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sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 3

April - June 2012

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Inspiring ideas for everyday living

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Issue 3

April - June 2012 sweetliving

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sweetliving Issue 3

April - June 2012

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sweetliving Crafts • DIYs • Food • Green Living • Backyard Sustainability Issue 3

April - June 2012

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

A special day for Mum Whether you pronounce them ‘scoans’ or scones, these tasty morsels are one of the cornerstones of Kiwi baking. Add lashings of cream and jam, and they’re the quintessential high tea treat. In this issue we’ve put together a collection of mouth-watering goodies for Mother’s Day – a sugary high tea feast that’s fit for a queen. Naturally we were obligated to taste test everything first, which had us coming to the conclusion that baking can be a dangerous business. Not from a possible burn from a hot dish or a cut from a kitchen knife, but from the very real probability of a thickening waistline. Particularly when you see the heavenly looking cake pops on our cover, and on page 14. If you plan to whip up a cake for Mother’s Day, make sure you flip to page 44 and print out our free cake bunting. It’s so very cute, and we’re certain it’ll make Mum’s day. While you’re at it, print out our free matching wrapping paper on page 39, and the free downloadable gift boxes, starting on page 40. Then turn to 29 and stitch Mum a handmade gift from the heart. That’s Mother’s Day covered. But we haven’t forgotten the youngsters too, with our DIY wooden toys, starting on page 45. Delicious recipes, gorgeous crafts and free downloads – Sweet Living, everyone!

Jane www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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Toy workshop Day gifts 29 Mother’s 45 Wooden toys are both durable and Handmade Mother’s Day gifts

New, views, tips & snips

Latest updates, inspiring ideas, thrifty tips and websites we love.

your own cheese 10 Make Andrea Gauland shows us how to make simple cheeses at home.

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timeless. Provide hours of fun with these crafty wooden projects.

gift boxes, wrapping paper and cake bunting.

your own cut flowers. Plus, flower design ideas for Mum.

Backyard sustainability printables 53 38 Free Plant garlic and kohlrabi, and pick Download your free gift tags,

Mother’s Day treats

Serve up high tea for Mum this Mother’s Day, with our mouthwatering recipes for cakes and chocolates. Contacts www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Editor: Jane Wrigglesworth Designer: Geoff Fitzpatrick Editorial enquiries: jane@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Advertising enquiries: admin@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Readers’ tips: tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz Join us on Facebook

can be super stylish. Check out our classy craft ideas for Mum.

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news, views, tips & snips Turn paper into packaging

Don’t throw away old newspapers, magazines, gift-wrapping paper or scrap paper. Run it through the shredder and use it to cushion fragile items in gift boxes and packaging.

How safe are your cosmetics? Start educating yourself on toiletry ingredients with the help of the Environmental Working Group’s Cosmetic Database. Look up cosmetics, hair care products and sunscreens and learn about the chemicals in the ingredients list. Then flick through to the Sunscreen Guide and discover the nine surprising truths about sunscreens. For instance, EWG reports that 30% of all sunscreens contain Vitamin A in the form of retinyl palmitate, and Vitamin A, they say, may actually speed up the development of cancer.

Plastics by numbers

Not all plastics are created equal. The different types of plastics are labelled with numbers (plastic identification code). If you’re concerned about plasticisers, hormone disrupters or styrenes leaching into your food, then avoid numbers 3 (which is polyvinyl chloride, PVC), 6 (polystyrene, PS) and 7 (miscellaneous plastics including those that contain BPA). Click through to Eco Nation’s website to read up on which plastics are good and which aren’t.

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Eco-friendly gift-wrapping

No wrapping paper in the cupboard? No problem. Raid your garden for eco-friendly alternatives. Justina Blakeney’s nature wraps are 100% compostable – and pretty to boot. She’s used broad shiny leaves for the wrapping ‘paper’ and flowers and seed pods for the ‘bows’. Visit Justina’s blog for more fun ideas.

Cucumber sarnies

Here’s a new take on the traditional cucumber sandwich, which is typically composed of paperthin slices of cucumber between two pieces of white, crustless bread. This recipe is a lot tastier – and much better looking. See how to make them over at Vegan Yum Yum. They’re so darn easy!

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Bouquet boxes

These adorable DIY gift boxes are perfect for small gifts, such as trinkets and jewellery, even a cupcake (see our cupcake recipes, starting on page 13). Click through to Once Wed for full instructions and to download the box template.

5 websites we 1. Food Subs

Need a substitute for a herb, a dairy product, oils or flavourings? Find it at Food Subs, a cook’s thesaurus that has suggested substitutes for thousands of ingredients.

2. Hillbilly Housewife 5 things to do with kids’ art

At a loss as to what to do with your budding Picasso’s collection of artwork? Here are some ideas. 1. Sort the scribbles from the fine art and save the best in a scrapbook. Buy a folder with plastic pockets to store the artwork, or glue the pieces to an A3-size scrapbook. 2. Make a puzzle. Glue the artwork to a piece of cardboard, turn it over and draw puzzle shapes on the back. Cut into pieces, and the fun begins. 3. Use them as wrapping paper. Aunts, uncles and family friends will appreciate your little artist’s expertise. You can make cards too by simply cutting them to size and folding in half. 4. Send them away. Grandparents, especially, will love receiving artwork. Send them a selection of drawings to proudly display in their own home. 5. Photograph them. Take snapshots and create a digital photo album on your computer, or a coffee table book for visitors to peruse. Snapfish can turn your snaps into a book for little cost.

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This site is all about low-cost home cooking from scratch. There are great recipes for breads, homemade convenience foods, crock pots, all the different meats, fruit and vegetables, even powdered milk.

3. Top 25 family dinner recipes Cozi.com has listed their top 25 family meals that are quick, easy and tasty. But that’s not all. There are hundreds of delicious and healthy recipes throughout the site.

4. Floral design 101

Want to create your own bouquets and boutonnières? Everything you need to know about arranging flowers is here, from making wreaths, corsages, bouquets, garland headpieces, centrepieces and topiary trees to making the perfect bow.

5. Knitty and Crochet Me

Both websites offer free patterns for the enthusiastic crafter and an inspirational craft community. Have fun knitting or crocheting up a storm.

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The thrifty cook Readers’ tried and true tips for saving money in the kitchen.

Homemade stock bullion

Chocolate ice blocks

No waste

I keep all the scraps from our veggies (all cleaned, no dirt) and pop them in a bowl in the fridge. When I have a week’s worth I blend them all up and add salt and a bit of oil and presto! Homemade stock bullion. Just add to your meal to your own taste. I use a teaspoon in a mug of hot water when I am feeling hungry, to get me through to meal-time. Nardia Cooper

Make your own tasty and inexpensive ice blocks with a few simple ingredients. Place 500ml milk (you can use reconstituted milk made from powder – it really tastes fine) into a saucepan, bring to the boil, then add 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon cocoa and 1 tablespoon cornflour. Stir until mixture thickens, remove from heat and cool. Poor into ice block moulds and freeze. Cath Porter

Don’t throw out fruit if it’s starting to spoil. Cut off the good bits and freeze until you have a kilo or so, then make chutney. Can do this with veg too. Lois Hampstead

Freezer ties

Homemade schnitzel

After opening a bag of frozen vegetables, cut a strip from across the top of the bag to use as a free bag tie.

Buy cheap cuts of steak, pound it with a mallet, then dip in egg, then flour, then breadcrumbs seasoned with dried herbs, or finely chopped fresh herbs. Rob Matthews

Lorna

Banana ice cream Mash up brown bananas with some lemon juice, mix with a little yoghurt and freeze. Instant frozen banana ice cream. Claudine

Spice it up I’m not sure if this counts as a thrifty tip, but Cajun spice seems to make almost everything a little tastier. I add it to all kinds of things, including making very easy seasoned wedges. We get the little jar with a sprinkler on the top, and then wash this and use it for other spices after de-labelling. It becomes hard to see why people ever buy spice shakers. Natalie Page 8

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Pizza base I have started blitzing up a tin of tomatoes with tomato purée and fresh herbs in a blender, then use it fresh on a pizza and the rest I freeze in ice cube trays. Just defrost 2 or 3 cubes for future homemade pizzas. So easy and it makes lots! Helen

Cleaning tight spots To hoover in very tight spots (like under the fridge), fix a paper towel roll to the vacuum nozzle, squish it so it’s almost flat, then hoover away. Shelley Walker

Sugarless jam Here’s a lovely rhubarb jam, without all the sugar. Stew rhubarb in a little water then add a packet (or less, depending on how much rhubarb you’re using) of Weight Watchers jelly crystals (I like strawberry). Stir until combined, then pour into a jar. Michelle Michaels

Soap saver A great idea to use the last slivers of cake soap. Get a thick sponge and cut a slit into it so it becomes a ‘pocket’. Slip in the pieces of small soap and use the sponge in the shower to lather up! Vivienne

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Crock pot Massaman beef curry Here is my Thai Beef Massaman Curry that I make in the crock pot. It’s very popular with the family. •7  00g stewing beef (rump, topside or

chuck)

•2  tablespoons sunflower or peanut oil •2  tablespoons flour •2  diced onions •2  medium potatoes (or kumara), cut into

bite sizes •2  tablespoons Massaman curry paste •1  tablespoon tamarind paste •2  tablespoons fish sauce •1  tablespoon brown sugar • s alt and pepper •2  50ml beef or vegetable stock •4  00ml coconut milk (light)

Cut beef into bite-size pieces. Brown meat in pan over medium heat with small amount of oil. Do it in a couple of batches and then set aside, removing excess liquid. Mix in flour to assist thickening process later. Cook onion until soft and place in crock pot. Set crock pot on low heat. Cook potatoes in microwave for approximately 4 minutes. You need to cook these thoroughly. Tip excess liquid from pan, and on a low heat add Massaman and tamarind pastes. Stir occasionally, until fragrant. Takes only a few minutes. Add fish sauce, brown sugar, salt and pepper to curry paste. Stir, then add to crock pot.

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Add meat, potatoes, stock and coconut milk to crock pot and stir. Cook on low for 6-8 hours. Give a stir and add flour to thicken if required and salt and pepper for taste. Serve with rice Tips: Can add capsicum, celery and/or shredded courgette. The night before you can pre-cut meat, potatoes, onions and vegetables (if any). Mark Roberts

Crock pot beef rogan josh

Gluten-free all-purpose flour mix

•1  00ml tomato purée •1  teaspoon coriander •1  teaspoon paprika •1  cup beef stock •2  tablespoons flour • s alt and pepper to taste

•7  00g stewing beef •2  medium potatoes, cut into medium

pieces

•1  tablespoon crushed garlic •1  tablespoon crushed ginger •4  tablespoons medium green curry paste •2  large onions, thickly sliced •1  teaspoon cinnamon •4  00ml canned tomatoes (Indian flavour

if possible)

I came across this gluten-free flour mix on Jeanne Sauvage’s website, Art of GlutenFree Baking. It’s brilliant; you can use it in everything. If anyone is looking for great gluten-free recipes, check out her website. • 1 ¼ cups (170g) brown rice flour • 1 ¼ cups (205g) white rice flour • 1 cup (120g) tapioca flour • 1 cup (165g) sweet rice flour (also known as Mochiko) • 2 scant teaspoons xanthan gum

Mix everything together and store in a cool, dark place. Rebecca Johnson

Blanch and freeze When vegetables are in season and a real bargain I buy in bulk, then blanch and freeze them. Margaret Leach

Cut meat into bite-size pieces. Add to pan with some oil and brown all sides. Do this in two batches and set aside, removing excess liquid. Put potatoes in microwave to precook (approximately 4 minutes). Gently cook garlic, ginger and curry paste until fragrant, then add onions and cook until soft. Add remaining ingredients to pan ¬– cinnamon, canned tomatoes, tomato purée, coriander, paprika, beef stock, flour. Mix well on low heat. Add everything to crock pot, mix and cook on low for 6-8 hours Serves 6 Tips: Can substitute beef for lamb. To spice it up a bit, add crushed chilli with the curry paste. Mark Roberts

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Make your own cheese Andrea Gauland shows us how to make simple cheeses at home.

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Cheese is a simple thing to make from the milk of cows, goats, sheep – or yak, llama and horse if you’re feeling a bit adventurous! It’s best to start simple and get the steps of the fresh cheeses mastered before jumping in at the deep end, unless you have chooks or pigs who would appreciatively eat your mistakes. Fresh cheeses, or cheeses which are not cooked or aged, are very simple to make, and you can be eating your delicious results in as little as 12 hours from paddock to plate.

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Make your own

cheese

Using a starter Milk becomes cheese through the actions of bacteria. Raw milk will have a variety of naturally occurring bacteria (and even pasteurised milk will pick up bacteria from the environment). But if we rely on this random mix of bacteria to produce our cheese, we’ll get inconsistent results. Instead, we seed the milk with a culture of bacteria known to produce good cheese. We use a mesophilic starter culture for lower-temperature cheeses (for which the milk is heated to between 25degC and 40degC), such as feta, gouda, cheddar, chevre, and manchego. If we’re heating the milk to between 45degC and 80degC (as for parmesan), we use a thermophilic starter.

Buying cultures g, and results Cheese is a living, breathing thin ment in can be as variable as the environ ures that are cult the which it is prepared and ter cultures star le used. Commercially availab you more are readily available and will give perfecting your consistent results while you are cheese. techniques of making and aging de Me has Tra s, Bin Inn carries some culture online mail a number of sellers, and there are well, such order places that sell cultures as as Cottage Crafts.

Which milk? Supermarket milk is fine to use, as long as it’s not the UHT milk, out of which any useful bacteria has been completely destroyed by the heating process. Green top milk also isn’t that great to use, as there’s not enough milk solids in it. Full fat is good, whole milk is even better. Calcium chloride will have to be added to supermarket milk to get a good curd. Calcium chloride, available online and at some Bin Inn shops, should be added according to the label’s instructions.

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sweetliving Chevre Cheese Chevre is the generic word used for any goat cheese and comes in many shapes and flavours. Originating in France, this versatile cheese can be used as a sweet or a savoury, served fresh or aged. One of the simplest recipes follows, and can be adapted for use in so many recipes. We use this mixed with minced garlic and sea salt as a spread or dip, plain in lasagne in place of ricotta, and with icing sugar added to taste in a sponge with liberal lashings of raspberry jam and chocolate fudge sauce. You can even use it in place of cream cheese in cheesecake recipes.

• 4 litres goat’s milk (you can use half the amount, and

Easy Cheese The easiest recipe to make can hardly be called a recipe. Just about every culture has its own version of it. It’s just fresh milk and food acid. Using lemon juice or vinegar is the most basic, about ¼ cup juice or vinegar to 2 litres of milk. You may have to adjust the amount of acid you use, as acidity will vary. Our favourite curdling agent is apple cider vinegar, which leaves a very pleasant taste with the cheese. Heat the milk slowly to 85degC, stirring occasionally to avoid scorching. When it has reached the correct temperature, remove from heat and stir in your curdling agent. Immediately you should see small curds forming. What you are looking for is something that resembles very small cottage cheese curds. If you don’t get this the first time, stir in a little more of whatever curdling agent you have chosen to use. Strain through a dampened cheesecloth, muslin, clean cotton tea towel or something with a similar fine weave. The reason for dampening is that the whey will drain out easily rather than splashing up in your face. Hang the curds in the cloth to drain overnight, or up to about 24 hours.

then use half the amount of starter. You can also use cow’s milk, with a thicker result and slightly different taste.) • 1 packet direct-set chevre starter culture (which also contains the setting agent) OR 1/8 teaspoon mesophilic culture OR if you have your own homemade starter culture, use 1 tablespoon. • Rennet (if you use the prepared starter culture, omit rennet and water)
  • Water (non-chlorinated) In 5 tablespoons of cool water, place several drops of junket rennet (Renco is readily available in many New Zealand supermarkets. Again, if you are using the directset starter, leave out this step. If you are using something other than junket rennet, follow the packet instructions for the volume of milk you are using. The amount of rennet will vary according to the type of curd set you need for the cheese you are wanting to make. Heat the milk to 30degC. Add the starter culture and stir thoroughly. Add 1 tablespoon of your dilute rennet solution, and stir again, slowly and thoroughly. Cover and let set at room temperature (approx 22degC) for 12 hours, or until it is set like a loose jelly. It may take more time, it may take less.

This is a fun cheese to experiment with, and one you can enjoy right away, sliced on crackers or a crusty loaf, or fried and served with a nice garlicky bruschetta. It will keep well in the fridge for up to 2 weeks, stored in an airtight container.

Line a colander with a fine towel or two layers of cheesecloth. Ladle the curd into the colander. Tie the corners of the cloth into a bag and let drain for 6-12 hours, till a nice, spreadable consistency is achieved.

Variations: Have some fresh or dried herbs ready before you add your acid. Basil and oregano are especially nice. As you ladle out the curds, add a sprinkling of salt and herbs, so it will be layered up when it hangs. You can also add things like chopped olives or jalapeño chillies, sundried tomatoes – the limit is your imagination. Another nice thing about this cheese is you can fry it and it doesn’t melt! If you get really ambitious, you can invest in or make some cheese moulds, and drain it in different shapes.

This keeps up to two weeks in the fridge. If you can bear to leave it to age for two weeks in a dark corner of the fridge, it takes on a whole new dimension of flavour complexity.

Andrea Gauland has been making goats’ milk cheeses for 11 years and holds cheesemaking classes. For more cheese recipes, and instructions on how to culture your own milk, visit lifestyleblock Visit Andrea’s website for more information on cheese-making classes.

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sweetliving

Mother's day treats

Serve up high tea for Mum this Mother’s Day, with our delicious cakes and chocolates.

Dear Santa, 40 gifts under $40 plus some stylish luxuries (for a little bit more)

Dress to impress You can never fail to impress with fancy cup cakes. Whip up a batch for Mum, pipe a pretty decoration on top, then present them in a tissue-lined box.

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Cake pops

Who could resist these classy cake balls? They are so very elegant, yet they’re a breeze to make. Follow the cake pop recipe from Hansells, then decorate with edible sprinkles and sugar flowers (you can make your own or by them readymade from Spotlight or cake decorating stores). Then add a bow for a finishing touch.

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Mother's Day treats Stencil with icing This technique looks difficult but in fact it’s super easy. All you need is a stencil and a rolling pin – and your icing, of course. Check out the tutorial for stencilling icing here. The butterfly uses the same technique. You can buy butterfly cupcake wrappers from cupcakeboxes.

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Cupcake cuties

The rose is the most popular icing flower of all, and it’s not too difficult to make your own. Use a buttercream or royal icing, then follow the step-bystep instructions from Wilton. If you’re looking for lovely frosted icing recipes (such as Bailey’s chocolate buttercream or chocolate lover’s buttercream), take a peek at Divalicious. Then check out our basic cupcake recipe on page 26.

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Mother's Day treats

Adorn your cupcake wrappers with pretty silk-ribbon bows or vintage jewellery

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Pear butter If your pear tree is overloaded with fruit, make this simple but tasty spread for toast, crumpets, pancakes, scones, or as a topping for ice cream. Bottle it up and present it as a gift to Mum. Recipe on page 26.

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Mother's Day treats

From the heart What gal doesn’t like receiving chocolates? Make your own homemade goodies and present them in a heart-shaped box. Recipe on page 26.

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Fit for a queen Invented by chefs of the British royal household to celebrate the marriage of Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine and Prince Louis of Battenberg, the Battenberg cake, when cut open, reveals a distinctive chequered pattern in pink and yellow. If it’s good enough for royalty, it’s good enough for Mum! Recipe on page 26.

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Mother's Day treats

Lemon cookies

These cookies are the perfect high tea treat, with their light lemony flavour and creamy filling. Recipe on page 27.

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Maple mousse

This decadent sweet can be served for afternoon tea or as a dessert. Buy brandy snap baskets from your local supermarket to serve your mousse, or serve in parfait glasses. Recipe on page 27.

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Mother's Day treats

For chocolate lovers For the sweet tooths among us, try these chocolate and berry tarts. Alena Vinogradskaya whipped these up based on a recipe she found in a magazine. She says the tarts have two drawbacks: “They are eaten too fast and they are dangerous to the figure.” Visit Alena’s website (be warned, it’s in Russian) to see the making of these tarts in action. For the recipe in English, see page 28.

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Banana wholemeal scones A high tea wouldn’t be complete without scones with jam and cream. Plain scones are lovely, but these banana wholemeal scones are divine. Recipe on page 28.

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Mother's Day treats

Swiss roll

This timeless dessert looks posh but it couldn’t be easier to make. Spread with lashings of strawberry whipped cream and top with a chocolate flower. Recipe on page 28.

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Recipes Basic cupcake recipe • 125g butter, softened
 • ¾ cup caster sugar
 • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence
 • 2 eggs
 • 2 cups self-raising flour
 • Pinch salt
 • ¾ cup milk

Lemon Icing
 • 1 cup icing sugar
 • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
 • 1 teaspoon butter, softened
 • Boiled water 1. Preheat oven to 190degC. 2. Cream butter, sugar and vanilla essence until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, and beat until combined. 3. Transfer to large bowl and fold in sifted flour and salt, alternating with the milk. 4. Pour mixture into cupcake cases until half fill. Bake for 10-15 minutes or until golden brown. 5. To make the icing, sift icing sugar into bowl and mix with lemon juice. Add butter and pour half to 1 teaspoon boiled water over butter to melt. Whip icing together to a smooth consistency. Ice cupcakes.

Pear butter

• About 40 pears • 1 ½ cups sugar • 2 teaspoons cinnamon • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 1. Peel, core and chop pears then purée in food processor. 2. Place pear purée, sugar and spices in a large saucepan and bring to the boil. 3. Reduce to a simmer and cook, uncovered, and stirring occasionally, until reduced by half. Pour into sterilised jars. Page 26

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Chocolates

• 1 packet of Oreos, or other cream-filled biscuit

• 250g tub of cream cheese • Chocolate melts 1. Crumb the biscuits in a food processor then transfer to a large bowl. 2. Add cream cheese and mix together. 3. Shape into small balls. Place in freezer to firm up while melting chocolate. 4. Melt chocolate as per packet’s instructions, then dip each ball into the chocolate. Place on a tray to set.

Battenberg cake This sponge can be cooked the day before. The sponge will be firmer and easier to handle.

• 175g butter, softened • 175g caster sugar • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten • 2 tablespoons milk • 175g self-raising flour • red food colouring • apricot jam • 2 tablespoons icing sugar • 350g readymade marzipan 1. Grease a 20cm x 15cm oblong tin and line base and edges with baking paper. Cut another piece of baking paper, the same length and width as the tin. Fold the paper

April - June 2012

in half, lengthways. 2. Preheat oven to 180degC. 3. Cream butter and sugar in food processor until light and fluffy. Gradually beat in eggs, one at a time. Transfer mixture to a large mixing bowl. 4. Add milk, mix, then fold in flour. 5. Divide the cake batter in two and spoon one half into one half of the tin, along the length. Place the extra piece of baking paper in your tin in the middle, so that it divides the two sponge mixtures. 6. Use enough food colouring to tint the remaining cake mixture pink, then add the batter to the other half of the tin. Bake for about 15-20 minutes, until firm to the touch. 7. Let cool for 5 minutes then turn out onto a wire rack. Let cake cool completely. Trim both halves to the same size, then cut each half down their length. 8. Warm apricot jam, then brush onto the top and sides of each cake strip. Place one pink strip and one plain strip side by side. Place another pink strip and plain strip on top of these, in a chequerboard effect. 9. Roll marzipan into a rectangle of 20cm x 30cm. Place cake at one end and wrap marzipan around it. Pinch seams together and place seam on the bottom. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Mother's Day treats

Lemon cookies

• 170g butter, softened • ½ cup icing sugar • 2 teaspoons lemon extract (or

4 teaspoons grated lemon zest) • 1 ½ cups flour • ¼ cup cornflour Filling • 60g butter, softened • 1 cup icing sugar • 2-3 teaspoons grated lemon zest • 2 tablespoons lemon juice • 1 tablespoon thick cream 1. Cream butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fluffy. 2. Add lemon extract (or zest) and combine, then mix in flour and cornflour until smooth. 3. Roll dough into a ball and flatten slightly. Wrap in plastic film and place in the refrigerator for approximately 60 minutes. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

4. Meanwhile, make the filling. Cream butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add lemon zest, juice and cream, and combine. Set aside. 5. Preheat oven to 160degC. 6. Take the chilled biscuit dough from the fridge and roll out to a thickness of 5mm. Use a cookie cutter to cut out circles and place on greased baking trays. 7. Bake 15-20 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies turn a golden brown. 8. Let cool then make a sandwich by spreading one cookie with a teaspoon of lemon filling and placing another cookie on top.

Maple Mousse

• 4 eggs, separated • ¼ cup brown sugar • 1 ¼ cups maple syrup (or golden syrup, or maple-flavoured syrup)

• 1 tablespoon powdered gelatine, dissolved in 2 tablespoons warm water • 1 ½ cups cream

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1. Place egg yolks and sugar in a glass or metal bowl and beat until well combined. Add maple syrup. 2. Place bowl over a hot-water bath and cook, whisking continuously, until the mixture reaches custard consistency, approximately 15 minutes. 3. Remove from the heat and stir in gelatine mixture. Allow to cool completely. 4. Beat egg whites until peaks form. In a separate bowl, whip cream. 5. Fold egg whites and cream into custard mixture. Pour into serving dishes and chill in fridge for at least four hours. Or chill mousse in fridge and fill brandy snap baskets about 30 minutes before serving.

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Swiss roll

• 4 eggs • 125g caster sugar • 2 tablespoons warm water • 1 teaspoon vanilla essence • 125g flour

Chocolate berry tarts

For the filling • 6 tablespoons strawberry or three-berry jam • 225ml cream 1. Preheat oven to 190degC. 2. Line the base of a 25cm x 38cm swiss roll tin with baking paper, and brush with melted butter. 3. Beat eggs and caster sugar together until light and fluffy, then add water and vanilla essence. 4. Sift flour, and fold into wet ingredients. 5. Pour mixture into baking tin and bake for 12–15 minutes, or until the centre of the cake springs back when touched and the edges have shrunk away from the sides. 6. Gently tip the swiss roll onto a piece of baking paper sprinkled with caster sugar. Remove baking paper from the bottom of the cake. 7. Place a clean, damp tea towel over the cake for 30 minutes and allow to cool. The damp tea towel will prevent the cake from drying out. 8. Meanwhile, make the filling. Beat the whipped cream until soft peaks form. Add jam, then beat until stiff peaks form. 9. When cake is cool, dollop jam onto it, then a layer of whipped cream. Roll up the cake and sprinkle with caster sugar or decorate with a chocolate rose.

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• 200g dark chocolate • 100g cream • 450g shortbread biscuits • 2 tablespoons cocoa • 150g butter, softened For the filling • 30g sugar • 100g dark chocolate • 100g cream • 300-320g frozen berries

1 Melt chocolate and cream in double boiler. Mix well and set aside. 2. Beat remaining cream (from filling ingredients) with sugar and put in fridge. 3. Using a food processor, grind shortbread biscuits into fine crumbs. Stir in cocoa, softened butter and melted chocolate and cream. Mix well. 4. Grease fluted tart pans and fill with biscuit base. Place in refrigerator for 30 minutes to harden. 5. For the filling, melt chocolate and mix with cream and sugar mixture. Spoon the mixture onto the tart bases and refrigerate for 30 minutes. 6. Remove from fridge, place frozen berries on top of chocolate filling, then refrigerate for another 2-3 hours.

Banana wholemeal scones • 1 cup flour • 4 teaspoons baking powder • ½ teaspoon salt • 2 cups wholemeal flour • 1 tablespoon butter • 2 tablespoons honey (or golden syrup)

• 1 ripe banana, mashed • 1 cup milk 1. Preheat oven to 215degC. 2 Sift flour, baking powder and salt into large mixing bowl, then add wholemeal flour. 3. Melt butter and honey in microwave, add mashed banana, then combine with dry ingredients. 4. Add milk and mix to form a soft dough. If too sticky, add extra flour. 5. Turn out onto lightly floured surface and pat into a 2cm thick round. Cut scones out and place on baking tray. Bake for 10-12 minutes.

Photo credits: Pages 13, 14, 15, 16 & 17 Ruth Black, fotolia; Page 18 Lulu Durand, fotolia; Pages 19 & 22 Vanilla, fotolia; Page 20 RA Photography, fotolia; Page 21 kyokoliberty, fotolia; Page 23 Alena Vinogradskaya; Page 24 Springfield Gallery, fotolia; Page 25 Brebca, fotolia.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Mother's day gifts Handmade Mother’s Day gifts can be super stylish. Check out these classy craft ideas for Mum.

Scan your flowers Got a scanner at home? Make a pressed flower picture with a modern twist. Press a few fresh flowers in a book, then place them in an arty position under your scanner. Scan, then print onto photo paper. Or take your digital file to a local printer and have them print your artwork onto a large sheet of glossy paper. Choose a fancy frame to match.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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Top tip: Cross-stitch fabric comes in a range of subtle pastel colours. This time I picked a soft sky blue, but the flowers would work equally well against a background of palest green, powder pink, lemon or ivory. Page 30

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Mother's Day gifts

Lavender hearts Reinventing the arts of needlepoint and cross stitch, Cath Kidston’s delightful book Stitch! is an inspiring reference for today’s crafter. No book of needlework projects is ever complete without a lavender bag! This aromatic posy sachet is a great beginner’s project, which introduces some basic hand-sewing skills. It requires only a small amount of thread and fabric, so you’ll have enough materials left over to make a few more for your friends.

MATERIALS • 15cm square of 14-count cross-stitch fabric • DMC stranded embroidery thread in the following colours: ecru (ecru); mid-pink (603); brown (840); green (954); lilac (3042); dark pink (3804) • cross-stitch needle • 10cm square of light-weight iron-on interfacing • 15cm square of backing fabric • 30cm narrow lace edging • tracing paper and pencil • matching sewing thread • dried lavender SKILL LEVEL: 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Fold the cross-stitch fabric lightly into quarters to mark the centre point. Starting with the flowers and working out to the leaves, sew the motif using two strands of embroidery thread.

click here to download

Trace or photocopy the heart template, and cut it out. Place the template on to the interfacing and draw around the outside edge with a sharp pencil. Cut along the outline. Position the heart centrally over the back of the completed embroidery, with the adhesive side downwards. Following the manufacturer’s guidelines, iron it in place. (This will prevent the lavender working through the holes in the fabric). Now tack the template directly over the interfacing and trim the cross-stitch fabric down to an 8mm margin all round. Snip into the fabric at top of the heart. Turn back the margin and tack it to the template, easing it round the curves. Press from the wrong side and remove the template. Fold the lace in half to find the centre. Starting with this point tucked behind the tip of the heart, slip stitch the lace along the right edge of the heart. Tuck the loose end down between the two curves at the top and stitch in place. Sew the other edge in the same way. Tack the template to the backing fabric, then trim and tack the edges as you did before to make a neatened heart. With wrong sides facing, pin and tack the front to the back. Stitch together around the end, passing the needle from front to back and through the lace. Leave a 3cm opening along one edge. Fill the bag with lavender, a teaspoon full at a time, pushing the dried buds right into the curves. Close the gap with neat slip stiches.

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Extract from Stitch! by Cath Kidston Photography by Pia Tryde Photography copyright © Quadrille Publishing RRP $21.99 PB Published by Quadrille Publishing Distributed by Bookreps.co.nz Stitch! comes complete with a free tapestry needle kit. Issue 3

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Pincushion panache A pretty pincushion makes crafting all the more fun. Choose from our three designs and create an adorable sewing accessory for Mum.

Free

load n w do ere h click ad your lo to down mplate te r e w flo

Wrist pincushion

Keep pins and needles handy with this gorgeous wrist pincushion

Step 1

Step 3

Place wrist strap pieces together and sew a 4mm border around the edges in green cotton.

Fold each flower in half and stitch up the middle.

MATERIALS • Pale pink felt square • Wine felt square • Green felt square • Wine-coloured cotton (to match felt) • Pale pink cotton (to match felt) • Green cotton • Velcro • Cardboard • Cotton stuffing Cutting measurments: • Cut from green felt: • Wrist strap 200mm x 30mm (cut 2) • Band 210mm x 15mm (cut 1) • Circles 70mm diameter (cut 2)

Step 4 Turn the felt inside out to form flowers.

Step 2 Download the flower template, cut out the flower shape and use template to draw 8 flowers on the pale pink felt square. Without cutting, place the pale pink felt square on top of the wine felt square and pin in place. Stitch around the flower outline using the wine-coloured cotton on top and the pale pink cotton on the bottom, so the cottons contrast with each felt. Stitch veins onto the flower petals as shown. Cut out the flower shapes close to the stitching.

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Step 5 Sew the band onto one of the round pieces using a blanket stitch. Cut a round circle out of cardboard, slightly smaller than the pincushion circle, and insert inside the cushion. Fill with stuffing, then stitch top circle to band.

April - June 2012

Step 6 Stitch flowers onto cushion top. Stitch Velcro to strap, then stitch strap to bottom of cushion.

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Mother's Day gifts Blooming delight

Free

Love flowers? Then you’ll love this blossom-covered pincushion.

MATERIALS • Felt (lilac, pale yellow, green, grey) • Embroidery thread (pale yellow, mustard, olive) • Cardboard • Cotton stuffing

1

Cut out pincushion pieces using the template. Using pale yellow embroidery thead, stitch largest flower to one of the round circles, as shown. Stitch veins on the middle-sized flower as well.

2

Position middle flower on top of bottom flower and stitch in place. Position smallest flower on top of that and stitch in place. Position small circle on top and stitch in place. Then sew French knots in the centre of the flower using pale yellow and mustard embroidery thread.

3

ad o l n dow here click ad your

lo to down template n io h s pincu

Take a petal and pull the bottom corners together. Stitch to hold. Repeat for remaining petals. Then join two petals together to look like an opening bud. Wrap a small piece of pale yellow felt around the bottom of the two petals and stitch to hold in place. Sew the three buds to the pincushion band.

Strawberry pincushions

4

Using yellow and mustard embroidery thread, sew French knots onto the yellow felt beneath the petals. Using olive embroidery thread, sew a stalk right around the band, using backstitch. Cut out 6 leaves from green felt and sew in place.

MATERIALS • Red felt • Green felt • Red cotton • Bronze or black seed beads (optional) • Thin decorative ribbon (15-20cm) • Cotton stuffing

Jessica Gillon shows us how to make the cutest fruity cushions in less than half an hour.

Step 1 Draw a circle on paper, roughly 140mm in diameter, and cut out. Fold the circle in half and cut along the fold line so that you have two half circles. Place one half circle on the red felt and cut out.

Step 4

Step 2 Fold the felt semi-circle in half to form a conical shape and hand stitch the two edges together. Turn inside out and stuff, making sure the stuffing is packed in firmly. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Step 3 Sew a running stitch along the top edge of the berry, without knotting. Pull the threads tight to gather the cone, creating a berry shape. Knot and finish off.

Cut 4 leaf shapes out of green felt. You can be creative and use pinking shears for a decorative edging. Stack leaves on top of one another, with the points facing way from one another. Stitch to top of strawberry. At this stage you can attach seed beads to the strawberry if desired to create the strawberry ‘seeds’. Issue 3

Step 5 Make a small loop out of ribbon and stitch to the centre of the leaves. Use the ribbon to tie your pincushion to your sewing basket.

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Fabric pots

This DIY project couldn’t be easier. It’s simply a matter of gluing some pretty fabric onto a pot. Use a reasonably thick fabric otherwise the glue will show through. We used a spray adhesive, but any craft glue will do. You can pot these up and present them to Mum, but we suggest placing a slightly smaller plastic pot inside these terracotta pots.

t

r u o 1h c

p r o je

1 Page 34

Cut a shape from your fabric, as shown, on the bias. Cutting on the bias gives the fabric some give when stretching it around the pots.

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2

Spray or brush adhesive on both pot and fabric, as per manufacturer’s instructions. Stretch the fabric around the pot and press down firmly. Fold edges over the rim of pot and at the bottom. Smooth out any bubbles, pressing the fabric down until it sticks to the pot.

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Mother's Day gifts Embroider a tea towel This cute linen may be used as a tea towel or tray cloth.

MATERIALS • 650mm x 450mm fabric for tea towel • 120mm x 450mm fabric for trim • fabric offcuts for appliqué pieces • lightweight fusible web • cotton • embroidery thread • tailor’s chalk

Step 3 Turn all edges of tea towel under 10mm, iron flat, then fold another 10mm under. Stitch around tea towel.

Free

load n w do re he click d your free

loa to down template é q li p ap u

Step 4 Download your free template and cut out the pattern pieces. Cut a square from your fabric offcuts and a square of fusible web, the same size. Iron the fusible web onto the fabric, as per manufacturer’s instructions. Place pattern pieces on top and cut out.

Step 5 Peel paper off the back of the fusible web, place the appliqué pieces onto your tea towel and iron in place.

Step 6 Stitch around appliqué pieces to provide a nice finish. Use a contrasting cotton colour.

Step 7

Step 1 Place fabric for trim on top of tea towel fabric (right sides together), about 90mm up from the bottom (enough so when it’s folded over after stitching the ends meet). Pin in place, then stitch.

Step 2 Fold the trim over, to the bottom edge of the tea towel, and iron seam flat. Topstitch 1-2mm down from folded edge.

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Using tailor’s chalk, draw a cupcake in freehand onto your tea towel. Draw some steam coming out of the cup and the words ‘tea and cupcakes’ at the top of the tea towel. Use embroidery thread to stitch the designs, using a backstitch.

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Step 3 Place bag pieces wrong side together and sew sides and bottom together. Finish edges by zigzagging, and trim. Fold top edge down 25mm. Iron.

Free

d nloa w o d ere h click d your free

Mouse pouch Make a simple drawstring bag and store your string in style.

loa to down template é q appli u

MATERIALS • fabric for bag (cut 2 pieces 220mm x 250mm) • fabric for mouse appliqué (150mm x 150mm) • lightweight fusible web • eyelet • eyelet tool • cotton • string for top of bag

Step 4 Unfold the edge again, then insert two more eyelets at the top of the bag on each side, with the centre of the eyelet 16mm down from the fold.

Step 1 Download your free template and cut out the mouse shape. Cut a square from your mouse appliqué fabric, big enough to fit the mouse pattern, and a square of fusible web, the same size. Iron the fusible web onto the fabric, as per manufacturer’s instructions. Place mouse pattern on top and cut out. Peel paper off the back of the fusible web, place the appliqué piece onto one of fabric pieces for your bag, and iron in place. Page 36

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Step 5

Step 2 Stitch around the mouse shape, using a zigzag stitch, then insert an eyelet near the bottom of the mouse.

April - June 2012

Fold down the top again and sew around top of bag, 10mm from the top edge. Sew another line 10mm down from first line. Using a largeeyed needle, thread string through one eyelet, drawing it right around the bag and out through the other eyelet. Tie knots at ends of string. Place a ball of string inside the bag and pull the end through the eyelet. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Mother's Day gifts

Make a

cake stand These DIY cake stands are so easy and so cheap to make you’ll be whipping up dozens of them for fancy gifts. They’re the perfect cake stand for high tea parties with their lovely vintage designs.

1

Pop down to your local charity shop and buy a collection of vintage plates and small glass vases. You’ll need three different size plates (a dinner plate for the bottom, a cake serving plate for the middle, and a side dish for the top), plus a couple of glass vases. The vases do not have to be matching. Small glass candlestick holders work too.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

2

Then simply glue the plates and vases together. You need a strong adhesive that bonds glass and ceramics. We bought ours from a building supply store. If making just one tier, place the vase at the bottom. For two tiers, the large plate goes on the bottom. Allow to dry, then serve fresh cakes!

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sweetliving

Printables

No need to buy labels. Download your free gift tags for Mum here.

Gift tags

e e r F

load n w do ere h click

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Mother's Day gifts Wrapping paper We’ve made it simple. Just click on the link provided, download the PDF, then print onto white card stock (gift tags) or plain paper (wrapping paper).

Free

load n w do re he click

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Gift boxes

Free

downloads

Download your free PDF for these small gift boxes, print on white card stock, then fold and glue the sides together.

SMALL

(print on A4 sheet)

click here

LARGE (print on A3 sheet)

click here

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Mother's Day gifts

Free

downloads www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

LARGE

SMALL

(print on A4 sheet)

(print on A3 sheet)

click here

click here

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sweetliving

Pillow box

Download your free pillow box PDF, print onto card stock or thick paper, and cut along the solid lines. Then fold along the dotted lines and glue one end and side together.

e e r F

load n w do ere h click

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Mother's Day gifts Gift bag

Free

downloads SMALL

(print on A4 sheet)

click here

LARGE (print on A3 sheet)

click here

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Cake bunting

Print out our miniature Mother’s Day cake bunting and impress Mum. Just click on the link provided, download the PDF, then print onto plain paper. Cut out the bunting flags, fold in half, then glue onto string. Tie the string to bamboo skewers and insert into your cake.

e e r F

ad o l n dow here click

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sweetliving

Toy Workshop Wooden toys are both durable and timeless. Provide hours of fun with these crafty wooden projects.

Happy as Larry These little larrikins are easy as pie to make. All you need are wooden geometric shapes (available in sets from toy shops), some wooden beads or buttons, and rope. Drill holes in the wooden shapes to thread rope through for arms and legs, and attach wooden beads to the rope for hands and feet. Use a strong glue for fixing ears, noses and hats, then paint a cheeky face.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Chugging along

Wooden trains are not difficult to make, even for beginner woodworkers. They usually consist of simple geometric shapes. Here a rectangle shape makes up the base of the train, dowelling is attached to this (either glued or drilled in place), and more oblong shapes are stacked on top of this. For instructions on making wheels, see our DIY, to the right.

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Toy workshop

Make a wooden train Classic toys such as wooden trains are ever popular with children. Save money and build your youngster one with our easy step-by-step instructions. We used pine for the body of the train and rimu for the wheels to provide a slightly different colour.

2

3

You’ll need: • 400mm x 250mm x 25mm piece of wood • 8mm dowelling (for wheel axle) • 15mm dowelling (for chimney) • Hooks and eyes • Jigsaw • Power drill • Hole saw

Cut out 12 wheels using hole saw. Drill two axle holes on each carriage, 5mm up from bottom edge. Drill the holes just big enough for the dowelling to fit snugly. Drill holes in wheels.

Cut 6 pieces of 8mm dowelling, each 50mm long. Push through axle holes, then fit wheels. You may need to hammer the wheels in place.

Click here to download train template. Page 17

sweet living Wooden train

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

Issue 3

Drill a pilot hole into one end of chimney, and the top of train where chimney is to go. Cut off the tip of a nail and insert it into the hole on the chimney. Hammer the chimney into place. Fix hooks and eyes to train and carriages.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

4

Cut 2

April - May 2012 sweetliving

1

Print out template, cut out pattern, then trace outline of train onto wood. Cut shape out with a jigsaw. Use a hole saw to cut out the windows.

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sweetliving

Puzzle blocks

Photo puzzle blocks are easy to make. It’s simply a matter of cutting wood into cubes and gluing on pictures. Use pictures from old, damaged books or print an image from your computer. You can cover all sides of the blocks with different images, or leave a couple of sides bare. Our blocks measure 450mm x 450mm each.

1

Choose images that are about the same size as your finished block puzzle (or reshape images on your computer), then print onto semi-gloss photo paper and allow to dry. When dry, trim to the same size as your puzzle when it’s put together.

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2

Position the blocks and place a rubber band around them to hold in place. Apply glue to the blocks (we used a spray adhesive) then place the image on top and press down. Let the glue dry completely, then use a craft knife to cut the blocks apart. www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz


Toy workshop

3

Scramble the blocks, then remake your puzzle!

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Painted dolls

If you’re handy with a paintbrush, or permanent marker, you can turn old wooden curtain rod finials into works of art. If using round or oval finials, saw off the base so that the finial sits upright on a flat surface. Paint a base colour, if necessary, then get crafty and paint on faces and clothes.

ma

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d e l c Recy ter

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Want to see your ad in Sweet Living? Email us at admin@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

share your

money-saving tips.

email us at

tips@sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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sweetliving

Backyard sustainability Grow your own veggies and fresh cut flowers

Plant garlic

There’s no need to wait until the shortest day (mid June in the southern hemisphere) to plant your garlic bulbs. Get them in the ground now to get them off to a good start. Although tradition says to plant garlic on the shortest day and harvest it on the longest, you can plant them as early as April and harvest around the new year. The earlier you plant, the quicker they’ll establish roots before the ground cools down. Then come spring, plants can focus their energy on leaf growth and bigger and better bulbs. Buy seed garlic from garden centres or use organically grown bulbs from fruit and vegetable shops. Avoid imported garlic, which is fumigated to stop sprouting. Break off the individual cloves and use only the fattest ones (you can eat the rest or plant the smaller cloves in another part of the garden and harvest the leaves as you would spring onions). Plant about 5cm deep, with pointy end up, in a sunny spot in fertile, well-drained soil that has plenty of compost dug in.

Plant kohlrabi

Kohlrabi has fat, turnip-like stems that sit above the soil surface. It’s a cool-season plant, with its fat bottoms developing during the winter. But what on earth do they taste like? Elizabeth Schneider, in her book Uncommon Fruits and Vegetables says, to her, kohlrabi tastes “like the freshest, crunchiest broccoli stems, touched with a hint of radish and cucumber.” Sow seeds directly in the ground or start in trays for transplanting later. Or buy seedlings from your local garden centre. Space 15cm apart in rows 45cm apart.

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Picking fresh flowers

Get the longest possible vase life from freshly picked blooms by harvesting in the coolest part of the day when the stems are crisp and turgid and full of moisture. First thing in the morning is ideal, once the dew has evaporated and before the heat rises. Or pick in the cool of the evening when the heat has disappeared. Most flowers can be picked at the bud stage for the longest vase life. But blooms with spikes, such as foxgloves, snapdragons and delphiniums, are best picked when at least a few of their flowers are open. Flowers in the aster family, including gerberas and dahlias, need to be fully open before cutting, otherwise they won’t open.

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Backyard sustainability

Chocolate cosmos

If dark chocolate is your weakness, plant Cosmos atrosanguineus. One sniff and you’ll be hooked. But sniff it in the afternoon when the warmth of the sun has had time to awaken its delicious scent. Trust us, it truly does smell like chocolate and its deep burgundy flowers look as velvety as chocolate too. Cosmos atrosanguineus, aka chocolate cosmos, is a perennial, whereas the more commonly grown cosmos (Cosmo bipinnatus) is an annual. Flowers appear on long stems in summer and autumn, just high enough for passersby to bend down and take in the full scent. The plant dies down in winter, but re-emerges in spring. Right about now garden centres are stocking up on chocolate cosmos for Mother’s Day.

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Bows & bits and bobs There’s no need to stick to conventional vases when displaying your freshly picked blooms. Old pots, heart-shaped baking tins, wooden bowls and coloured glasses are a pretty substitute.

Wrap ribbon around glass or ceramic vases for a glamorous effect.

For low vases, create a grid of sticky tape across the bowl to support the flower heads and stop them from slipping into the bowl.

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Backyard sustainability

Even the simplest of posies can look gorgeous with a bow at its base.

Instead of paper, wrap Mother’s Day flowers in pretty fabric and tie with a satin bow.

www.sweetlivingmagazine.co.nz

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Freshen up your next paint job with Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free, which combines the popular low sheen of Resene Zylone Sheen without the unwanted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for better indoor air quality. Improved air quality can help prevent headaches, asthma, nausea, respiratory complaints and allergic reactions. And to suit all tastes, Resene Zylone Sheen VOC Free is available in a wide range of popular Resene colours using Resene non VOC tinters. Now that’s fresh thinking. Available exclusively from Resene.

0800 RESENE (737 363) www.resene.co.nz

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Backyard sustainability A case for baskets

Baskets make great vases (just place a waterproof vessel inside to hold your flowers), or you can plant one up with herbs, bulbs or potted colour. Pansies and polyanthus are perfect potted specimens with their cheerful faces and compact nature – and they flower right throughout winter. Raid your local charity shop, school fair or inorganic rubbish collection for cheap baskets and stock up with back-up baskets, because wicker will rot after a couple of seasons. To get the most out of your basket, line it with plastic. Poke some drainage holes in the plastic before potting up.

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next issue

sweetliving

Out July 2012

• Party themes for kids • Host your best dinner party ever • Host a craft evening with friends • Free printables for party fun • Cute toys to make • Crafty storage ideas - make your own thrifty storage boxes • Readers’ money-saving tips

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Sweet Living magazine