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UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA

DINING HALL.

allows them to understand: Yes, it’s actually possible.” In addition to the new dining hall, the university puts an emphasis on sourcing food locally. The contract the university has with its food service provider insists on a percentage of local food, and that percentage gradually increases year by year. “At one point, the provider asked if they could grow some of the food on campus,” says Mr. Rausseo. “We’re looking at farming within an urban context. We’ve had such success this summer, next year we’re actually taking a rooftop near one of the campuses and turning a section of that into a dedicated herb garden for the cafeteria.”

WASTE AUDIT ON CAMPUS. THIS YEAR THERER WAS A 60% DIVERSION OF ALL WASTE ON CAMPUS.

STUDENTS WHO COMPLETED A COMMUNITY SERVICE PLACEMENT FOR THE SUSTAINBILITY OFFICE.

Then there are the water fountains. The University of Ottawa is a bottled water free campus; instead, there are 174 water fountains. “It’s a small thing which means a lot to us because it has a big impact,” says Mr. Rausseo. “People occasionally forget their bottles and still want to buy water. We give out free bottles all the time, but we’re now actually going to be putting reusable water bottles in the vending machines. It’s one of those little things that helps close the loop.”

ally a store in which everything is free. Outgoing students often can’t take some of their clothes, books, and appliances. Rather than throwing them away, the university collects these things, cleans them, and gives them to new students. “We’re trying to embrace the idea of industrial ecology where you say the waste from one system is really just the food of another,” says Mr. Rausseo. These combined efforts to reduce waste add up. This year, the university hit 60% waste diversion overall. “It’s a big achievement because we keep expanding the definition of what’s waste,” says Mr. Rausseo. “Last year, for example, someone mentioned biomedical waste over in our

WASTE DIVERSION The list of the university’s programs to reduce waste goes on. There’s the Free Store – liter-

Central to Chartwells’ residential dining program, Pulse on Dining, is a commitment to

LOVE FOOD NOT WASTE.​

Member of Compass Group Canada​ Compass-canada.com • dineoncampus.ca

50 | SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS MAGAZINE

​ Love Food…. Lots of fresh and nutritious offerings delivered in an open-kitchen restaurant format to fuel the minds of the next generation.​ ​ Not Waste… Creating a dining environment that is commitment to no disposable packaging, recycling and composting leadership and programs that center on waste reduction. ​ ​ We congratulate our partner, the University of Ottawa, for being a leading example of the Love Food Not Waste philosophy with their newly renovated Dining Hall. ​ ​ Together, we can achieve our shared vision through sustainable innovation and advance sustainable food and dining services on your campus.

Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 06/15

Sustainable Business Magazine  

Issue 06/15

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