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ECONOMIC REPORT PHOTOGRAPH OF LIGHTING INSTALLATION TO BE REPLACED

THE ACCURATE TECHNICAL MODEL OF THIS UNIVERSITY ATRIUM.

ECONOMICREPORT

RENDERING OF PROPOSED RETROFIT INSTALLATION

RENDERING OF PROPOSED RETROFIT INSTALLATION

By Adam Glatherine, Managing Director of G3 Lighting Design.

Lighting Design & Sustainability Lighting design is highly relevant to sustainability in our built environment and an area with particularly exciting potential for improvement. Some of the main factors likely to be involved in a sustainable lighting design include daylighting, artificial lighting, accurate modelling, and controls, as well as the interaction between these different aspects. DAYLIGHTING In my experience the best energy savings can often be achieved if we start by considering how to make best use of the highest quality and most sustainable light source we have, our most local of stars, the sun! Creating static or dynamic built forms that make the most of the changing play of daylight throughout the day under varying weather conditions is a wonderful challenge, and one that yields great benefits to a building’s sustainability when undertaken. Accurately modelling a space throughout a sample year of changing lighting conditions means a building can be modified to bounce useful quantities of diffuse daylight into the space using techniques such as light shelves, prismatic glazing, heliostats, and light wells, and that the position of windows can be optimized whist limiting uncomfortable and debilitating glare. This process can allow many spaces to use primarily daylight throughout most of the year. Using daylight to good effect as our primary light source will result in enormous carbon and electricity savings. Good levels of daylighting have also been shown to improve educational attainment, speed recovery rates after 6 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

operations, and increase alertness during the day, which in turn has been shown to improve the quality of sleep at night. ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING LED is the buzzword here, and for good reason. Implemented well (i.e. the most appropriate LED chips coupled with the right heat sync, driver, body, optics, and control systems) this light source can last for decades, use relatively little energy, render colours well, and has the potential to be highly controllable; both by using precise optics to put the light where it’s needed and using dimming and switching so that the light is only on when it’s needed and only as brightly as is required. The flip side of this is that there is plenty that can go wrong too if LEDs are specified incorrectly. Poor LED systems can produce inadequate light output often with very cool light of blue-white tone where colours are poorly rendered, looking grey and washed out. Other problems with poor LED systems include flicker (particularly when dimmed), colour shift over time, quickly reduced light output over time, significantly reduced lifespan, and thermal and electrical problems amongst others. It’s important not to forget other lighting technologies in the rush for LED. Discharge lighting such as metal halide still has its uses, particularly in areas such as high output sports stadium lighting. Even the humble T5 fluorescent may still be a robust, efficient, and practical solution where the budget is tight. Looking to the future OLED (already used in many phone displays and some high end

Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 02/14

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