. How you handle this new added element will determine how long you are able to continue in the sport. I have done all of the above. I now have the ability to pay for my education that I know is so important, and I have been able to save a little for the future. My favorite part of being a professional athlete is a tie between the travel and the swim clinics. In the eight years that I have been on the national team, I have been able to swim in different countries and experience a range of different cultures. Being able to see the world has been an amazing growing experience. Also, the clinics that I do are very important to me. Being able to give back to the sport and inspire the next generation of swimmers is a very fulfilling job. Swimming is a growing sport where you are seeing more and more people call themselves “professional.” There are a lot of exciting new opportunities as long as you can keep swimming fast. It is possible to make a living off of your performances in the pool, but it takes a lot of balance. I have been blessed to be able to do well in the sport so far, but the future of swimming is going to be interesting, and I hope to be a part of it. v

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REBECCA EJDERVIK Most swimmers see the end of their college career as a natural end to their lives with competitive swimming. I knew I wanted to give swimming a little more time to see what I could accomplish as a professional athlete outside of the college sphere. I was prepared that it would be hard in more ways than one, but to quit was not an option. I was excited to step into the “postgraduate scene,” and with that, also change my relationship to the sport. Before I left for college, I did try to have swimming as my main focus in my home country of Sweden. Therefore, I kind of knew what to expect out of the lifestyle I was getting myself into once again. However, being older and having four years of college swimming behind me gave me a different attitude leading into it. The past year has made me learn a lot about myself. I am not swimming for a team, for points or dual meet victories anymore, which was a major motivation for me. Swimming is for me now, and I approach it on my own terms. And even though I have other professional swimmers to train with, everyone is individually focused on their swimming careers, including me. In college, you are directed one way by team rules and a set competition schedule. You always have your teammates around to hold you accountable, and you all work toward the same goal of having the team succeed. Being a professional swimmer now gives me more freedom to determine what I want and need out of practice from all I have learned the past 20 years in the sport. With freedom comes more individual responsibility for my swimming and preparations, which I believe has been an important development for me as a swimmer and person. Individual responsibility is something that signifies success on a club team in Sweden, so I had some experience with that from before. My days consist of practice and a lot of downtime, which was probably the biggest challenge for me. Some might think that it sounds like a dream come true to do whatever you want during the day. Even though I have the luxury of living in a city such as Miami, and I get to do what I love, it was hard in the beginning, and I did get bored once in a while. Some people are perfectly fine with that lifestyle. I, however, need to feel productive in some way every day. Therefore, I took the opportunity to engage

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in volunteer work and enroll in a class to get scubacertified—something that had been on my bucket list for a while. Choosing to swim professionally after my college career also comes with financial challenges, much like any recent college graduate experiences. I do have a couple of sponsors, TYR being the biggest one. However, since I do not have tons of potential sponsors running after me, and since Swedish swimmers do not get funding from our federation, I had to find an employer who is fine with me being away for weeks at a time and only able to work a few hours each day. What makes it even trickier is the fact that I am not an American citizen, which narrows down the available jobs significantly. However, I was lucky and got a lot of help from my coaches in Miami. I have been coaching a lot this past year and I love it. There cannot be a more rewarding job than sharing the swimming expertise I have gained over the years and also see how younger and older swimmers get better with the help I give them. Having a job—as well as two very supportive parents— has made this past year as a professional swimmer reality for me. Despite its challenges, being a professional athlete comes with many rewards—I get to travel over the world and visit places I would never get the chance to see otherwise. Just within the past 12 months, I have been to places such as Japan, Italy and Turkey. During the trips, I constantly meet people and get to know some of the best swimmers in the world. I know I cannot swim like this forever. Therefore, I enjoy every moment I get to have my sport as my job, and get the opportunity to compete on the highest level in the world. To find a job that you love is what all people want to do, and as of right now, I have found just that job. v

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by garrett weber - gale

T

he evolution of a professional athlete’s diet, competition routine, training and racing strategies is something that comes through a lot of trial and error, time and patience. It’s easy to look at the top athletes and think, “These people have it all figured out—how can I do that?” I thought this very same thing when I was a kid and watched the likes of Josh Davis, Neil Walker, Gary Hall Jr. and Misty Hyman competing for gold. However, as I matured from an age grouper, through high school and college, and on to professional swimming, I realized they didn’t have it all figured out—and what they did, it took a long time to get there. For most athletes, unless you’re a “super freak” such as Michael Phelps, Dara Torres or Ian Crocker, it takes a long time to get to the top ranks of the sport. This means that there will be countless meets to experiment eating different things for breakfast, warming up in new ways, eating and drinking a variety of items throughout a meet and even training with different coaches until you really start hitting your stride. LEARN FROM OTHERS Long ago, when I was around 15 years old, I had a coach

take me to a meet in Minnesota to compete with some really great swimmers. When we showed up at the pool, my coach said, “Watch what the best swimmers do. Watch how they warm up. Watch what they do during their races, how far they kick out under water, what they eat after the race, how long they warm down.” I was amazed—what a great idea! My coach added, “We need to learn from what the best athletes are doing and mimic some of their practices.” I became a freak for watching others, picking apart exactly what they were doing, and trying to take things and make them my own: • One meet, I saw Neil Walker stretch right before his races. I tried it during my next meet and didn’t feel comfortable with it, so I stopped. • I saw Aaron Peirsol walk up to the blocks without his cap and goggles on, so I tried it. I felt anxious not having my cap and goggles ready to go before heading to the block, so I continued to put them on beforehand. These are just a couple of examples of the many things that I tried and didn’t like. Other things, however, I did like... and made them my own: • Natalie Coughlin wore her parka to the blocks at almost every meet that I saw her. I thought, “Wow! That looks warm and cozy.” Soon, I started wearing a parka. • Gary Hall Jr. put his hood up like a boxer. I tried putting my parka hood up at a couple of meets and loved it. The hood was like my own little security blanket on the deck, and it made me feel at ease. Some swimmers swung their arms, others used stretch cords in warm-up, a few were eating right after they got out of the race. I was learning. I was taking it in. My routine was falling into place. DISCOVER WHAT WORKS BEST FOR YOU As a youth, I ate basically whatever I felt like in the morning before a race. Sometimes I’d eat oatmeal, other times eggs, pancakes, waffles, grilled cheese, yogurt or even a sugary cereal on rare occasion. There was no rhyme or reason for what I was doing. In my training, I had realized that being consistent and sticking to a training plan made a positive difference on my performance. Why not try it with what I eat before meets? Slowly, I began whittling out things that I didn’t like, didn’t make me feel good or that my nutritionist told me to discard. Sugary cereals were definitely out. Bacon before meets—no way! Big omelets were gone, too. All the heavy and rich foods were removed from my diet, as I soon began to understand that slow, long burning energy was what I needed. Now I go with oatmeal and kamut mixed with quinoa,

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gale

milled flax seeds, almond butter, blueberries and some honey. If you don’t know what some of that is, look it up and try it for yourself! This meal was the perfect way to wake up to something tasty, filling, but not heavy. You don’t want to head to the blocks feeling bloated. I was fueled up and ready to go! As a professional athlete who has competed at many World Championships, the Olympics and countless U.S. nationals, I am still learning every day, every meet I attend and from many different people around me. Even the best of the best are still working to figure out ways they can modify their training, warm-up, diet and pre-race routines. Take a few minutes to watch what others are doing. Experiment with what looks good—and maybe even some things that “shock” you. You never know what might help you become the best athlete you can be. Also, don’t ever be afraid to ask for help. As I’ve discovered from many years in the sport, swimmers love helping other swimmers. Even the greats such as the Olympic gold medalists will give a helping hand when you ask. v Here is a recipe I love making to drizzle over salads and vegetables. This is an easy way to pack extra natural flavor with fresh and nutritious produce items:

Olympic gold medalist Garrett Weber-Gale and his family founded AthleticFoodie in 2008 on the belief that delicious food can be healthy, too. The company’s mission is to show athletes—particularly swimmers—how tasty, healthy food and fitness can easily become an important part of everyone’s daily routine. Weber-Gale’s passion is to help others realize how good nutrition can make a difference in their lives. For more information, visit www.athleticfoodie.com.

strawberry spice vinaigrette INGREDIENTS: • 1 cup strawberries, diced • 6 tbs canola oil • 1 tsp orange zest

• ¼ cup orange juice • 1 tbs lemon juice • 1-¼ tsp coriander • ½ tsp cardamon

DIRECTIONS: • Add strawberries and canola oil to a small food processor. Blend until smooth. • Add orange zest, orange juice, lemon juice, coriander and cardamom to the food processor. Blend until smooth. • Use dressing over salads and vegetables. • Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 7-10 days.

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dryside // training

summ e r swim shap e - up! by j . r . rosania photos by kaitlin kelly demonstrated by samantha caldwell and j . r . rosania

Summer is right around the corner, and you’re looking to shape up both your swimming and your physique for summer fun. Well, you’re in luck! This month’s article gives you exercises plus conditioning and nutritional tips. Use the following info as guidelines, and adjust as needed. CONDITIONING ACTIVITIES Choose a cardiovascular activity other than swimming. Try walking, jogging, hiking, biking, rowing, and perform 20 to 40 minutes of low heart rate (about 70 percent of your max). This will burn fat as a fuel source and help you burn body fat. Do this one to three times a week, preferably on non-swim days. Drink plenty of water.

2

DUMBBELL TRICEP EXTENSION Sitting on a stability ball, perform a dumbbell tricep extension.

4 med ball crunch with knee lift While lying on your back and holding a medicine ball, begin to do an upward crunch. At the same time, do a hip-up with your knees bent. Lower together and repeat. stability ball shoulder press While sitting on a stability ball, perform alternating shoulder press movements.

Complete three sets of 15 reps for the accompanying exercises. Do not max out or go to failure on any of them. Rest one minute between each exercise. v

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stability ball leg raises While holding a stability ball with your legs and lying on your back, perform leg lifts.

3

NUTRITION GUIDELINES Count how many calories a day you take in. Find a Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) formula to find out how many calories a day is appropriate for you—http:// www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/ bmr-formula.php. Begin to eat 300 fewer calories a day—or less if you’re over that number. This also will help you become leaner. Every three to five days, eat extra calories by 300 to recharge your fat burning abilities. The combination of these guidelines and the exercises shown here will help you “lean out” and “shape up” for the rest of the summer!

J.R. Rosania, B.S., exercise science, is one of the nation’s top performance enhancement coaches. He is the owner and CEO of Healthplex, LLC, and has finished the Ironman Triathlon 18 times. He also serves as Swimming World Magazine’s fitness trainer and was named one of “America’s Top Trainers” by Men’s Journal and Vogue magazines. Check out Rosania’s website at www.jrhealthplex.net.

1

MED BALL PUSH - UPS Using a medicine ball, perform push-ups.

5

6 lunge with med ball twist Holding a medicine ball, lunge forward. At the lowest position, do a full twist with the med ball. Stand up and repeat with opposite leg.

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A S W I M M E R’S G U I D E TO

Achieving

GOALS

high school record in the 500 yard free (4:31.38, which also was a 15-16 national age group record) and added 15-16 NAG marks in the 1000 (9:22.35) and 1650 freestyles (15:28.36) as well as the 400 medley (3:40.53) and 800 free (7:16.04) relays.

WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF US? So, how does the process work if you are not an Olympian, but rather a potential state champion, a motivated swimmer or maybe even a coach with non-elite athletes? Rod Montrie, coach at The Madeira by michael j . stott = photo by peter h . bick School in McLean, Va., is a recipient of NISCA’s David H. Robertson Excellence The second of a two-part article about goal setting in Coaching Award. His teams have won five Virginia Independent School shows how coaches work with swimmers and teams to Championships, and he has mentored quantify and execute goals. In last month’s magazine, Bill Olympic Trials qualifiers and an NCAA championship finalist. Smyth, head men’s and women’s coach at Boston University, “I use short-term goal setting for practical improvement (often around shared his measured approach to the big dreaming, technique or race strategy),” he says, “a planning, prioritizing, executing and re-evaluating required nuts-and-bolts swimming journey that requires embracing and ownership by coach and athlete on a daily, weekly or for successful aquatic and life outcomes. by-meet basis.” Regarding season planning, Montrie asks his varsity hen asked about her goal in September 2011, swimmers to swim fast just twice—at the league and state Katie Ledecky responded, “To make the Olympic meets. “I want them to look at the dual meets as fun sprint team.” It is hard to dream much bigger than workouts and relays. Our rival meets end up being very that—unless it is to win an Olympic gold medal. intense, but we try not to overload swimmers too often Ledecky “took ownership of that goal,” recalls Yuri emotionally during mid-season. Suguiyama, her coach at the time. With a plan in place, “Long-term goal setting involves a competitive ladder— Ledecky kept a daily journal, made a trip to the Olympic for example, making the team, competing on relays and Training Center in Colorado Springs and followed a individual events (C, B, A), qualifying for league champs, calculated and graduated competitive schedule leading to scoring at league champs, qualifying for states, scoring at Olympic Trials. A successful performance at the May 2012 states (B final, A final), titles, team record, league record, Grand Prix confirmed for the 15-year-old that she could state record, All-American. compete with the nation’s best. “The questions (that need to be answered) are ‘How far However, the Olympic Trials produced an initial do you want to go?’ and ‘What are you willing to do to get heartbreak. On the second day of the meet, her 4:05 in the there?’ ” 400 meter free left her 72-hundredths short of making the “Setting goals that are both achievable yet challenging team. Fortunately, “Katie has a bounce-back ability,” says is the key, ” continues Montrie. “If every goal is met every Suguiyama. “The disappointment allowed her to relax and season, then the swimmer is either doing really well or they focus on the 800,” which she won in a Trials record 8:18.78. are not setting their goals high enough. If they never meet After qualifying third in London, coach and swimmer their goals, then either they had a string of tough seasons correctly surmised that the top seeds—native Brit Rebecca or they are setting the goals too high,” he says. Adlington and Denmark’s Lotte Friis—would focus on one another. In the finals, she took command at the start GOAL SETTING FOR TEAMS with a strong opening 100. Then the fearless 15-yearold leveraged a powerful kick to pull away and win the Question: “Does the goal setting strategy employed by Olympic gold medal in American record time (8:14.63). coaches for individuals apply to teams as well?” Since London, Ledecky has been setting more records Chris VanSlooten has coached club, public school and with Nation’s Capital Swim Club (formerly Curl-Burke) and private school swimmers. He answers the question by Stone Ridge School of the Sacred Heart (Bethesda, Md.). saying, “That depends”—upon the culture of the school and This past short course season, she bettered the national the athletes. These days, he directs a state champion squad

REALITY AT WORK

W

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at Fork Union Military Academy (Va.) and the Fork Union Aquatic Club. “All student-athletes arrive in our program with different baggage,” says VanSlooten. “One of my top priorities is to establish an early connection and, as the year progresses, help them unpack and organize their ‘baggage.’ ” His process is to: • Identify leaders and get them to serve as small group leaders, helping new cadets in the classroom and in the pool; • Meet with the team early to establish rapport; • Meet regularly to talk about life, family, interests, swimming and goal setting; • Pray together; • Have formal and informal team meetings. “At the first formal team meeting, we discuss how to be successful with each person playing a significant role. We ask how personal goals will fit into team goals as we focus on giving and serving others. “The next day, we do individual goal setting. Each person gets a goal-setting chart, a copy of the USA Swimming Motivational Times, national high school records, senior and junior national times, state cuts and first-, eighth- and 16th-place times from previous conference and state meets. I then have athletes identify their current best time per event and their athletic and classroom strengths and weaknesses. Then they write how they intend to improve those strengths and strengthen their weaknesses.” Season-long formal and informal meetings follow. VanSlooten posts all goals on a whiteboard in his office. “I want swimmers to know what the daily team goals are and how they need to apply them to their personal goals. Everything we do in practice relates to our team goals. The more specific I am with them, the better the results. We stress the little things and record all test set times,” he says. THE “LITTLE THINGS” APPROACH Stressing the little things has been integral to VanSlooten’s last two coaching stops, both of which have required a resolute approach when dealing with athletes and their unique cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. In working with junior Ali Khalafalla, one of three Egyptians on his FUMA team, the two devised a plan to reach the following goals: EVENT (SCY)

GOAL

ACTUAL

50 Free

21.9

20.92

100 Free

46.35

45.21 (state champion)

100 Back

50.18

51.84

200 Back

1:58.00

1:58.93 (unshaved/ untapered)

This year, Khalafalla’s goal was to improve his streamlines, kicking and maintain tempo to the finish. “Last year, Ali did 50 meter kicks on :55; now he is on a :45 base,” says VanSlooten. “We also increased his power with weight room exercises specific to swimming. In race analysis, we

pictured > Katie Ledecky reacts to winning the 800 meter freestyle at the 2012 Olympic Trials in Omaha, Neb.

projected splits required for every race phase, recording each swim on main sets. In addition, we tracked minimummaximum totals (stroke count added to time) to get to his goal times.” At Oliver Wendell Holmes High School in San Antonio, VanSlooten’s “little things” approach meant securing continued commitment by athletes and parents to the core beliefs of honor, integrity, discipline and excellence— qualities not always prevalent under previous Husky coaches. VanSlooten admits he inherited a squad that was viewed locally as one of thugs and verified as losers, based on a history of last-place conference finishes. Working with a predominantly Hispanic roster in four short years, VanSlooten altered both team culture and fortunes as exemplified by his work with Angel Hernandez. As a junior, Hernandez’ goal was to go :59 in the 100 yard free, increase practice attendance to 80 percent and improve his technique and kicking ability. “Angel went :59 by mid-season, and then reset and attained his goal of reaching :56,” says VanSlooten. Senior year, the goals became to go :55, increase attendance to 90 percent and to improve kick, starts, turns and finishes. Utilizing the same race analysis methods he was to use with Khalafalla, VanSlooten coached Hernandez to a :52 by year’s end. While hardly Olympian, VanSlooten’s success is a reminder that getting better is a process in which a dream with a plan can become an attainable goal. v Michael J. Stott, one of Swimming World Magazine’s USA contributors, is based in Richmond, Va. June 2013

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GREG

Q&A

by michael j . stott

MEEHAN photo provided by stanford university

Hired in August with little time to prepare for his first campaign,

Head Women’s Coach Stanford University Stanford, California

taking dead aim on a future national championship for his Stanford women.

SW: You and your four siblings all swam in college... GM: My family has been involved in the sport ever since I can remember. I’m the youngest of five, and by the time I came around, it was just what we did. I was fortunate enough to have amazing parents who let me play all different sports growing up, but I always gravitated back to the water. SW: You have coached with some of the nation’s most respected coaches, such as Susan Teeter, Cyndi Gallagher and 24

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SW: After winning Pac-12s, two of the conference teams finished ahead of Stanford (eighth) at NCAAs. Was that a function of training emphasis, taper, strong competition outside the conference or something else? gm: Our conference has some amazing programs, and then you add the strength of the SEC, and all of a sudden, you are 10 teams deep. I think our relative inexperience among the group—half of our NCAA team was there for the first time—

GREG MEEHAN

Greg Meehan is now

Q. Swimming World: How does a degree in mathematics prepare one for a career as a swim coach? A. Coach greg meehan: It doesn’t—unless you think figuring out splits prepares one to be a swim coach!

person who sets the bar high for our team. She is also an incredible role model for these young women. We were able to win Pac-12s because of our depth, our talented diving program and a senior class that refused to accept anything else.

Dave Durden. What did you learn from each of them? gm: I sure have. Each of their programs is very different, yet I walked away from each experience with similar thoughts: be true to yourself, learn how to connect with each student-athlete on a daily basis and work your tail off. I’m so grateful to each of them. SW: An August call to The Farm and a pregnant assistant coach didn’t give you much time to prepare for the Pac12 conference meet and for NCAAs in March. So, how did you win Pac-12s? gm: No, it didn’t, but the team and the staff adapted. For me, hiring Tracy (Duchac, former assistant at Arizona and Texas A&M) was the right choice for the future of the program, not just what was best for this season. She is an amazing coach and a wonderful

While Greg Meehan’s undergraduate degrees were in mathematics and secondary education (Rider University), his advanced degrees in swim coaching came from William & Mary (assistant, interim head), Princeton (women’s assistant), UCLA (women’s assistant with responsibilities for distance, IM and recruiting), University of the Pacific (head, men and women) and Cal-Berkeley. In his first year on The Farm, Meehan led the Cardinal women to an eighthplace NCAA finish after serving four years as Dave Durden’s top assistant at Cal, where he helped lead the Bears to NCAA titles in 2011 and 2012 and a runner-up spot in 2010. In 2007, Meehan served as a manager for the U.S. team that competed at the World University Games in Bangkok, Thailand. In 2003, he was an assistant coach for the USA Swimming National Distance Camp in Colorado Springs.

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coupled with the fact that it was our first championship meet together presented some challenges. However, at the end of the meet, we had some really good performances. More importantly, we walked away with an understanding of how this particular group will be better in the future. SW: Cardinal women were blanked in distance free events, butterfly and diving in 2013. Will those be areas of recruiting emphasis next season? gm: Not specifically. We will always be in pursuit of the best studentathletes in each class regardless of which events they swim. We get excited about young women who are looking to be challenged and grow in each area of their collegiate life—academically, athletically and socially. SW: You said the finish at NCAAs has given the team knowledge of how to be better next season. How? GM: I don’t think our finish gives us better knowledge of how to be better, I think our experience gives us better knowledge on how to be better. Seeing how an individual responds to work, rest and academic stress is important. I now have better knowledge on this moving forward. SW: Over the years, Stanford has had 84 All-American certificates in diving, but none in 2013. Was that just an anomaly? GM: Absolutely. Our divers did great all season and just happened to have a tough Zone E performance. We have the best diving coach (Rick Schavone) in the country, and I’m confident they will be better next year. SW: Your roster at Cal was sprinkled with internationals. Any thought to recruit abroad more heavily? GM: Not specifically. Regardless of where someone might be from, I’m interested in those young women who can help our program while thriving in this academic climate.

SW: Does the outstanding history of Stanford swimming carry with it heavy expectations? Are they heavier than your own? GM: Absolutely...and, no, they are not. Stanford has won more NCAA Championships in women’s swimming and diving than any other Division I program. However, the last title was in 1998, and I’m very aware of that— not because those in the athletic department tell me, but because I am a fan of the sport, and I was just getting into coaching during that

“I walked away from each (coaching) experience with similar thoughts: be true to yourself, learn how to connect with each studentathlete on a daily basis and work your tail off.” -Coach Meehan time. Coach (Richard) Quick had amazing success here, and I look forward to the challenge of pursuing the legacy he left behind. Winning an NCAA championship is not something that just happens. It’s developed and cultivated over a long period of time. Even though he is no longer with us, I want Coach Quick and all of the Stanford swimming and diving family to be proud of our program each and every year. SW: What is the emphasis of Stanford training this season—volume, quality, race pace, all of the above?

GM: This spring will be about getting ready for the World Championship Trials in June. That is our focus, and we will train appropriately. SW: How will it change for 2013-14? GM: It won’t change much. Continuity will be the biggest factor next season. The team will be more prepared for the things I expect from them on a daily basis. SW: How many people know that looka-likes Greg Meehan and Virginia coach Mark Bernardino went to Cardinal O’Hara High School in Springfield, Penn.? GM: A few, but not too many. There are quite a few coaches from the Philly area at the NCAA level—Mark, Jack Bauerle, Jeremy Kipp, Tyler Fenwick.... SW: What is the difference between coaching men and women? GM: In my experience, 90 percent of what we do from a training perspective is the same for men and women. The other 10 percent is where the really good stuff happens, and I believe our women’s-only program allows us to focus on it. From a non-training perspective, how I communicate with our student-athletes is really important and a bit different between men and women. My wife always tells me, “Women seek a purpose and want to know they are contributing to the greater good.” She’s a smart, successful woman, so I’ve stuck to this philosophy over the years, and it has allowed our student-athletes to feel empowered. With men, it was typically easier to get them to do the work up front without knowing why. They want the explanation, but wouldn’t necessarily need to know beforehand.v

Michael J. Stott, one of Swimming World Magazine’s USA contributors, is based in Richmond, Va. June 2013

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HOWTHEYTRAIN

FELICIA

LEE

by michael j . stott photo provided by stanford university

Highly recruited PROGRESSION OF TIMES out of high school, SCY 2010 2011 2012 2013 Felicia Lee was the 17-18 NAG record HS Sr. Fr. Soph. Jr. holder in the 100 200 Free 1:46.22 1:46.91 1:47.79 1:44.96 yard fly (52.71). She also had the 100 Back 53.30 52.94 52.06 51.58 nation’s fastest 200 Back 1:59.03 1:55.01 1:55.56 1:54.24 SCY times among 100 Fly 52.71 52.63 52.37 52.32 17-year-olds in the 100 back (53.30) and 200 fly (1:56.18), and she ranked among the top 10 in four other events. “She was a fantastic swimmer as an age grouper for North Baltimore,” says Stanford coach Greg Meehan, “but didn’t quite hit her stride at Stanford until this year. Then as a junior, she thrived.” That’s not to say Lee didn’t do well in her first two years—she did rack up six All-American citations. However, Olympic Trials in 2012 were a disappointment. She finished 27th in the 200 meter IM (2:17.31), 35th in the 100 free (56.28) and 38th in the 100 fly (1:00.58), and then followed up Trials with necessary shoulder surgery. Lee did not take a stroke in workout until late December. “She spent the entire fall kicking, kicking underwater and riding a spin bike,” says Meehan. “Then this spring at NCAAs, she made her first-ever ‘A’ final, broke our school record in the 100 back (51.58, fourth) and was on our school record 800 free (6:57.12), 200 medley (1:36.54) and 400 medley (3:30.06) relays.” Along with the 200 and 400 free relays, Lee earned six more All-American certificates. “She is a really tough kid and a great competitor,” says her coach. “Witness that she barely swam fly until late January, yet at season’s end, she still managed a best time. ‘Flee’ does well when you give her race specifics, otherwise she can be a bit distracted in her races. As a staff, we worked with her a lot on an exact number of underwater kicks for all the walls in each race, how to manage the first 75 of her 200, etc.” v

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“We do quite a bit of underwater, and our team feels comfortable under water. I would not recommend this for someone with limited underwater kick experience.” -Coach Meehan

SAMPLE SET: Fast Set (SCY) (3 Rounds) • 100 @ 1:20 (backstroke, negative split to strong effort) • 4 x 25 @ :25 (easy underwater) • 2 x 75 @ 1:10 (backstroke at pace +:01, pace— she would go :42, then :41) • 4 x 25 @ :25 (strong underwater to flags—20 yards) • 3 x 50 @ :60 (backstroke—2 at pace, 1 faster) • 4 x 25 @ :25 (fast underwater—15 meters) • 50 Easy • 100 (as FAST as possible with a negative split)

June 2013

5/17/13 10:55 AM


JOSHUA

ZUCHOWSKI

WHAT IS YOUR PRACTICE SCHEDULE? “Monday through Friday, 4:30-6 p.m., and Saturday, 8-10 a.m.”

[ photo

by jonathan zuchowski ]

TELL ME ABOUT A TYPICAL WORKOUT. “I swim in the elite junior group. We do about 3,500 yards per practice.”

by shoshanna rutemiller

AGE GROUP SWIMMERs OF THE MONTH

UP & COMERS

WHEN DID YOU START SWIMMING? “I started swimming year-round on my seventh birthday in April 2011. I swam for a few months as a 6-year-old, but then took the winters off.”

A

LONG-TERM GOALS? “Long-term for me is (when I turn) 10 years old. I would like to break a few NAG records—50 back, 50 fly and 100 IM. I want to be part of history.” WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT SWIMMING? “My friends—I train with a great group of kids who push me every day. I like practice more than the meets.” WHAT DO YOU DO OUTSIDE THE POOL? “I play travel soccer. I like music, video games and horse racing.” WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE SWIMMER? “Jason Lezak—I had the opportunity to practice with him, and he [ p h o t o by p inspired me to dream big. He went to four Olympics and did not make his first until he was 24.” et

er h.

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bick]

Although Joshua Zuchowski celebrated his 9th birthday on April 20, he left quite an impression as an 8-year-old swimmer. Zuchowksi swims for the Jupiter Dragons of Jupiter, Fla., and ranks among the top 10 in the country in eight short course yards events for 8-and-unders. He is second in the 100 fly (1:11.69) and 100 IM (1:13.03) and third in the 100 back (1:13.31) and 50 fly (31.50). He recently broke six Florida Gold Coast records, including the aforementioned events and the 200 IM (2:36.21) as well as being part of the 200 medley relay (2:27.72) record-setting squad. Zuchowski is most proud of the relay record: “I did it with my friends, and it was a great day!” he said. One of Zuchowski’s biggest motivators is Olympic gold medalist Jason Lezak. “Josh swam with (Lezak) after the London Olympics at his community pool in Irvine for two hours,” said Josh’s father, Jonathan. “He had a big impact on Josh and his positive attitude. This is a great sport with great role models. Josh hopes to be one someday and work with kids.” v —continued on 28

WHAT ARE YOUR SHORTTERM GOALS? “Win the high-point award at Winter Champs 2013 and Junior Olympics 2014.”

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up & comers—continued from 27

GRANT HOUSE

WHEN DID YOU START SWIMMING? “I began swimming competitively at the age of 5 with my sister as my coach, and ever since have been coached by my sister, mom or dad.”

WHAT ARE YOUR SHORTTERM GOALS? “Qualify for summer junior nationals and be in the final for any event at winter junior nationals this year!”

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to

LONG-TERM GOALS? “To swim for an NCAA Division I school and become a collegiate multi-national champion. Also, to qualify for 2016 Olympic Trials and possibly make an Olympic relay or individual event by 2020 or 2024.”

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WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE SWIMMER? ter h. bic pe k] “Ricky Berens—his by enthusiasm for the sport is inspirational, and the way he carries himself is impressive.”

[ photo

TELL ME ABOUT A TYPICAL WORKOUT. “A standard practice consists anywhere from 6,000 to 8,000 yards. Main sets vary from day to day and week to week. When we’re finished with that, we focus on our legs with a kick set. Finally, we go over to the diving well or pool for intense underwater work and warmdown.”

by sue house ]

WHAT IS YOUR PRACTICE SCHEDULE? “During short course season, I do six workouts a week and three dryland sessions. During long course season, I attend three to four dryland sessions a week and seven to eight practices a week.”

G

Grant House had the swim of the meet at the 2013 NASA Showcase Classic in Clearwater, Fla., in early April. The Cincinnati Marlin surged ahead from a three-second deficit at the beginning of the freestyle leg for a photo finish win in the boys 13-14 400 yard IM. His 3:58.78 ranks Grant ninth in the event on USA Swimming’s All-Time Top 100 age group list. He is also sixth on the all-time list in the 200 free and 16th in the 200 IM. It’s no wonder, as Grant comes from a swimming family. His mother, Sue, is his primary coach at the Marlins, and father, Ray, and sister, Ashley, have previously coached him. Grant’s older brother, Kyle, swam collegiately for NCAA Division II Queens University of Charlotte. His family’s immersion in the sport has worked wonders for Grant, who just finished eighth grade at Sunman Dearborn Middle School in St. Leon, Ind. Grant holds a remarkable eight Ohio LSC 13-14 SCY records, spanning all strokes and distances. The versatile 14-year-old also holds 12 Cincinnati Marlins team records in the 13-14 age group and 17 for 11-12 year olds. At the 2013 Junior Olympic Championships, Grant broke the Marlins’ 100 yard fly team record (50.81) that previously dated back to 1975, erasing the club’s longest standing record. v

June 2013

5/17/13 10:55 AM


Who Will be Swimming’s Jason Collins?

Sponsored by

When currently active NBA player Jason Collins announced via Sports Illustrated that he is gay, Swimming World Magazine’s Jeff Commings took it upon himself to write a commentary article titled, “Who Will Be Swimming’s Jason Collins?” In the article, Commings, who is an openly gay swimmer, wondered whether the swimming community is ready to embrace a high-profile openly gay athlete. The article ignited a considerable amount of positive and negative discussion. Read some of the responses below:

The author has an agenda because of his being gay. If he was hetero, I doubt this article would have been written. I have nothing against gay people, but it gets tiresome when someone’s alternative lifestyle gets shoved down our collective throats. - CaptainGuts (In response to CaptainGuts) Jeff’s article is a commentary. Therefore by definition it is a piece written by someone who has an opinion about something and is sharing it. It was not written as a news article. I loved the letters to the editor section in last Sunday’s LA Times about Jason Collins. The last one was the best. It simply said “So What” as if to say, it’s no big deal. Bravo. - Glenn I am gay. Unfortunately I am not a well-known swimming personality. My coming out was never an issue with anyone. It just was who I am. Family and friends never made it an issue because it wasn’t. The day being gay is a non-issue is the day we will all be free to be who we were born to be and not hiding from fear of displeasing those who are quick and easy to condemn based on their own beliefs. You don’t like me because of my sexual orientation? Fine. Not a problem for me. But do keep your lecturing and values to yourself. Anonymous. - Lane Four v

>

GUTTERTALK

making headlines

photos by hermine terhorst

Four-time Olympic gold medalist Dana Vollmer served as the keynote speaker at the “Go Red for Women” luncheon, May 3, in Santa Rosa, Calif. The fund-raising event, in its 10th year, educates women about heart disease and encourages them to lead healthier lives. Vollmer was diagnosed with long QT syndrome at age 15 right before her Olympic debut in 2004. The defect, which can cause sudden cardiac arrest, left Vollmer with two options: forgo her Olympic dream and have a defibrillator implanted in her chest, or cross her fingers and continue to train and live with the defect. Rather than letting her daughter forgo her Olympic dream, Vollmer’s mother carried an AED to every training session, swimming competition and, eventually, the Olympics. After overcoming her lifethreatening heart defect, Vollmer

began volunteering for the American Heart Association while training for the 2012 London Olympics. She is now a spokesperson for the organization, speaking out about the need for dollars to be devoted to research so athletes can pursue their dreams without fearing their hearts may stop. v

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[photo

p r o v id ed

b y je ss ic a

hardy]

Sponsored by

> GUTTERTALK TH E

Nickname:

I’m totally addicted to:

In a relationship, I usually: a) wear the pants. b) am the more emotional one. c) make all the plans. d) overanalyze everything. e) can’t get enough PDA. I sometimes get mistaken for:

If I could tell my 16-year-old self anything, it would be:

The best thing about swimming is: a) boys in Speedos, DUH! b) seeing my friends everyday! c) competing all over the world! d) my swimmer tan all year long!

My favorite part of my body is: a) my legs. b) my abs. c) my arms.

When I feel defeated, I boost my confidence by:

I’m secretly afraid of:

[ ph ot o

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What She’s Listening to... Swimming World wanted to know what the top five most recently played songs were on Jessica Hardy’s iPod. Here is what we found out...

I credit a lot of my success to:

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ll en ] by jo hn m c gi

Name:

Jessica hardy at the 2013 toyota grand prix of long beach!

[ ph ot o

SW QUIZ

by pet er h . bic k]

1

Hold on -Alabama shakes

2

Here comes the sun -the beatles

3

wing $ -macklemore

4

adorn -Miguel

5

mean -taylor swift

June 2013

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I wish I could be more: a) outgoing. b) relaxed. c) self-motivated. d) I like the way I am!

SWIM MART

After a race, I immediately... Drink: Talk to:

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m embarrassed when: a) someone catches me singing loudly in my car! b) I trip and fall in front of a lot of people! c) say the wrong thing at the wrong time!

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pro vid ed by jes sic a ha rd y ]

d) Other:

jessica hardy tops swimming worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best dressed list at the 2013 grammy awards with her 2012 london olympics gold medal around her neck! June 2013

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recent women’s NCAA Division I Championships were able to see the diving competition from above the water, but Swimming World’s photographer captured the action beneath the pool’s surface through an underwater window at the IUPUI natatorium in Indianapolis.

[ photo

by peter h . bick ]

parting shot

pictured > Fans at the

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June 2013

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Online June Swimming World Magazine