Page 1

sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 6 AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

The home decorating issue

Make a Roman blind Vintage embroidered quilt Print your own fabric Crochet a bunting Toys and cushions to make DIY artwork Cakes & cupcakes Homemade crackers www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Inspiring ideas for everyday living Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 1


Want to see your ad in Sweet Living? Email us at admin@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

share your

money-saving tips.

email us at

tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Page 2

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 6 August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

From the editor Need some home decorating ideas? Whether you want to beautify your bedroom or revamp your living room, we’ve got it covered in this issue. From inspiring home decorating ideas, colour psychology tips, craft and soft furnishing DIYs, we have tons of tips to help you upgrade your décor. If you’re enamoured with colour, check out our tips on colour psychology on page 59. Colour has the power to transform not only our homes but the way we feel, our behaviour and our general efficiency. A room painted with red walls, for example, can make us feel energised or excited, while a room with blue walls can promote calmness and relaxation. And who knew that an orange hue could encourage activity? If you’re a vintage fanatic, you’ll love Nicki Trench’s embroidered quilt on page 42. She uses vintage traycloths for her design, but you could also use old tablecloths cut to size. Or you might like the bejewelled lamp DIY on page 68, which doubles as a clever storage idea for your vintage brooches. Then we have the vintage wallpapered magnetic board for you to make on page 51. There are many other DIYs to keep you busy: a crocheted bunting (page 39), a Roman blind (page 46), a gorgeous wall hanging (page 63) and your very own designer toys (page 65). Of course, if you’re feeling a little peckish after all that crafting, there are plenty of delicious recipe ideas to keep you going. Sweet living everyone.

Jane www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Join us on Facebook to get the latest Sweet Living updates, and sign up for our free weekly newsletter from our website.

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 3


sweetliving

53

42

contents 6

News, views, tips & snips

10

Homemade crackers

13

69

Latest updates, inspiring ideas, thrifty tips and websites we love. Make your own healthy, preservative-free crackers.

Preserve your bounty

Delicious jams, pickles, chutneys and marmalades to make.

18 19 31 37 70

Cross-stitch covers

73

Backyard sustainability

Cute covers for your preserves.

Sweet treats

Recipes for cakes and cupcakes.

Printable labels

Print your own labels and gift boxes.

Home decorating

Give your home a fresh makeover.

For bookworms

We’ve scoured the bookstores for crafty new releases. Eight easy spices to grow at home.

Contacts www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Editor: Jane Wrigglesworth Designer: Geoff Fitzpatrick, grafix@fitzi.co.nz Editorial enquiries: jane@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Advertising enquiries: admin@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Readers’ tips: tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Join us on Facebook

Page 4

62

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

38 www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


39

66 20 23 25

52 www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 5


sweetliving

news, views, tips & snips Craft inspiration

French designer Frederique Morrel creates stunning objects from vintage tapestries. “We like materials that tell stories of simple, ideal happiness and that have been caressed by many hands,” she says. Her tapestry artworks include life-size people and animals. Visit Frederique Morrel’s website for more inspiration.

Homemade herbal tea blends

Use spray-free herbs from the garden to make your own healing teas. Nature’s herbs are loaded with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Use the fresh or dried leaves of basil, catnip, lemon balm, lemon verbena, hyssop, mint, peppermint and thyme, the fresh or dried flowers of chamomile, cornflower, elderberry and lavender, and the seeds of anise, caraway, celery, coriander, dill, fennel, fenugreek, and rose hips, among others. To dry herbs, place in a dry, warm place out of sunlight and leave for a couple of weeks. Store in an air-tight container. You can mix and match your flavours. Check out some great herbal tea blends over at Wellness Mama.

Make your own talcum powder

Are you a fan of talcum powders? No doubt you’ve heard mention in the news about a possible link from commercial powders to cancer. If you’re concerned, try making your own instead. Donna Lee of Cottage Hill Herb Farm has provided the following recipe. You need: 1 ½ cups maize cornflour (maize cornflour is less gritty than wheaten cornflour and is softer to use), 1 ½ cups arrowroot powder, 6 drops each of lavender and chamomile essential oils. Grind essential oils into small quantity of mixed powder, using mortar and pestle or a cup and the back of a spoon, then blend with balance of powders. Store in a glass container. Page 6

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

Stencilled windows

Use acrylic paint to stencil an intricate lace pattern onto windows to provide some privacy without blocking the sunlight. “Although acrylic paint is not permanent on glass, it is hardy enough to withstand a light wipe as long as you do not use any harsh cleaning materials on it,” says Rachel from The Stencil Library. See more ideas over at The Stencil Library’s blog. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Recycle plastic bottles

Don’t throw away your old shampoo bottles. Turn them into nifty storage containers. Freya and Karin from Pysselbolaget used an assortment of accessories to make these cute owl knick-knack holders. Visit Pysselbolaget to see how it’s done.

Cameo wax seal

Use an old cameo brooch or a cheap alternative as a stylish wax seal. It works just the same as a traditional seal – dip the brooch in the hot wax and an impression will be left behind. Send letters the old-fashioned way with your signature imprint.

5 websites we 1. Free quilt patterns

Download free quilt patterns from Freespirit Fabric’s website. They have a large collection of gorgeous patterns for you to choose from.

2. Make your own flour

Have you seen the price of gluten-free flours? If you’ve got a grain mill, you can make your own. Find out how to create brown or white rice flour, corn flour, quinoa flour and others. Includes recipes too.

3. Budget Bytes

Budget Bytes includes a collection of delicious, inexpensive recipes for you and your family to enjoy, including breakfasts, beans and grains, and meat and vegetarian dishes.

4. Herbivoracious

Table flowers

Create a stunning table centrepiece by placing your flower arrangement on a perch. Choose a pretty glass or china cake stand and place a soaked half domed floral foam on top. Then simply insert your flowers and foliage into the dome, rotating the cake stand as you work so that the foam is evenly covered on all sides. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

This site aims to reinvigorate vegetarian cuisine with modern techniques and bold, authentic flavours. Chef Michael Natkin’s philosophy is this: “I don’t care whether you call yourself a vegetarian, carnivore, pescetarian or flexitarian. I want to make sure that if you cook a meatless meal tonight, it is hearty and delicious.”

5. Red Heart

Lots of fab knitting and crochet patterns for crafters of all levels to download for free. We like that.

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 7


sweetliving

The thrifty cook Readers’ tried and true tips for saving money in the kitchen.

Homemade condensed milk

Marmalade chicken

Seafood fritters

I don’t often have sweetened condensed milk in my pantry, but I do have all the ingredients to make it, so when a recipe calls for it, I make up the following:

Ever year we get a stash of homemade marmalade to use up. This family friendly meal is a great way to use up half a cup at a time! Serves 4.

These are quick and easy, very tasty, and economical too!

• ½ cup water • 1 tablespoon butter • 1 cup granulated sugar • 1 cup milk powder

• 4 chicken legs • Salt and pepper • ½ cup marmalade • 2 teaspoons lemon juice • ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard • Pinch garlic powder • 1 teaspoon curry powder

Put water and butter in a microwavesafe bowl, place in microwave and heat until it comes to the boil, about 45-60 seconds. Pour into a blender, together with sugar and milk powder, and blend until combined. Makes 1 ½ cups. Meagan Brooker

Fluffy omelettes To make your omelettes lighter and fluffier, mix in 1 tablespoon of water for each egg in place of milk. Andrea Edwards

Crunchy bangers Give sausages a crispy crust – the kids love them. Dip sausages in milk or egg, then roll in seasoned flour. You can crush cheesy crackers to a fine powder and add that to your flour too. Then cook as usual.

Preheat oven to 190degC (375degF).

Leigh Cuff

In a small bowl, combine marmalade, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, Dijon mustard, garlic and curry powders, and combine.

I like to make my own crackers so that I know exactly what’s in them. And they are very easy to make. For the kids, I often cut them into animal shapes.

Coat the chicken with the marmalade mixture. Cover the pan with tin foil, then bake for 45 minutes.

• ¾ cup brown rice flour • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds • 1 teaspoon fresh chopped parsley (or thyme or rosemary) • 1 teaspoon onion or garlic powder • ½ teaspoon salt • 1 teaspoon brown sugar • 1 tablespoon olive oil • 3-4 tablespoons water

Remove tin foil and baste the chicken. Continue baking, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Glenda Simminson

Separating eggs

Ground almond substitute

An easy way to separate eggs is to use a funnel. Break the egg into the funnel; the yolk will stay intact and the white will drip through the nozzle. Jean Walker

Jean McKenzie Page 8

sweetliving Issue 6

Whizz all ingredients in a food processor. Heat a little oil in a frying pan and spoon in batter to form fritters. Flip to other side after a few minutes.

Season chicken with salt and pepper and place in a greased baking pan.

Barb Ullrich Ground almonds are quite expensive, so I often substitute with ground rice (I grind it in my food processor) flavoured with almond essence.

• 2 cups seafood (eg. pipi, paua, mussels) • 1 egg • ½ onion • 1 tablespoon chilli sauce • Salt and pepper • Parsley • 1/3 cup self-raising flour

August - November 2013

Brown rice crackers

Place all ingredients into a bowl and mix/ knead to form a dough. Tip onto a silicone baking mat and roll out thinly. Cut into squares or shapes and bake at 180degC (350degF) for 10 minutes or until golden brown. Cheryl Riley

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Quick and easy bread

Marzipan cakes

Breakfast fun

I recently learned how to make this bread when I ran out of yeast for making my normal bread. It’s unbelievably easy.

I had some marzipan left over and found this fantastic recipe for miniature cakes. It’s delicious.

Just mix 1 cup of flour, 1 teaspoon of baking powder and water into a batter and pour into a large, oiled frying pan. Cook like you would a pancake. It’s delicious with butter and jam, or your choice of topping.

Jeri Lafon

• Marzipan • 100g butter • ½ cup caster sugar • 1 egg (medium) • 1 ½ cup all-purpose flour • ½ teaspoon baking powder • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda • Pinch salt • 1 teaspoon mixed spice • 2 egg whites, whisked • 2 tablespoons milk • ½ teaspoon vanilla essence • Icing (confectioner’s) sugar

My man surprised me with breakfast in bed one morning with a very cute heartshaped egg on toast. He used a pancake mould to make the egg shape. Such a simple thing, but it made my day.

Make your own rice flour

Preheat oven to 200degC (400degF).

Since rice flour and almond flour are not cheap, I make my own by grinding either white or brown rice for rice flour, and whole or slivered almonds (whichever are cheaper) for almond flour. If you have a grain mill, great, but as these are pretty expensive, I just use a coffee grinder. It’s smaller than a grain mill, so you have to do several batches, but it works just as well. Making your own flours is so much cheaper than buying them.

Roll marzipan into walnut-sized balls and set aside.

To make a sweeter version, you can add a teaspoon of sugar, and cinnamon and raisins if you wish. Or you can cook these over a campfire. Just wrap some batter around a sturdy stick and toast until cooked through.

Rhona Parrish

Mini hotdogs Here’s a great idea for kids’ parties - cheerio sausages (cocktail sausages), battered and deep fried, and presented on toothpicks or ice cream sticks. Like mini hotdogs. Kim Sampson

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Rebecca Earley

Homemade lime soda This is the most delicious, refreshing drink. It’s always a winner with guests. And as I have a very productive lime tree, it’s economical too. If you prefer, you can simply use water instead of soda water.

Cream butter and sugar in food processor until light and fluffy then transfer to a large mixing bowl. In a small bowl whisk the egg, and set aside. Add flour, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, salt, mixed spice, whisked egg whites and milk to creamed butter and sugar, and mix well. Add the vanilla and whisked whole egg, and stir until combined. Place a marzipan ball into a muffin pan cup, then spoon over cake batter until cup is half to three-quarters full. Bake in oven for 15-20 minutes. Cool then dust with icing sugar. Yvette Lawless Issue 6

• 250ml lime juice • 2 tablespoons sugar • 1 litre soda water • Lime slices • Mint Combine lime juice and sugar and stir until sugar dissolves. Pour into a large pitcher, add soda water and stir. Add lime slices and mint. Edith Fairclough

Quick seasoning Many recipes call for seasoning of salt and pepper. I keep a salt shaker filled with both – three-quarters salt to onequarter pepper – so when a recipe calls for seasoning, I use that. Jackie Petersham

Send your tips and recipes to: tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 9


sweetliving

Homemade

Make your own healthy, preservative-free crackers for a tasty snack.

Rosemary, almond & linseed crackers These spicy nibbles have a distinct nut and herb flavour, with a slight peppery aftertaste. Try them with dips, or with aged and blue cheeses. Download recipe, page 12.

Page 10

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Homemade Rye & caraway thins These crackers are delicious on their own, or try them with dips, aged Cheddar or caraway cheese. Download recipe, page 12.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 11


sweetliving

Cheese & paprika squares Serve these savoury morsels with dips, cheese, or a homemade spread made up of cottage cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, cucumber, radishes and chives.

sweet living

Cracker recipes

Free

Rosemary, almond and

linseed crackers

• 2 cups almond flour • 1 cup ground linseed (flax meal) • 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds (can use white) • ½ teaspoon garlic powder • ½ teaspoon salt • 1 teaspoons ground black pepper • 2 teaspoons roughly chopped rosemary • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil • 2 eggs

d nloa dow re

1. Preheat oven to 180degC (350degF). 2. Place all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre and add eggs and olive oil. Beat in with a fork or whisk. Use your hands to knead the dough together. 3. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and roll out dough 3-4mm thick, or thinner for a really crisp result. Cut into squares or circles and place onto a prepared oven tray. 4. Bake for 12-15 minutes (or until just beginning to brown on edges), or slightly less if your crackers are very thin.

he clickload your

Rye & caraway thins • 1 cup rye flour • 1 cup all-purpose flour • ½ cup warm water • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for brushing • 2 tablespoons caraway seeds • ½ teaspoon salt 1. Place all ingredients in a standing mixer (you can also do this by hand) and, using a paddle attachment, mix on medium-low until a dough forms. Switch to a dough hook and knead for 8 minutes.

to downr recipes. cracke

2. Turn dough out onto a bench, wrap in cling film and let rest in fridge for 30 minutes. 3. Preheat oven to 200degC (400degF). 4. Divide dough into two or three portions. Wrap the portions you are not working with in cling film to prevent them from drying out. Roll dough out as thin as you can. Do this by placing the dough between two silicone baking sheets or baking paper. Once rolled out, remove top silicone sheet and place the bottom one, with dough, onto a baking tray. Repeat with other dough portions. 5. Brush dough with extra olive oil and sprinkle with salt (optional). 6. Bake for 8-10 minutes, or until golden. Cool before breaking into pieces.

Cheese & paprika crackers • ¾ cup all-purpose flour • ¾ cup whole wheat flour • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika • ¼ teaspoon salt • ¼ teaspoon baking powder • 60g (4 tablespoons, ½ stick) butter • 1 cup grated Tasty cheese • 80ml (3 fl oz) cold water • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2

sweetliving

1. Preheat oven to 200degC (400degF). 2. In a large mixing bowl, combine flours, paprika, salt and baking powder. Grate or cube butter and rub into mixture until it resembles coarse breadcrumbs. 3. Add cheese and mix in. 4. In a separate bowl, mix together water and mustard, then stir into dry mix. Use your hands to knead the dough together. 5. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and roll out 3mm (1/8th inch) thick. Cut into squares or circles, poke dough with a fork, then place onto a prepared oven tray. Bake for 12-15 minutes or until lightly golden. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Page 12

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Homemade

Homemade preserves Jams, pickles, chutneys and marmalades – preserve your homegrown bounty.

Three-fruit marmalade

No breakfast table is complete without a jar of marmalade. This tangy spread is delicious on thick toast for a hearty morning meal. Recipe page 16.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 13


sweetliving

Clockwise, from top left: With just three ingredients, this blackcurrant jam couldn’t be easier to make (recipe page 16); Use fresh or frozen berries to make a vibrant coloured tripple berry curd (recipe page 16). Serve with scones or toast, or use to fill sweet pastry tarts; Apples, pears, peaches, apricots, berries and other fruit can all be used to make jams, jellies and chutneys; Sour cherry jam with tamarillo vinegar is the ideal accompaniment to cranberry cookies (recipes page 16).

Page 14

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Homemade

• Use only top-quality ingredients. Fruit and

vegetables should be at their peak of freshness. Those that are bruised or over-ripe should not be used; they will affect the taste and possibly the setting. You get out of your jar what you put in.

• As a rule of thumb, use slightly under-ripe fruit rather than over-ripe fruit. Under-ripe fruit has a higher pectin content.

• Use granulated sugar when making jam. Caster sugar or brown sugar tends to make the jam frothy.

• For a sugar-free stewed rhubarb, replace the sugar with a little stevia, lemon juice and cinnamon.

• W hen making marmalade, replace 2-3 cups of water with pineapple juice for a delicious flavour.

• To keep fruit whole when stewing, bring the water or syrup to the boil before adding the fruit, then turn down to a gentle simmer.

• Cook your fruit thoroughly before adding

sugar so that all the pectin is extracted. Pectin is important as it binds with the sugar and fruit acid to form the gel that helps the jam set.

• Fruits that are low in pectin include

strawberries, peaches, pears, apricots, kiwifruit and tamarillos. Use a special preserving sugar that has pectin added when cooking these fruits, or balance them with fruits that are high in pectin, such as cooking apples, lemons, cranberries, blackcurrants, boysenberries and green gooseberries.

• Avoid copper, aluminium and unsealed

cast-iron pans as they may react with the natural acids in fruit and vegetables and spoil the flavour of your preserves. A wide top is important as it allows for rapid evaporation during the boiling process.

• Freeze tomatoes whole and unblanched, then

simply rub off the skins under hot water when you are ready to use them.

• To remove skins from grapes, place them in

a pot of boiling water for 2 minutes, then in a bowl of cold water. The skins will rub off easily.

• Place pips and stones from the fruit you are using

in a muslin bag and cook these with the jam to improve pectin levels and to add extra flavour.

• Test if jam is at setting point by dropping

a teaspoon of jam onto an ice-cold plate. After a minute drag your finger through and check to see if it ‘wrinkles’ or has the desired consistency. If not, continue to boil.

• To sterilise jars, wash both the jars and lids in

hot soapy water. Place upside down on a clean tea towel to drain. Place jars on oven tray, not touching, and place in preheated oven at 180degC (350degF) for 10 minutes. Put the lids in a saucepan of boiling water, also for 10 minutes. Remove jars from oven and lids from saucepan and place on a clean tea towel to dry.

• Processing jams in a water bath helps to

eliminate any germs that may have been introduced while pouring the jam and at the same time ensures the seals are airtight.

• Warm sugar for jam making in a heat-proof

bowl on a low heat in the oven while the fruit is cooking. This will help the sugar dissolve faster. It is important that the sugar is completely dissolved before the jam starts to boil or it may crystallise.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 15


sweetliving

Recipes Sour Cherry Jam with Tamarillo Vinegar

Free

d nloa dow here clickload your to downes recipes. preserv

• 1 cup sugar • 1 cup water • 700g (25oz) fresh sour cherries, pits removed • 1 tablespoon lemon juice • 1 tablespoon tamarillo vinegar (or your choice of flavoured vinegar)

1. Combine the sugar and water in a saucepan and cook on a medium heat until the sugar has dissolved and the mix takes on the consistency of syrup, approx. 5-10 minutes. 2. Add fresh cherries, lemon juice and tamarillo vinegar and cook until the cherries soften. Stir occasionally to stop jam from sticking on the bottom of the saucepan. 3. Cook for about 20 minutes or until mixture reduces and thickens. Test to see if the jam has set by placing a teaspoon on a cold saucer. When cooled slightly it should wrinkle when touched. 4. W hen ready, remove from heat, skim off any froth, allow to cool slightly, then pour or ladle jam into a warm sterilised jar.

Blackcurrant jam

• 1 kg (35oz) blackcurrants • 3 cups water • 1.5 kg (53oz) sugar 1. Wash the blackcurrants and remove the stems. 2. Place fruit and water in saucepan and cook on medium heat until the fruit is soft and the liquid has reduced by half. 3. Add sugar and stir until completely dissolved. 4. Bring to boil for 15-20 minutes until the setting point is reached. 5. Test if jam is ready by placing a teaspoon of jam on a cold saucer, let cool and test to see if it wrinkles. 6. Remove from heat and skim off any froth, then allow to cool slightly before pouring into warm, sterilised jars. Page 16

sweetliving Issue 6

Triple berry curd

• 1 cup blueberries • 1 cup raspberries • 1 cup boysenberries (or blackberries) • 2/3 cup sugar • 1/8 teaspoon salt • 1 tablespoon cornstarch • 2 tablespoons lemon juice • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten • 1 tablespoon butter 1. Place berries in a blender and process until smooth. 2. Press blended berries through a sieve until you have 1 cup of purée. Discard seeds. You could save any left-over purée and add it to a smoothie or drink. 3. In a saucepan combine sugar, salt and cornstarch with a whisk. 4. Stir in the cup of puréed berries, lemon juice and eggs, and stirring constantly bring to boil over a medium heat. 5. Reduce heat to a simmer and continue to stir until curd thickens (approx. 1 minute). 6. Remove from heat and add butter, stirring through gently. 7. Pour mixture into a jar, cover and refrigerate for approximately 6 hours before using.

Three-fruit marmalade • 2 grapefruit • 4 lemons • 2 oranges • 11 cups water • 3 kg (100oz) sugar

1. Wash and scrub the fruit to remove any wax or surface dirt. 2. Cut each piece of fruit into thin slices, remove any thick pith and place in a muslin bag along with seeds. The pith and seeds contain a lot of pectin, essential for making the jam set. 3. Place the fruit and muslin bag in a saucepan along with the water and slowly bring to the boil. 4. Simmer for 2 hours or until the peel is soft. Remove the muslin bag and squeeze as much of the juice back into the marmalade mix as you can. 5. Pour in the sugar and stir until fully dissolved. 6. Bring marmalade back to the boil until setting point is reached. Test by placing a teaspoon of marmalade on a cold saucer, leave for 1 minute and then check to see if it wrinkles. 7. Remove from heat and skim off any froth, then allow to cool slightly before pouring into warm, sterilised jars.

Cranberry cookies

• 225g (8oz) butter, softened • ½ cup sugar • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence • 1 egg • 3 cups all-purpose flour • 1 teaspoon baking powder • ½ cup dried cranberries 1. Preheat oven to 180deg C (350deg F). 2. Cream butter, sugar and vanilla essence with August - November 2013

hand beater until light and fluffy. 3. Add egg, beating lightly. 4. Sift flour and baking powder into mix, add cranberries, then use hands to form a dough. Turn out onto lightly floured surface and knead lightly. 5. Roll out dough to 5mm thickness and cut into rounds using a cookie cutter. Place on a greased baking tray and bake for 15 minutes, or until lightly golden. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Homemade

Chilli Lime Pickle This spicy preserve makes good use of surplus chillies and limes. It’s delicious served with curries, naan bread and rice, or as an accompaniment to cold meats and cheese.

Eggplant Chutney This chutney is great alongside antipasto platters, or spread on breads and crackers.

• 1.5 kg (53oz) eggplants • 6 chillies • 6 garlic cloves • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger • 2 tablespoons mustard seeds • 1 tablespoon ground coriander • 1 teaspoon turmeric • 2 teaspoons garam masala • ½ cup olive oil • 1 teaspoon salt • ½ cup sugar • 1 cup wine vinegar 1. Preheat oven to 200deg C (400deg F). 2. Wash and dry eggplants, then cut in half and place skindown on an oven rack. Bake for 45 minutes. 3. De-seed chillies and chop finely. Crush garlic and place in food processor along with chillies, ginger, mustard seeds, coriander, turmeric and garam masala, and blend together. 4. Place olive oil, salt, sugar and wine vinegar into a saucepan and bring to the boil. 5. Reduce heat and add the blended spices. Simmer for 2 minutes. 6. Peel skins of eggplants and discard them. Place eggplants in food processor and purée. 7. Pour spice liquid over the puréed eggplant and mix well. 8. Spoon mixture into warm sterilised jars. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

• 6 limes • 2 tablespoons salt • 3 red chillies, minced • 1 tablespoon garam masala • 1 tablespoon cumin • 2 tablespoons sugar • 6 cloves garlic, crushed • ¼ cup vegetable oil • 3 large onions, finely chopped • 2 cups malt vinegar 1. Wash and scrub the limes to remove any surface dirt. Then roughly chop, discarding seeds, and place in large bowl. 2. Add salt, chillies, garam masala, cumin, sugar and garlic and mix well. Cover bowl and leave to marinate overnight. 3. Next morning, heat oil in saucepan, add onions and cook until soft. Do not brown. 4. Add limes and marinade spices and cook for 15 minutes, stirring continuously. 5. Add vinegar and bring mixture to boil. Cover saucepan and simmer for 1 hour, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking. 6. Remove from heat and cool slightly, then pour into warm, sterilised jars and seal. Allow to cure for 2 weeks before using.

Rhubarb relish This goes well with cold meats and cheeses.

• 2 cups finely diced rhubarb • 2 cups finely sliced onions • 1 cup malt vinegar • 2 cups brown sugar • 1 teaspoon salt • ¼ teaspoon white pepper • ¼ teaspoon ground ginger • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon Place all ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a slow boil. Cook slowly, uncovered, for 20-30 minutes, until the mix is of a jam consistency. Pour into warm, sterilised jars. Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 17


sweetliving

Free

d nloa dow here

click ad your nlo to dow s-stitch cros s. pattern

Cross-stitch covers Top your homemade preserves with a cute cross-stitch cover. Linen, cotton and blended evenweave fabrics are all perfect for a rustic look. We picked up a 100% cotton evenweave fabric from an op shop (thrift store) for a song. Look out for vintage linen as well. Place your fabric in an embroidery hoop and use our free cross-stitch patterns to make up your design. We used three strands of white embroidery floss to stitch these motifs. Once finished, remove fabric from embroidery hoop and cut in a circle, big enough to top your preserving jar. Use pinking shears for a decorative edge.

Page 18

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Sweet treats

Every now and then we all need a sweet treat. Indulge your taste buds with these decadent creations.

Chocolate mandarin cake

Mandarin and chocolate‌ Mmmm. What a delicious combination! Something akin to Jaffa sweets. When mandarins are in season, this cake is simply the bees knees. See recipe page 34.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 19


sweetliving

Simple flowers Use a petal flower cutter, available from cake decorating suppliers, to cut out flower shapes from pink sugar paste. Then mix a fuchsia coloured food powder or paste with vodka and brush onto the tips of the petals for a two-toned effect. Place a shop-bought sugar pearl in the centre of each flower, or pipe on your own iced pearl drop (see page 34, sugar paste cameos).

Page 20

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

There are a range of flower cutters on the market, which makes cake decorating super easy – and your cake look a million dollars. When cutting out flower shapes, keep them covered with cling film to prevent them drying out while working. Shape the petals using a bone tool or round ball tool. Pipe small dots in the centre of your flowers. Use a butterfly mould to make the butterfly.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 21


sweetliving

Peanut butter Oreo truffles These exquisite truffles are a treat for any occasion – for fancy afternoon teas, for kids’ parties, or as a special gift for friends. See recipe page 34.

Page 22

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Chocolate & vanilla truffles These bite-sized treats are a creamy mix of white or dark chocolate. Various flavourings, such as liqueurs, dried fruit, nuts and extracts can also be added. See recipe page 34.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 23


sweetliving

Cameo cupcakes Here’s the perfect treat for a high tea party – cameo cupcakes. All you need is a rubber cameo mould, from cake decorating suppliers, or you can make your own mould from a piece of jewellery and food-safe moulding gel. See sugar paste recipe and technique on page 34.

Page 24

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Hydrangea cupcakes

The sheer abundance of petals gives these cupcakes a sophisticated feel. Don’t be fooled by their intricate nature. They’re actually quite easy to make. See how on page 35.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 25


sweetliving

Custard cookies

These crunchy cookies make excellent lunchbox treats, or gifts for friends and family. See recipe page 35.

Page 26

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Orange and walnut cake

This is an accommodating cake. It keeps well, so you can make it a day or two before a special event. Serve with whipped cream, with orange zest sprinkled on top. See recipe page 35.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 27


sweetliving

Napoleon cake Deliciously rich and decadent, this cream-filled pastry cake tastes even better after a few days. Serve at room temperature with lashings of whipped cream. See recipe page 35.

Page 28

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Apple & cinnamon cookies These scrumptious cookies are similar in taste to apple turnovers, only crunchy. See recipe page 35.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 29


sweetliving

Filigree butterfly cake This pretty single-tiered cake is decorated with filigree butterflies and cosmos flowers made with craft punches. The project features in Alan Dunn’s new book, Creative Cakes, published by New Holland, RRP $39.99.

Free

d nloa dow ere h

click a full extract oad to downl structions. with in

Page 30

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Free

load n w do A3 A4 Click

or

Download free labels and giftwrap These vintage-look labels are perfect for adorning decadent gifts. Download and print onto white card stock and cut out. The giftwrapping paper can be downloaded onto A4 or A3 paper.

Free

load n w do re he Click

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 31


sweetliving Print a cupcake box Download this cute box and present it, complete with homemade cupcake, to a special friend.

e e r F

ad o l n dow here click

Page 32

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Wrap your chocolates These small gift boxes measure 8cm x 6.5cm x 3.5cm each. Perfect for holding homemade chocolates. Download the free template, print onto white card stock, then fold and glue the sides together.

e e r F

load n w do ere h click

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 33


sweetliving

Recipes Chocolate mandarin cake

• ¾ cup cocoa • 2 cups boiling water • 3 cups all-purpose flour • 2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda • ½ teaspoon baking powder • ½ teaspoon salt • 250g (9oz) butter, softened • 2½ cups caster sugar • 4 medium eggs • 2 tablespoons mandarin (or orange) juice • 1 teaspoons vanilla essence • 2 tablespoons finely grated mandarin zest • Mandarin slices 1. Preheat the oven to 180degC (350degF). Grease three 23cm (9 inch) round cake tins. 2. Place cocoa in medium sized mixing bowl, pour over boiling water and whisk until smooth. Allow to cool. 3. Sift flour, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder and salt into separate bowl and set aside. 4. In a large bowl, cream butter and sugar with electric beater until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at time, then stir in mandarin juice and vanilla essence. Add half the flour mixture and half the cocoa mixture and stir. Add remaining flour and cocoa mixture, then mandarin zest, and stir until combined. 5. Pour batter evenly into 3 prepared cake tins. Bake 25-30 minutes, or until a metal skewer inserted into the middle of the cakes comes out clean. Allow to cool, then spread mandarin buttercream icing on two cakes and sandwich all cakes together. Pipe buttercream icing around the sides and on the top and decorate with mandarin slices.

Mandarin buttercream icing

• 200g butter, softened • 2 ½ cups icing (confectioner’s) sugar • 1 teaspoon grated mandarin zest • ¾ teaspoon vanilla extract • 2-3 tablespoons mandarin (or orange) juice Beat butter with electric beater until light and fluffy. Add half a cup of icing sugar to butter at a time, beating until mixed. Add mandarin zest and vanilla and enough mandarin juice to achieve frosting consistency.

butter at a time, beating until mixed. Add milk and essence at the end.

Peanut butter Oreo truffles Makes 25 • 250g (9oz) Oreo cookies • 170g (6oz) cream cheese • ½ cup peanut butter • 350g (12oz) dark chocolate

1. In a food processor, pulse Oreo cookies until they become fine crumbs. Alternatively, place in large plastic bag and crush with rolling pin. 2. In a separate mixing bowl, mix cream cheese and peanut butter with an electric beater until light and fluffy. 3. Add Oreo cookies and mix until combined. 4. Roll mixture into balls the size of a walnut and place on baking tray lined with waxed paper. Chill in freezer for 1 hour. 5. Melt chocolate in double boiler and dip chilled balls in melted chocolate. Place back on waxed paper until chocolate sets.

Chocolate truffles

Makes 30-35 • 450g (15oz) good quality chocolate • 250ml (1 cup) cream 1. Chop or grate chocolate. 2. Heat cream in saucepan to boiling point (do not boil). Remove from heat and add chocolate. Stir until smooth. 3. At this point you can add flavourings if desired, such as liqueur or vanilla essence. Stir. 4. Refrigerate until firm then shape into small balls. Coat with cocoa powder, melted dark or milk chocolate, chocolate flakes, coconut or nuts. Refrigerate again to firm up.

Chocolate orange fudge truffles

Buttercream icing

Makes 30 • 50g (1 ¾ oz) unsalted butter • 395g (13 ¾ oz) tin sweetened condensed milk  • 400g (14 oz) dark chocolate, chopped • 2 teaspoons orange essence • Zest of two oranges

Beat butter with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add half a cup of icing sugar to

1. Put butter and condensed milk in saucepan and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally until butter is melted. 2. Remove from heat and add chocolate, stirring until chocolate has melted. Add

• 200g butter, softened • 2 ½ cups icing (confectioner’s) sugar • 2 tablespoons milk • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Page 34

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

essence and zest and mix in. 3. Refrigerate until firm then shape into small balls. Coat with melted dark or milk chocolate if desired and icing squiggles. Refrigerate again to firm up.

Vanilla truffles

• 500g (17oz) white chocolate, chopped • 2 tablespoons water • 150g (5oz) butter • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract • Seeds from 1 vanilla bean • Extra white chocolate for squiggle icing (optional)

1. Place chocolate, water and butter in saucepan, heat gently, stirring until chocolate has melted. Continue stirring over low heat for 10 minutes, until mixture is thick and completely combined. 2. Remove from heat and add vanilla extract and seeds. Stir. 3. Refrigerate until firm then shape into small balls. Melt extra white chocolate, let cool slightly and apply squiggles to truffles through icing bag. Refrigerate again to firm up.

Sugar paste cameos

• W hite sugar paste (rolled fondant or ready rolled icing)

• Gum tragacanth • Cameo silicone mould 1. Knead the sugar paste with a small amount of gum tragacanth (about 1 teaspoon per 250g sugar paste) until smooth and supple. Cover with cling film and pull off small pieces as you work. 2. Roll a walnut sized piece of sugar paste into a ball, and push into the centre of the mould. Use a rolling pin to level the top, trimming off excess sugar paste at sides. 3. Push sugar paste cameo out, and repeat until you have the desired number of cameos. 4. Put a small amount of icing or jam on centre of iced cupcakes and place your cameo on top. 5. To make the pearls, first make royal icing (see recipe) then fill a piping bag with it and pipe a pearl border around each cameo. To make a pearl drop, press bag lighting at top point, moving the bag down and pressing slightly harder, to form a drop. For a pearl-like sheen, apply lustre dust to each pearl.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Sweet treats

Free

d nloa dow ere h clickload your

to down recipes at sweet te

Royal icing

• 2 egg whites • 2 tablespoons cold water • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, strained • 2 ½ cups icing sugar Place all ingredients into a bowl and mix with an electric beater until fluffy and shiny.

Hydrangea flowers

• Flower paste (gumpaste) • Cornflour blue food colouring • Flower mould • Royal icing (coloured yellow and brown) 1. Knead the flower paste until soft and pliable. Divide into two portions. Cover one portion with cling film. 2. Dip a toothpick into blue food colouring and then into the uncovered flower paste. Use just a tiny amount of colour – a little goes a long way. You can always add more. 3. Work the colour into the flower paste by kneading the flower paste. Make your first portion a light cornflour blue. You can add more white flower paste to make it a softer colour if necessary. 4. Take the other portion of flower paste and add blue colouring, making it a slightly darker blue. 5. Use a flower mould to cut out about 30 hydrangea florets per cupcake – 15 from each colour. Lift the flower petals slightly at tips to form an upward curve. Allow to dry for at least four hours or overnight. 6. W hen dry, fill a piping bag with brown royal icing and pipe a small ball in the centre of each flower. Fill another piping bag with yellow royal icing and pipe small beads around central disk. 7. Beginning at the top of the cupcake, stick the first floret down with brown (or blue) royal icing. Continue placing the others in a ring around the first floret, and so on. Any gaps can be filled in with florets.

Custard cookies

• 125g butter (4 ½ oz), softened • 125g (4 ½ oz) caster sugar • 2 tablespoons milk • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence • 1 ½ cups plain flour www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

• 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder • ½ cup custard powder

1. Preheat oven to 190°C (375°F). Grease 2 baking trays. 2. Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add milk and vanilla essence and beat until combined. 3. Add flour, baking powder and custard powder and mix into a soft dough, using hands to finish off. 4. Tip dough onto floured surface and knead until smooth, about a minute. Roll dough out 4mm-5mm thick. Cut out letters using cookie cutters. Place on greased trays. 5. Bake in oven for 15-18 minutes. Ice when cool, if desired.

Orange and walnut cake • 1 cup all-purpose flour • 1 tablespoon baking powder • 1 ½ cups roughly chopped walnuts • 4 eggs • 1 ½ cups sugar • ½ cup orange juice • 1 tablespoon grated orange zest • 1/3 cup olive oil

1. Preheat oven to 180degC (350deg F). Prepare a 23cm (9 inch) springform pan – grease bottom and sides and place a piece of waxed paper on bottom. 2. Place flour, baking powder and chopped walnuts in bowl, mix together and set aside. 3. Beat the eggs with an electric beater until frothy. Gradually add the sugar while beating, continuing to beat until light and pale yellow. 4. Add the walnut mixture, orange juice, grated orange peel and olive oil, and mix until blended. 5. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake for 1-1 ¼ hours, or until a metal skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Cool before releasing from pan. Serve with whipped cream and zest.

Napolean cake

• 250g (9oz) butter, softened • 4 cups all-purpose flour • 1 egg • 125ml (4 fl oz) cold water • 1/8 cup lemon juice • ½ teaspoon salt

Cream filling • 250g (9oz) butter, softened • 395g tin sweetened condensed milk 1. Place butter and flour in food processor and mix until they resemble breadcrumbs. 2. Add egg, water, lemon juice and salt and combine until just mixed. Issue 6

3 Remove from food processor and gently knead into a ball. 4. Divide the dough into seven balls (plus one small piece if you wish to make a pastry flower) and leave in the fridge for at least 1 hour. 5. Preheat oven to 220deg C (430deg F). 6. Lightly dust work surface with flour. Take one ball at a time and roll out to form an 18cm (7 inch) circle, about 3mm thick. To make flower, roll extra pastry out in a band then roll up to form a flower. 7. Place circles and flower on baking tray, prick circles with a fork and bake for 15 minutes, or until lightly browned. Let cool. 8. Make cream filling: mix butter and condensed milk with electric beater to form a cream. 9. Crumble one of the pastry circles and set aside. 10. Layer pastry circles with cream in between. Smear cream on sides and top as well. Sprinkle pastry crumbs on top and sides to cover cream. 11. Refrigerate overnight. You can eat the next day – but this cake tastes its absolute best on day 3 (if you can wait that long) when the layers have soaked up the cream and the flavour is less buttery.

Apple & cinnamon cookies

Makes 16 cookies • 1 cup all-purpose flour
 • 1 cup whole wheat flour
 • 1 teaspoon baking powder
 • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
 • ¼ teaspoon salt
 • 115g (1 stick) butter, softened
 • ¾ cup brown sugar
 • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
 • 1 apple, peeled and grated • Cinnamon sugar (a mix of caster sugar and cinnamon) 1. Sift flours, baking powder, cinnamon and salt into large mixing bowl. 2. Cream butter and sugar in food processor until light and fluffy. Add vanilla extract. 3. Add grated apple to dry ingredients. Mix until combined. 4. Add creamed butter and sugar and mix in. Knead the mixture a few times until a dough forms. 5. Flatten the dough to form a disk, wrap in cling film and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. 6. Preheat the oven to 180degC (350deg F). On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to 6mm (¼ inch) thickness. Use a cookie cutter to cut out shapes. Place on prepared baking tray, sprinkle with cinnamon sugar and bake for 15-20 minutes. August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 35


Freshen up your next paint job with Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free, which combines the popular low sheen of Resene Zylone Sheen without the unwanted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for better indoor air quality. Improved air quality can help prevent headaches, asthma, nausea, respiratory complaints and allergic reactions. And to suit all tastes, Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free is available in a wide range of popular Resene colours using Resene non VOC tinters. Now that’s fresh thinking. Available exclusively from Resene.

0800 RESENE (737 363) www.resene.co.nz

Page 36

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Home decorating ideas Give your home a fresh makeover with these easy decorating ideas.

Colour choices

The atmosphere of a room can be changed by our colour choices of paint and soft furnishings. The colour green, for example, is considered balancing and harmonising, and possesses a soothing influence on body and mind. It brings peace, comfort, hope, nurturing, and healing. It’s an ideal colour for bedrooms, as is blue.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 37


sweetliving

Bedroom bonanza

Children’s bedrooms should be fun as well as calming. A blue and grey colour scheme is pacifying, while quirkly prints add playfulness. Attach fabric pockets to headboards to store books or toys.

Page 38

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Crochet a bunting Crochet a lavish bunting for your child’s bedroom or a whimsical party. Pattern visually recreated by Kathy Williamsen of Colorado.

Free

d nloa w o d here click step-by-step

load to down uctions. instr

Instructions View Kathy’s step-by-step images on the Knitting Paradise forum.

1

Begin with ch 4, slip st to form a ring, ch 1, work 12 sc in ring, slip stitch to ch 1, ch 3, skip 1 sc, sc in next sc, around to form 6 ch 3 spaces, join, slip stitch into first ch 3 space.

Ch 3, counts as first dc, 3 dc in ch 3 space, ch 7, 4 dc in next ch 3 space, ch 3, 4 dc in next ch 3 space around, slip stitch to join into 1st dc.

2 3

Ch 1, 7dc, ch 7, 7dc in ch 7 space, ch 1, 3 sc in ch 3 space, ch 1, repeat around, sl stitch to join.

Slip stitch to 3rd dc of the previous 7 dc then ch 3, counts as first dc, dc in next 2 dc, ch 1, 7 dc, ch 7, 7 dc in ch 7 space, ch 1, skip first 2 dc of next 7 dc, 3 dc in next 3 dc, ch 4, skip first sc of previous 3 sc, dc in next sc, ch 4, skip first 2 dc of the 7 dc, 3 dc in next 3 dc, around. Join with a slip stitch to first dc.

4

Ch 5, dc in next ch 1 space, skip 2 dc of the 7 dc from previous row, dc in next dc, skip 2 dc, dc in next dc, skip 2dc, dc in the last stitch of the 7 dc from previous row, ch 2; in ch 7 space do dc, ch 2, dc, ch 3, dc,ch 2 then ch 2, dc in first dc of the 7 dc from previous row, ch 2, skip 2 dc, ch 2, dc in next dc, ch 2, dc in ch 1 space from previous row, ch 2, dc in 3rd dc of the three dc from previous row, ch 2, dc in ch 4 space, ch 4, dc in next ch 4 space, repeat around. Join.

5 6 7 www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Slip stitch into ch 2 space, ch 3, counts as 1 dc, dc on same ch 2 space. Continue to do 2 dc in each ch 2 space around. Do 3 dc, ch 3, exchange in each point on the triangle and 4 dc in the ch 4 spaces at the sides. Join with sl stitch. Ch 3. Ch 3, skip 1 dc around with 3 ch 3 spaces at each point. Do a picot stitch in first ch 3 space, sc in next ch 3 space, sc in next ch 3 space, do picot stitch, around, join, finished.

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 39


sweetliving

All in the details Dress up your princess’s room with pretty florals and ruffles.

Page 40

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Curtain call Source curtain bead strands from a specialist bead shop and make your own door furnishings. Simply attach the beads to a strip of fabric by sewing or gluing, and use hooks and eyes to hang it above a door.

Ruffled purse Pick up an old evening purse from an op shop or thrift store and glue or sew coloured lace to the bottom of the bag. Add a vintage brooch at the top, just below the clasp.

Layered florals Layered florals work well when there is enough of a contrast for each to stand out. The different colours and sizes of these prints, including the floral wallpaper, work brilliantly, providing a very pretty, feminine feel.

Light relief A neutral coloured floor and a collection of white toys and ornaments provides some relief from the abundance of pattern in the room.

Storage solution Old baskets are a dime a dozen at thrift stores. Pick one up for a few cents and line it with pretty vintage linen. Use it to store toys, pillows or bedlinen. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 41


sweetliving

Vintage embroidered quilt Nicki Trench’s new book A Passion for Quilting includes 35 step-by-step patchwork and quilting projects, including this gorgeous vintage quilt.

Page 42

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Free

Many of the blocks in this quilt were made using vintage traycloths that are exactly the right size. Alternatively, look out for old and damaged tablecloths that can be cut to size. Don’t feel guilty about cutting them up: you’re going to revitalise them and give them a new lease on life.

load n w do re he click step-by-step

load to down uctions. instr

You will need: • 35 13 x 18-in. (33 x 46-cm) blocks of vintage embroidery • 111 x 85 in. (282 x 216 cm) toile de Jouy fabric for backing • 111 x 85 in. (282 x 216 cm) batting (wadding) • Two 103 x 4½-in. (262 x 11.5-cm) and two 77 x 4½-in. (196 x 11.5-cm) strips of white cotton fabric for borders • 10 yd (9.15 m) navy blue rick-rack • 10¼ yd (9.4 m) embroidered ribbon, 1 in. (2.5 cm) wide Finished size: 95 x 84 in. (242 x 213 cm)

1 2

Lay the embroidered blocks out on a flat surface and arrange them in six rows of five. Label the rows and the order of the blocks.

Right sides together, using ¼-in. (6-mm) seams and making sure you keep the blocks in order, machine stitch the blocks in each row together. Press the seams in each row to one side, all in the same direction. Machine stitch the rows together, again using ¼-in. (6-mm) seams. Press the seams to one side, all in the same direction. Turn the quilt top over and press the whole quilt on the right side.

3

Cut two 77 x 4½-in. (196 x 11.5-cm) and two 103 x 4½-in. (262 x 11.5-cm) strips of white cotton fabric for the borders. With right sides together, using ¼-in. (6-mm) seams, pin and machine stitch the short strips to the top and bottom of the quilt. Press the seams to one side and trim the side edges level with the quilt top. Pin and machine stitch the long strips to the side edges of the quilt. Press the seams to one side and trim the edges. Press the quilt on the right side.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 43


sweetliving

8

Trim the backing fabric to the same size as the quilt top. Turn the quilt top edges over the batting (wadding) and pin, so that the top edges cover the batting (wadding). Fold the backing fabric to the inside to align with the quilt top and pin together, so that both edges are turned in toward each other. Press all edges.

4

Measure out 1 in. (2.5 cm) from the seam between the pieced quilt top and the border all around, pin rick-rack in place, and machine stitch.

9

Pin the border ribbon around all edges, folding it under at the corners for a neat finish. Machine stitch the ribbon onto the quilt.

5

Cut the backing fabric and batting (wadding) to the size of the quilt top plus 2 in. (5 cm) all around. Assemble the quilt “sandwich” (see next page), centring the batting (wadding) and quilt top on the backing fabric. Using curved safety pins and starting in the centre of the quilt and working outward, pin through all layers to secure well, smoothing the fabric as you go.

6 7

Using a walking foot if possible, starting with the centre seams and working outward, quilt “in the ditch” along each seam line.

Lay the quilt out flat again. Smooth out the border and pin it to the batting (wadding) and backing to hold it in position. Lift up the edge of the border and mark the batting (wadding) ½ in. (1 cm) in from the edge of the quilt top. Trim the batting (wadding) along the marked line.

Page 44

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

10

Using a neutral thread and a darning/embroidery foot on your machine, lower the feed dogs and machine stitch one flower in the centre of each block. If you prefer, you can mark the flower on the fabric using a fade-away fabric marker pen.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating Quilted flowers

Practise these flowers first on a mini quilt sandwich. You may need to set a smaller stitch size and adjust the tension on your machine until they look right.

Assembling the quilt ‘sandwich’ This method is used for quilts that are going to have their edges bound. The backing fabric needs to be about 2 in. (5 cm) larger than the quilt top all around. If your fabric isn’t wide enough, cut two lengths and join them together in the centre. 1. Press the backing fabric and cut it to the size of the quilt top plus at least 1 in. (2.5 cm) all around. Lay the backing fabric right side down on a flat surface, smooth it out, and tape it down to keep it in position. 2. Cut a piece of batting (wadding) the same size as the backing fabric and lay it down on top. Lay the quilt top right side up on top of the batting (wadding), smoothing out all the creases. 3. Using curved safety pins or quilting pins and starting in the centre of the quilt and working outward, pin through all layers to secure well, smoothing the quilt as you go. Use plenty of pins and take your time. Don’t pin the seams if you intend to stitch “in the ditch”.

A Passion for Quilting There’s something for everyone in Nicki Trench’s new book, A Passion for Quilting. From bags and purses, to quilts, cushions, tea cozies and table runners, A Passion for Quilting contains 35 inspirational ideas for the living room, dining room, bedroom and more. It includes a wide range of quilting methods, plus projects for patchwork, appliqué, and embroidery.

Extract from A Passion For Quilting 35 step-by-step patchwork and quilting projects By Nikki Trench RRP $29.99 © Cico Books Distributed by Bookreps.co.nz www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 45


sweetliving

Lined Roman shade Vanessa Arbuthnott’s new book, The Home-Sewn Home, has 50 great DIY projects, from window dressings to soft furnishings. Here she shows us how to make a shade.

Page 46

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Free

d nloa dow ere h click step-by-step

load to down uctions. instr

Making a lined Roman shade needs a few more sewing skills than a simple roller shade, but is well worth the effort. Made in Butterfly Dance in Spinach, this shade is edged with a trim of Plain Linen, also in Spinach, and is a classic window solution.

Estimating yardage

You will need: • Main decorator fabric—see right for yardage • Contrast decorator fabric for borders—see right for yardage • Lining fabric—see right for yardage • Matching sewing thread • Hook-and-loop tape the width of the finished shade • Roman shade tape (a special tape that has a casing woven along its centre, with fabric loops attached)—see right for yardage • Dowel rods 3⁄8in (1cm) in diameter, 1 ½in (4cm) shorter than the width of your finished shade • One thin 1in- (2.5cm-) wide wooden slat, 1½ in (4cm) shorter than the width of your finished shade • Fine Roman shade cord • 1 x 2in (2.5 x 5cm) wooden lath as long as the width of your finished shade • Brass screw eyes • Wooden acorn and brass cleat • Angle irons (optional) • Screws • Bodkin or large tapestry needle, staple gun, saw, drill, awl (bradawl)

• The main-fabric panel should measure the finished length of the shade plus 3 ½ in (9cm) for hem allowances, by the finished width minus 1 ½in (4cm) to allow for the borders and seam allowances. Also allow main fabric for covering the lath (see instructions).

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

• Measure your window to determine the finished width and length of the shade (see instructions).

• T he contrast-fabric borders should measure the calculated length of your shade including the hem allowance, by 4in (10cm). • The lining should measure the finished width of the shade, by the finished length of the shade plus 3 ½in (9cm) for hems. • For the Roman shade tape, calculate the dowel rod spacing for your shade length (see instructions) and then allow for a length of tape the width of your shade multiplied times the number of rods calculated, plus 20in (51cm).

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 47


sweetliving

Making fabric Hannah Stanton, in her new book Contemporary Upholstery, divulges techniques and inspiration for upstyling furniture. Here, she explains how to design your own fabric. You can print onto fabric, embellish pre-made fabric or even weave your own. When designing fabric, be inspired by what’s around you. Think about colour, pattern and scale in relation to your piece and the room it will end up in. Whichever printing technique you use, experiment with materials or play with scale. Be open to ideas, keep a sketchbook and create something unique.

Block chair with machineembroidered patchwork by Eleanor Young.

Little Animals. Screen-printed fabric by Celia Birtwell.

Screen-Printing

Birds n Bees. Digitally printed fabric by Timorous Beasties.

Digital Printing Digital printing is a pain-free and cheaper alternative to screen-printing. A digital printer is essentially the same as your home printer, except it is larger and prints onto fabric. The turnaround is (usually) quick and you can produce designs for a small run – making it possible to create fabric for one chair. You can be as creative as you like in terms of colour and pattern. The range of colours is only limited by the set-up of the supplier. If you like, the pattern can be specific to each panel of your chair. Re-sizing elements of your design and breaking the repeat are also possible, and you should receive samples so you can check the quality before going ahead. To minimise wasted fabric and save money, produce prints to fit each panel of your chair, for example the inside back and the seat, then organise each panel so they fit together. A good supplier will be able to help you with this. Page 48

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

Screen-printing is certainly more hands-on and involved than digital printing. The results are not always perfect, but sometimes the best or most interesting print is the result of a mistake. The screen itself is made from a metal or wooden frame with one side covered in a woven mesh. In its simplest form, a paper stencil is placed between the screen and the fabric, and ink is then pulled across the screen with a squeegee. It will only transfer onto the fabric through the open area of the stencil. More commonly, a photosensitive medium is spread across the mesh and an image is exposed onto it. Once the medium is washed away from the screen, you are left with open areas for the ink to pass through. Every colour in a design requires its own separate screen. Taking a course in screen-printing is a good idea, even if you intend to print at home. The tips, advice and inspiration you will get from working with other printmakers are invaluable. If you do go down the home-printing route, everything you need, including the chemicals, can be bought online or from large art suppliers. You’ll then need enough space to print, somewhere completely dark for the light-sensitive screen to dry and the correct wattage bulb for exposing the screen. Exposing the screen will be a case of trial and error – as will the printing results themselves. The texture of your fabric and how hard you press or how many pulls of the squeegee you use will all add to the effect of the finished print. It’s best to start with a simple design in one colour. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Eep and Herds fabrics by Skinny laMinx.

Stencilling The principle of stencilling is to cut a design in a sheet material such as paper or plastic and apply paint through the cut-out areas. You can transfer paint through these openings by spraying, sponging or brushing, for example. To allow for repeated use, it’s best to cut the stencil design onto plastic. You can buy sturdy plastic that can be put through your home printer – the design is then cut out with a craft knife. A heat pen is also a useful tool. Practise with both before over-cutting or melting your design.

Block-printed fabrics by Jesse Breytenbach.

Use spray glue or pins to fix your fabric flat and use the same spray to fix the stencil to the fabric. If you’re worried about gluing on the upper side of the fabric, then just tape the stencil in place and take care when applying the paint. Test the stencil and your chosen application method on a scrap piece of fabric first.

Block or Lino Printing

Embellishing

A lino print is essentially a step up from the classic potato print. Lino is available as a flat sheet or ready-mounted on a wooden block. The flat sheet option is more suited for a printing press. The latter makes for an easier, more even print if you’re printing at home. Lino is suited to line-heavy designs rather than blocks of colour and has a handmade texture and feel. It can be time consuming and possibly painful depending on how intricate your design is and how skillful you are with a lino cutter. To make a print, transfer the image onto the lino by drawing, tracing or with a photocopy and nail polish remover. Remembering that the image will need to be back to front, photocopy your design, then place it face down onto the lino. With some absorbent paper, dab the back with the nail polish remover to transfer the design. When it comes to cutting, keep both hands behind the blade. If possible, clamp the lino down so you have more control. Heating the lino will make it easier to cut.

Even the most basic sewing techniques can change the feel of a fabric. Try to think beyond the played-out patchwork covers and use the fabric in a different way. Be inventive with cutting and sewing.

Appliqué Appliqué, meaning ‘to be applied’, involves sewing a piece of fabric onto another piece of fabric. It has been around for centuries – but your appliqué designs don’t need to look as if they have.

Embroidery The traditional description of embroidery is the decoration of fabric using a needle and thread. But don’t be restricted by your preconceptions – embroidery doesn’t need to be twee and floral. Experiment with the materials you have and don’t be bound by tradition.

With careful positioning and marking, it is possible to produce repeat patterns. Experiment with different colours by offsetting the lino on the next print. Do check the transparency of the ink and how the colours mix before committing them to your final fabric. If you have a lot of time on your hands and a bit of lino experience, try reduction printing – or suicide printing, as it’s better known. The principle is that you only use one block of lino for each colour. To do this, make your first cut and print. Then cut and print again, and so on, and so on. You’ll need to plan this method carefully, making registration marks and printing light colours before dark. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Extracted from Contemporary Upholstery By Hannah Stanton Published by Jacqui Small Llp Distributed in NZ by New Holland Publishers RRP $39.99

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 49


sweetliving

Upstanding blooms

Create a floor-standing vase out of an old painted plant urn to provide colour and impressive height to a room. Arrange your flowers in a vase as usual, then place the vase inside the urn. Alternatively, if the urn is waterproof, you can place a piece of wet floral foam, or chicken wire with some water, at the bottom of the urn and arrange the flowers accordingly.

Page 50

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Magnetic board

Ashlee Parks made this delightful magnetic board using an ornate picture frame, a piece of sheet metal and some vintage wallpaper. She also made the upcycled vintage jewellery magnets too. So clever! Check out her magnetic board tutorial here, and her magnet tutorial here.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 51


sweetliving

Gymkhana

Now your kids can join the horsey set too. This equestrianthemed wallpaper, called Gymkhana, from Hibou Home, is just the ticket for horse and pony lovers.

Page 52

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Luxurious looks A velvet headboard functions as a work of art. Make your own by covering a piece of plywood with velvet or the more inexpensive velveteen.

Horsing around

Turn driftwood, scrap wood and tree prunings into works of equine art. Seriously, what child wouldn’t have a rocking good time on one of these?

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 53


sweetliving

Bold metallic florals add decadence to an interior’s colour scheme.

Wall coverings

From classic to contemporary and sophisticated to playful, wallpaper is back in a big way. Bold patterns, interesting textures, metallics and Anaglyptas are all chic, whether in a formal or informal setting, in traditional or contemporary styles. Here, the large-scale floral pattern eliminates the need for art.

Page 54

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Blooms for all rooms

Botanicals are still very popular and suit both masculine and feminine spaces. Large silhouettes and oversized leaves through to dainty blossoms and stylised flowers offer pure glamour or classic sophistication.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 55


sweetliving

Drape it

Blinds are an effective window treatment, but they can lack pizzazz. Dress your windows with decorative swags and elegant holdbacks. Curtain holdbacks are available from curtain retailers, or try these funky gold ones (inset) from Neiman Marcus or the jade floral rosettes from Urban Outfitters.

Page 56

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

F lag it A Union Jack cabinet steals the show in this dining room. All other furniture remains neutral, which allows this statement piece to stand out without disturbing the existing ambience. Do it yourself: pick up an old piece of furniture from a garage sale or online auction and give it a facelift with paint.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 57


sweetliving

Make a statement Looking to perk up your living space? Don’t be afraid to use vibrant hues to create a visual colour feast.

The use of bold fabrics helps to break up an otherwise neutral theme in this living room. The stripes also mimic the tongue and groove wall panelling.

Vintage chairs are right at home beside contemporary pieces and can provide accents of colour. An eclectic blend of furniture adds personality to a room. Page 58

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating Although it’s dark, a deep purple can often be used in the same way as a neutral but with a more dramatic flair. Purple is calming for the body and mind. It encourages contemplation and is good for meditation and prayer. It brings sleep, and soothes emotional and mental stress, so it’s ideal for the bedroom or a quiet hideaway.

Want to know more about colours and their meanings? Read about colour psychology here.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Blue can sometimes feel cold and uninviting, however you can use a contrasting colour to warm it up. Yellow makes us happy. It denotes warmth and optimism, so it’s perfect for dining rooms or other places where you gather to converse with friends and family. Together, these colours make a bold statement.

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 59


sweetliving

Peachy pouf Make a simple seat or footrest to match your existing décor. Materials: • 1m x 1.5m (1.1 yards x 1.6 yards) upholstery fabric • 3m (3.2 yards) contrasting or complementary bias binding • Matching machine thread • 3m (3.2 yards) piping braid • Compass (or pencil and string) • Zipper foot for sewing machine • Paper or cardboard for template • Stuffing (you can use anything from foam chips and cushion stuffing to old clothing and towels)

Step 2

Make a template. Using a compass (or pencil and string), draw a circle on paper 45cm (17.5 inches) in diameter. Cut out and use template to cut 2 x circles from your fabric. Next, cut a strip of fabric 150cm x 30cm (59 inches x 12 inches) for your side piece.

Step 3

Make piping. Cut 2 pieces of bias binding and 2 pieces of piping braid measuring 1.5m (59 inches) each. Place piping braid along centre of wrong side of bias binding, fold the binding over piping braid and stitch, using a zipper foot, along the length, close to the braid, to form a pipe. Page 60

Step 1

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

Pin a length of piping to each circle on right side of fabric, lining up the raw edges. Stitch directly on top of the stitching on the piping, using zipper foot. Overlap the end pieces, angling the piping down slightly. Cut off overlap.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating Download

this artwork here, either A4 or A3 size.

Reupholster a drab footstool with bold fabric.

Step 4 Take the side piece and pin right sides together to your top circle. Stitch, using thread on circle as a guideline. Where end pieces join, stitch together to form a seam.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Step 5 Pin the bottom circle up to half to three quarters away around the side piece (allowing an opening for stuffing) and stitch. Turn pouf right side out, then stuff. Hand stitch opening closed.

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 61


sweetliving

Patchwork pet Materials • Fabric scraps in various colours and patterns • Machine thread • 2 buttons (for eyes) – optional • Stuffing (the stuffing from old cushions works well) • Needle and thread

Step 2

Repeat for the other side, but the lay the squares out so that the dog faces the opposite direction.

Step 5

Hold buttons in position where eyes should be (one on either side of dog), and stitch in place.

Step 3

Sew the remaining squares together in one long strip. Take strip and pin to one side of dog, with right sides together. Stitch around dog, leaving a 1cm (3/8 inch) seam. Sew other side of strip to other side of dog, leaving a 10cm (4 inch) opening for stuffing.

Step 4 Step 1

Cut 84 x 7cm (2 ¾ inch) squares from fabric scraps. Lay the squares out in a dog shape, as shown. With right sides together, sew the squares together, leaving a 1cm (3/8 inch) seam.

Page 62

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

Trim outside facing corners on a diagonal, and clip inside facing corners up to the seam (being careful not to cut the seam), then turn the dog right side out. Stuff, then hand-stitch opening closed. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Too cute turtle Rose Clay’s adorable wall hanging will lift any room. Entitled ‘At The Water’s Edge’, it’s made from 100% wool fabric. “I hand-pieced the turtle’s shell using a variety of earthy and vibrant shades of hand-dyed wool,” says Rose. “The piecework was applied with a blanket stitch. The ‘plates’ on the shell are embellished with glass beads, semi-precious stones, buttons and hand embroidery.” You could also make it into a rug, though it would be best to leave off the beads and buttons. The wall hanging measures 22.5in. x 13.5in. (57.15cm x 34.29cm) and includes a sleeve at the top for hanging purposes. Click through to Rose’s blog, Three Sheep Studio, to see more. Check out her Etsy shop too.

Felted wool is easy to work with. When wool fabric is fulled or felted, it ‘tightens’ to prevent or limit fraying.

Appliqué with wool Rose gives step-by-step instructions on how to appliqué with wool, plus she has a free paisley pattern to download. Follow these instructions to get the gist of how to appliqué the turtle wall hanging as well. Then make yourself a lovely paisley cushion while you’re at it. Click here for the instructions. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 63


sweetliving

Make a hanging basket This cute little cotton crochet bag is just the thing for storing your youngster’s favourite toys, his or her PJs, or your own scarves or stockings. Sweet Living’s crochet expert Lisa van Klaveren designed this clever storage bag, complete with drawstring. You can download the pattern for free. Check out Lisa’s website, Holland Designs, for more patterns, but first, download your free one here.

Free

d nloa w o d ere h click ad your lo to down asket eb g ra to s pattern

Page 64

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Design your own soft toy It’s not hard to design your own toys. All you need is a basic pattern – a simple outline of a cat, for example, which you can easily draw freehand. Use the pattern to cut out your fabric, adding an extra ¼ inch (6mm) for your seam allowance. Add whatever accessories you like – felt patches, buttons for eyes, lace and trims for clothing – then stitch, stuff, and that’s it! See how different these soft toys look (two forms use the same pattern) by just changing the fabric and accessories.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 65


sweetliving

DIY artwork

Make your own inexpensive artwork to brighten walls. Clockwise from right: Paint cheap wooden boxes in cheerful colours and hang them up – they become instant shelves for toys, ornaments or books; Take a leaf out of Ashlee Park’s book and repurpose old silverware into cute curtain tiebacks. Ashlee provides a full tutorial on her website My So Called Crafty Life; Use soothing pastel paint colours to decorate furniture and walls; Frame a child’s initials made out of buttons; For the more patient, try your hand at a framed ‘patchwork’ flower. Download our free pattern onto A4-size white card stock and glue fabric onto it, in a patchwork fashion, to form a flower.

Free

d nloa dow ere h click ad your lo to down attern flower p

Page 66

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Diamonds are forever Instead of stripes, try stencilling diamonds onto walls to inject some fun into a room. Pick colours that match the existing dĂŠcor.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 67


sweetliving

t

r u o 1h c

p r o je

Bejewelled lamp

Stuck for a solution for displaying all those vintage brooches you’ve been collecting? Stick them to the base of a lamp. Use a sticky tack to attach them – that way you can easily pluck them off when you feel the urge to wear them.

Page 68

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Home decorating

Upgrade your décor From blah to beautiful, upgrade your room’s accessories in a flash.

High bling

Add instant glamour to a room by attaching a vintage diamante brooch or sparkling button to the centre of your cushions.

Button art

Pep up your cushions by switching the existing buttons for multi-coloured ones. Choose colours that match the room’s décor.

Paisley panache

Turn an old scarf or shawl into a chic cushion cover. Thrift stores have numerous vintage silk scarfs – line them for extra strength then upcycle them into gorgeous cushion covers.

Floral upgrade

Dress up a plain throw by hand- or machine-stitching a simple floral pattern at the corners.

Print a cushion

Print your favourite images onto iron-on transfer paper and iron them straight onto white cotton fabric. Cut the fabric to size then sew into cushion covers. It couldn’t be simpler.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 6

August - November Issue 6 2013 sweetliving

Page 69


For bookworms

A Little Course in Knitting

Dorling Kindersley Penguin Group (NZ), RRP $26.00 What a fantastic book for those wanting to learn how to knit or to develop their knitting skills further. It is divided into three sections: Start Simple, Build on It, and Take It Further, with easy-to-follow instructions and illustrations. The book introduces the different yarns and what they’re used for, needle types and sizes (with a handy conversion chart), and demystifies knitting abbreviations and symbols. Start off knitting a simple scarf or bag and before long you will be knitting cabled cushions, babies’ cardigans, Fair Isle armwarmers, socks, medallions, or a monkey toy, among other things. From bookstores.

Crochet at Play

Kat Goldin Kyle Books, RRP $39.99 Whether on the prowl in a lion hat or riding their trusty steed

Page 70

hobby horse, there is something for every child to enjoy among Kat Goldin’s modern designs. This lovely book features 30 fun projects – hats, scarves, clothes, blankets and toys. Whether you are picking up a hook for the first time or you’re a longstanding crocheter, we guarantee there is a project that you can have as much fun making as your child will have wearing or playing with. Distributed by New Holland, available from bookstores.

Sew It Up

Ruth Singer Kyle Books, RRP $49.99 This mighty resource is a stylish, easy-to-use manual packed with professional sewing techniques and tips. It contains more than 200 techniques and guides, with 20 contemporary projects and 20 professional masterclasses – from simple stitching to trapunto quilting, to making accessories, clothes and furnishings. Suitable for both novices and experienced sewers. Distributed by New Holland, available from bookstores.

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

There’s nothing like a stack of good books to while away your evenings. We’ve scoured the bookstores for crafty new releases.

A Little Course in Sewing

Dorling Kindersley Penguin Group (NZ), RRP $26.00 As with others in the ‘A Little Course in…” series, this book is divided into three sections: Start Simple, Build On It and Take It Further. The chapters are carefully structured to help you learn new skills and techniques then cement your newfound knowledge by providing step-bystep projects. Start simple with a drawstring bag, then progress to a tote bag, a toddler’s dress, an apron, a patchwork quilt, appliqué cushion covers, and more. A great resource. From bookstores.

Baby & Toddler Knits Made Easy

Dorling Kindersley Penguin Group (NZ), RRP $37.00 This book is adorable. It shows you how to make custom-made knitted pieces, and provides you with the technical foundation, design inspiration and projects to create lovely gifts for newborns

and toddlers. It features more than 50 patterns, including clothing, toys, bits and pieces for the nursery, and accessories. Throughout the book you’re shown ways to experiment with different yarns and colours – there’s a handy standard equivalent yarn weight chart to refer to. The most difficult thing in this book is choosing what to start with. From bookstores.

My Felted Friends

Mia Underwood CICO Books, RRP $34.99 Mia Underwood has produced 35 adorable needle-felted designs for you to make yourself. The projects are designed for both beginners and experienced crafters, with superb stepby-step instructions and illustrations to transform felting wool into miniature animals. Learn a range of needle-felting techniques, and churn out lions, monkeys, squirrels, ponies, dogs, cats, giraffes, elephants, and more. Distributed by Bookreps, available from bookstores or Bookreps.co.nz

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

500 Crochet Blocks

Hannah Elgie & Kath Webber New Holland, RRP $24.99 Packed with both traditional and new designs, 500 Crochet Blocks will provide hours of creative fun for beginner and advanced crocheters. Divided into eight chapters for easy reference, each pattern features clear step-bystep instructions, diagrams and photos. Each featured square (or circle) includes four easily achieved variations. This book is compact enough to take along with you; just grab some yarn and a hook and you are ready to go. From bookstores.

Sweet & Simple Handmade

Melissa Wastney Stash Books, $36.00 Whether you stitch up a pair of baby shoes, knit a cute cardigan, or upcycle adult sweaters into children’s sweaters, this charming how-to book has something for all the little ones in your life. Kiwi mother and designer Melissa Wastney shares 25 adorable projects designed for babies www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

and young children up to age 10. Inside you’ll find reusable patterns, detailed instructions, and endless inspiration. We love it! Available overseas from C&T Publishing, or in NZ from Melissa’s website, Tiny Happy.

Kids’ Party Cakes

Diane Hockings New Holland, RRP $27.99 Diane Hockings helps both the novice and enthusiast create uncomplicated birthday cakes using decorations and ingredients that are easy to find. Kids will love looking through the book and choosing their favourites. Features cupcake ideas as well as variations of the ever-popular doll cake. Also included are trucks, robots, dinosaurs, lots of cute animal faces, and numbers. From bookstores.

Art Smart

Traci Bunkers, Kath Durkin, Melanie Grimshaw, Wendy Walker QED Publishing, RRP $24.99 Get ready to be inspired with this wonderfully creative book for budding young artists. Art Smart presents a fresh, imaginative

approach to art, covering four main artistic skills – painting, drawing, printing and textiles (with some cute hand sewing projects). The projects, which are graded for difficulty, have simple step-by-step instructions that will encourage kids of all ages to flex their artistic fingers. Distributed by New Holland, available from bookstores.

Tea Time

Jackie Brooks New Holland, RRP $24.99 Dust off the fine china and invite your friends around to sample some of the delights from Jackie Brooks’ inspiring book. Packed full of mouthwatering recipes, Tea Time includes chapters on teas, sandwiches, cupcakes, cakes and slices, scones and muffins, shortbread, and cheesecakes and tarts. These recipes are delicious and easily achievable, confirming the book’s tagline “quick, simple, easy”. From bookstores.

Vintage Home

Sarah Moore Kyle Books, RRP $49.99 If beautifully patterned fabrics and vintage wallpapers inspire you, Issue 6

then you’ll love this book. Sarah Moore has a great eye for detail, layering gorgeous pattern upon gorgeous pattern. This book is an eclectic mix of vintage styling, projects to make, decorating ideas and practical instructions. From blanket curtains and wallpapered stair risers, to clever storage crates and beanbags, there are ideas for every room in the house. Distributed by New Holland, available from bookstores.

Kids’ Garden Adventure Kit

Don Burke New Holland, RRP $29.99 The Kids Garden Adventure Kit has everything kids need to get going outdoors. Aimed at kids aged 7 years and over, it includes a beautifully illustrated book with lots of handy garden hints and ideas, a garden trowel, a compass and a special night-time UV torch. Children will discover the magic of growing plants, how to create a terrarium and change the colour of a flower, how to track the sun, and more. This well written book will appeal to the adventurous young gardener. From bookstores.

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 71


Page 72

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


sweetliving

Backyard sustainability Grow your own vegetables year round

Male courgette flower

Female courgette flower

Growing courgettes successfully Whether you call them courgettes or do as the Italians do and call them zucchini, they’re one and the same thing – and they’re one of summer’s most prolific veggies. But they don’t always get off to a good start. Sometimes those bold yellow blooms fall to the ground before fruiting. Why is that? There are two reasons: lack of pollination, or because they are all male flowers. Courgettes bear both male and female flowers (the male flowers have normal stems and a single stamen inside, the female flowers have a small swelling behind them – the fruit – and a more complex internal structure – the stigma), but only the female flowers produce fruit. Once the male flowers open and release their pollen, they fall off. At the very start of the season courgette plants often produce more, or only, male blooms to ensure there’s plenty of pollen about when the female flowers open. Then they fall off, making it look like a deluge www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

of blossom drop. But this is quite normal and within 1-3 weeks, female flowers should start to appear. The other reason is poor pollination. This might be because of a lack of bees or bumblebees in your garden, or even high humidity, which causes pollen to clump. Tiny fruits often form, but because of poor pollination, the plant aborts the fruits rather than waste its energy developing fruit that’s unable to produce fertile seeds (a plant’s whole purpose in life). Misshapen fruit may also form where incomplete pollination occurs. If there’s not enough pollen to fertilise all the seeds, the part of the fruit that wasn’t fertilised (typically the flower end) will grow at a slower rate than the rest of the fruit, and misshapen fruit occurs. Blossom end rot is another cause of fruit drop. You’ll first notice blackened ends

Issue 6

on stunted fruit. While blossom end rot generally indicates a calcium deficiency, it’s often caused by irregular watering or sudden fluctuation in water levels (it’s the water that carries calcium through the plant), or other environmental stresses. Blossom end rot occurs most often at the start of the season. You can reduce its incidence by watering regularly and evenly, by not over-feeding, and adding calcium to your soil if a test indicates it’s deficient.

Hand pollination

If bees are lacking, try hand pollinating your courgettes. Use a small paintbrush to transfer the pollen from the stamen of the male flower to the stigma of the female flower. Or you can pick the male flower, remove the petals and rub the stamen against the female flower. The best time to do this is when the female flower opens early in the morning. August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 73


sweetliving

8 easy spices to grow Black cumin Nigella sativa Annual

Uses: The black poppy-like seeds are used in both cooking and baking, in particular curries, vegetables and breads like naan bread. They are frequently used in Indian and Mexican food, adding a smoky, peppery, slightly bitter nutmeg flavour.

Fennel seeds Foeniculum vulgare Perennial

Uses: The anise-flavoured seeds are used in sauces, breads, fish dishes, Italian sausages, and many Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine. Position: Fennel is a doddle to grow. Sow seeds in trays in late winter/early spring and plant in the garden when big enough. Plant in a sunny spot in fertile, well-drained soil. Plants send up umbels of yellow flowers in summer, which eventually go to seed. Harvest the seeds as soon as the flower heads change from yellow-green to brown. Snip off a seed head and place it in a paper bag. Put the bag in a warm, dry room and allow the seeds to dry completely. While still in the bag, shake the seed head to dislodge the seeds. The leaves can also be harvested throughout the season and used in salads or to flavour meat and fish dishes.

Position: Sow seeds in early spring and transplant in the garden when big enough. Plant in a sunny spot in free-draining soil. Plants flower in midsummer, after which seedpods begin to develop. Let them dry completely before harvesting. When the seedpods are completely dry the top of the pod begins to split open. Snip off the pods and remove the seeds – they should be black, not green. Leave them to dry completely, then store in an airtight container. Black cumin grows up to 45cm high.

Horseradish

Armoracia rusticana Perennial Uses: Horseradish is always used fresh, as cooking diminishes flavour and pungency. It’s usually peeled and grated into dips, salad dressings, cream sauces, mustards, mashed potatoes, mashed beets and the likes, although young leaves can be added to salads too.

Caraway

(Carum carvi) Biennial

Uses: The dried seeds are used whole or ground. They have a strong anise flavour with hints of fennel and mint. They are often an ingredient in rye bread, biscuits and cakes, and are used to flavour cabbage dishes, stews and sausages. The young leaves, which look and taste a bit like parsley, may be eaten too. Position: Caraway is a biennial; it produces seed in its second year. If collecting your own seed, sow it fresh in autumn. Bought seed may be sown in spring or autumn. For best flavour, plant in full sun. Harvest the seeds by placing the cut seed heads into a paper bag and leave until the seeds fall out.

Page 74

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

Position: Horseradish has a tendency to take over the garden, so keep it contained, or harvest the plant in its entirety each year to keep it in check. It’s best harvested annually anyway; if left in the ground for too long, the roots tend to lose flavour and become stringy. Plant in a sunny spot in deep, fertile soil that’s been enriched with compost. If planting root cuttings, lay them on their sides in a 10cm-deep trench with the pointy end slightly deeper than the top. Once planted, water well, then leave them alone. Horseradish doesn’t need any additional fertilisers – just constant moisture. The roots can be dug up at any time for harvesting in the second or third year, but the best time is late autumn or early winter after a couple of frosts, which improves flavour. Dig up the entire plant, remove the foliage and any thin roots. These small roots can be stored in moist sand in a cool area over winter and planted out in spring. Store roots to be eaten in the fridge or freezer. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Backyard sustainability Cardamom

Elettaria cardamomum Perennial Uses: Cardamom is an essential ingredient in many Indian spice mixes. It’s used in both savoury and sweet dishes. The green oval pods may be lightly bruised and used to flavour rice, stews and casseroles, or the seeds may be removed and either lightly bruised and fried, or toasted and ground before adding to dishes. Position: Cardamom is a member of the ginger family and native to southern India where it grows under the forest canopy. It’s a heat-loving perennial, so during winter grow it in a hothouse or indoors where it will grow up to 2m. Its summer flowers are followed by greenish-brown fruit, each containing about 15-20 aromatic seeds. Harvest when nearly ripe, or the pods will split open and you’ll lose the seeds.

Cumin

(Cuminum cyminum) Annual Uses: Cumin is an important spice in many cuisines, including Indian, Mexican, North African and Middle Eastern. It’s used in curries, chutneys, relishes, stews, spice mixes and curry powders, and the famous Dutch cheese, Leyden. Cumin seeds resemble caraway seeds. However, the seeds of cumin are larger, slightly lighter in colour and hotter to taste. Position: Cumin is a small plant that grows only 20cm high. Sow cumin indoors in late winter/early spring and plant outside once the risk of frost has passed. Plant in a sunny spot in well-drained, average soil, or grow in pots. Cumin likes a fairly moist soil, although it won’t tolerate wet feet. Flowers appear in midsummer, followed by seedpods. The seeds can be harvested once the pods turn brown. When the seedpods crack when pressed, they’re ready to harvest.

Paprika

Capsicum annum Annual

Coriander

Coriandrum sativum Annual Uses: All parts of this plant are edible – the leaves, often referred to as cilantro, the seeds and the roots. It’s used in many cuisines, including Thai, Chinese, Middle Eastern, Indian and African, traditionally in curries but also in desserts and sweet pastries. The slightly sweet, citrus-like flavour of the seeds complements many foods, including chicken, pork, lamb, fish, even fruit. They’re also used in pickles, sauces and chutneys and soups and stews. The roots have a more intense flavour than the leaves and are traditionally cooked as a vegetable or used in curry pastes. Position: Coriander grows best in the cooler seasons. During hot weather, plants quickly go to seed. Grow from seed in spring or autumn, sowing every two to four weeks for a continuous supply. Sow direct, as coriander dislikes root disturbance. Full sun is best in cooler climates or when growing in early spring or late autumn. Part shade is best in hot spots and during the heat of summer. Seeds develop after plants flower. Harvest when they turn brown. Pick a stem and place it in a paper bag upside down and shake out the seeds. If they remain on the plant, set the bag aside in a warm room for a week and try again. Leave some seeds on the plant to self-sow. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Uses: Paprika may be added to stews, casseroles, goulash, homemade sausages and rice. To bring out its full flavour, paprika should be heated in oil or a moist environment. Be careful, as paprika burns easily. Heat for only a few seconds in hot oil before adding to a dish. Position: Paprika is simply finely ground red peppers. It comes from various varieties of Capsicum annum, either bell or chilli peppers or a mix of both. ‘Alma Paprika’ is one variety that’s typically used. The fruit has thick walls, which make it ideal for drying and grinding. Paprika peppers are grown just like any other pepper. They need warmth to thrive. Start seeds off in trays in spring and transplant when big enough. Water and feed on a regular basis. Harvest fruit when red and fully mature. The traditional method of drying peppers is to hang them in a hot, dry room out of direct sunlight. Sunlight bleaches the colour, and humidity promotes mould. You may also dry the fruit in your oven, or a food dehydrator. Cut the fruit open and remove the seeds. If using some chilli peppers, you may wish to retain some seeds if you like your paprika hot. Lay fruit on a baking tray and bake in the oven at 100degC for several hours, turning several times. The fruit is dry when it feels brittle. The peppers can then be ground in a blender or mortar and pestle. Store in an airtight container. Issue 6

August - November 2013 sweetliving

Page 75


next issue

sweetliving

Out December 2013 • Brilliant gifts to make for the whole family - cross-stitch, embroider, sew, crochet, knit, felt & upcycle • Free wrapping paper & gift tags to download • Gorgeous vintage-style decorations to make • Festive wreaths and flowers • Simple, delicious party food • Readers’ money-saving tips

Page 76

sweetliving Issue 6

August - November 2013

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Sweet Living 6  

Crafts, DIYs, food, backyard sustainability - The Home Decorating Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you