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County News Santa responds to local letters at Ashtabula Towne Square

PHOTOS BY SADIE PORTMAN

Lily Sheeman of Cork Elementary School reads her letter to Santa. pate and we had over 1,000 letters,” Gazette Newspapers Publisher/President ASHTABULA TOWN- William Creed said. The Ashtabula Towne SHIP - The Gazette Newspapers held its annual Letters Square lets the Gazette use to Santa event this past Sat- its facility each year as they urday. Students from partici- all gather in the Commupating schools were ran- nity Room. “We hold the event here domly selected to meet with Santa and enjoy a holiday each year because the moment with friends and Ashtabula Towne Square is kind enough to help sponsor family. “This year we had 10 el- the event with us to make it ementary schools particiSee LETTERS page 4B

BY SADIE PORTMAN Gazette Newspapers

Zane Nezprenko is excited to meet Santa.

ODNR approves funding for two Ashtabula County projects BY STEFANIE WESSELL Gazette Newspapers

these programs will support the acquisition of more than 98 acres of green space as ASHTABULA COUNTY - well as the development and State and federal grants improvement of 23 playawarded by the Ohio Depart- grounds, five splash parks ment of Natural Resources’ and dozens of other local im(ODNR) Office of Real Es- provement projects. Funding tate will fund 105 commu- from these grants will also nity-based projects, includ- make Ohio’s park infrastrucing two in Ashtabula County. ture more accessible. “The thoughtful and qualFunding from the NatureWorks and Land and ity projects proposed by loWater Conservation Fund cal officials reflect a long(LWCF) grants will be used term commitment to providto establish and renovate ing recreational opportuniparks and improve public ties to their citizens,” said access to outdoor recreation Paul Baldridge, chief of the ODNR Office of Real Estate. facilities. Ashtabula County grant “These projects will impact recipients include communities for generations Austinburg Township and and will enhance the qualWindsor Township. ity of life for many Ohioans Austinburg Township will in the coming years.” ODNR has recommended receive $14,185 for park improvements, including that nearly $2 million in ballfield improvement, pa- NatureWorks grants and vilion and bandstand roofs. more than half a million dolWindsor Township will re- lars in LWCF grants be ceive $3,000 for a play- awarded. To view all of the ground renovation at the projects receiving funding, Windsor Community Center. go to: http://ohiodnr.com/ ODNR administers the tabid/10762/Default.aspx/. NatureWorks and LWCF See PROJECTS page 5B grant programs. This year

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 1B

Sweet home Ashtabula

BY WILLIAM A. WEST Gazette Newspapers

ASHTABULA - When the desire to raise her daughter near family members outweighed the fear of leaving their California home, Jennifer Muscio made the decision to return to the place of her birth. She and daughter Jenica, 13, moved in with Jennifer ’s parents in Ashtabula. “I decided it was best for my daughter to come back and be raised around family,” Muscio said. The duo has adapted well to northeast Ohio. Jenica is in the eighth grade at Saint John School and Jennifer is happy with her job in Ashtabula County. “I told Jenica when we moved here I would give it a year and if she wasn’t happy we would go back to California,” Muscio said. “She absolutely loves it here in Ohio.” The idea of going back to California was brought up by Jenica while she and Jennifer were together in a car. “Are we ever going back to California?” Jenica asked. “Well, if you’re happy, then no,” Muscio said. “So that’s what started the process of looking for a house to buy.” Muscio, a single mother, eventually would go to Catholic Charities to see if they could assist in buying a house or renting a home in a safe area. “I wanted something nice and safe for my daughter,” Muscio said. Muscio met with Kathy Sandella at Catholic Charities at 4200 Park Ave. in Ashtabula. Sandella asked Muscio if she was familiar with Habitat for Humanity. “I heard about Habitat in California and told Kathy I did not think I would qualify,” Muscio said. She and Sandella did the paperwork for everything and Muscio discovered that she did qualify and meet the standards to begin the process. She had 24 hours to complete the application. “I am the first contact that people have a lot of times because they do not know which direction they need to go,” Sandella said. “Habitat is something I always talk about.” Sandella has been doing this for years and is, as she says, “the money cruncher” as she looks at the feasibility, the money coming in and the money going out and what’s going to work for the client. “When people sit with me I get a feel pretty much right away who is going to be a good candidate,” Sandella said. “Jennifer was immediate. She was such a great candidate, did everything she needed to do and she did it really, really, really, really well.” Muscio has received a great deal of help building her house at 2813 Columbus Ave. in Ashtabula. “My sister, her kids, my boss Michael Brown and his daughter Kathy Brown all helped with the priming,” Muscio said. “Bryant Farmer has been very helpful and patient with me.” Jeffrey Scribben, a Habi-

tat for Humanity in Ashtabula County board member and project manager, said the previous house on the site was demolished and the remaining foundation and basement were unsuitable for use for a new structure. Materials and labor were donated to the building project. Puffer Roofing provided all the roofing material and labor at no cost to Muscio. Ashtabula County Community Action employees donated their time to the effort. “It’s been fun to work with my family to build a dream home for my daughter and me,” Muscio said. “I love the house. It’s gorgeous” As for moving into the house, Muscio and her daughter have to wait just a bit longer. “When the first big snowstorms comes is probably when I’ll move in,” she said. Muscio makes monthly payments to cover the cost of Hannah Kile, 5, of Ashtabula, listens to Deacon Richard Johnson bless the home of Jennifer Muscio last Sunday. building the house.

PHOTOS BY WILLIAM A. WEST

Brandon Scribben, 15, of Jefferson, reads a pamphlet as Jenica Muscio, 13, looks on last Sunday during the dedication of the Muscio home on Columbus Avenue in Ashtabula.

Jennifer Muscio and her daughter, Jenica Muscio, 13, stand in front of their home on Columbus Avenue.

Jennifer Muscio, right, accepts a gift bag from Cynthia Nagy during a dedication ceremony in Muscio’s home.


Education

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 2B

Students get festive at A-Tech

Horticulture students Misty Sackett, Andrew Lesperance and Nicole Demas were selling PHOTOS BY BARBARA J. HAMILTON Christmas plants, wreaths and centerpieces at the A-tech Technical and Career Staff members of A-Tech helped with serving the food at the school’s annual Christmas Campus during the school’s annual Christmas Dinner on Dec. 6. Mr. Ken Noble is their dinner. Hours were 4:30-7 p.m., and an overwhelming crowd turned out making the instructor. evening one of their very best.

Marcus Demas receives degree at Ashland University Winter Commencement

Truckmen Proudly Acknowledges Our Second Quarter 2012 Safety Bonus Winners:

ASHLAND - Marcus Demas of Rock Cree received a Bachelor of Science in Education degree from Ashland University at the Winter Commencement ceremony on Dec. 15. Demas majored in integrated social studies. He is the son of Cheryl Demas of Rock Creek. Demas is a 2008 graduate of Jefferson Area High School. Ashland University, ranked in the top 200 colleges and universities in U.S. News and World Report’s National Universities category for 2013, is a mid-sized, private university conveniently located a short distance from Akron, Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio. Ashland University (www.ashland.edu) values the individual student and offers a unique educational experience that combines the challenge of strong, applied academic programs with a faculty and staff who build nurturing relationships with their students.

Dec. 20 Ashtabula: Front Row: Marshall Sterba, John Phillips, Rich Fedak, Keith Brooks, Bill Thompson, Mike Cash, John Tressler

St. Vincent de Paul Society benefit concert

Back Row: Chuck Brooks, Danny Hazeltine, Steve Hudson, Patrick Lewis, Joe Hazlinger, Rich Madarena, Robert Foster, Dan Johnson, Denver Sumner, Chuck Cash, Rick Akers

A benefit concert for the emergency assistance programs of the St. Vincent de Paul Society of Ashtabula will take place in Mother of Sorrows Church, 1464 West 6th St., Ashtabula, on Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012 beginning at 7 p.m. It will feature original and traditional Christmas music performed by Seasons (www.seasons music.com). Ticket purchases ($5 each) and patron payments ($10, $25, $50 or $100) may be made at Our Lady of Peace Parish Administrative Office, 3312 Lake Ave., Ashtabula, OH 44004. Patrons will also have their names included in the event program.

Not Pictured: Walt Asuma, Ken Call, Phett Khoundamdeth, Dennis Newhart, Mike Piispanen, Rob Strang

Truckmen is looking to expand our team. Drivers, if you have a clean CDL with a minimum of two years of over-the-road experience, learn more about our Drive to Own Program and company driver positions. We are also looking for experienced diesel mechanics. Call Debbie at 440-466-0020 x115.


County News

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 3B

Community gets festive in Austinburg Township BY SADIE PORTMAN Gazette Newspapers

street with dogs and pets in hand ready to ring in the holidays. Shannon’s Mini Market AUSTINBURG TOWNSHIP - Austinburg Township also showed the spirit of the held its annual Christmas season with a banner and parade on Saturday, with miniature horses. Of course the Blue Belles community members lining with candy canes in hand up to participate. People lined the streets to danced down the street to cheer on friends and family “Jingle Bell Rock.” Santa gave a wave at the and children waited anxiously for candy and the end of the parade riding on the back of one of the town’s main man, Santa. The Austinburg Veteri- volunteer fire department’s nary Clinic came down the trucks.

Children wave to the crowd as they take a sleigh ride through the streets of Austinburg Township. PHOTOS BY SADIE PORTMAN

The Austinburg Country Days Court girls wave to those lining the streets. The parade marshal, David Scharping, a social studies teacher at Grand River Academy, carries the American flag as head of the parade.

Representatives for the Austinburg Veterinary Clinic wave to children.

Miniature horses represent Shannon’s Mini Mart.

Dancing Divas dance down the streets of Austinburg.

A piggy back ride is enjoyed for a smile boy during the Students from Iron Dragon show off their skills. Austinburg parade.

Ashtabula Covered Bridge Festival Court representatives Lisa Kalas, Gabrielle Frasure and Isabelle Wilms wave to the crowd.


County News LETTERS

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 4B

From page 1B

all possible,” Creed said. Each child had a chance to talk with Santa and received a special gift bag filled with the special Letters to Santa tab, which was included in the Gazette Newspapers last week, and a stuffed animal. “We call up each kid by school, give them a copy of their letter. They can go up to meet with Santa and read their letter to Santa,” Creed said. “We have a little gift bag for each of the kids.” The children became excited as they waited for Santa to appear. “I asked Santa for an iPod Touch,” Erica Houser said. Houser did not think her letter would be chosen and was not expecting a notice from the newspaper. “I was excited,” Houser said when she learned her letter had been chosen. Houser was accompanied by her mother, Tanya, and father, Andy, both of whom had not yet read Erica’s letter. “I haven’t read her letter yet,” Tanya said. “Her grandma has, but I haven’t seen it yet.” Creed was grateful for all the those who took the time to compose letters and for the mall for making the event a holiday tradition at the Gazette. “I’d like to thank all of you for coming and give a special thanks to Ashtabula Towne Square for our annual Letters to Santa event,” Creed said. Creed thanked everyone who took the time out of their Zoey Coffman holds tight to her stuffed animal. busy schedules to come to the Letter to Santa event and wished them all the best holiday season. “I’d like to thank all of the kids of taking the time to write the letters,” Creed said. “I’d like to wish everyone a very merry Christmas.” Sadie Portman, reporter for the Gazette, may be reached at sportman@gazettenews.com.

Xzavier Severino meets with Santa after his sister DeAundra.

Nathan Thompson of Ontario Elementary School shares his letter with Santa.

Marco Ratermann gets his letter out to read it to Santa.

Avery Drum of Pymatuning Valley Elementary School reads her letter to Santa. Samantha Speakman picks up her special gift bag after talking with Santa.

Linda Dalton has a heart to heart with Santa.

Erica Houser concentrates on reading her letter aloud to Santa.

Kelly Klingman smiles after reading her letter to Santa.

Lily Sheeman takes her family up to meet with Santa.

Jonathon Renoso smiles as he gets his chance to meet Santa.


County News

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 5B

Geneva administration Local woman witnesses signing of CRPS Bill MARTHA SOROHAN attends discussion on BY Gazette Newspapers House Bill 601 CONNEAUT - For Susan Diamond of Conneaut, witBY SADIE PORTMAN Gazette Newspapers

that kind of says whether or not a bill moves forward through the legislative procedure,” Anderson said. “He pretty much said this bill dead in the water.” Anderson said the representative did not see promise with the bill as there were still too many problems not addressed in House Bill 601. “He felt there were just too many weaknesses in the bill and not enough public meetings and so forth,” Anderson said. He did warn the municipalities of another bill which may move through the state legislature in the future. “He did say he expected another bill to come out of the next biannual legislation and he pointed out all the different difficulties that have to be addressed,” Anderson said. The new bill will hopefully address more clearly the issues 601 has not. “Anything from this city’s taxes, lottery winners from $100 to $5 million, and if there is to be any sort of leveling of the playing field, there would have to be some sort of resolution on all of these,” Anderson said. Huff said the new bill shows more promise but they will have to wait and see for the final results of the legislation once it has been written and brought forth. “It would need to be revenue neutral. That is what they were trying to go for,” Huff said.

nessing Ohio Gov. John Kasich sign a bill making Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) information available via Ohio Department of Health web sites was “unforgettable.” “Gov. Kasich was very concerned around the issue and asked questions about the availability of CRPS experts for Ohio patients,” said Diamond, who led the fight for the legislation. “He asked for connections to these doctors, and then said emphatically, ‘Let’s sign this bill!” The daughter of Herb and Irene Hopkins of Conneaut, Diamond traveled to the State House on Dec. 12 to witness the bill-signing due to the significant role she played in encouraging legislators to get the frequently-misdiagnosed syndrome into the public arena. Diamond also started the Ohio RSD/CRPS Support Group. Diamond was greeted upon her arrival in Columbus by Ohio Sen. Capri Cafaro (D32). “I was glad to see her,” she said. “My Ohio support group for CRPS patients calls her the ‘Firecracker’ because she is such a go-getter in the Senate and a chronic pain support advocate.” Another bill advocate, State Rep. Casey Koslowski (R-99), sent congratulations. “He’s been a motivator for

GENEVA - Geneva City Councilor Howard Anderson and city Tax Administrator Shelly Huff took a trip to Richfield, Ohio, recently to discuss the issues with House Bill 601, which would rewrite Ohio’s tax laws. The city officials have previously spoken out against the bill and wanted to hear details on where the bill now stands. “Shelley Huff and I went to Richfield City Hall last Friday and listened to a state representative talk about House Bill 601,” Anderson said. The bill, co-sponsored by Ohio House Majority Whip Cheryl Grossman (R-Grove City) and Rep. Mike Henne (R-Vandalia) was introduced to the Ohio General Assembly on Oct. 30 and aims to establish municipal tax uniformity. The bill includes provisions that require state oversight of municipal income tax administration, as well as new administrative policies and procedures for municipal income tax collection. Provisions in this bill will hamper every municipality’s ability to audit and correct municipal income tax returns, according to the city council resolution. Huff said the measure would create restrictions on how they collected taxes in the city and rewrite their current taxation methods. BY DORIS COOK Many municipalities have spoken out against the Sadie Portman, reporter Gazette Newspapers new tax codes as it would for the Gazette, may be ANDOVER - SLC Lighting decrease their revenues. reached at sportman@gazette Co. store and display center “He chairs the committee news.com. has recently opened in the Andover industrial park, just east of the public square. The store display facility is a distribution center for lighting and safety products made by KD Lamp, another subsidiary of ATC Lighting & Plastics, Inc. Steve Turner, director of WINDSOR TOWNSHIP – Camp Whitewood is lookbusiness development, overing for help for its summer Day Camp and Resident Camp sees the newly opened outlet programs. Join the effort to give kids a world of good at store and display center for camp. An outstanding summer experience awaits! SLC Lighting. Working with The camp is hiring creative, responsible and kid-oriented him in the store with walk-in individuals for these positions, which include cabin staff; customers or those who call in specialized cabin staff (lifeguards, boating instructor, shootfor product orders is Rachel ing sports instructor); resident camp assistant director Hornyak. (male and female); and day camp assistant director. “We supply all types of Qualifications include: lights for trucks, freight car• At least 18 years old. rier trailers, RVs, boats and • Availability June 1- August 16, 2013. really any type of recreation • Experience working with youth preferred. vehicles. These include • Background check required. marker and tail lights, truck Staff benefits include weekly stipend, free housing, cab marker lights, head lamps free meals, valuable experience for any career and inand bulbs carried in the store ternship experience available. and center here,” explained Find out more and apply: at Camp Whitewood, 800-967Turner. CAMP, campwhitewood@cfaes.osu.edu or www.4hcamp Large display boards, whitewood.com. counter areas and movable

NatureWorks provides up to 75 percent reimbursement assistance to local government subdivisions, such as townships, villages, cities, counties, park districts, joint recreation districts and conservancy districts for the acquisition, development and rehabilitation of recreational areas. The projects are funded through the Ohio Parks and Natural Resources Bond Issue, which was approved by Ohio voters in November 1993. Additional legislation authorized the creation of the NatureWorks Grant Program. Similarly, the LWCF provides up to 50

the bill to move forward and had spoken publicly about this issue in the past year. I thank him and Capri for returning my phone calls and joining this effort,” Diamond said. The bill-signing was followed by a party in suburban Dublin, where guests enjoyed pizza, vegetables, cream pie, cookies, and big Hershey’s kisses, and where Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association Director Jim Broatch led a toast to “No more pain.” Party favors were copies of the bill. With the bill’s requiring information about littleknown CRPS (also known as RSD, or Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy) on the Ohio Department of Health web site, early diagnosis in the state should be on the upswing. Numerous other states enacted such legislation years ago.

“In my opinion, for appropriate care to be realized, CRPS patients require an interdisciplinary treatment team approach, supervised by a CRPS specialist,” Diamond said. “Peripheral nerve blocking, vasodilators, Prialt [snail venom] treatment, TEC placement pre/post surgery, and Ketamine infusions [veterinary tranquilizers], and other interventions are available to patients, but in many cases not being offered by physicians.” Because RSD patients’ sympathetic nervous systems often develop “plasticity” after being afflicted for some time, and may resist treatment, early diagnosis and early treatment are best for successful remission. “But some patients achieve remission for long periods of time, even permanently, after having RSD/CRPS for many years,” she said.

Diamond attributes her CRPS to two accidents. The first, in 2006, was a fall down a loading dock while entering a building at work. (Contrary to a story in the Dec. 6, 2012, Gazette, Diamond never worked on a loading dock.) A year later, Diamond was hit by a car and ended up in a wheelchair in a nursing home, wondering if she would ever walk again. “But I’m alive, walking again, and here to do something about this disease. I have been blessed,” she said. Her Ohio RSD/CRPS Support Group is on Facebook, where a January date for the local support group will be announced. “Maybe now that the bill is passed, and we will have more awareness of this disorder in Ohio hospitals/ clinics/physicians offices, things will change for CRPS patients,” Diamond said.

SLC Lighting opens display center store in Andover industrial park

Camp Whitewood looking for help

PROJECTS

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Conneaut’s Susan Diamond (third left) was at the State House for the Dec. 12 signing of Senate Bill 40 into law. Also pictured are Ohio Sen Capri Cafaro (D-32), fifth left, standing next to Ohio Gov. John Kasich, seated. The bill makes Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) information available via Ohio Department of Health web sites.

Steve Turner, director of business development for KD Lamp and SLC Lighting, and Rachel Hornyak are working on setting up more display areas at the SLC Lighting store and display center in Andover industrial park. PHOTO BY DORIS COOK

display standards are filled with the specialty lighting and safety reflector products made by the company. The store also holds an Amish buggy, which has a number of new type reflector lights attached as samples. The store center address is 101 Parker Drive. “We are letting our Amish neighbors know they can come in here to buy what they need for safety lights and reflector type products on their buggies. The company sells to large freightliner companies as well as small independent truck fleet firms in Ohio and

From page 1B percent reimbursement assistance for state and local government subdivisions, such as villages and cities, for the acquisition, development and rehabilitation of outdoor recreational areas. The federal grant program is supported by offshore oil lease revenues and other non-tax sources. Many local parks, trails, pools and other outdoor recreation facilities that Ohioans enjoy today were made possible through the federal program, which has awarded more than $150 million to projects in Ohio since its inception in 1965.

Award winning housing. Pay only a portion of your income for rent your rent depends on your income.

Ashtabula Metropolitan Housing Authority 3526 Lake Ave. Ashtabula, OH 44004 www.amha.ashtabula.oh.us Mon. through Fri. 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM

other states,” Turner said. With KD Lamp for five years, Turner works with all divisions of the parent company, ATC Lighting & Plastics Inc. KD Lamp is an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and the employees at the Andover site assemble the products sold in the display store center. Turner said the company has an online website: www.slclighting.com where customers can look at the catalogue items to order or call the display center at 800-9380120 order desk for information. The store and display center is open Mondays

through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. “Persons can come into our store center here and see the large array of items we have in stock for their vehicles and buy what they need or order special. I also go on the road to do truck industry shows around the country. For example we go to the Cleveland Expo Center with our products. We have the LED and incandescent bulbs stocked in the center as well,” Turner said. Some items can be customized for a customer’s special needs, too, he added. The company has engineers are on site at the Andover plant to work with customers needing special lighting products. They also have a supply of head lamps for motorcycles stocked as part of inventory in the store. Turner said as the company grows he hopes to add a few more employees for the store center.


For the Record Conneaut Police • At 4:04 a.m. Dec. 6, a Lake Road resident reported harassment. • At 8:35 a.m. Dec. 6, a noninjury traffic accident was reported in the area of Broad and 16th Street. • At 1:35 p.m. Dec. 6, a WII game system was reported stolen from a Main Street residence. • At 2 p.m. Dec. 6, a Grant Street resident reported a fraud. • At 10:21 p.m. Dec. 6, an unwanted female reported at a Sandusky Street residence was directed to leave by police. • At 2:37 a.m. Dec. 7, vandalism to a vehicle was reported at the Shell Gas Station. • At 12:42 p.m. Dec. 7, theft of diesel fuel was reported at Love’s Travel Center. • At 2:31 p.m. Dec. 7, a West Main Road resident reported a theft of money by use of his stolen debit card. • At 3:31 p.m. Dec. 7, Conneaut High School reported threats made by one student towards another. The juvenile was suspended and cited into Juvenile Court for menacing. • At 5:45 p.m. Dec. 7, a male Conneaut resident reported threats were allegedly made against him. • At 1:11 a.m. Dec. 8, a fight between two females was reported on State Street. • At 9:57 a.m. Dec. 8, a GPS unit was reported stolen from a vehicle on Salem Street. • At 3:22 p.m. Dec. 8, a Parrish Road resident reported harassment. • At 4:14 p.,m. Dec. 9, an assault was reported that allegedly occurred earlier in the evening in the parking lot at True North Shell Station. • At 1:07 p.m. Dec. 9, a domestic altercation was reported on Joann Drive. • At 9:54 a.m. Dec. 10, a West Street resident reported that he had backed into his neighbor’s vehicle on Saturday evening. • At 1:43 p.m. Dec. 10, a Buffalo Street resident reported the unauthorized use of a motor vehicle. • At 1:57 p.m. Dec. 10, a vehicle struck a pole on Liberty Street after the driver had suffered from a seizure. The driver was transported to UHConneaut Medical Center for evaluation. • At 5:15 p.m. Dec. 10, a Pop-

lar Street resident reported a package was stolen off of his porch.

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 6B

Ashtabula Police

• At 3:14 p.m. Dec. 12, a Jackson Street resident reported an assault that occurred between juveniles on the school bus.

December 5 08:26 a.m. - block of 9700 Bridge St. Criminal damage or endangering. 10:42 a.m. - block of 5700 Woodman Ave. Assist other agency. 12:18 p.m. - Station Ave./W. 32nd St. A traffic stop was made. As a result one arrest was made. 01:18 p.m. - block of 1600 E. 47th St. Assist ACSO. 01:43 p.m. - block of 1000 Seymour Dr. Caller reports child abuse. 02:18 p.m. - block of 4200 State Rd. Caller reports an unruly juvenile. 03:16 p.m. - block of 1600 E. 47th St. Assault. 07:49 p.m. - block of 1000 E. 24th St. A report of a deer in the roadway was received. 09:28 p.m. - block of 1300 Hamlin Dr. Welfare check, child neglect. 10:14 p.m. - block of 6300 W. 57th St. A report of a motor vehicle theft was received. 10:41 p.m. - block of 8600 W. Prospect Rd. A request for a welfare check was received. 11:31 p.m. - block of 2100 Norman Ave. Disturbance.

• At 4:31 p.m. Dec. 12, a landlord/tenant dispute was reported on Gore Road.

December 6 01:01 a.m. - block of 4900 Osborne Ave. Domestic violence.

• At 7:15 p.m. Dec. 12, a Main Street resident reported harassment.

December 7 03:37 a.m. - block of 3200 Altman Ct. A suspicious person was reported. One felony arrest was made. 04:04 a.m. - block of 2400 W. 11th St. A caller reported entered vehicles. 08:48 p.m. - block of 1600 Allen Ave. Theft from auto was reported. 09:41 a.m. - block of 3800 S. Ridge Rd. Welfare check requested. 10:03 a.m. - block of 2300 Wade Ave. Unruly juvenile reported. 11:21 a.m. - block of 2900 Glover Dr. A theft was reported. 11:29 a.m. - block of 6100 Allen Ave. Caller reports a burglary. 01:17 p.m. - US 20/Cornell Ave. Traffic offense. 01:20 p.m. - block of 9400 Seymour Dr. Officer injury. 01:22 p.m. - block of 3400 Lake Ave. Identity theft and fraudulent credit card and utility charges. Suspect had access to reporting party’s personal information and also lives in the area the thefts are occurring. 01:38 p.m. - W. 15th St. Columbus Ave. Vehicle entered; items removed. 01:44 p.m. - block of 5700 Woodman Ave. Caller reports a domestic dispute. 02:32 p.m. - block of 9100 Seymour Dr. Number left for uniform damage.

• At 5:33 p.m. Dec. 10, a car/ deer accident was reported on Route 7 near Welton Road. • At 11:46 a.m. Dec. 11, a domestic altercation was reported on West Main Road. • At 1:15 p.m. Dec. 11, an unwanted female reported at a Harbor Street residence was escorted off the property by police. • At 3:42 p.m. Dec. 11, a domestic altercation was reported on West Main Road. • At 5:12 p.m. Dec. 11, a Park Place resident reported that her juvenile step-son was unruly. • At 8:44 a.m. Dec. 12, a Harbor Street resident reported a theft of medications and money from his vehicle overnight. • At 2:52 p.m. Dec. 12, someone allegedly tampered with the locks at a Parrish Road doctor’s office.

• At 7:37 p.m. Dec. 12, a semi truck driver reported hitting a deer with his vehicle on I-90 near the scales.

Orwell Police Dec 9 • 9:48 pm - Domestic dispute on Carroll Ave Dec 10 • 12:40 am - Assist ACSO on Noble Rd Windsor Township • 9:20 am - Property damage on E Main St • 4:39 pm - Warrant arrest on S Maple Ave Dec 11 • 12:15 pm - Unwanted subject on S Maple Ave Dec 12 • 2:15 pm - Property damage on Leffingwell Dr • 8:30 pm - Disturbance on E Main St Dec 14 • 2:54 pm - Disturbance on Leffingwell Dr • 5:04 pm - Domestic dispute on S Maple Ave • 9:00 pm - Welfare check on Janate Ave Dec 15 • 6:00 pm - Assist Roaming Shores Police Department on Morgan Terrace

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02:35 p.m. - block of 9400 Seymour Dr. Report left for uniform damage. 04:37 p.m. - block of 5300 W. 38th St. Attempted burglary. 09:13 p.m. - W. 57th St./ Madison Ave. A suspicious vehicle was reported. 10:10 p.m. - block of 1600 Norman Ave. A caller reported that his parked vehicle was struck. 10:52 p.m. - block of 2000 W. 16th St. A report of people beating on a door. December 8 12:24 a.m. - block of 7000 Ohio Ave. Caller reports a burglary. 01:15 a.m. - block of 9100 W. 50th St. A theft was reported. 03:08 a.m. - block of 1100 Myrtle Ave. Assault. 03:36 a.m. - block of 6300 W. 57th St. A domestic disturbance was reported. 04:03 a.m. - block of 6000 West Ave. A trapped animal was assisted. 09:33 a.m. - block of 8200 W. 41st St. A theft was reported. 02:15 p.m. - block of 2400 Deerfield Dr. Caller reports a drug overdose. 03:14 p.m. - block of 2500 Walnut Blvd. Caller reports an unruly juvenile. 03:35 p.m. - block of 2400 Deerfield Dr. A caller reports a domestic dispute. 09:14 p.m. - block of 2000 Lake Ave. Assault, simple, and felonious. 10:25 p.m. - block of 5800 Ogden Ave. A disturbance was reported. December 9 12:09 a.m. - block of 3100 Johnson Ct. Two subjects were arrested on warrants. 02:12 a.m. - block of 5100 Nathan Ave. A burglary was reported. 02:37 a.m. - block of 2000 Lake Ave. Disorderly conduct, one arrest. 03:38 a.m. - block of 1000 Bridge St. General Assistance. 03:58 a.m. - block of 7200 E. 16th St. A disturbance was reported. 04:17 a.m. - block of 4500 Lake Ave. Alarms. 06:41 a.m. - block of 1300 Michigan Ave. A report of a domestic complaint. 08:09 a.m. - block of 8100 Myrtle Ave. A report of criminal mischief was reported. 08:24 a.m. - block of 9300 Southwood Dr. A report of criminal mischief was received. 09:03 a.m. - block of 2500 Walnut Blvd. Caller reported found property. 09:14 a.m. - block of 2400 Walnut Blvd. A report of criminal mischief was reported. 09:44 a.m. - block of 9200 Eastwood Dr. A report of criminal mischief was received. 10:03 a.m. - block of 2900 Glover Dr. A caller reported a disturbance. One arrest was made. 10:07 a.m. - block of 1300 W. 47th St. Caller reported vandalism to her window. 11:00 a.m. - block of 5800 Ogden Ave. A caller reported being threatened with a knife. 11:42 a.m. - block of 5100 Benefit Ave. A caller reports a theft from vehicle. 01:49 p.m. - block of 5800 Main Ave. Caller reports a suspicious person. 02:20 p.m. - Ann Ave./W. 34th St. Caller reported 6-7 shots fired in the area. 05:50 p.m. - block of 3400 Forestal Pl. Caller reported a sex offense. 06:09 p.m. - block of 3200 Altman Ct. A structure fire was reported and an arson/methamphetamine lab investigation was initiated. 07:14 p.m. - block of 5500 Adams Ave. A pedestrian was struck by a vehicle. 10:14 p.m. - block of 1400 W. 8th St. Caller reports a disturbance. 11:20 p.m. - block of 5800 Ogden Ave. A report of a fare failing to pay cab driver. One arrest made. December 10 06:50 a.m. - block of 1300 Lake Ave. Alarm.

Jefferson Police December 17 2:30 a.m. Disorderly conduct was reported on North Chestnut Street when men from Wildside Bar were yelling at each other. One man had said the suspect had pulled a knife on him and threaten to cut him. The suspect was arrested for disorderly conduct. 3:39 a.m. Police were dispatched in reference to a domestic violence case. A man said his daughter and her boyfriend were fighting so he came over to pick his daughter up. The boyfriend said the daughter had punched him. She admitted to the punching but said it was because he was choking her. After also seeing cut on his chin and a bloody lip, the daughter was arrested. December 16 Police observed three male subjects dumping over trash cans. Police told them to pick up the cans and go home. When another can was dumped over, all three were arrested for disorderly conduct. December 11 6:49 p.m. Police were dispatched in reference to an identity theft. The complainant said a man had used an alias name to open a Chase Bank Credit Card and run up charges of over $2,000.

Geneva Police Monday, December 17 6:33 a.m. Accident without injury on South Broadway and Ruth Street Sunday, December 16 5:29 p.m. Disabled vehicle on Austin Road 11:53 a.m. Criminal Mischief on 600 block of South Eagle Street 8:18 a.m. Suspicious person on 600 block of South Broadway 1:07 a.m. Possible intoxicated driver on Route 20 Saturday, December 15 7:25 p.m. Erratic driver on Route 20 8:24 a.m. Male passed out in car on 600 block of East Main Street Friday, December 14 8:55 p.m. Kids in roadway on Eastwood and Grant Streets 4:59 p.m. Abandon item on 100 block of Lawnfield Court 2:53 p.m. Possible domestic issue on 500 block of West Main Street

1:20 p.m. Shoplifter on 700 block of South Broadway 12:50 p.m. Threat on 700 block of Austin Road 11:38 a.m. Theft on mile-marker sign on Lawn Street 2:36 a.m. Domestic disturbance on 100 block of South Cedar Street 1:59 a.m. Suspicious person in the downtown area 12:29 a.m. Suspicious person and vehicle in parking lot behind US Bank Thursday, December 13 8:12 p.m. Neighbor concern on 300 block of East Main Street 6:35 p.m. Possible impaired driver on east of city heading west 5:09 p.m. Disabled vehicle on Villas of Geneva 3:22 p.m. Suspicious male on property on 700 block of Austin Road 2:21 p.m. Crash with possible injury on State Route 84 and Route 534 1:00 p.m. Possible assault on 800 block of Sherman Street 5:56 a.m. Erratic driver on Route 20 Wednesday, December 12 9:06 p.m. Facebook threat on 3100 block of Spencer Circle 7:36 p.m. Harassing calls and texts on 500 block of Eastwood Street 4:51 p.m. Violation of no contact order on 100 block of Lawnfield Court 2:26 p.m. Fraudulent credit card charge on 100 block of Roosevelt Drive 9: 25 a.m. Erratic driver on Route 20 1:26 a.m. Suspicious vehicle on 400 block of South Broadway Tuesday, December 11 5:56 p.m. Panhandling on South Broadway 5:20 p.m. Domestic issue on Leslie Street 5:13 p.m. Hit and run on 700 block of South Broadway 12:03 p.m. Trespassing North Avenue 10:54 a.m. Unwanted people on 100 block of Woodlawn 10:55 a.m. Removal of BB Gun on 100 block of South Crowell 8:29 a.m. Check on child on 700 block of Austin Road 1:44 a.m. Suspicious person and vehicle on 600 block of East Main Street 1:26 a.m. Suspicious male on Cedar and Route 20 1:02 a.m. Suspicious male by the square

Marriages Dean R. Moon and Audrey L. Robinson, both of Erie, Pa.

Jerry L. Smith of Lewistown, Pa., and Judy L. Huffman of Kingsville

Rodrick M. Sallee and Jennifer L. Jerman, both of Ashtabula

Wesley J. Parrish of Jefferson and Melissa D. Cusano of Chardon

Christian G. Williamson and Tedgina L. Crandall, both of Conneaut

Anthony D. Benson of Ashtabula and Amy D. Baldwin of Rome

Titus P. Hinojos and Kimberly A. Anthony, both of Conneaut

Reginald D. Steel Sr. and Ashley J. Daubenspeck, both of Ashtabula

Jefferson EMS 12/02 01:18 MVA (WITH INJURY) Treated and Released 12/02 01:18 MVA (WITH INJURY) Treated and Released 12/02 5:30 Chest Pain Transported 12/04 03:21 General Medical Patient Refused Care 12/04 16:40 General Weakness Transported 12/04 19:57 Abdominal Pain (non-Traumatic) Transported 12/05 15:00 Diabetic Problem Transported 12/05 18:56 MVA (NO INJURY) Patient Refused Care 12/06 11:16 Fall Victim (Injury) Transported 12/06 14:34 Resp. Distress/Difficulty Breathing Transported 12/07 04:52 Resp. Distress/Difficulty Breathing Patient Refused Care 12/07 05:58 General Medical Transported 12/07 09:29 Respiratory Distress/Difficulty Breathing Transported 12/07 12:48 General Medical Patient Refused Care 12/08 10:10 General Weakness Transported 12/09 03:01 Eye Injury Treatment / No Transport 12/09 11:45 Respiratory Distress/Difficulty Breathing Transported 12/11 20:11 Respiratory Distress/Difficulty Breathing Transported 12/12 19:26 Fall Victim (Injury) Transported 12/13 09:27 Fall Victim (NO INJURY) No Treatment Required 12/13 18:30 General Medical Transported 12/13 19:21 Stroke/CVA Transported 12/13 22:25 Respiratory Distress/Difficulty Breathing Transported 12/14 08:36 Nausea/Vomiting Transported 12/14 18:34 Respiratory Distress/Difficulty Breathing Transported 12/14 21:30 Chest Pain Transported


For the Record Asht abula Ashtabula County Cour t News

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 7B

ing for drug/alcohol use. The defendant shall make restitution in the amount of five hundred dollars to the victim. No fine is imposed. The court costs are assessed against the defendant. Bond is canceled. The defendant was sentenced to the NEOCAP facility and shall remain in jail until a bed becomes available. The defendant is granted sixty seven days because of time spent is custody.

Taylor A. Simsa James R. Shaver III October 22: The defendant moved to withdraw the former plea of not guilty to the charges in the indictment and entered a written plea of guilty to count one of the indictment, illegal manufacture of drugs, a felony of the second degree, a lesser included offense under count one of the indictment, count two of the indictment, aggravated trafficking in drugs, a felony of the third degree, and count five of the indictment, domestic violence, a felony of the fourth degree. Order: Count one, three years incarceration in prison the mandatory/minimum sentence for the conviction of illegal manufacture of drugs. Count two, three years incarceration in prison for the conviction of aggravated trafficking. The sentences will run concurrently. Count five, six months incarceration for the conviction of domestic violence. The defendant’s driver’s license will be suspended for six months. The defendant will be subject to post release control for a period of three years. A mandatory fine of $7,500 is rendered for count one. A mandatory fine of $5,000 is rendered for count two. Bond is canceled.

Stephen J. Voytko October 31: The defendant has previously entered a plea of guilty to one count of illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs, a felony of the third degree. Order: The defendant shall serve two years under basic supervision. The defendant shall submit to drug and alcohol evaluation. The defendant shall submit to testing for drug/alcohol use. The defendant shall comply with all other terms of supervision set forth in the standard “conditions of supervision.” The defendant’s right to drive a motor vehicle in the State of Ohio is suspended for six months. The mandatory fine is suspended. The court costs are assessed against the defendant. The bond is canceled. The defendant is granted credit for ten days.

Dylan M. Ramkey November 1: The defendant has previously entered a plea of guilty to one count of illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs, a felony of the third degree, and one count of aggravated possession of drugs, a felony of the fifth degree. Order: The defendant shall serve a stated term of 24 months for one count of illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs and twelve months for count one of aggravated possession of drugs. The sentences shall be served concurrently. The offender may be subject to a period of three years post release control. The defendant’s right to operate a motor vehicle in the State of Ohio is suspended for six months. The mandatory fine is waived. The court costs are assessed against the defendant. Bond is canceled. Credit is granted for 133 days.

Scott F. DeDomenico November 6: The defendant advised the court that he will stipulate to the violations contained in the complaint and the court finds the defendant has violated the terms of his community control. It is ordered the defendant’s community control is revoked and the defendant is sentenced to three years incarceration in prison for the conviction of assembly of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs, a felony of the third degree. The defendant shall be subject to post release control for a period of three years. The defendant is granted 413 days. The defendant will be permitted to attend calling hours for his brother.

Richard Hennessey November 1: The defendant’s sentencing hearing was held. The court finds that the defendant has entered a pleas of guilty to and has been convicted of the offense as charged under count one of the indictment, forgery, a felony of the fifth degree. And for the offense as charged under count three of the indictment, theft, a felony of the fifth degree. It is ordered that the defendant be sentenced to two years community control and restitution in the sum of $408 to the victim. He also is sentenced to intensive supervision for a period of two years of community controls and unannounced urinalysis. The defendant is ordered to pay all court costs. No fine is ordered. Bond is terminated.

Richard Hennessey November 1: The defendant has previously plead guilty to one count of receiving stolen property, a felony of the fifth degree, and one count of forgery, a felony of the fifth degree. Order: The defendant shall serve two years under intensive supervision. The defendant shall successfully complete the six month NEOCAP program. The defendant shall submit to drug/alcohol evaluation. The defendant shall submit to testing for drug/alcohol use. The defendant shall make restitution in the amount of $1,475 to the victim. No fine is imposed. The court costs are assessed against the defendant. The defendant shall be responsible for his medical and dental expenses during his time in the NEOCAP facility. Bond is canceled. The defendant is granted 64 days credit because of time spent in custody.

Michael A. Skaruppa November 1: The defendant previously withdrew his former plea of not guilty and entered a plea of guilty to one count of endangering children, a felony of the third degree, and one count of domestic violence, a misdemeanor of the first degree. Order: The defendant shall serve a stated term of eighteen months for one count of endangering children and six months for one count of domestic violence. The sentences shall be served concurrently. The offender may be subject to a period of three years post release control. No fine is imposed. The court costs are assessed against the defendant. Bond is canceled. Credit is granted for one day.

Richard Hennessey November 1: The defendant has previously plead guilty to one count of receiving stolen property, a felony of the fifth degree, and one count of forgery, a felony of the fifth degree. Order: The defendant shall serve a term of two years under intensive supervision. The defendant shall submit to drug and alcohol evaluation. The defendant shall submit to test-

November 9: The defendant’s sentencing hearing was held. The court finds that the defendant has been convicted of count two of the indictment, illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs, a felony of the third degree. Sentence: Count two illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs three years incarceration in prison. Defense counsel shall prepare a motion to waive the mandatory fine of $5,000. The defendant’s driver’s license will be suspended for six months. The defendant will be subject to three years of post release control. Credit is granted for ten days. Bond is canceled.

Keith D. Green October 29: The defendant’s sentencing hearing was held. The court finds the defendant has entered a plea of guilty to and has been convicted of offense as charged under count one of the indictment, engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, a felony of the first degree, and of the offense under count three of the indictment, conspiracy to trafficking in marijuana, a felony of the third degree, and to the offense under count five, vandalism, a felony of the fifth degree and of the offense under count six of the indictment, burglary, a felony of the second degree. It is ordered for the conviction of the offense as charged under count one of the indictment the defendant serve a term of four years in prison, and for the conviction of the offense as charged under count three of the indictment, the defendant serve a term of thirty six months in prison and for the conviction of the offense as charged under count five of the indictment, the defendant serve a term of eleven months in prison and for conviction of the offense as charged under count six of the indictment, the defendant serve a term of thirty six months in prison. The sentences are ordered to be served concurrently with each other. The offender will be subject to a period of five years post release control. The defendant’s motor vehicle operating privileges are suspended for four years. The defendant is ordered to pay all court costs. No mandatory fines are imposed. No restitution is ordered.

Keith D. Green October 29: The defendant’s sentencing hearing was held. The court finds that the defendant entered a plea of guilty to and has been convicted of the offense as charged under count three of the indictment, failure to comply with an order or signal of police officer, a felony of the third degree. It is ordered that for conviction of the offense as charged under count three of the indictment the defendant serve a term of nine months in prison. The offender may be subject to a period of three years post release control after the offender is released from prison. It is also ordered the defendant not ingest or be ingest with a drug of abuse and submit to random drug testing. The defendant’s motor vehicle operating privileges are suspended for four years. The defendant is ordered to pay all court costs. No mandatory or discretionary fine is ordered. No restitution is ordered.

Keith D. Green October 29: The defendant’s sentencing hearing was held. The court finds that the defendant has entered a plea of guilty to and has been convicted of the offense as charged under count one, burglary, a felony of the second degree. It is ordered that the defendant serve a term of four years in prison. The offender will be subject to a period of three years post release control. It is also ordered that the defendant not ingest or be injected with a drug of abuse and submit to random drug testing. The defendant is ordered to pay all court costs. Restitution is ordered in the amount of $14,115.53 to the victims.

Robert A. McMillian II November 1: The defendant’s sentencing hearing was held. The court finds that the defendant has entered a plea of guilty to and has been convicted of the offense as charged under count one of the indictment, breaking and entering, a felony of the fifth degree. It is ordered that the defendant serve a term of one year in prison. The offender may be subject to a period of three years post release control. The defendant is ordered not to ingest or be injected with a drug of abuse and submit to random drug testing. The defendant is ordered to pay all court costs. The defendant is granted two days jail credit. No monetary fine is imposed.

Commissioners pass agenda items BY STEFANIE WESSELL Gazette Newspapers JEFFERSON - The Ashtabula County commissioners approved some agenda items during their meeting on Thursday, Dec. 13. The agenda items largely dealt with different agreements and contracts in the county. In one action, the commissioners approved an agreement with Professional Planning Consultation services to assist the Ashtabula County Community Services and Planning Department. The provider of this service is the Lake County commissioners, at a cost not to exceed $7,500 per calendar year. The term is ongoing, and either party may terminate with 30 days advance notice in writing. The commissioners, at the request of Patrick Arcaro, director of the Ashtabula County Department of Job & Family Services, also approved a Contract Amendment to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) contract for the Ohio Works First and Prevention Retention and Contingency Contract with the Ashtabula County Technical and Career Center. The change involves extending the termination date from Nov. 30, 2012, to Dec. 31, 2012, and increasing the available funds for Nov. 1, 2012, to Sept, 30, 2013, in the amount of $8,331.38. Total available funds increases from $341,606.80 to $349,938.18, according to the resolution. Commissioners also approved an amendment to the memorandum of understanding by and between the Ashtabula County commissioners and the Ashtabula County Department of Job and Family Services, on behalf of the Ashtabula County Transportation System. The amendment extends the termination date from Jan. 1, 2013, to Dec. 31, 2013, and increases available funds in the amount of $71,572.80. The commissioners also approved amendments extending the termination date and increasing the availability of funds for purchase of service contracts for Prescription As-

Ashtabula County Sheriff’s Department

George R. Williams Jr. November 2: The defendant is charged with one count of trafficking in drugs a felony of the fifth degree and one count of trafficking heroin a felony of the fifth degree. Order: The plea negotiation is approved and accepted by the court. The State of Ohio’s motion to dismiss counts two, four and five of the indictment is granted. The defendant shall serve a stated term of twelve months for one count of trafficking in drugs, twelve months for one count of trafficking in heroin. The sentences will be served concurrently. Upon completion of the prison term the offender may be subject to a period of three years post release control. No fine is imposed. The defendant’s right to drive a motor vehicle in Ohio is suspended for six months. Credit is granted for seven days. Court costs are assessed against the defendant. Bond is set in the amount of $20,000.00.

sistance, Personal Care & Alzheimer’s Respite Services, Chore Services, Homemaker Services and Education and Wellness Programs with various vendors under the senior services levy. They also did the same with Transportation Services, Home Delivered Meals, Protective Services, other Chore Services, other Education & Wellness Programs, Enhanced Senior Information and Referral and other Homemaker Services in another resolution. In other actions, the commissioners approved a resolution ratifying the agreement between the Ashtabula County Clerk of Courts and the American Federation of State, County and Muncipal Employees, Ohio Council 8, Local 3781 AFL-CIO. Ashtabula County Clerk of Courts Carol Mead has been negotiating with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Ohio Council 8, Local 3781 for representation of certain employees of the Ashtabula County Clerk of Courts in collective bargaining procedures, and on Nov. 27, 2012, a union vote was taken for the ratification of a three-year bargaining agreement and ratified by a majority vote of the union membership. Mead then recommended that the commissioners also ratify the collective bargaining agreement, which is effective Jan. 1, 2013, and expires Dec. 31, 2015. Additionally, the commissioners also have been negotiating with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Ohio Council 8, Local 3781 for representation of certain employees of the Ashtabula County commissioners in collective bargaining procedures. On Dec. 4, 2012, a union vote was taken for the ratification of a three-year bargaining agreement effective Jan. 1, 2013, through Dec. 31, 2015, with the agreement being ratified by a majority vote of the union. With the recommendation of Janet Discher, County Administrator, the board ratified the collective bargaining agreement last week.

Dec. 11 • 12:01 a.m. - 4000 block of Denise Drive in Ashtabula. Report of larceny/theft. Caller stated that someone had taken his Smith and Wesson 9 mm gun, black in color.

Dec. 12 • 1:51 p.m. - 3000 block of North Ridge Road East in Ashtabula Township. Report of larceny/theft at K-Mart.

Dec. 13

• 1 a.m. - 2000 block of State Route 45 North in Ashtabula Township. Report of larceny/theft. There is video footage of a man stealing videos from this location. Michael King • 5:42 p.m. - 4000 block of Stanhope-Kellogsville Road November 8: The defendant is charged with one count of complicity to illegal manufacture of drugs, a felony of the in Monroe Township. Report of threats. A man posted first degree, and one count of endangering children, a felony threats on Facebook that he would shoot up the woman’s of the third degree. The defendant entered a plea of not guilty. house if she didn’t let him see their child. Bond is set in the amount of $10,000.00.

Judd G. Campbell November 8: The defendant is charged with one count of illegal manufacture of drugs, a felony of the first degree, one count of illegal assembly or possession of chemicals for the manufacture of drugs, a felony of the second degree, one count of aggravated possession of drugs, a felony of the third degree, and one count of endangering children, a felony of the third degree. The defendant entered a plea of not guilty. Bond is set in the amount of $10,000.00.

Dec. 14 • 8:06 p.m. - 2000 block of West Prospect Road in Saybrook Township. Report of larceny/theft. A man took a bunch of razors from Giant Eagle and fled on a bicycle.

Dec. 15 • 9:25 p.m. - 6000 block of State Route 307 in Harpersfield Township. Report of a burglary. Various hand and power tools, a baseball card collection and other items were taken.


GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 8B

Visit us @

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SEAFOOD SALE

Sale Good Dec. 20 - Jan. 1 THAW AND SERVE COOKED SHRIMP 16oz Pkg $ 99 Wholey Cooked Shrimp 31/40 Ct ... 8 $ 99 $ 99 51/60 Ct ... 6 26/30 Ct .. 9 $ 99 $ 41/50 Ct ... 7 16/20 Ct 1000 SAVE $2.00/LB

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Manufacturer’s cents off DOUBLE COUPONS up to & including 50¢ in value. Get complete details at our market. Prices effective: Dec. 20, 2012-Jan. 1, 2013 while supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for typographical or pictorial errors. No sales to dealers.


s a m t Chris L

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 9B

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Manufacturer’s cents off DOUBLE COUPONS up to & including 50¢ in value. Get complete details at our market. Prices effective: December 20-24, 2012 while supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for typographical or pictorial errors. No sales to dealers.


County News

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 10B

Polar Express makes a stop at the Harbor-Topky Memorial Library BY STEFANIE WESSELL Gazette Newspapers ASHTABULA - Children were ready to ride the Polar Express last Wednesday night at the Harbor-Topky Memorial Library. The library held a special Polar Express night for the children of the area, giving them a night of Christmas enchantment and daring to ask the question, “Do you believe?” Kathy Eames, librarian at Harbor-Topky Memorial Library, read the book The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg during the program. She also showed clips of the movie of the same name to coincide with the book. The program is always a popular event, and the movie room was filled to capacity, with children and their parents all enjoying a piece of Christmas. Before entering, everyone received a golden ticket with the word “Believe” on it. Conductor Daryl Metcalf punched the tickets at the door so they could ride the Polar Express.

Children listen intently as librarian Kathy Eames reads from the Polar Express. Hot chocolate was given to those on the Polar Express as they watched the movie and listened to the reading of the book by Kathy Eames. Serving the children were A-Tech students Tori Lister and Gabrielle Novak. ABOVE: Luke and Daniel Zannelli, pictured with mom Lindsay, wait for the start of the Polar Express program.

BELOW: Children and their parents received a golden ticket with the word “Believe” on them. All tickets were punched by conductor Daryl Metcalf as they walked into PHOTOS BY STEFANIE WESSELL the Polar Express room.

Kathy Eames reads the Polar Express while enhancing the experience with clips from the movie.

ASHTABULA FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES 2013 GRANT PROCEDURE The Board of Trustees of The Ashtabula Foundation will accept Letters of Intent from 501(c)(3) charitable organizations in Ashtabula County seeking funds. In keeping with its mission to “serve the needy,” the Board will once again focus its grant making in the Human Services categories. The remaining category requests will be considered based upon the amount of funds available. The Letter of Intent should include the following information: • A brief description of the reason for your request. • The dollar amount of your request • Are there other sources of funding? If so, list the other sources. • Is this project something that must be done immediately, or can it be postponed? • Rate this project as far as priority to your organization. (On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest priority.) • How many people will be affected by the grant funding? The deadline to submit Letters of Intent from all categories is Friday, February 1, 2013. Applicants in the Human Services category should be prepared to submit a full application packet by March 4, 2013. Grants will be reviewed according to the following schedule: February 12: Board receives Letters of Intent and determines grants to proceed or deny March 4: Human Services full grant applications due March 12: Board receives application packets April 9: Board reviews Human Services requests May 1: Application packets due from all remaining categories May 14: Board receives application packets June 11: Board reviews remaining applications Another important change to be aware of is that the Board will accept only one application from any organization per year. An organization will not be permitted to request funding for multiple projects. Finally, the Ashtabula Foundation will accept grant applications electronically. Packets can be sent to the Foundation’s email address if the organization has the ability to do so. If the application cannot be sent electronically, one copy should be sent in accordance with the above schedule. You will be notified via email if you should proceed or if your request will not be considered. Please be sure to include your email address in all correspondence. If you have questions, please contact the Ashtabula Foundation office at (440) 992-6818, or ashtabulafdn@gmail.com. Grant applications are available on the website at ashtabulafoundation.org. 4510 Collins Boulevard, Suite 6, Ashtabula, Ohio 44004 • 440-992-6818 • Fax: 440-992-0724 www.ashtabulafoundation.org • ashtabulafdn@gmail.com

Harpersfield United Methodist Church to hold special service Harpersfield United Methodist Church is ready to welcome the Christ Child this weekend. Sunday morning worship will begin at 11 a.m. and Pastor Shirley will bring the message, “No Room?” Marsha Vandervort and Bill Stone will bring an instrumental duet and the Advent Wreath will be lit by a church family. Lots of favorite Christmas music will be featured and children in attendance will receive a special gift. Greeters will be the Baldwin Family and hosts for the Fellowship Hour will be Pam Himes Ohler and Sue Burk. The traditional Christmas Eve Candlelight Service will begin at 7 p.m. Monday evening. Donna Berbig will bring special music and Marsha Vandervort will be accompanist for the service. Pastor’s message will center on the hope we have at the end of 2012. The church is located at the corner of Cork Cold Springs Rd. and Garford Rd. in Geneva. Shirley Stoops-Frantz is church pastor and is inviting the community to join them in celebrating the Birth of Jesus. Call the church, 466-4778 with questions.

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church to host Children’s Christmas Party Children are welcome to attend the Children’s Christmas Party noon to 3 p.m. Dec. 22 in the Parish Hall of the church, 4901 Main Ave., Ashtabula. Lunch of macaroni and cheese, hot dogs, chips, juice and cookies will be served. Crafts and lessons about the birth of Jesus are

part of the fun. At 2 p.m., a special rehearsal will be held for children participating in St. Peter’s “Lessons & Carols” service 10 a.m. Dec. 23. Children not participating will have a special activity. At the end of the afternoon, children will share a

program with guests. Parents are welcome to leave their children at the church to take a pre-Christmas rest of to finish shopping or other tasks before the holiday. Parents must pick up children promptly at 3 p.m. Contact Danielle Weiser-Cline at daniweiserclind@gmail.com


County News

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 11B

Lakeside High School strings new orchestra with local seniors BY SADIE PORTMAN Gazette Newspapers SAYBROOK TOWNSHIP - The Lakeside High School choir and band performed for the seniors of the Ashtabula community last Friday afternoon. “We have two different concert bands here at the high school,” Joseph Tredent, the school’s orchestra and band director, said. “We have our concert band, which is primarily comprised of freshmen and sophomores.” Tredent said their symphonic band is a selective band that requires an audition to participate in. “We also have a symphonic band, which is comprised of primarily seniors and juniors. It is an audition process that determines which band you are placed into,” Tredent said. Very few freshmen and sophomores have the privilege of making the cut for the symphonic band. Tredent was also excited as this was the first senior concert for the high school orchestra to participate in. “If you went to the concert last year, it was just the bands and choir, and this is the first year we have offered high school orchestra,” Tredent said. The orchestra was first formed when the students were in fifth grade. “This group of students started four years ago as fifth graders and they’ve progressed along,” Tredent said. Since the orchestra has been playing together since fifth grade, the orchestra is comprised of only freshmen. “Being our first orchestra that we’ve had, they are all freshmen,” Tredent said. “We have classes behind them that will be coming up next year.” Tredent said the orchestra

will continue to grow as each freshmen class will have had an orchestra program for four years. “So we’ll continue to build our orchestra,” Tredent said. The orchestra played two pieces for the local seniors, one of which was from the Polar Express movie, entitled “Believe.” “Believe” was also performed with the Ashtabula Orchestra last Saturday night. “This past weekend, our orchestra students participated in the Ashtabula Orchestra’s annual Christmas concert,” Tredent said. Tredent is extremely proud of the orchestra and all the work that has gone into making the program a success. Tredent also said for those who would like to see the high school’s orchestra perform with the Ashtabula Orchestra, they will have a chance to view their Christmas concert on television. “If you did not have an opportunity to attend that, check it out on Channel 19. There is a recording that is being played throughout the holiday season,” Tredent said.

Saybrook Township woman wins Total Snow contest

The Lakeside High School symphonic band performs “Let It Snow” Friday afternoon.

The violins of the first Lakeside orchestra perform for the area seniors. PHOTO BY STEFANIE WESSELL

Ellen VanPelt, of Saybrook Township, pictured with Tim Strong, was the winner of the Total Snow Contest sponsored by Gazette Newspapers. For correctly guessing the total amount of snow that fell in Ashtabula County between Nov. 15 to Dec. 15, VanPelt won a brand new snowthrower. BY STEFANIE WESSELL Gazette Newspapers

JEFFERSON A Saybrook Township woman has correctly guessed the amount of snow that fell in Ashtabula County between Nov. 15 and Dec. 15, 2012. Lakeside High School’s cello section of the orchestra Ellen VanPelt guessed that perform the song, “Believe.” 3.5 inches would fall in the 30day time frame of the annual Total Snow Contest sponsored by Gazette Newspapers. For her correct guess, she has won a brand new Cub Cadet snowthrower valued at over PHOTOS BY SADIE PORTMAN $800. Gazette Newspapers Joseph Tredent, Lakeside purchased the snowthrower High School’s orchestra and from The Great Outdoors band director, introduces Store in North Kingsville, the school’s first orchestra. Ohio. Gazette Newspapers President/Publisher William Creed said the contest received approximately 1,000 entries from subscribers of the Gazette’s group of community newspapers located across three counties and two states, including Ashtabula County and Lake County residents in Ohio and Erie County, Penn. residents. The snow fall this year is comparable to the amount that fell in the same timeframe last year. Last year, Marthetta Kuhar guessed that a mere three The symphonic band is an audition-only band with The orchestra members prepare for the second song as inches would fall in the 30Lakeside’s top notch musicians. day time. But the low snow they turn the pages of their sheet music.

fall isn’t always the case. In 2010, 47 inches of snow fell in the contest period. The total amount of snow is measured by National Weather Service snowfall observer Greg Becker in Dorset Township. VanPelt said she was going to guess higher, because in Saybrook Township she receives the brunt of the Lake Effect snow, but when her mother told her the snow was measured in Dorset Township, she decided to lower her amount to coincide with that location. “I can’t thank you enough. This is amazing,” VanPelt told Creed when she came to pick up the snowthrower. VanPelt was not the only one to correctly guess the amount of snow. Five other people also correctly guessed 3.5 inches. But there can only be one winner, so one name was randomly chosen among the six guesses by a representative of Smith and Miller, Attorneys at Law, in Jefferson. The other correct guessers were: Dora Joiner of Geneva; John Matras of Jefferson; Kathryn Zorik of Perry; Peggy Barber of Geneva; and Lawrence Kizlik of Eastlake. Stefanie Wessell, senior editor for Gazette Newspapers, may be reached at swessell@gazettenews.com.

Geneva’s Safety Forces once again join forces for Christmas BY SADIE PORTMAN Gazette Newspapers

ing of food boxes will be at 1800 at Northwest Ambulance.” Once the packing of food GENEVA - For 23 years, the Geneva Area Safety and gifts have been done, Forces, including Northwest they will personally deliver Ambulance District and the the packages to those in Geneva fire and police de- need. “We will deliver the food partments, have partnered to give back to those less for- boxes and gifts after we have tunate during the holidays. completed packing,” Baehr “The Geneva Area Safety said. People throughout the Forces will be holding our 23rd annual Share a Christ- Geneva area, including the mas on Wednesday, Dec. 19, safety forces, will be wrap2012,” Rhonda Baehr, one of ping and sifting through dothe organizers said. “Pack- nated items on Dec. 19.

“The wrapping process seemed to work well last year to help stay organized due to the growth we are having with families and their gifts. This is a great problem,” Baehr said. If you’d like to help with the process, you can call Rhonda or Ashley of NAD at (440) 466-4900. “Set up a time and day to come in and wrap with your family or a friend,” Baehr said. “We will have lots to wrap and need lots of Santa’s Helpers.”

People throughout the Geneva area have been giving to the cause. “Letters have been sent to local businesses, organizations and merchants seeking donations,” Baehr said. City Manager Jim Pearson recognized Geneva’s Giant Eagle for its constant support of the program at the Geneva Area Chamber of Commerce Dinner. “For the past 23 years, this business has donated the vast majority of food to our safety forces’ Shared Christ-

mas program,” Pearson said. However, Giant Eagle is just one of many that have been a constant support in their yuletide care. “If you know of others that would like to donate financially or with non-perishable items, please let us know,” Baehr said. There are some restrictions in items they will accept. “We will not accept stuffed animals, shoes or clothing,” Bear said. Fire Chief Doug Starkey looks forward to the event

each year and has helped with the collecting of donations. “It’s a great way to give back to the community,” Starkey said. Starkey said those receiving are always gracious and there is nothing like seeing a smiling child as they realize they will have presents for Christmas. “Giving back, we collect a lot stuff and it makes the kids happy some of them wouldn’t have a Christmas without it,” Starkey said.


Sports

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 12B

Members of the Edgewood Warriors wrestling team watch their match against Geneva. Members of the Geneva Eagles wrestling team watch their match against Edgewood. BY BYRON C. WESSELL Gazette Newspapers GENEVA – The Geneva Eagles wrestling team hosted the Edgewood Warriors in a recent dual wrestling match. The night started out in the 138lb division where Anthony Barszczewski, of Geneva, set the tone with a 10-9 win over David Ellis, of Edgewood. Ellis tied the match twice at 6-6 and 8-8, but Barszczewski held on for a

Eagles pin Warriors late 10-9 win. Geneva went up 9-0 as Geoffrey Chappman picked up a first period pin over Jeron Ellis, of Edgewood, at 145lbs. After both teams forfeited the 152 weight class Geneva quickly went up 15-6 behind a forfeit to Stephen Thom at 160. Edgewood picked up their own forfeit at the 170lb

weight class to cut the gap to 15-6. Both teams would forfeit another weight division at 182 before Geneva went on a three match win streak. In the 195lb division, Matt Kozcowski picked up a pin 29 seconds into the third period for Geneva over Edgewood’s Jarrod Harrah to put the Eagles up 21-6. Justine Ales then picked up a minor decision for the Eagles over Austin Sturgill, of Edgewood, at 220. Drew Herman picked up another forfeit for the Eagles at heavy weight as Geneva was up 30-6. The Warriors tried to make a comeback with some of their light weight wrestlers. Tanner Pery picked up a pin for Edgewood at 106 over Geneva’s Joseph Virant. Kiel Dickey put the Warriors within 12 points with another pin for Edgewood over

Geneva’s Carter Williams. The Warriors were down 3018 going into the final three matches. Geneva picked up three straight pins to win the match 48-18. Jack Elliot then put things out of reach for Geneva with a pin over Zac Noce at 120lbs. Zack Watts picked up another pin for the Eagles over Zach Lemay, of Edgewood, at 126. Tyrone Brininger then picked up the final pin of the evening for Geneva with a pin over Edgewood’s Caleb Kuhar at 132lbs.

Noce, of Edgewood 126 Zack Watts, of Geneva, won by pin over Zach Lemay, of Edgewood 132 Tyrone Brininger, of Geneva, won by pin over Caleb Kuhar, of Edgewood 138 Anthony Barszczewski, of Geneva, won by minor decision 10-9 over David Ellis, of Edgewood

145 Geoffry Chappman, of Geneva, won by pin over Jeron Ellis, of Edgewood 160 Stephon Thom, of Geneva, won by forfeit 170 James Lyle, of Edgwood, won by forfeit 195 Matt Kozcowski, of Geneva, won by pin over Jarrod Harrah, of Edgewood 220 Justine Ales, of Geneva won by minor decision 8-2 over Austin Sturgill, of Edgewood HW Drew Herman, of Geneva, won by forfeit

RESULTS 106 Tanner Perry, of Edgewood, won by pin over Joseph Virant, of Geneva 113 Kiel Dickey, Of Edgewood, won by pin over Carter Williams, of Geneva 120 Zack Elliot, of Geneva, won by pin over Zac

Caleb Kuhar, of Edgewood, and Tyrone Brininger, of Geneva, shake hands prior to a 132lb match.

Kiel Dickey (left), of Edgewood, and Carter Williams, of Geneva, get ready to wrestle during a 113lb match.

PHOTOS BY BYRON C. WESSELL

Tanner Perry, of Edgewood, picks up a pin over Joseph Anthony Barszczewski, of Geneva, and David Ellis, of Zack Elliot, of Geneva, goes for a pin against Zac Noce, Virant, of Geneva. Edgewood, wrestle during a 138lb wrestling match. of Edgewood.

Local Champions Crowned in ‘Elks Hoop Shoot’ Ashtabula, OH - Three boys and three girls, ages 8-13, won the second round of competition in the “Elks Hoop Shoot” free throw contest at the gymnasium of Lakeside Junior High School on Saturday, December 15, 2012 and have been named Ashtabula area champions. First place trophies were awarded to one boy and one girl in each of three categories: ages 8-9, 10-11, 12-13. Winners also received a certificate of achievement, a basketball, and a limousine ride to the district finals courtesy of Ducro Services. Second place trophies were also awarded in each category. BOYS (School) GIRLS (School) 8-91st Ayden Richmond (20)Cork Elem.Grace Costello (9)Cork Elem. 2nd Zach Mayle (18)AustinburgJasmine George (7)Erie Inter. 10-111st Brandon Smith (16) Superior Int.Jordan Vencill (15)Austinburg 2nd Mataio Snyder (14) Superior Int.Abbey Carter (12) Cork Elem. 12-131st Nicholas Stoltz

(16)Geneva Mid.Macie Arcaro (15) Braden 2nd Aaron Thompson (14) Superior Int.Megan Pitcher (14) Geneva Mid. * Number of shots made is in parentheses. The six champions will now advance to the district finals at Ravenna High School in Ravenna, OH on Saturday, January 12, 2013 where they will compete with other winners from throughout the Northeastern Ohio area. The Elks Hoop Shoot, begun as a local program by Corvallis, Oregon Elks in 1946 is in its 41st year of national competition. Over three million boys and girls are expected to participate this year. Names of the national winners will be inscribed on the Elks National “Hoop Shoot” plaque, on permanent display in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts. The competition represents one of many activities sponsored by the Elks as part of their ongoing commitment to drug awareness and education.

SUMBITTED PHOTO

Award winners in the 2012-2013 Elks Hoopshoot at Lakeside Junior High School on Saturday, December 15, 2012. Age groups in ( ). Back Row Standing left to right:1st place winners Ayden Richmond (8-9), Brandon Smith (10-11), Nicholas Stoltz (12-13) J.P. Ducro IV, Hoopshoot Director, Macie Arcaro (12-13), Jordan Vencill (10-11), and Grace Costello (8-9). Front Row Seated: 2nd place winners Mataio Snyder (10-11), Aaron Thompson (12-13), Megan Pitcher (12-13), Abbey Carter (10-11), and Jasmine George (8-9). Not pictured Zach Mayle 2nd place (8-9).


Sports

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 13B

Lakers drop close game

PHOTOS BY TODD THURBER

Kennedee Drnek dribbles the ball for the PymatuningValley Lakers during a game against Maplewood. BY TODD THURBER Gazette Newspapers ANDOVER The Maplewood Rockets came into Pymatuning Valley and stole one right out from under their noses Monday night. With the contest never having either team with more than a six point lead all night the Rockets found themselves with a two point lead with 20 seconds to play, but PV couldn’t catch a player to put on the foul line until 1.9 ticks left in the contest. Things started off good for the Lady Lakers after trading baskets for most of the first period they found themselves up by one, after Abby Hamilton came off the bench and scored five quick points to give PV the early advantage. The game got faster in the second quarter with both teams using full court pressure and the intensity picked up with as Maplewood’s point guard Miranda Sloan sliced and dished to Brook Dawson on the inside for six easy points. However, Pymatuning Valley battled back as Kelsea Brown put in six straight points to get things back to even just before the half. Maplewood came out strong in the third quarter with Dawson carrying the

load for the Rockets scoring ten of her game high 24 points. Heather Brant worked hard to keep things close with six tough points along with Megan Stetch’s four points in the paint. Maplewood took a two point lead going into the fourth quarter 39-37. Both teams battled to get the ball down low in the fourth quarter, trading baskets with three minutes to go. Sloan then hit a big three-pointer and found Dawson alone under the hoop for an easy two to give the Rockets a six point lead. Geena Gabriel then took things in her hands and drove to hoop twice getting hacked both trips and buried all four free throws .Next in line was Michaelia Skleres who dropped in a tough runner and a free throw to tie things up at 55 with 35 seconds to go. Back came the Rockets dynamic duo Sloan to the unstoppable Dawson for two last points. PV turned the ball over and then could not find anyone to foul leaving only 1.9 seconds on the clock. Maplewood’s first shot bounced off the rim and Coach Compan called for a quick time out for the Lakers. Pymatuning Valley then tried a great desperation play that came up short and Maplewood escaped with the 57-55 win.

Heather Brant shoots a free throw for Pymatuning Valley during a recent game.

Scores

Lakeside 74, Chardon 69 Cardinal 79, Conneaut 66

Boys Basketball

Girls Basketball

Pymatuning Valley 59, Grand Valley 47 LaBrae 77, Jefferson 53 University 69, Madison 54 North 76, Geneva 30 South 49, Lakeside 47 Edgewood 54, Lutheran East 32 Geauga Grizzlies 61, St. John 22 PV 52, Champion 24 Madison 86, Geneva 46 Jefferson 75, Ledgemont 44

Geneva 49, Chardon 37 Madison 48, Riverside 39 OT North 95, Lakside 38 Edgewood 48, Harvey 46 OT Perry 49, Conneaut 25 Maplewood 57, PV 55 St. John 37, Geauga Grizzlies 21

Boys Swimming Lakeside 81, Edgewood 55

Girls Swimming Edgewood 92, Lakeside 61

Ashtabula Township trustees present plaque to Edgewood coach The Ashtabula Township trustees presented Mr. Dominic Iarocci, Edgewood High School football coach, with a plaque for having a 7-3 regular season record and making the playoffs for the first time in school history this past season. It took place at the last regular meeting held on Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012. This was a tremendous feat for Mr. Iarocci, the SUBMITTED PHOTO football team and the high school. The entire community will remember this accomplishment for many years to come. Pictured, from left to right, are: Trustee Steve McClure, Board of Trustees Chair Bambi Paulchel, Edgewood Football Coach Dominic Iarocci, Vice Chair Joe Pete and Fiscal Officer Robert Dille.

Magnum Pro Wrestling to hold Wreck the Halls By BYRON C. WESSELL Gazette Newspapers ASHTABULA - Marlo Sams is the owner and promoter of Magnum Pro Wrestling right here in Ashtabula. Marlo first became involved in the wrestling business nine years ago while working as an understudy with his friend and mentor Eddie Schmidt. Marlo started out by learning the basics, such as setting up the ring, or arranging seats so that the fans could have the best view of the action. Over time, he worked his way up from the bottom of the totem pole to the top, eventually helping with the marketing of the company. Marlo then decided to make Ashtabula his wrestling home when Magnum Pro Wrestling started on July 19th, 2009. He felt there was a need for family entertainment in the area, and quickly discovered there was a passionate fan base for professional wrestling in Ashtabula. “Magnum Pro Wrestling’s fans are, in our opinion, some of the best wrestling fans around. Our primary goal is to make our events fun and affordable for the entire family, by discounting our normal ticket price of $8 to $5 with the donation of a non-perishable food item. The food items go directly back into the community with the help of the G.O. Ministries food bank. It’s not unusual for our fans to bring more than what is asked for the discount, further helping the ministry,” Sams said on his fans and their donations. “Pastor Salters of G.O. Ministries, along with his staff, are very accommodating with the venue we operate in. We have a large, clean gymnasium, professional sound and video equipment, and comfortable seating without a bad seat in the house. In addition, all proceeds from the concession stand help fund ministry-operated programs,”

Sams added. The professional wrestling experience is also important to Magnum. The fans return to their monthly events to cheer on their favorites or boo the unpopular wrestlers! Magnum provides a unique form of escapism, somewhere in-between watching a movie and attending a football game. The events are interactive, and Magnum Pro Wrestling provide a fun filled evening for the whole family. Unlike other events, they can provide long-lasting memories, as children can meet the wrestlers: who take pictures and sign autographs before, during and after the event. “Many families have complimented the organization for expanding their children’s imagination. Others have been grateful for giving their kids a forum to exert energy; some of the kids are so exhausted from the night’s excitement they fall asleep early when they get home! The children are the core of our audience and we are proud to say they are the reason they make Ashtabula our home,” Sams said on some of the feedback he has received. Right now the wrestling events run every month at the G.O. Ministries, with hope for future expansion, either in the number of events or to nearby towns. “We feel that in comparison to the cost of a night at the movies, our events offer a night the whole family can enjoy for a fraction of the price,” Sams said on how affordable watching wrestling in the area is. The next Magnum Pro Wrestling event is “Wreck The Halls” which will take place on Saturday, December 29th with a 5pm bell time. Fans are encouraged to arrive early to get the best seat available, as all seats are general admission on a “first come, first serve” basis. Scheduled to appear: Magnum Pro Heavyweight Champion Lamont “Action” Williams to defend

against The Bouncer in a Lumberjack Match. The back story of Williams is an interesting one. At the beginning of 2012 he lost the championship to Scott Prodigy, and then lost an impromptu “loser leaves Magnum” match. Williams disappeared until May, where he was allowed to return with the understanding he would be fired if he lost, however Williams not only won, but found a way to regain the Heavyweight Title, cashing in an “anytime” contract over then champion “Flyin” Ryan Burke. Williams would not lose a match until getting intentionally disqualified against The Bouncer at September’s Fallout event. Lamont would’ve been fired, but since the title belt could not change hands via a DQ decision, he remained on the roster. The following events saw Lamont get counted out and having other wrestlers interfere for him. Management has now decided to give The Bouncer his rematch at Wreck the Halls. To see that Lamont fairly defends the title, the office has made the encounter a Lumberjack Match, where all of the Magnum wrestlers will surround the ring and benefit either the champion or challenger. Williams should hope it’s the former, as his career and title are on the line in this highly anticipated bout! Aces High collide with Mercury & Martini to determine the first ever Magnum Pro Wrestling tag team champions. Both teams rolled through the round robin tournament and this will be the first time they’ve faced each other. On paper, the edge goes to Mercury & Martini, who won June’s Harbor Cup tournament and have yet to lose a tag team match since. Aces High have an equally impressive record, though with one blemish on their record against Projekt 13, who Mercury & Martini defeated in the semifinals. Who will earn the distinc-

tion of being called the first ever champions? Former friends set to end nearly year-long battle as “Flyin” Ryan Burke takes on Scott Prodigy in an “I Quit” match. As noted above with Lamont “Action” Williams, these two wrestlers were also intertwined within the Heavyweight Title picture, to a degree where Prodigy, according to some, turned his back on Burke. The long-awaited rubber match at Fallout ended in controversy, as Burke won via pinfall when the referee missed Prodigy’s foot on the rope. Adding to the tension, Prodigy interfered in Burke’s title match with Williams at Zero Tolerance, causing Burke to get disqualified. Now both wrestlers will do anything and everything in their power to make the opposition say the words “I Quit” over the house speakers. Who will stand tall in this matchup? In addition, Tri-County champion Thomas Adams takes on the man who injured him, The Aftermath. Moondog Scrap takes on the imposter Moondog with the rights to the Moondog character on the line. Angus O’Toole reveals his partners as Team Magnum takes on the forces of E.L.I. and much more! All Magnum Pro Wrestling events are typically on Saturdays near the end of the month, with the same time and location. Details of our future events are released via our official website (www.magnumprowrestling. com) and Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/ magnumprowrestling) and various other media outlets, including professional wrestling websites and magazines. Our goal is to continue to grow and become a “must see” event in the area. For more information about Magnum Pro Wrestling, including tickets, sponsorship or fundraising for any organization please contact Marlo Sams via phone at 440-364-6540 or email at magnumprowrestling @gmail.com.


County News

GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 14B

Santa makes historic visit to the Jefferson Historical Society

PHOTOS BY BARBARA J. HAMILTON Mrs. Claus helped Santa pass out red bell ornaments and candy canes to little girls like this one. Santa will return Wyatt Hamilton answers Santa’s question, “Have you Katrina Weber talks things over with Santa Claus last Friday at the Jefferson Historical Society while her father on Friday and Saturday at 11 o’clock. been a good boy all year?” recorded the conversation.

BY BARBARA J. HAMILTON Gazette Newspapers JEFFERSON - Santa made his first visit to the Jefferson Historical Society last Saturday to the de-

light of many children present for the Christmas Trains Express Show held every Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. until Dec. 22. Santa will return on this coming Friday at 11

o’clock and on Saturday at 11 o’clock. Children can color a choice of two train pictures and enter their page into the Christmas Train Express coloring contest running through December 22,

Saturday. Judges from the Gazette and Santa will pick winners in the ages, 34, 5-6, 7-8,9-10 and 11-12. The contest is jointly sponsored by the Jefferson Gazette and the Jefferson Historical Society. Winners

will be called on Saturday afternoon. The Christmas Trains Express Show includes nine running trains controlled by four engineers. The feature train is a Gscale model of the 1876

Lakeshore and Michigan Train that fell into the Ashtabula Gorge on Dec. 29, 1876. The director of the documentary, “Engineering Tragedy,” will be on hand Saturday afternoon to answer questions.

Friends of the Library: Making a difference now and in the years to come essential for special programs we present to try to bring them to the Library. By Tom Milligan And why care if kids read all summer? As partners with Community Relations Coordinator parents and educators, we’re trying to make sure all kids grow up having developed strong reading skills. Reading is Ashtabula County District Library the foundation for the lifetime of learning that we’re all embarked upon, and when kids read all summer they don’t The libraries need their friends. And lose the skills they’ve gained during the last school year, as whether we know it or not, the people educators tell us they tend to if summer recess is a recess who use libraries need those friends too. from all reading. When you think about what libraries Friends make the arrangements and cover some expenses do for communities, and what Friends of the Library do for libraries, you realize what seeds the for some of the special guests who come to present programs at the Library. Whenever you hear the Library is providing Friends are helping to sow for the future. There are Friends of the Library groups at both Ashtabula a gift card as a prize, that’s the Friends. The benches outCounty District Library locations, and their activities com- side the Geneva Library building are a gift of the Friends, and the shed built this past summer to store books for the bine to raise more than $3,000 a year. They do it with half-a-dozen weekend used book sales used book sales as well. The digital camera and some of the every year and another that’s going on whenever the Geneva software the staff uses to capture images for sharing the Library is open, with bake sales when Geneva Library Library’s story on the web and elsewhere, were provided by doubles as a polling place on election day, with a wine-and- the Friends. They help make sure there are regular veteribooks-themed fun-and-fundraising event at one of the local nary visits for Crash the Cat, Official Mascot of the Geneva wineries, complete with an enormous Chinese raffle, and Library. None of these are things we’d be willing or able to spend the still-ongoing Coke Rewards program. It’s money that goes back into developing the Library and your tax dollars on, but all of them contribute one way or another, directly or indirectly, to the Library’s mission. Yes, for programs for readers and readers-to-be of all ages. A few mere thousand may not sound like much in the even the cat, who makes it more fun especially for kids to context of a budget of $1 million a year. But it’s the differ- come to the Library, and a kid who finds it fun to be at the ence between having and not having some nice enticements Library is more likely to develop into a strong reader. Friends can take on other roles at the Library as well, to try to keep school-age children reading all summer. Prizes for their reading achievements. Snacks and other supplies volunteering to help present Storytime, for instance, but it’s

Don’t Hide Your Smile!

their small-but-significant contribution to the Library’s financial health that makes all the more difference in times of inadequate funding. You haven’t heard much about the Library’s funding situation lately, but that doesn’t mean all the problems are solved. In fact, new ones are cropping up. Funding shortages the last 10 years have led to maintenance deferred too long on Ashtabula’s historic Carnegie Library on West 44th Street. It’s going to need major expenditures just to keep it serviceable. Which is a separate problem from the obvious fact that Ashtabula needs additional, modern library space. Somehow, significant additional revenues must be found to support the mission of the Library. Apart from its value in providing free entertainment and enrichment for people of all ages, a library holds the potential to transform the lives of individuals—and the entire community—through the resources it makes available. Imagine: a local entrepreneur scouting business information available through the Library sees and ultimately exploits an opportunity for something that brings new jobs to the area, someone on the staff of a local non-profit finds funding for a needed project, or a pre-school child gets into reading and grows up to discover or invent something that changes everything. Those are the kinds of possibilities a library keeps alive. Friends of the Library are doing all they can, and we all should be grateful. And we should recognize that, dedicated as they are, there’s only so much the Friends can do on their own.

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GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 15B

AGRICULTURAL AGENT COMMENTS by David Marrison OSU Extension Agent Hello, Ashtabula County! I am pleased to announce that OSU Extension in Ashtabula County will be help residents kick off the New Year by offering a workshop, titled “Getting your Financial Affairs in Order.” This workshop will be held on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013 at the Ashtabula County Extension office located at 39 Wall Street in Jefferson, Ohio from 10 a.m. to noon. Yo u r s t r u l y ( D a v i d Marrison) will teach this class which has been designed to help program participants make good on their New Year’s resolution to get their financial affairs in order. This workshop will help participants learn how to get a grasp on their financial situation by learning how to develop a year-end balance sheet. January is the perfect time to examine your assets and liabilities and the material presented will be pertinent to homeowners, small

business owners and farmers. In addition to developing a balance sheet portfolio, this program will help participants develop letter of instructions to their heirs regarding their financial matters. Participants will learn how to consolidate all of their financial and personal information into one easy document. Nothing is worse than searching every nook and cranny of your desk to find your important documents. I will share an easy to use document which allows you to document all your real property; asset list; savings, retirement, and investment accounts; and legal wishes into one place. This will help you get a better handle on your finances and allow you to get a jump start on your estate plan. Take time in 2013 to organize your financial matters for your peace of mind. This program will save you hundreds of dollars as you plan develop your succession, retirement, and estate plans. Get your affairs in order so you can concentrate on your family, career, and bucket list! The registration fee for this program is $5.00/per person. Registration fee is to help defray the cost of program handouts. Make checks payable to OSU Extension. Space is limited to 30 participants so reservations are required. If Jan. 5 does not work for your schedule, another session will be held in Cortland, Ohio on Thursday, January 10, 2013, from 1 to 3 p.m. More information about each of these programs can be obtained by calling 440576-9008 or at http:// ashtabula.osu.edu.

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is accepting applications to help producers improve water and air quality, build healthier soil, improve grazing and forest lands, conserve energy, enhance organic operations, and achieve other environmental benefits. In 2013, over $13 million in financial assistance will be available to help Ohio producers implement conservation practices through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), the agency’s largest Farm Bill conservation program. Producers can apply to receive EQIP assistance for a variety of conservation activities. These could include nutrient management plans; field buffers; rotational grazing systems; on-farm energy audit; seasonal high tunnels to extend the growing season; conservation practices on certified organic operations; and improving air quality through cover

crops, windbreaks, nutrient management and other conservation measures that mitigate and prevent air quality problems. The deadline for the next signup period in Ohio is Jan. 18, 2013. A second sign-up deadline will occur on Feb. 15, 2013, if funding is available. Interested producers should contact Jonathan Mauk, from our NRCS service center located in Orwell, Ohio, at 440-437-5888 or Jonathan. Mauk@oh.usda.gov for more information on EQIP sign-up periods.

Ashtabula County

I would like to end today’s column with a quote from Louise Heath Leber who stated, “There’s always room for improvement, it’s the biggest room in the house.” Have a good and safe day!

PHOTO BY MARTHA SOROHAN

“Light of Day” vocalist Arlene Peterson-Bowie (front), David Marrison is Ex- keyboardist Chris Stennis (behind) and drummer Joe tension Educator, Agricul- Moon performed to a full house Sunday evening at ture & Natural Resources, St. Peter Episcopal Church in Ashtabula. Not pictured Ohio State University Ex- are bass player Bernard Bowie and guitarist Brian tension. Mr. Marrison can Bowie. Three other holiday concerts, plus the final be reached at 440-576-9008 performance of “The Nutcracker” at the Ashtabula Arts Center, were offered Sunday in churches in the or marrison.2@osu.edu northern half of the county.

‘Getting Your Financial Affairs in Order’ workshops to be held in Northeast Ohio in January OSU Extension in Ashtabula County is pleased to announce it will be kicking off 2013 with a workshop, titled “Getting your Financial Affairs in Order” on Saturday, January 5, 2013 and Thursday, January 10, 2013 in Northeast Ohio. The January 5 workshop will be held at the Ashtabula County Extension office located at 39 Wall Street in Jefferson, Ohio from 10 a.m. to noon. The January 10 workshop will be held at the Trumbull County Extension office located at 520 West Main Street in Cortland, Ohio from 1 to 3 p.m. David Marrison, OSU Extension Educator, will be the featured speaker at these workshops and will help program participants make good on their New Year’s Resolution to get their financial affairs in order. This workshop will help participants learn how to get a grasp on their financial situation by learning how to develop a year-end balance sheet. January is the perfect time to examine your assets and liabilities and the material presented will be pertinent to homeowners, small business owners and farmers. In addition to developing a balance sheet portfolio, this program will help participants develop letter of instructions to their heirs regarding their financial matters. Learn how to consolidate all of your financial and personal information (real property, savings and investment accounts, legal documents) in one easy document. This will help you get a better handle on your finances and allow you to get a jump start on your estate plan. Take time in 2013 to organize your financial matters for your peace of mind. This program will save you hundreds of dollars as you plan develop your succession, retirement, and estate plans. Get your affairs in order so you can concentrate on your family, career, and bucket list! The registration fee for each program is $5.00/per person. Registration fee is to help defray the cost of program handouts. Make checks payable to OSU Extension. Space is limited to 40 participants so reservations are required. Return registration to: OSU Extension, Ashtabula County and mail to 39 Wall Street, Jefferson, OH 44047. More information can be obtained by calling the Ashtabula County Extension office at 440-576-9008.

Pesticide Re-certification Sessions planned for Northeast Ohio The OSU Extension offices in northeast Ohio would like to remind farmers who need their private pesticide applicators license renewed by March 31, 2013 that six re-certification sessions will be held in four locations for Northeast Ohio. These sessions will be on January 11 in Medina, January 18 in Williamsfield (two sessions), February 1 in Parkman (two sessions), and February 26 in Perry. Each of the sessions will offer re-certification in CORE and All Categories. A pre-registration fee of $35 is required for each location. Registration for each location is due eight days prior to the re-certification session. The registration deadlines will be strictly adhered and late registration fee will be $50. All registrations will be taken by the Geauga County Extension office. For more information about these programs, please contact the Geauga County Extension office at 440-834-4656.

BY MARTHA SOROHAN Gazette Newspapers ASHTABULA - Music lovers in Ashtabula had plenty to choose from when it came to holiday concerts on Sunday, not to mention the final soldout performance of “The Nutcracker” at the Ashtabula Arts Center. Sunday’s concerts began at 2 p.m. with a brass performance at Zion Lutheran Church, followed by a 4 p.m. standing-room-only “Christmas Canticles” concert presented by the Ashtabula County Choral Music Society and several area church choirs at First United Methodist Church. Over in Conneaut, professional musician and local church choir director Norris Kelly was joined by vocalists affiliated with the Oberlin Conservatory at the former Lakeview United Methodist Church. Also on that program was Jacob Crislip, student at Edgewood Senior High School. The afternoon offerings were capped by a Gospel Christmas concert presented by “Light of Day Band” as part of the “Great Music Without Barriers” fine arts program held at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. Performing its third annual Christmas concert at St. Peter, the quintet drew a fullhouse. Vocalist Arlene PetersonBowie began the evening by taking the audience back to the church of her childhood, where her mother rewarded her good behavior by slipping her peppermint candy. The quintet launched into a rousing “Marching in the Army of the Lord” to kick off its 90minute concert mixing holiday, gospel and popular numbers. “I Want to Know What Love Is” was dedicated to the grieving community of Newtown, Ct. “The heart of a nation is broken,” said Peterson-Bowie, the group’s emcee and vocalist. Before performing Michael Jackson’s “Give Love on Christmas Day,” PetersonBowie explained that she is a

great Michael Jackson fan and recalled listening to the Jackson 5’s Christmas album when she was just 12 years old. The group also performed “Jesus Loves Me,” “What Child Is This?” and “Silent Night.” “It’s great to be back in a church, our roots, home,” Peterson-Bowie said. Concert-goers were treated to a dessert reception an hour before the free 7 p.m. concert and to hors d’oeuvres and punch afterward in the church hall. There they mingled with the Light of Day quintet that includes in addition to Peterson-Bowie drummer Joe Moon, of Cleveland; keyboardist Chris Stennis of Berea; Bernard Bowie, bass, of Garfield Heights; and Peterson-Bowie’s husband and band music director, Brian Bowie, of Highland Hills. Popular on the Ashtabula County winery circuit, the quintet has been together for 39 years. All have day jobs. Bass player Bernard Bowie said the band was “discovered” by a member of the Debonne family during a gig at the Willoughby Brewing Company. Now, most of their gigs are in Ashtabula County, where they have acquired a faithful following. Many were in attendance Sunday evening. “We’re out here more than we’re in Cleveland,” Bowie said. Bowie said the group is used to the hour-long drive from Cleveland and considers it an honor to perform in Ashtabula County. With day jobs and weekend gigs, band members have little time off. “We love it. It’s about giving back,” Bowie said. “We’ll be doing this until we can’t do it any more.” The next “Great Music Without Barriers” concert is 2 p.m. March 10, featuring the Telos String Quartet of the Cleveland Institute of Music. The Salzedo Harp Duo will perform 2 p.m. April 7. Concerts are presented free of charge at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 4901 Main Avenue.


GAZETTE NEWSPAPERS • WEEK OF WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2012 • 16B

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