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Research Bulletin 2011

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Research Bulletin of Faculty and Students Volume Thirty-Four, 2011 Edited by Laura Peil

Saginaw Valley State University Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs University Center, Michigan 2012

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From the cover: Tree Word Cloud created by Laura Peil using Tagxedo (tagxedo.com) Copyright © 2006, ComponentAce http://www.componentace.com All rights reserved.

The Research Bulletin of Faculty and Students publishes news of scholarly and creative activities in the following categories: Books; Edited Publications; Articles, Book Chapters, and Essays; Papers and Presentations; Fiction; Poetry; Art Works; Performances; Online Resources; Poster Sessions; Book Reviews; and Grants and Funded Research. ―Books‖ includes scholarly books in print: monographs, textbooks, and collections of the author‘s work. ―Edited Publications‖ includes both single volumes edited by the contributor and journals or collections of which the contributor is the primary editor. ―Articles, Book Chapters, and Essays‖ includes articles published in refereed journals or in collections of scholarly papers; papers presented at conferences and subsequently printed in Proceedings are included in this category. ―Papers and Presentations‖ includes refereed papers presented at conferences of scholars. ―Fiction‖ includes published novels and short fiction. ―Art Works‖ includes art works when they are first exhibited at an adjudicated exhibition. ―Performances‖ include contributions to adjudicated performances. ―Online Resources‖ includes online web sites and resources of scholarly material of which the contributor is the primary author. ―Poster Sessions‖ includes refereed posters presented at conferences of scholars. ―Book Reviews‖ includes critical reviews of scholarly works in print or other media, published in refereed journals. ―Grants and Funded Research‖ includes funding for research completed or underway. In all the categories, the Editor will alphabetize the names of multiple authors, and designate their institutional affiliations. Multiple entries in any category are alphabetized. The Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs calls for contributions to the Research Bulletin once a year. Contributions should be confined to the categories described above and should bear dates within the calendar year of the call for contributions. Contributions to in-house publications are not included. Contributors should make their entries conform to the style evident in Volume Thirty-Four, 2011 or the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Abstracts may be supplied for all submissions, and should be limited to two hundred and fifty words each. Contributions may be submitted to the Editor as e-mail at llpeil@svsu.edu or by using the electronic submission form at http://www.svsu.edu/researchbulletin

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Preface

This is our 34th annual Research Bulletin of Faculty and Students and its publication provides us with the opportunity to reflect once again on the nature of who we are and what is important to us. We are a diverse community of scholars, teachers, and students who are actively engaged in the pursuit of knowledge and the sharing of this knowledge within our local, regional, and global societies. The entries in this Bulletin represent an amazing array of research being done across the university. Topics as wide ranging as the science behind sophisticated metal casting, inquiries into how the digital world is affecting how we read and integrate information, methods to help children succeed in school, the effect of globalization on society, and the creation of a composition for solo marimba, are examples of the important scholarly work being done on our campus. The works represented in the Bulletin have been shared with colleagues through peer-reviewed publications and presentations here and abroad, and by so doing, we have enriched our students, our professions, our communities, and ourselves Our Bulletin is an on-going testament to the fact that we, as a university community, remain committed to honing our intellectual curiosity, as well as contributing to both the scholarship of teaching and the disciplinary research that characterizes professional university scholars. I invite you to share my pride in our collective work.

Donald J. Bachand Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

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From the Editor

I consider it an honor to have had the opportunity to serve as editor of the 34th volume of The Research Bulletin. Like the editors that preceded me, I am humbled by the amazing and meaningful work of our colleagues that fill the pages of this publication. It has been my pleasure to showcase that work here. As with most undertakings of this scope, it has required a firm commitment to see it through and there are people to thank for their assistance. I appreciate Diane Boehm‘s constant willingness to consult with me when called upon for her expertise on citation. I also appreciate the help of Matt Giddings and Mike J. Holiday, Jr. (SVSU CIS major), Web Programming, whose work on the electronic submission form was vital. I thank Craig Snook, University Communitcations, for his artistic advice. And finally, Drs. Marc Peretz and Jane Girdham both provided a great deal of patient and thoughtful guidance along the way. It is my hope that you enjoy volume 34 of The Research Bulletin as you learn more about the wonderful work we do here and the expert and diverse people around us that make SVSU a place that we can all take pride in.

Laura Peil, Editor Project Coordinator & Information Specialist Academic Affairs

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Contents

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College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences

10-75

College of Business and Management

76-105

College of Education

106-131

Crystal M. Lange College of Health and Human Services

132-178

College of Science, Engineering and Technology

179-246

Students

247-369

University Wide

370-394

Index

395-398

University Mission & Vision

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College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences Scholarship in the College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences is as diverse as the disciplines in the College. It encompasses the strict social science protocols of psychology, geography and political science as well as the analytical approaches of literary studies, language arts and philosophy and the creative endeavors of our writers, artists, actors and musicians to name a few. Historians may labor in isolation in archives around the world while sociologists and criminologists work in collaboration with local communities on a variety of applied projects and communications specialist focus their energies on understanding how people interact across cultural boundaries, however those are defined. Each, in their own way, contributes to the body of knowledge that informs their respective disciplines. Many are able to involve students in the academic enterprise changing their perspectives of knowledge as a static compendium of information or practice to destabilizing enterprises that demand active engagement with how things are and what they may become when lab results challenge an old assumption or a new set of documents is uncovered or a fresh perspective is applied to a well thumbed text. The scholarship that is undertaken by the faculty of the College and their partners across the University, in their disciplines and in the community is worth celebrating. It defines us as a community of scholars that makes a significant contribution to the knowledge encompassed within the various fields in which we work and which enriches and enlivens our classrooms.

Mary A Hedberg, Ph.D., Dean College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences

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Martin Arford Associate Professor of Geography Appointed to SVSU in 2005 Ph.D. University of Tennessee, Knoxville M.S. University of Tennessee, Knoxville B.S. Indiana University of Pennsylvania

GRANT Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Arford, M., Baker, D. (Delta College), Hedquist, B., Martin, A., Meisel, E.C. III, Nitz, K. (Delta College), Ross, A., & VanHouten, J. (Delta College). Saginaw Bay - Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship Through Education Network planning grant. National Center for Science and Civic Engagement GLISTEN program, $31,675, May 10, 2011 – May 31, 2012. Saginaw Valley State University and its potential GLISTEN partners reside in the Saginaw Bay Watershed, the largest in Michigan. Land use within the watershed can strongly influence water quality in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron. Nutrient loading, bacterial pollution, erosion, and the spread of invasive plant species are key issues related to land use in the watershed. This GLISTEN cluster will engage college students with regional partners in activities designed to impact the key issues through education, awareness, and service. The GLISTEN partners to be involved in the planning phase include Saginaw Valley State University, Delta College, Chippewa Nature Center, and Bay City State Park (MI-DNRE Parks Division). The planning process will include activities involving water quality assessment through sampling and measurements followed by communication of the results. This activity will be a preview of what we envision for the GLISTEN Cluster. Depending on the level of each course, students in GLISTEN activities will be involved in erosion assessments, water quality parameter measurements, beach bacterial monitoring, and source tracking of phosphorus and bacteria. In addition to learning through in-field activities designed to provide data and awareness of water quality issues, students will also be involved in reporting and communicating results to area stakeholders including the Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network and personnel with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Through the Saginaw Bay RC&D, college students will be engaged in watershed based educational

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outreach to K-12 students. As part of the planning process, we hope to enlist further partners in the watershed. These may include other colleges and universities such as Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Alma College, and Central Michigan University. Our overall goal is to form a network of people and resources that will benefit both education and environment in the region.

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Gina Burkart Assistant Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ed.D. University of Northern Iowa M.A. University of Northern Iowa B.A. Loras College

ARTICLE Burkart, G. (2011). New "best practices" for freshmen of the twenty-first century? The North American Review, 296(3), 48.

BOOK Burkart, G. (2011). Finding meaning in Narnia: A voyage on the dawn treader. (p. 178). Ann Arbor, MI: Nimble Books.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Burkart, G. (2011, April). Academic coaching as a tool for building selfefficacy in college students. Invited presenter at the Iowa Academic Advising Network (IowAAN) Drive-In Conference, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.

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Geoffrey V. Carter Assistant Professor of Rhetoric & Professional Writing Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. Purdue University M.A. Central Michigan University B.A. Central Michigan University

ARTICLE Carter, G. V., & Arroyo, S. J. (2011). Tubing the future: Participatory pedagogy and YouTube U in 2020. Computers and Composition, 28(4), 292-302. doi: 10.1016/j.compcom.2011.10.001 Our vision for the future of composition focuses on the ―tube‖ and the culture inspired by online video sharing. Understanding composition in 2020 requires further theorizing about the participatory practices occurring in online video culture. Based on practices found on the platform YouTube, we turn to the term ―tubing‖ to explain phenomena taking place there, and we put forward the concept of ―participatory pedagogy‖ that we see emerging in 21st century classrooms. The ubiquitous and historically loaded ―tube‖ (noun) and its YouTube-specific counterpart ―tubing‖ (verb), explain many of the shifts taking place as acts of writing expand to include participation in online video sharing. Other scholars have forwarded the notion of ―postpedagogy‖ (Vitanza, 1991; Davis, 2000; Arroyo, 2003, 2005; Rickert, 2007), which places a high value on invention, encourages the playful, yet serious linking of disparate historical figures, and opens up new pathways that we see as working in tandem with what George Siemens (2005) called a ―pedagogy of participation,‖ an offshoot of what Henry Jenkins named ―participatory culture‖ (2009). Using tubing as a guiding metaphor, we develop our version of ―participatory pedagogy‖ for 2020 by focusing on the propagation of Internet memes and the inventional possibilities found in the everyday practices of video culture, which create an historical archive, an untapped repository of cultural patterns, and a light yet ruthlessly public demand for participation.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Carter, G. V. (2011, October). Turning on and tuning in: Expatriating place

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from the Parisian salons to the Sunset Strip. Presented at the Western States Rhetoric and Literacy Conference, Tempe, AZ. Carter, G. V. (2011, May). Participatory publics: From MEmorials to MEMEmorials. Presented at the Computers and Writing Conference, Ann Arbor, MI. Carter, G. V. (2011, March). The chora of the twin towers: Three panelists invite you to participate in contesting and documenting the struggle for rebirth of the 9/11 site. Presented at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES Carter, G. V., Arroyo, S., Leston, R., & Merrow, S.R. (SVSU student) (2011). The chora of the twin towers. Enculturation: A Journal of Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture, (10) Retrieved from http://www.enculturation.net/thechora-of-the-twin-towers This project sets a new precedent for sustained scholarly investigation in the medium of video. Determined to examine how the former ground zero and current World Trade Center site could be thought of as a space for invention (but also mourning), the authors draw upon the ancient concept of ―chora.‖ Conceived of by ancient philosophers and reconceived by contemporary rhetoricians as an undecided, undetermined space to be filled by the unknown, the chora has always been a vessel for non-generic possibility. Through combinations and juxtapositions of journalism, art, music, sound, image, and theory, the authors put choric possibilities into play and present a project that plays the post-9/11 world in various tonalities, timbres, and tunings. Carter, G.V. (2011). inter.virtual.vitalism.views: Aural encounters with Byron Hawk, Victor Vitanza, and Alex Reid. Currents in Electronic Literacy, (Special Edition: Writing with Sound). ISSN: 1524-6493. Retrieved from http://currents.dwrl.utexas.edu/2011/intervirtualvitalismviews Using the medium of a Prezi©, this work conjoins and remixes three interviews with significant figures in rhetorical theory and history, namely, Byron Hawk, Alex Reid, and Victor Vitanza. The work not only provides a significant demonstration of writing with sound, but also takes up the ancient question of where one might situate (or refuse to situate) rhetoric disciplinarily, as well as complex theoretical issues related to re-thinking

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vitalism and the Deleuzian virtual.

PRESENTATION Carter, G.V. (2011, September). Arranged by Sondra Perl. Remembering the chora of the twin towers on 9/11. Lecture presented to The Holocaust Educators Network and the New York City Writing Project, The Memorial Library in Midtown Manhattan, NY

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Basil A. Clark Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 1975 Ph.D. Ohio State University M.A. University of Maine A.B. Bowdoin College

PAPERS Clark, B.A. (2011, March). A defense of betrayal in Malory‟s Morte Darthur. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. This paper argues that ugly as betrayal may be, it has a positive effect in Arthurian legend. Set against the background of Judas‘s betrayal of Christ and Aquinas‘s question whether, if human kind had not sinned, God would have become incarnate, a happy result, the same question when raised about the Arthurian stories has a similarly positive answer: if King Uther had not betrayed Igraine, Arthur would not have been conceived; if Mordred had not betrayed Arthur, Arthur would not be expected to return in the hour of England‘s greatest need. The paper does not deny the pervasiveness of betrayal in Malory, at root a betrayal of sexual fidelity, but it postulates that at the end of the day, Morte Darthur is a hopeful romance: Arthur is translated from this world to the next, Guinevere experiences a blessed death, and Lancelot joins the angels in heaven. Clark, B.A. (2011, October). Clergy and conflict: sacred and secular in Morte Arthur. Paper presented at The 27th Annual Conference of the Medieval Association of the Midwest, St. Norbert College, De Pere, WI. Teasing differences emerge in comparing Malory with his sources, particularly the French book (Old French Arthurian Vulgate); my paper focuses on these differences as they apply to clergy and the secular issues of love and war; for example, the Pope‘s intervention to coerce Arthur to receive Guinevere back to court following her rescue from the stake and flight with Lancelot to Joyous Garde. Though the Pope‘s authority in both versions is absolute, the role of his emissary, the Bishop

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of Rochester, is more detailed in the Vulgate; Malory‘s attenuated account distances this episode somewhat from a reader, as might be expected in a fifteenth-century version of a high-medieval subject. I argue that in his treatment of clergy, love, and conflict both here and elsewhere in the Morte, Malory offers resistance to his thirteenth-century source and introduces the narrative perspective of a very early modern writer.

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Fenobia Dallas Associate Professor of Rhetoric & Professional Writing Appointed to SVSU in 2006 Ph.D. Michigan Technological University M.A. University of Tennessee at Chattanooga B.A. Fisk University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Dallas, F. (2011, October). Mentoring ourselves: Looking across campus and across disciplines for support & satisfaction. Presented at the 2011 Michigan Sociological Association Conference, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI. Faculty often look to their colleagues to guide and support them in the requisite research venues in their disciplines. However, male colleagues may exhibit a paternalistic and presumptive attitude about research agendas, and white women breaking the glass ceiling may not wish to raise the window sill for women of color. As such, African American women are caught in a flux of competing interests, as male colleagues encourage them to "wait their turn," and white women hold the door open for "diversity service" only. This either-or paradigm serves to re-entrench African American women in committee or university service, while invalidating their scholarship pursuits. This presentation explores this continuing dilemma, while offering a pathway to successfully negotiating a robust research agenda. Dallas, F. (2011, October). A nose for news: Engaging students as community writers. Presented at the 2011 Michigan Sociological Association Conference, Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI. The challenge for any teaching moment in this century is to pry our students‘ fingers from the texting mode and shift back to the writing mode. We won‘t even go into the ―thinking and writing‖ mode - a concept that challenges some of our college students today. The multiliteracies approach is a literacy pedagogy that engages the ―multiplicity of communication channels and media… [and] the increasing salience of cultural and linguistic diversity‖ (Cope and Kalantzis, 2001, p. 5). The

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multiliteracies approach can help students navigate the written text and visual images with their complex, overlapping, and numerous ways. In this presentation I demonstrate how the four steps of the multiliteracies approach: Overt Instruction, Situated Practice, Critical Framing, and Transformed Practice, are used to refashion students‘ writing practices in a journalism class.

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Monika Dix Assistant Professor of Japanese Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. University of British Columbia (Canada) B.A. University of Victoria (Canada)

PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Dix, M. (2011, January). Motherhood real and imagined: Narrating women's lives, identities and images in Heian Japan. Paper presented at the Modern Language Association Annual Conference, Los Angeles, CA. Dix, M. (2011, April). Between text and image: Mapping literature and narrating space in the Taima-dera jikkai-zu byobu. Paper presented at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, Honolulu, HI. Dix, M. (2011, August). HeikeNokyo: Taira no Kiyomori and kechien-gyo practice in Kamakura-period Japan. Paper presented at the International Conference "Loveable Losers: The Taira in Action and Memory,‖ The East Asian Studies Department of the University of Alberta, Banff Center, Banff, Canada. Dix, M. (2011, October). Straightening the Wrinkles: Aging ambivalence in the Jōjin Ajari no haha no shū. Paper presented at the Midwest Japan Seminar (MJS)/ Midwest Conference of Asian Affairs (MCAA), Macalester College, St. Paul, MN.

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Jesse Donahue Professor of Political Science Appointed to SVSU in 1996 Ph.D. Boston University B.A. University of California, Santa Cruz

PANEL PRESENTATION Donahue, J., & Trump, E. (2011, August). Zoos in society: Perceptions of animal welfare in zoos. Paper presented at symposium entitled From good to great welfare - Advancing zoo animal welfare science and policy, sponsored by the Detroit Zoological society, Ford Education Center, Detroit Zoo, Royal Oak, MI.

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Robert Drew Professor of Communication Appointed to SVSU in 1998 Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania M.A. University of Pennsylvania B.A. Columbia University

ARTICLE Drew, R. (2011). Going home for All Tomorrow's Parties: Indie culture, the Borscht Belt, and the romance of ruins. Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies, 11(5), 446-452. In 2008 it was announced that All Tomorrow‘s Parties, an independent music festival originating in the U.K., would make its first-ever appearance in the Eastern U.S. at Kutsher‘s Country Club in Monticello, New York. As a die-hard indie music fan who happens to have grown up in Monticello and spent a good part of my youth navigating Kutsher‘s in various roles, this particular harmonic convergence of Borscht Belt culture and indie culture served as an opportunity for reflection, remembrance, and ethnographic investigation. In this paper I watch, wander, converse, and dust off old diaries and photos, tacking between multiple roles as music maven, lapsed Jew, and upstate yokel, trying to make sense of indie‘s mining of the past for authentic experience and of my own ambivalent quest for a home in modernity.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Drew, R. (2011, May). Cassette culture: The evolution of underground sound as interpersonal exchange. Paper presented at the Midwest Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology, Bowling Green, Ohio. The compact cassette was the first medium to offer large numbers of people the ability to share tastes, express identities, and form relationships through recorded music. At the height of its popularity between the 1970s and 1990s, the cassette was both a revolutionary medium and a controversial one. On one hand, it allowed consumers to record music from the radio or from friends‘ albums and thus to avoid buying albums, and as a result the recording industry condemned home taping as a form

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of theft. On the other hand, the cassette allowed musicians to record and distribute their music without the backing of major labels and thus increase the diversity of music available. It also allowed consumers to make customized mixes of music from their own collections and to exchange mix tapes with significant others as a means of interpersonal expression. The cassette evolved into a symbol of independence, a product of originality, and a means of preserving memories. Even today the cassette is widely discussed and celebrated books such as Thurston Moore‘s Mix Tape and Jason Bitner‘s Cassettes from My Ex collect writings and relics from the cassette era. Using contemporary evidence from popular and alternative publications, this paper will look at the rise of the cassette tape and the competing responses to home taping from opponents who viewed it as piracy and from advocates who viewed it as a consumer right.

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Julie A. Foss Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. Eastern Michigan University B.A. Albion College

BOOK REVIEW Foss, J.A. (2011). A review of the book Communicative language teaching in action: Putting principles to work, by K. Brandl. The French Review, 85(2), 414.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Foss, J.A. (2011, October). Keep them talking: Developing speaking skills with information gap activities. Paper presented at the Michigan World Language Association Conference, Lansing, MI.

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Eric Gardner Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 1996 Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign A.M. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign B.A. Illinois Wesleyan University

ARTICLE Gardner, E. (2011). Remembered (Black) readers: Subscribers to the Christian Recorder, 1864-1865. American Literary History, 23(2), 229-259. doi: 10.1093/alh/ajr008

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Gardner, E. (2011, November). We refer our readers: Black transformations and advertising in the Christian Recorder. Paper presented at Before Madison Avenue: Advertising in Early America, American Antiquarian Society, Center for Historic American Visual Culture, Worchester, MA. Gardner, E. (2011, May). A [Black] visitor from California: Philip Bell‟s „notes‟ from the Pacific Northwest. Paper presented [in absentia] at the American Literature Association 22nd Annual Conference, Boston, MA. Gardner, E. (2011, May). Slave narratives and the archive (as part of the New Approaches to Slave Narratives roundtable). Paper presented [in absentia] at The American Literature Association 22nd Annual Conference, Boston, MA.

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Mary Harmon Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 1991 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. Western Michigan University B.A. Western Michigan University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Harmon, M., Herzog, B., & Raica-Klotz, H. (2011, April). From strangers to family: The development of a first year writing program. Paper presented at the College Composition and Communication Conference, Atlanta, GA.

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Phyllis G. Hastings Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 1981 D.A. University of Michigan M.A. Wayne State University B.A. Northwestern University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Hastings, P. G. (2011, May). Moving in, moving out, moving on: A vision for reshaping the prison experience. Presented at the Experiencing Prison Conference sponsored by Interdisciplinary.net., Warsaw, Poland. Programming in prisons, to the extent that it exists, is often based on the goal of correcting defects while punishing the violator and isolating him or her from society. My presentation argued for a broader and deeper basis for programming in order to enable authentic human growth and preparation for re-integration into society. In particular, it proposed education in the humanities to promote understanding oneself and one‘s society. In addition to building knowledge and awareness, such classes provide guided experience in inter-personal communication, collaborative interaction in various social settings, and relationship to authority figures in work environments. Foundations on which this proposal is built come from two important sources. One is Shadd Maruna‘s book Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild their Lives. Maruna studied narratives of persons who successfully turned away from criminal activities, comparing their stories to those of persons who continued in crime. He discovered the difference lay in the ways they talked about themselves, their self stories. This suggests that inmates need opportunities for self-discovery and development of a positive self-image. A second foundation is Earl Shorris‘s study of poverty in his book New American Blues. Shorris saw that persons are kept in poverty by a ―surround of forces.‖ To enable escape from poverty (and in parallel sense from the poverty of crime and incarceration), he claims persons need education in humanities to enable reflection. He asserts that we offer this kind of education to the rich but not the poor. Based on this insight, he developed the Clemente Project, which has since been providing high-quality liberal arts education in community centers and prisons.

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Hastings, P. G. (2011, April). Who‟s in prison? Contesting images of inmates and incarceration. Presented at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA. The presentation looks at photos and profiles of persons from two groups– persons serving life sentences in prison and persons who have been victims of violent crimes or who have lost spouses or children to violent crimes. These profiles are found in two books by Howard Zehr, Doing Life and Transcending: Reflections of Victims of Crime. While we tend to think of these persons, victims and perpetrators, as opposites in both character and situation, the profiles reveal the similarity of their positions in their life journey, all needing to come to terms with and live out consequences of dramatic life-changing events in their lives. While the events are very different in nature, the juxtaposition of their stories reveals the parallel nature of their journey toward self-understanding and acceptance, the basis for continued life. Howard Zehr, who played a central role in the development of ―restorative justice,‖ believes connecting rather than separating victim and perpetrator is needed to allow restoration and healing for both. My presentation was done in the context of an extended panel for teachers presently working or interested in working with inmates.

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Brent C. Hedquist Lecturer of Geography Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. Arizona State University M.A. Arizona State University B.S. Brigham Young University

GRANT Hedquist, B., Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Arford, M., Baker, D. (Delta College), Martin, A., Meisel, E.C. III, Nitz, K. (Delta College), Ross, A., & VanHouten, J. (Delta College). Saginaw Bay - Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship Through Education Network planning grant. National Center for Science and Civic Engagement GLISTEN program, $31,675, May 2011 – May 2012. Saginaw Valley State University and its potential GLISTEN partners reside in the Saginaw Bay Watershed, the largest in Michigan. Land use within the watershed can strongly influence water quality in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron. Nutrient loading, bacterial pollution, erosion, and the spread of invasive plant species are key issues related to land use in the watershed. This GLISTEN cluster will engage college students with regional partners in activities designed to impact the key issues through education, awareness, and service. The GLISTEN partners to be involved in the planning phase include Saginaw Valley State University, Delta College, Chippewa Nature Center, and Bay City State Park (MI-DNRE Parks Division). The planning process will include activities involving water quality assessment through sampling and measurements followed by communication of the results. This activity will be a preview of what we envision for the GLISTEN Cluster. Depending on the level of each course, students in GLISTEN activities will be involved in erosion assessments, water quality parameter measurements, beach bacterial monitoring, and source tracking of phosphorus and bacteria. In addition to learning through in-field activities designed to provide data and awareness of water quality issues, students will also be involved in reporting and communicating results to area stakeholders including the Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network and personnel with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Through the Saginaw Bay RC&D, college students will be engaged in watershed based educational outreach to K-12 students. As part of the planning process, we hope to

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enlist further partners in the watershed. These may include other colleges and universities such as Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Alma College, and Central Michigan University. Our overall goal is to form a network of people and resources that will benefit both education and environment in the region.

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Gladys Hernandez Professor of Modern Foreign Languages Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. Ohio University M.A. Ohio University M.A. Ohio University B.S. Universidad Pedagogica Nacional, Bogota, Columbia

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Hernandez, G., & Luque, M.(De Paw University). (2011, July). El lenguaje del agua y la cultura. Paper presented at the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, Washington, D.C. Hernandez, G., Becker, E. D. (SVSU student), Bond, S. M. (SVSU student), Finta, Z. R. (SVSU student), & Wendorf, J. E. (SVSU student) (2011, October). Cultural extravaganza: An afternoon of Spanish cinema. Paper presented at Michigan World Language Association, Lansing, MI.

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Bradley Herzog Associate Professor of Rhetoric & Professional Writing Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. Texas Christian University M.A. Brigham Young University B.A. Brigham Young University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Herzog, B., Harmon, M., & Raica-Klotz, H. (2011, April). From strangers to family: The development of a first year writing program. Paper presented at the College Composition and Communication Conference, Atlanta, GA.

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Drew E. Hinderer Finkbeiner Endowed Chair in Ethics Appointed to SVSU in 1981 Ph.D. University of Michigan A.B. Hope College

PAPERS Hinderer, D. E. (2011, March). Applied ethics: Problems and prospects. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (2011, September). Applied ethics in health care: Problems and prospects. Paper presented at The 2nd Annual Tri-City Collaboration in Health Care Ethics, University Center, MI.

PERFORMANCES Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Concert in the park, Works by Gershwin, Sousa et al., Alpena Symphony Orchestra, Dr. Eric Lawson, Conductor. (2011, August), Alpena, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Baroque on Beaver and beyond, Works by Bach, Delius, Farkas, Gounod, Handel, Mendelssohn, Milhaud, Mozart, Puccini, Purcell, Rossini, Rutter, Strauss, Sullivan, Verdi and Wagner, (2011, July 28-31), Beaver Island, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Emerald Winds, Works by Arnold, Gounod and Mozart, Calvin College, (2011, April), Grand Rapids, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Emerald Winds, Works by Arnold, Gounod and Mozart, Gaylord Chamber Orchestra Benefit, (2011, March), Gaylord, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Works by Holst and Tchaikovsky, Gaylord Chamber Orchestra, (2011, December). Gaylord, MI.

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Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Works by deFalla, Mozart, Rodrigo and Tchaikovsky, Midland Symphony Orchestra, (2011, February), Midland, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Works by Schumann, Sibelius and Weber, Midland Symphony Orchestra, (2011, October), Midland, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Works by Actor, Rachmaninoff and Shostakovich, Midland Symphony Orchestra, (2011, November), Midland, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (principal bassoon), Works by Ellington et al., Midland Symphony Orchestra, (2011, December), Midland, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (second bassoon, contra bassoon), Works by Hanson and Holst, Traverse Symphony Orchestra, Kevin Rhodes, Conductor. (2011, September), Traverse City, MI. Hinderer, D. E. (second bassoon, contra bassoon), Works by Beethoven and Sibelius, Traverse Symphony Orchestra, Kevin Rhodes, Conductor. (2011, October), Traverse City, MI.

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James Hitt Assistant Professor of Philosophy Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ph.D. University of New York, Graduate Center M.A. Arizona State University M.S. State University of New York at Stony Brook B.A. University of Pittsburgh

PANEL PRESENTATION Hitt, J. (2011, March). What works. Panel presentation at The 2nd Annual Tri-City Collaboration in Health Care Ethics, University Center, MI.

PAPERS Hitt, J. (2011, March). Case study: Ethics consultation at Maimonides Medical Center. Paper presented at The 2nd Annual Tri-City Collaboration in Health Care Ethics, University Center, MI. Hitt, J. (2011, September). Vegetative state as a postulate of medical knowledge. Paper presented at the Pittsburgh Area Philosophy Colloquium, Pittsburgh, PA. Hitt, J. (2011, September). Vegetative state as a postulate of medical knowledge. Paper presented at the Medical Humanities Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Hitt, J. (2011, November). Vegetative state as a postulate of medical knowledge. Paper presented at the Philosophy of Medical Roundtable Conference, University of the Basque Country, San Sebastian, Spain. Hitt, J. (2011, November). Problems with unreportable awareness. Paper presented at the Philosophy of Medicine Conference, Fundaci贸n Ram贸n Areces, Madrid, Spain.

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Joseph J. Jaksa Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. Oakland University M.A. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Michigan State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Jaksa, J.J. (2011, March). Bridging the ideological gap: Signs of moderation in undergraduate criminal justice curriculum and Identity Crisis: Teaching the concept and history of private security to introductory criminal justice undergraduate students. Paper presented at The 48th Annual Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences meeting, Toronto, Ontario Canada.

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J. Blake Johnson Assistant Professor of Art Appointed to SVSU in 2007 M.F.A. University of Idaho B.F.A. The Art Center College of Design

ART WORK Johnson, J. Blake. (Artist). (2011, September – November). Paper sculpture. All Michigan All Media – Visual Arts Competition, sponsored by the Holland Area Arts Council.

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Beth Jorgensen Associate Professor of Rhetoric & Professional Writing Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. Iowa State University M.A. Iowa State University B.A. Iowa State University

ARTICLE Jorgensen, B. (2011). In J. Williams (Chair). Granola-eating, Birkenstockwearing treehuggers who want to take your guns: Re-framing the rhetoric of sustainable agriculture. In Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE ) (Ed.), 2011 IEEE International Professional Communication Conference Proceedings (397 pages). doi: 10.1109/IPCC.2011.6087205 Environmentalists have long been perceived as radical idealists who are out of touch with the needs of average citizens. Meanwhile, the environmental movement has been marked from within by overlapping and competing concerns which have alienated key groups of potential allies. For example, concerns about humane treatment of animals, both wild and domestic, overlap and compete with wilderness preservation, crop and husbandry practices, and hunting and fishing. Moreover, public discourse is grounded upon an incoherent and incommensurate paradigm of rational liberalism which assumes that quantitative data and linear reasoning are absolute, transparent, and sufficient to persuade the public to ―go green,‖ and thus neglects to address the experiential values of the general. Against this background, sustainable agriculture struggles to invent itself as relevant to both consumers and producers. This paper examines the rhetorical and paradigmatic missteps of the environmental movement and suggests ways to re-frame the rhetoric of food production and consumption to appeal to held values, personal responsibility, and community, thus fueling consumer demand for local, sustainable, organic food.

BOOK CHAPTER Jorgensen, B. (2011). Lines, angles, and squares: Some consequences of linear epistemology in American English idiom. In Bruce C. Swaffield & Iris Guske (Eds.), Global encounters: Pedagogical paradigms & educational

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practices. (pp. 386-406). Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K.: Cambridge Scholars Press.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Jorgensen, B. (2011, June). The grain meme: Myths of the green revolution. Paper presented at the Joint Annual Meeting of Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society & Association for the Study of Food and Society, Missoula, MT. Jorgensen, B. (2011, October). Granola-eating, Birkenstock-wearing tree huggers who want to take your guns: Re-framing the rhetoric of sustainable agriculture. Paper presented at the International Professional Communication Conference, Cincinnati, OH. Jorgensen, B. (2011, October). The grain meme: Global consequences for women and children. Paper presented at the Feminisms & Rhetoric Conference, Mankato, MN.

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John L. Kaczynski Instructor of Political Science Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. candidate, Michigan State University M.P.A. Central Michigan University B.S. Central Michigan University

GRANT Kaczynski, J.L. Engage the Great Lakes Bay Region. Bay Area Community Foundation, $970; Midland Area Community Foundation, $995; & Saginaw Community Foundation, $975, December 2010 – December 2011. This project was created by SVSU students to increase civic engagement, community pride, volunteerism and the number of registered youth voters.

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Emily Kelley Assistant Professor of Art Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ph.D. Cornell University M.A. Cornell University B.A. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

BOOK REVIEW Kelley, E.D. (2011). A review of the book Fernando Gallego and his workshop: The altarpiece from Ciudad Rodrigo, Dotseth, A.W., Anderson, B.C., & Roglan, M.A., (Eds.). Medieval Encounters 17(3), 407-410.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Kelley, E.D. (2011, November). Imitating the Italians: The impact of Florentine funerary practices on the altarpiece of Gonzalo L贸pez de Polanco. Paper presented at the Southeastern College Art Conference, Savannah, GA.

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Sara Beth Keough Assistant Professor of Geography Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. University of Tennessee M.S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University B.S. Jacksonville University B.A. Jacksonville University

ARTICLE Keough, S.B. (2011). Promoting and preserving cultural identity through Newfoundland radio music broadcasts. Aether: The Journal of Media Geography, 7, 75-96. In light of the hegemonic influence of American popular culture on Canadian media, the Canadian government established the Canadian Content Regulations that set minimum quota for the amount of Canadian material contained in radio, television, and film in Canada. This study examines the regulations as they apply to radio and explores the influence of these regulations on St. John‘s, Newfoundland radio stations, a market that exists within a region with a strong local identity. Semi-structured interviews with station personnel in the St. John‘s market reveal that although the regulations influence station personnel‘s music selection, they are secondary to the importance that station personnel place on opportunities for cultural preservation through radio broadcasting.

BOOK REVIEW Keough, S.B. (2011). A review of the book El lector: A history of the cigar factory reader by Araceli Tinajero. Journal of Latin American Geography, 10(1), 213-215.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Keough, S.B. (2011, November). Ft. McMurray, Alberta: Considering urban development in a boom town. Presentation delivered at the Association of Canadian Studies in the U.S. Biennial meeting, Ottawa, Ontario.

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Keough, S.B. (2011, April). Newfoundland migration to Alberta: The accumulation of social capital in the migrantsâ€&#x; place of origin. Presentation delivered at the Association of American Geographers Annual meeting, Seattle, WA.

EDITORSHIP Chief Editor, Material Culture: Journal of the Pioneer America Society Material Culture is published twice yearly and contains peer-reviewed articles on theoretical and comparative studies and artifact and site analysis, as well as book reviews. The geographical scope of the subject matter with which the journal is concerned is Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the rest of the Western Hemisphere, although manuscripts about material culture in other regions are considered, with a special concern for the historical, cultural, and environmental heritage of the United States. The scope of the journal is not restricted by national boundaries across which that heritage cuts.

PRESENTATIONS Keough, S.B. (2011, September). Teaching high school geography: Pedagogical considerations.� Presented at the Social Studies Education workshops for in-service teachers, College of Education, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Keough, S.B. (2011, April). Contemporary Newfoundland in a larger Canadian context. Presented to the Bowling Green State University, Department of Political Science, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH.

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Jeffrey Koperski Professor of Philosophy Appointed to SVSU in 1997 Ph.D. Ohio State University M.A. Ohio State University B.E.E. University of Dayton

BOOK CHAPTER Koperski, J. (2011). Metetheoretic shaping principles: Where science meets theology. In W. Hasker, T. Oord & D. Zimmerman (Eds.), God in an open universe (pp. 33-49). Eugene, OR: Pickwick. Scientific knowledge is often categorized as experimental or theoretical. There is, however, a third layer where philosophy of science and science proper overlap, the realm of metatheoretic shaping principles. For example, we assume that the causal regularities observed today will also hold tomorrow. Researchers are thereby relying on two metaphysical doctrines: the uniformity of nature and mechanistic causation. There are also the ―explanatory virtues‖ of simplicity, testability, internal and external coherence, fruitfulness, and wide scope. My first goal is to categorize these principles and show how they‘ve operated in the history of science. Particular attention will be paid to their suspension and rejection, even of widely held principles. My second goal is to consider how certain shaping principles impinge on open theology. Of particular interest will be naturalism (both metaphysical and methodological), reductionism, and realism. Surprisingly, differences within the open theology camp are more relevant to these issues than open theism itself.

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Kimberly Lacey Instructor of English Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. Wayne State University B.A. Oakland University

ARTICLE Lacey, K. R., & Pruchnic, J. (Wayne State University). (2011). The future of forgetting: Rhetoric, memory, affect. Rhetoric Society Quarterly, 41(5), 472-494. This article argues for a rethinking of the rhetorical canon of memory as a productive tool for understanding and effectively responding to recent changes in culture, economics, and politics. After reviewing historical conceptions of rhetorical memory both before and after it‘s ‗‗canonization,‘‘ we identify two processes at the heart of the contemporary relationships between persuasion and memory: an ‗‗externalization‘‘ of memory and commonplace rhetorical structures through information networks and technologies, and an ‗‗internalization‘‘ of memory and dispositions that takes place in human affective systems. We conclude by arguing for the value of such an expanded notion of rhetorical memory for addressing two of the more pervasive and significant registers of contemporary persuasion: advertising and populist politics.

BOOK REVIEW Lacey, K.R. (2011). A review of the book Reticulations: Jean-Luc Nancy and the Networks of the Political, by Philip Armstrong. The Information Society, 27(4), 272-273.

ELECTRONIC ARTICLES & RESOURCES Lacey, K. R. (2011). Viva whenever: Suspended and expanded bodies in time. Journal of Evolution & Technology, 22(1), 73-80. ISSN 1541-0099 Available at http://jetpress.org/v22/lacey.htm

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In this paper, I investigate suspension under two guises: digital and pharmaceutical. These two versions of suspension interrogate the limits of the body to different extents. The former highlights our increasing desire and need to externalize and supplement what our physical bodies are incapable of doing – perfect, un-influenced storage capacity. The latter example illustrates the continued need for the physical body, but shows that the demands on the body are changed with age or desire to activate or suppress biological processes. Lacey, K. R. (2011). Face the truth. Guru Magazine, December 2011(3), 26-28. Available at http://gurumagazine.org/get-guru/issue-three/pc-mac/ Is the truth really written all over our faces? Inspired by her experiences dealing with difficult customers whilst hiding her true feelings, Mind Guru Kim Lacey takes a close look at Dr. Paul Ekman – the world expert in spotting a liar. Kim wonders whether her expressions are giving away her real inner feelings. Lacey, K. R. (2011). Stop copying me! Guru Magazine, October 2011(2), 42-44. Available at http://gurumagazine.org/get-guru/issue-two/pc-mac/ Ever wonder how speech writers and politicians can make their messages so convincing? Mind Guru Dr. Kim Lacey shows us that our inbuilt ability to care for others also makes us vulnerable to the charm of a good speaker or sales pitch. Don‘t fret, it‘s not your fault – you were built that way… Lacey, K. R. (2011). Is seeing really believing? Guru Magazine, August 2011(1), 26-29. Available at http://gurumagazine.org/get-guru/issueone/pc-mac/ Our Mind Guru Dr. Kim Lacey asks ‗How do you make a memory?‘ It sounds simple, but she shows us that reality is quite different. Get ready to question what you thought you knew. Welcome to the frightening world of ‗memory implantation‘: You just might never trust yourself again… Lacey, K.R., Karcher, M., Solomon, D., & Thomas, L. (2011). Living mediations: Biology, technology and art [HASTAC Scholars Forum hosts]. Retrieved from http://hastac.org/forums/hastac-scholarsdiscussions/living-mediations-biology-technology-and-art This forum aims to engage the biological in its many dimensions through the critical lens of media studies while simultaneously examining media through the biological. Our goal is to investigate and interrogate the

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contemporary understandings of life itself in its widely varied mediated forms. Such interrogation is at once metaphorical (DNA as the code of life, the metaphoricity of science, viral media), rhetorical (the appearance and development of outbreak narratives in films, digital art, and the popular press), and material (disease surveillance networks, media ecologies, forensic media practices). We developed the forum, invited other special guests, moderated the comments and continued the discussion offline. Launched March 2011, the forum has 57 lengthy comments and 8000+ page views.

PRESENTATONS Lacey, K. R. (2011, May). Some new laws of motion: Physics and digital writing. Paper presented at Computers and Writing Conference, Ann Arbor, MI. Our digital writing is always on the move, even without our nudging to keep it in motion or our desire to delete posts to keep them at rest. Anytime we write in digital spaces, we are automatically participating in what communication theorist Mark Andrejevic calls the digital enclosure, ―the creation of an interactive realm wherein every action and transaction generates information about itself.‖ Digital writing constantly produces an exponential amount of new information. When we shop for items on Amazon, for instance, our consumerist patterns are re-presented to us as tailored suggestions for future purchases. In order map the relationship between the laws of motion and digital writing, this paper asks: What forces act on our digital writing in order to cause change? What is digital writing‘s relationship to acceleration, force, and mass? For our actions in online spaces, what are the equal and opposite reactions that respond to our digital writing? Lacey, K. R. (2011, April). Manipulating memory: Keeping it real. Paper presented at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA. Alongside information technologies, the role of personal writing has taken on a new meaning. As writing instructors, we encourage our students to use and create digital texts (blogs, websites, course Wikis), ones that are available long after they leave our classrooms. For these students, their constant online presence signifies that they have ―one hand in the past‖ while another ―hand is dipped in the future.‖ The ways we create and keep memories have radically changed in recent times, causing many (in and outside of composition studies) to ponder what we can literally do with

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those memories now that they are so ubiquitous (Crowley, Reynolds, Mayer-Schonberger, Klingberg, Bell). The future use of our students‘ digital projects, however, might not be known at the time of its creation, and so memory texts become a rather complicated ethical concern in the digital composition classroom. I suggest that we consider memory studies as a part of our digital composition pedagogy by exploring the future possibilities of manipulation, for good and for ill.

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Nameeta Mathur Associate Professor of History Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. West Virginia University M.A. St. Stephen‘s College, University of Delhi B.A. St. Stephen‘s College, University of Delhi

BOOK REVIEWS Mathur, N. (2011). A review of the book The Partition of India by Ian Talbot and Gurharpal Singh. Canadian Journal of History, 46(1), 205-207. Mathur, N. (2011). A review of the book Reconsidering Islam in a South Asian Context by M.R. Pirbhai. Comparative Sociology, 10(4), 654-656.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATON Mathur, N. (2011, April). East meets East: Foreign relations between India and Eastern Europe, 1947-1989. Presentation delivered at the South Asian Studies Association Fifth Annual Conference, Richmond, VA.

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Marsha Millikin Lecturer of Rhetoric and Professional Writing Appointed to SVSU in 2006 M.A. Texas A&M University-Commerce B.S. University of Texas at Tyler

CONFERENCE PRESENTATON Millikin, M. (2011, April). It is not as I imagined it to be: Finding the American Eve in Michael Mann‟s “The Last of the Mohicans.” Paper presented at the Popular/American Culture Associations (SWTX PCA/ACA) Joint Conference, San Antonio, TX.

PANEL PRESENTATON Millikin, M. (2011, April). Crafting identities on screen. Chaired panel presentation at the Popular/American Culture Associations (SWTX PCA/ACA) Joint Conference, San Antonio, TX.

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Michael R. Mosher Professor, Art/Communication & Digital Media Appointed to SVSU in 2000 M.F.A. San Francisco State University M.A. San Francisco State University B.A. Dartmouth College

ART WORKS Mosher, M.R. (Artist). (2011, April). Four Wisconsin Teachers, 1937 and Service Staff, High School, Wisconsin, 1937 [Drawings, Ink on Paper]. MEA/MAEA Art Acquisitions Purchase Exhibition, Michigan Education Association Headquarters, East Lansing, MI. **Jurorâ€&#x;s Choice Award Mosher, M.R. (Artist). (2011, April). Four Wisconsin Teachers, 1937, [Drawing, Ink on Paper]. MEA/MAEA Art Acquisitions Purchase Exhibition, Michigan Education Association Headquarters, East Lansing, MI. **Jurorâ€&#x;s Choice Award Mosher, M.R. (Artist). (2011). Four Wisconsin Teachers, 1937, [Drawing, Ink on Paper]. University of Michigan at Dearborn Open Competition 2011. Juror Bruce Winslow, Director, Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art of the Midland Center for the Arts. Mosher, M.R. (Artist). (2011, December). S.F. City Seal [acrylic and china marker on cardboard], iPhone Skins Showing Steve Jobs and Some of the Cool Women He Dated in the 1980s [ink and pencil on paper]; Roast Vegs [ink on paper], Imagined Chattering Chipmunk in the Trees [ink on paper], & Bay City Girl Raising Phone to her Head as She Walks [ink on paper], included in Gems: Exquisite, Intricate, Intimate Small Works of Art, Arts Benicia, Benicia, CA. Juror Larnie Fox

CONFERENCE PRESENTATON Mosher, M.R. (2011, March). Comics, community murals and software development. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University,

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University Center, MI.

ELECTRONIC RESOURCES 81: Arizona Biopower. In (2011). A. Aldama, P. Garcia & M. Mosher (Eds.), Bad Subjects. Retrieved from http://bad.eserver.org/issues/2011/81 Mosher, M.R. (2011, February). Saginaw, Detroit, Ann Arbor: Pursuing the art of Jon Onye Lockard,‖ Ann Arbor Observer. J. Hilton (Ed.) Retrieved from http://arborweb.com/articles/saginaw_detroit_ann_arbor_full_article.html Mosher, M.R. (2011). Allegory and alterity: Regulating labor, immigration, and the ruinous emblems of hate in Michigan. Bad Subjects: Arizona Biopower, 81, retrieved from http://bad.eserver.org/issues/2011/81

ELECTRONIC REVIEWS Mosher, M.R. (2011, October). A review of Destroy all monsters, destroy all monsters magazine 1976-1979. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/oct2011/DAM_mosher.php Mosher, M.R. (2011, May). A review of Octopus time: Bellmer painting by Herbert Lust. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/may2011/mosher_lust.php Mosher, M.R. (2011, May). A review of A touch of blossom: John Singer Sargent and the queer flora of Fin-de-Siècle art by Alison Syme. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/may2011/mosher_syme.php Mosher, M.R. (2011, March). A review of Infinite city: A San Francisco atlas by Rebecca Solnit. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/mar2011/solnit_mosher.php Mosher, M.R. (2011, January) A review of Hypertext and the female imaginary by Jaishree K. Odin. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from

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http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/jan2011/odin_mosher.php Mosher, M.R. (2011, January) A review of Fast feminism by Shannon Bell. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/jan2011/bell-lacy_mosher.php Mosher, M.R. (2011, January) A review of Leaving art: Writings on performance, politics and publics, 1974-2007 by S. Lacy. Republished in Leonardo Reviews Quarterly 1(4), M. Punt (Ed.) Retrieved from http://www.leonardo.info/reviews/jan2011/bell-lacy_mosher.php Mosher, M.R. (2011). Good bad investigatrix of techsploitative monsters. A review of Pretend we're dead, Otherzine #21, by Annalee Newitz. M. Hankwitz (Ed.). Retrieved from http://www.othercinema.com/otherzine/?issueid=26&article_id=142 Mosher, M.R. (2011). A review of Punk slash! musicals: Tracking slip-sync on film, Undercurrent #7 by D. Laderman. C. Fujiwara (Ed.). Retrieved from http://www.fipresci.org/undercurrent/issue_0711/mosher_slipsync.htm

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Paul T. Munn Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 1988 Ph.D. University of Minnesota B.S. University of Minnesota

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Munn, P. (2011, June). Artifice and the representation of emotion: The case of George Herbert. Paper presented at the Shakespeare and Early Modern Emotion: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference, The Andrew Marvell Centre, The University of Hull, England. Munn, P. (2011, July). The lyric sequence as life writing to expose the abuse of human rights: NazÄąm Hikmetâ€&#x;s 9-10 p.m. poems. Paper presented at the Life Writing and Human Rights: Genres of Testimony Conference, Centre for Life Narratives, Kingston University, Kingston upon Thames, England.

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Eric Nisula Professor of Music Appointed to SVSU in 1978 D.M.A. University of Southern California M.Ed. University of Southern California M.M. Hartt College of Music

PERFORMANCES Nisula, E. (2011, October). (On bass gamba, tenor gamba, alto recorder, tenor recorder, and lute) as a member of the Early Music ensemble, Northern Renaissance, and in collaboration with Schmelter, N. (on harpsichord), Music of the Medieval, Renaissance and Early Baroque periods, including music by Samuel Scheidt, First Congregational Church, Saginaw, MI. Nisula, E. (2011, November). As a member of Northern Renaissance Music of the Medieval, Renaissance and Early Baroque periods, (2011, November). Flint Institute of the Arts, Flint, MI.

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Gerald Peterson Professor of Psychology Appointed to SVSU in 1981 Ph.D. Kansas State University M.A. University of Missouri at Kansas City B.S. University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh

PAPER Peterson, G., & Reinert, J. (2011, March). Effects of red clothing on ratings of attractiveness and dominance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Helen Raica-Klotz Lecturer of English /Writing Center Coordinator Appointed to SVSU in 1998 M.A. Central Michigan University B.A. Central Michigan University

ARTICLE Raica-Klotz, H., Blumner, J. (University of Michigan-Flint), Boehm, D., Crawford, M. A. (Central Michigan University), & Wynn Perdue, S. (Oakland University) (2011). Writing center data: What do we need and how should we use it? East Central Writing Centers Association Newsletter (fall). Retrieved from http://ecwca.org/newsletter/fall-2011issue/ Writing Center data collection varies from one Center to the next; the data we collect and analyze depend on numerous factors: the programs and systems we use to collect the data, the questions we bring to our analysis, and the arguments we wish to make about the quality and quantity of our work. This article presented a comparison of the instruments, methods, rationale and usage of data in each Writing Center, followed by a narrative from each Writing Center discussing its current data collection practices and their impact.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Raica-Klotz, H. Harmon, M., & Herzog, B. (2011, April). From strangers to family: The development of a first year writing program. Paper presented at the College Composition and Communication Conference, Atlanta, GA.

PANEL PRESENTATION Raica-Klotz, H., Blumner, J. (University of Michigan-Flint), Boehm, D., Crawford, M. A. (Central Michigan University), & Wynn Perdue, S. (Oakland University). (2011, March). Writing center data: What do we need and how should we use it? Panel presentation at the East Central Writing Centers Association Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.

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Panel members from four different Michigan Writing Centers presented the data collection methods used in each writing center, including the tools used to collect the data and the ways each uses the data. Each Writing Center presented its own view on data collection and the need for data. Perspectives ranged from those who see data collection as essential to research-based practice, to those who believe data collection may detract from student-centeredness. The panel concurred that consistent data collection is essential to carrying out a writing center‘s mission.

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Evelyn D. Ravuri Associate Professor of Geography Appointed to SVSU in 2004 Ph.D. University of Cincinnati M.A. Indiana University of Pennsylvania B.A. Indiana University of Pennsylvania

PAPER Ravuri, E. D. (2011). Reviewing the Guyana project: Lifetime migration to and from Bolivar state, Venezuela, 1950–2001. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, 32(2), 253-266. doi: 10.1111/j.14679493.2011.00431.x By the mid-twentieth century the population and economic resources in many developing economies had become concentrated in the capital city. Planned industrial cities became an important mechanism to encourage more balanced urban systems as well as development in peripheralized regions. Venezuela boasts one of the most impressive planned industrial cities, Ciudad Guyana, constructed in 1959 in the resource rich but inaccessible Bolivar state in the southeast. This paper summarizes the lifetime migration to and from Bolivar state for the years 1950, 1971 and 2001. Whereas the majority of lifetime migrants originated from the neighboring northeast region in 1950 and 1971, by 2001 more migrants arrived from the capital region. For lifetime outmigrants, the destination states became more diverse and less focused on the capital region. Gender ratios of lifetime migrants to and from Bolivar became more equitable as women became more prominent in migration flows. The level of urban primacy in Venezuela declined substantially after 1971 as the country became more internally integrated, although this more equitable distribution of the country's population may not have been solely a result of the creation of the growth pole, but a result of wider economic development.

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Thomas J. Renna Professor of History Appointed to SVSU in 1970 Ph.D. Brown University M.A. University of Nebraska B.A. University of Scranton

PAPERS Renna, T.J. (2011, March). Political theory and the Roman Empire. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Renna, T.J. (2011, April). The crisis of the empire: The popeâ€&#x;s response. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL. Renna, T.J. (2011, May). Empire and Augustinians. Paper presented at the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Renna, T.J. (2011, October). William of Ockham and the natural law. Paper presented at the Patristic, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies Conference, Villanova University, Philadelphia, PA. Renna, T.J. (2011, October). Papal-imperial theory: Dante to Alvarus Pelagius. Paper presented at the Midwest Medieval History Conference ~ 50th meeting, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO.

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David Rzeszutek Assistant Professor of Theatre Appointed to SVSU in 2009 M.F.A. Ohio University

PANEL PRESENTATON Rzeszutek, D. (2011, July). Reflections on the field: Observing, contemplating, and imagining. Panel presentation at the American Alliance for Theatre & Education National Conference, Chicago, IL.

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Kerry W. Segel Professor of English Appointed to SVSU in 1986 Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin M.A. University of Texas at Austin B.A. University of Utah

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Segel, K.W. (2011, May). Beyond translation: Designing ELL-focused professional development for paraeducators and mainstream educators. Paper presented at the National Center for Paraprofessionals Conference, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. English Language Learners (ELLs) are at greatest risk of academic failure in classes without teachers prepared in ESL methodology and second language acquisition. Bilingual paraeducators in such classrooms may be given the task of ―teaching‖ these students without having the necessary educational preparation, or simply asked to translate, assuming that is sufficient for knowledge transmission. The key to academic success for ELLs in such classrooms is to provide professional development which fosters a teamwork approach involving both the paraeducator and the mainstream teacher. This presentation provides the underpinnings of such professional development, including understanding myths and realities of ELL education; exploring the appropriate roles of paraeducators in ELL education; L1 teaching methodologies appropriate for ELLs, and cooperative lesson planning and assessment. Participants will take part in a ―mini‖ PD session, and be provided with useful resource information. Segel, K.W., & Essenmacher, N.T. (SVSU Student), (2011, March). Forugh Farrokhzad: A twentieth-century poetic voice for the twenty-first century. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. The 20th-century Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad is revered by Iranian both inside Iran in the Diaspora and her work has been translated into many languages, including English. Despite these translations, Farrokhzad‘s work is not well known in the English-speaking world. This

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presentation is designed to introduce Farrokhzad‘s life and poetry, with a goal of encouraging the audience to seek out her works and introduce them to others. Each presenter will introduce and discuss one of her poems– focusing on what drew us to this particular work. Segel, K.W. (2011, October). Academic vocabulary development within a task-based teaching approach: A framework for post-secondary ESL. Paper presented at the Michigan Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (MITESOL) Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. How can teachers and ESL programs meet the vocabulary needs of ESL students entering post-secondary education in the U.S.? This session presents a framework for teaching intensive vocabulary development within a task-based language teaching (TBLT) approach. A review of TBLT and key aspects of vocabulary development will be provided, along with guidelines for implementation in the curriculum, course, and individual lesson.

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Steve Sherlock Professor of Sociology Appointed to SVSU in 1988 Ph.D. University of Notre Dame M.A. University of Notre Dame M.S.W. Grand Valley State University B.A. Aquinas College

PAPERS Sherlock, S. (2011, March). The political performativity of social identity categories. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Jacques Derrida has argued that words, although singular in social context, must be recognizable across contexts in order to have meaning. For Derrida, this "iterability" of language is a structural, necessary condition. Judith Butler has extended this insight to the "performativity" of gender, arguing that the maintenance of "gender" as a socially recognizable identity category requires its continual re-citation or reperformance in everyday life. However, Butler emphasizes a "social" iterability regarding the political performativity of identity categories, opposing the more "structural" approach which she finds not only in Derrida, but also in the Lacanian-influenced work of Ernesto Laclau. This paper discusses the issue of "social" versus "structural" iterability, in regard to the political performativity of all social identity categories. Sherlock, S. (2011, August). Performance and performativity: Erving Goffman and post structuralism. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Sociological Association, Las Vegas, NV. This paper reconsiders the work of Erving Goffman in reference to poststructuralist work on "performativity", particularly as formulated by Jacques Derrida and Judith Butler. There are affinities between the approaches which may not be immediately apparent, given that Goffman is clearly not a poststructuralist. The paper argues that while Goffman's view of "performance" in everyday life may retain vestiges of the "metaphysical" subject criticized by Butler and Derrida, his work remains

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useful in envisioning the nature of agency within performativity theory. In addition, Goffman's work on frames and their transformation is informative when considering the possibility of resistance to normative identity categories, as in the case of Butler's work on gender.

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Brian J. Thomas Assistant Professor of Sociology Appointed to SVSU in 2005 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. University of Oregon B.S. Michigan State University B.A. Michigan State University

ARTICLES Thomas, B.J. (2011). Consumer agency and food retailer choice in an American urban neighborhood. The Journal of Social Inclusion, 2(1), 5-22. This study examines the issue of consumer agency within the food system as manifested by food secure and food insecure households in an urban neighborhood in the United States. Using a self-administered mail survey this study examines food retailer perception and shopping behavior of food secure and insecure households in Lansing, Michigan. Food security represents a useful lens through which to examine the issue of agency since food, while a necessary part of life, is nonetheless something that is difficult to access for a large sector of the population. By examining both food secure and food insecure households, light is shed on some of the factors that lead to the relative ability of each group to successfully and reliably obtain food. In particular, this study focuses on the perception and behavior of consumers in relation to the decision to shop, or not to shop, at various food retailers. Some theories of consumer behavior tend to focus either on class related cultural elements which determine taste preferences while other theories focus on structural elements of the food system which force a limited selection onto various social groups. While certainly class culture influences taste preference to some extent, results from this study suggest that structural elements of the food system and economic differences between food secure and food insecure households have a larger influence on store choice than cultural preferences. In fact, both food secure and insecure households indicated similar sets of criteria used in determining store choices. However, in examination of actual shopping behaviors, this study found that food insecure households are more likely to shop at deep discounters and more likely to travel farther to obtain food. These results suggest that structural elements such as food

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retailer locations limit the range of shopping options of food insecure households when compared to food secure households. Thomas, B.J. (2011). A qualitative study of socioeconomic status, postsecondary education plans, and educational aspirations of students from a Michigan public school. Sociation Today, 9(1) Post-secondary education is often seen as an important factor for individual success and is positively correlated with factors ranging from income to happiness. Unfortunately, access to higher-education varies greatly in the United States. In this paper, I examine the relationship between socioeconomic status and the post-secondary plans of current high-school students and recent high-school graduates. Through in-depth interviews, I explore the relationship between students‘ socioeconomic backgrounds and their educational aspirations of students from Bay City School District in Michigan, USA. I conclude that both cultural and economic factors combine to influence the range of decisions that students make, not simply about whether or not to pursue post-secondary education, but also about how and where to pursue that education.

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Diana Trebing Assistant Professor of Communication Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. Southern Illinois University, Carbondale M.A. Southern Illinois University, Carbondale Diplom, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Mainz, Germany

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Trebing, D. (2011, March). Analyzing international teaching assistantsâ€&#x; identity gaps. Presented at the International TESOL Conference, New Orleans, LA. Trebing, D., & Kim, Y. (Georgia State University). (2011, March). How to establish intercultural training programs. Presented at the International TESOL Conference, New Orleans, LA.

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Lee D. Trepanier Associate Professor of Political Science Appointed to SVSU in 2005 Ph.D. Louisiana State University M.A. Louisiana State University B.A. Marquette University

GRANT Trepanier, L.D. Student research fellowship and seminar/colloquia. The Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation, $4940, January 2011 – December 2011.

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Erik Trump Professor of Political Science Appointed to SVSU in 1997 Ph.D. Boston University B.A. University of California, Santa Cruz

PANEL PRESENTATION Trump, E., & Donahue, J. (2011, August). Zoos in society: Perceptions of animal welfare in zoos. Paper presented at symposium entitled From good to great welfare - Advancing zoo animal welfare science and policy, sponsored by the Detroit Zoological society, Ford Education Center, Detroit Zoo, Royal Oak, MI.

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Carol A. Zimmermann Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. Ohio State University B.A. University of Michigan

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Zimmermann, C. A. (2011, March). Restorative justice impacts for middle th school students. Paper presented at The 48 Annual Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences meeting, Toronto, Ontario Canada.

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Matthew Zivich Professor of Art Appointed to SVSU in 1976 M.F.A. Indiana University B.S. University of Michigan

ART WORKS Zivich, M. (Artist). (2011, July-August). Untitled,(Potemkin), (2007) [Household caulk and shellac on canvas]. Stone Soup exhibition at the University of Michigan's WORK.DETROIT gallery, Detroit, MI. Energizing the space with a wide array of flavors from a diverse sampling of ingredients and providers, Stone Soup offers creative process on any topic in this, WORK.DETROIT‘s main summer offering. Zivich, M. (Artist). (2011, July). Icarus, (2007-2010) [acrylic on linen]. Things that Move exhibition, the University of Michigan's Fifth Annual Alumni Show, University of Michigan School of Art, Ann Arbor, MI. Zivich, M. (Artist). (2011, June-July). Helter-Skelter, (2005-2011), [acrylic on linen]. Joint faculty exhibition of Delta College and SVSU faculty, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, MI. Zivich, M. (Artist). (2011, June-July). Flu-like Symptoms, (20072011), [acrylic on linen]. Joint faculty exhibition of Delta College and SVSU faculty, Midland Center for the Arts, Midland, MI.

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College of Business and Management The College of Business and Management recognizes that students pursuing degrees in business and economics need to address two objectives during their academic experience at SVSU. First, they must obtain skills that will qualify them for an entry level degree requiring position in a variety of public and private enterprises. Second, they must obtain the ability to continue their education and broaden it so that they can move beyond the entry level position or have the flexibility to change occupations if desired or necessary. The College facilitates the first objective by providing rigorous content upper division courses and requiring the students to successfully master the skills they need. The University and the College facilitate the second objective by providing a rich liberal education. The College strives to create graduates who will not only be able to obtain an appropriate entry level position but be able to embrace and conquer future educational and career challenges.

Jill L. Wetmore, Ph.D., Dean College of Business and Management

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Said M. Elfakhani Harvey Randall Wickes Endowed Chair in International Business Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. University of Texas at Dallas M.B.A. University of Texas at Dallas M.S. University of Texas at Dallas B.B.A. Lebanese University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Elfakhani, S.M., Chahine, S. (Texas Christian University), & Omecihe, M. (2011, April). A comparative study of the performance of Islamic and conventional banks: Evidence from the Middle East region. Paper presented at the Eastern Finance Association Conference, Savannah, GA. Mackie, W., & Elfakhani, S.M. (2011, May). The determinants of FDIs in BRIC countries. Paper presented at The 3rd Annual Global Management Conference, Godollo/Budapest, Hungary.

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Kylie M. Goggins Assistant Professor of Economics Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. University of Kentucky M.S. University of Kentucky B.A. Asbury College

GRANT Goggins, K.M., Misra, K., Park, H.Y., & Reddy, S. SVSU Family Business Research Grant. $15,000, March 2011 – February 2013.

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Joyce Hoffman Associate Professor of Management Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. University of Memphis M.B.A. Shippensburg University B.A. Aquinas College

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Hoffman, J., & Sirias, D. (2011, May). Designing a process for teaching the main QFD matrix in the classroom. Paper presented at the Production and Operations Management Society, Reno, NV. Hoffman, J., & Sirias, D. (2011, May). Quality of Work is not quality of service. Paper presented at the Production and Operations Management Society, Reno, NV.

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Wayne Mackie Professor of Finance Appointed to SVSU in 1977 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.B.A. Georgia State University B.S. St. Mary‘s College

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Mackie, W., & Elfakhani, S.M. (2011, May). The determinants of FDIs in rd BRIC countries. Paper presented at The 3 Annual Global Management Conference, Godollo/Budapest, Hungary.

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Kaustav Misra Assistant Professor of Economics Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. Mississippi State University M.S. University of Kentucky M.B.A. Webster University B.S. Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalaya

ARTICLES Misra, K., & Chi, G. (Mississippi State University). (2011). Measuring public school competition from private schools: A gravity-based index. Journal of Geographic Information System, 3(4), 306-311. doi: 10.4236/jgis.2011.34027 This research develops a gravity-based index of public school competition from private schools within local markets. Proponents of educational reform often call for policies to increase competition between schools. A major hurdle for researchers examining this issue is to determine a workable definition of ―competition‖ by which they can measure the degree of competition within local markets. This study addresses this challenge by developing a school competition index for public schools in the Jackson metropolitan area of Mississippi, USA that considers the enrollments in public schools and the enrollments in their neighboring private schools, as well as the distances between them. The school competition index reveals the degree of competition for each public school based on its spatial location relative to peer private schools operating within its service area. This methodology can be useful for evaluating competition in other markets and redefining the traditional market structure. Misra, K., Henry, T. (Mississippi State University), & Pitts, J.D. (Mississippi State University). (2011). The wages of religion. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(12), 70-81. Retrieved from http://www.ijbssnet.com/journals/Vol._2_No._14;_July_2011/9.pdf This research attempts to quantify the impact of religious affiliation on an individual‘s hourly wage rate. In addition to estimating a wage equation as a function of religious affiliation for our entire sample of observations from

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the 2006 wave of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we also decompose our sample to analyze the effects of religious affiliation on wages by race, sex, and region. Contrary to the majority of previous literature, we are unable to conclude that Jews receive a wage premium over members of other religious groups or those with no religious beliefs. However, we find ample evidence of a Catholic wage premium. Furthermore, we find the wage premium for Catholics to be largest in the Northeast. Our results also show that Protestants do not receive a statistically different hourly wage rate from non-religious individuals.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Misra, K., Chang, H., & Park, H.Y. (2011, August). The impact of mortgage securitization on housing bubble and subprime mortgage crisis: A self-organization perspective. Paper presented at the KDI Journal of Economic Policy Conference, Korea Development Institute, Seoul, Korea. The current subprime mortgage crisis has been analyzed from many different perspectives. The securitization of subprime mortgages has emerged as the leading cause of the subprime mortgage crisis. This securitization is a complex process that involves a number of different players (Ashcraft and Schuerman, 2008).Securitization of subprime mortgages which are a part of mortgage-backed securities (MBSs) also led to further complexity by the introduction of collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and credit default swaps (CDSs). MBSs, CDOs and CDSs became sources of adverse selection and moral hazard which have contributed significantly to the current subprime mortgage crisis. Our study investigates the impact of securitization of mortgages on mortgage rates, the housing bubble and the subprime mortgage crisis. The study found that securitization of mortgages has an inverse relationship with mortgage rates and securitization of subprime mortgages triggered the housing bubble in 1995. We found that an application of the self-organization in biology and thermodynamics to the analysis of the current housing bubble provides a better understanding of the current subprime mortgage crisis. Misra, K., & Sarkar, S. (2011, July). Determinants of firm formation: An international perspective. Paper presented at The 86th Annual Western Economic Association International Conference, San Diego, CA. The purpose of this paper is to examine the associated factors which determine the business formation around the European countries. The panel data are used for 15 countries from 2003 to 2006 in this paper. This paper finds significant relationships between days of firm formation and lending interest rates, start-up procedures, taxes and per capita gross

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domestic product. This analysis demonstrates that formation of a new business in a country is significantly associated with country‘s institutional factors. Hence, to encourage business formation policy makers should develop business friendly institutional tools which will increase interests and capabilities of entrepreneurs to form new businesses. Misra, K., Memili, E. (Mississippi State University), & Chrisman, J.J. (Mississippi State University & University of Alberta), (2011, November). Corporate governance provisions enhancing controlling ownersâ€&#x; voting rights in family firms: A panel data analysis. Paper presented at the Southern Management Association Meeting, Savannah, GA. **Selected as the Best Doctoral Paper in the Entrepreneurship/Information Technology/Innovation track. We draw on agency theory and corporate governance to examine the differential effects of family ownership and family management on the use of governance provisions enhancing controlling owners‘ voting rights in publicly traded family firms. We suggest that family ownership affects the use of such provisions. We also suggest that family management moderates this relationship. Using a sample of 386 of SP500 firms, we find support for the moderation effects of family management on the suggested relationship as well as the principal-principal agency theory logic to explain family firm behavior. Finally, we discuss implications for future research and practice. Misra, K., Memili, E. (Mississippi State University), & Chrisman, J. J. (Mississippi State University & University of Alberta), (2011, November). Family involvement and the use of corporate governance provisions protecting controlling versus noncontrolling owners. Paper presented at the Southern Management Association meeting, Savannah, GA. Drawing on agency theory and corporate governance, we first classify the corporate governance provisions within the context of family firms. Then, we probe the influence of family involvement (i.e. family ownership and family management) in corporate governance on the use of governance provisions protecting controlling and noncontrolling owners. Specifically, we suggest that family ownership affects the use of governance provisions protecting controlling and noncontrolling owners. We also suggest that family management will moderate the relationships between family ownership and the use of these governance provisions. Finally, we discuss future research directions and insights for practitioners.

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Misra, K., Chang, E.P.C. (Arkansas State University), Chrisman, J.J. (Mississippi State University & University of Alberta), & Memili, E. (Mississippi State University). (2011, August). The propensity to use nonfamily managers‟ incentive compensation in family firms. Paper presented at the Academy of Management meeting, San Antonio, TX. We demonstrate that family-centered non-economic goals can decrease the willingness of family firm owners to hire and provide competitive compensation to non-family managers even if those managers act as stewards rather than agents. Discrepancies between what family firm owners need and want to pay, owing to their economic and non-economic utilities, increase their performance expectations for non-family managers. Furthermore, family-centered non-economic goals and firm idiosyncrasies reduce non-family managers‘ ability to meet those expectations. Thus, from the perspective of family owners, even when non-family managers possess superior capabilities than family managers, hiring them is likely to lead to the ―winner‘s curse.‖ Misra, K., Chang, E.P.C. (Arkansas State University), & Memili, E. (Mississippi State University). (2011, August). Entrepreneurship capital in American counties: A panel data analysis. Paper presented at the Academy of Management meeting, San Antonio, TX. Entrepreneurship capital refers to the factors of a region that drives new businesses (Audretsch & Keilbach, 2004). This study considers industry growth and performance in manufacturing, retail and service as components of entrepreneurship capital to drive the long term growth of new establishments. Using a panel data of 2,940 counties from 20022007, our results support the notion that the overall new venture activity is benefited by the industry growth and performance. Future research directions and practical implications are also discussed. Misra, K., Chrisman, J.J. (Mississippi State University & University of Alberta), & Memili, E. (Mississippi State University). (2011, May). The link between corporate governance, family involvement, and firm performance. Paper presented at the Family Enterprise Research Conference, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI. Misra, K., Chang, E.P.C. (Arkansas State University), Chrisman, J.J. (Mississippi State University & University of Alberta), & Memili, E. (Mississippi State University). (2011, January). An empirical analysis of the antecedents of nonfamily managers. Paper presented at the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship meeting, Hilton Head, SC.

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We use an economic utility perspective to examine nonfamily managers‘ incentive compensation in family firms. Specifically, we suggest that the family involvement in the business through ownership, management, and intentions for transgenerational succession exerts a negative influence on the propensity to use non-family manager‘s incentive compensation packages. We develop and test our model on a sample of 2019 small family firms. Our findings suggest that the three components of family involvement are negatively associated with the propensity to use nonfamily managers‘ incentive compensation in family firms. Further research implications are discussed. Misra, K., Grimes, P.W. (Mississippi State University), & Rogers, K.E. (Mississippi State University). (2011, January). Does competition improve public school efficiency? A spatial analysis. Paper presented at the American Economic Association Annual meeting, Denver, CO. The influence of social capital on economic activities has been a central theme in the literature for quite a long time, but the relationship between social connectedness and school choice has not been addressed. If the primary objective of social capital is to create cohesiveness through the connectivity of community members, then it is clear that parents‘ school choice decisions are influenced by the groups or organizations to which they belong. Ni (2007) argues that parents‘ decision not only influence students‘ academic performance, but also affect school expenditures. Thus, it is worthwhile to investigate the effect of social capital on school performance. The measurement of social capital has been debated for a long time. In this paper we create a geographically bounded community around schools in Mississippi employing GIS instead of following the commonly used political boundaries such as school district or county to measure social capital. Then we estimate the social capital stock for each school to analyze the relationship between the school‘s performance and existing social capital. Data were collected from the Northeast Regional Center for Rural Development (NRCRD) and the Mississippi Department of Education for the academic year 2005-2006. We find that schools located in communities with a higher stock of social capital significantly outperform those with relatively low levels of social capital. The results also suggest that students‘ race and socio-economic status significantly reduce primary school performance, holding all else equal. This research helps to understand the importance of social capital from spatial perspectives and will guide policy makers in future resource allocations.

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GRANTS Misra, K. Poverty and teen mothers: A zip code analysis. The Allen Foundation, $4,970, May 2011 – April 2012. In the last several decades studies have been trying to explore the determinants and consequences of teen motherhood. Evidently most of these studies agree that the associated social costs of teen motherhood are enormous. The federal, state, and local governments are spending a large portion of their budget to support these programs but surprisingly most of these programs fail to reduce the rate of teen mothers significantly in most of the states in the nation. Michigan is one of the states where the number of teen mothers has been growing steadily over the years. Hence, this old problem definitely needs a fresh look. Thus far only a handful of studies consider observing this problem from a spatial perspective, and this is the major goal of this study. Teen mothers are distributed unevenly across the state so finding these vulnerable areas is the major challenge. To do that, we are employing zip code level data instead of county or state to obtain the precise estimate. Developing teen mother eradication programs based on this study will guide and reduce the overall government spending and ultimately should help in shaping our community. Misra, K., Goggins, K.M., Park, H.Y., & Reddy, S. SVSU Family Business Research Grant. $15,000, March 2011 – February 2013.

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Shiva Nadavulakere Assistant Professor of Management Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. City University, London M.B.A. Gulbarga University B.Com. Gulbarga University

ARTICLES Nadavulakere, S., Maheshwari , S. (Hampton University), & Rawat, A. (Nicholls State University). (2011). Strategos and pathos: Examining the influence of affectivity on perceptions of competitive advantage. Delhi Business Review, 12(2), 21-31. Nadavulakere, S., & Rawat, A. (Nicholls State University). (2011). Strategy and competitor cognition: An exploratory study of cognitive maps of competition held by inside and outside industry actors. Delhi Institute of Advanced Studies Technology Review, 15(1)

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Joseph Ofori-Dankwa Professor of Management Appointed to SVSU in 1987 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.Sc. University of Wales M.L.I.R Michigan State University L.L.B. University of Ghana

ARTICLE Ofori-Dankwa, J., & Julian, S.D. (Wayne State University). (2011). Utilizing an integrative multi-lens model to explain firm performance in emerging "double void" economie. International Studies in Management & Organization, 41(2), 5-27.

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Hong Y. Park Professor of Economics Appointed to SVSU in 1975 Ph.D. Utah State University M.B.A. Fairleigh Dickenson University M.A. Seoul National University B.A. Kyung Hee University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Park, H.Y., Chang, H., & Misra, K. (2011, August). The impact of mortgage securitization on housing bubble and subprime mortgage crisis: A self-organization perspective. Paper presented at the KDI Journal of Economic Policy Conference, Korea Development Institute, Seoul, Korea. The current subprime mortgage crisis has been analyzed from many different perspectives. The securitization of subprime mortgages has emerged as the leading cause of the subprime mortgage crisis. This securitization is a complex process that involves a number of different players (Ashcraft and Schuerman, 2008).Securitization of subprime mortgages which are a part of mortgage-backed securities (MBSs) also led to further complexity by the introduction of collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and credit default swaps (CDSs). MBSs, CDOs and CDSs became sources of adverse selection and moral hazard which have contributed significantly to the current subprime mortgage crisis. Our study investigates the impact of securitization of mortgages on mortgage rates, the housing bubble and the subprime mortgage crisis. The study found that securitization of mortgages has an inverse relationship with mortgage rates and securitization of subprime mortgages triggered the housing bubble in 1995. We found that an application of the self-organization in biology and thermodynamics to the analysis of the current housing bubble provides a better understanding of the current subprime mortgage crisis. Park, H.Y., Chang, H., & Lee, S.K. (2011). Ideation as a practice for knowledge creation and protection. The International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, 10(7), 13-32. This paper reviews literature on the nature of knowledge and knowledge creation. The review of literature identifies issues that need to be resolved

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in knowledge creation. The paper, then, examines ideation, one of the emerging knowledge creation practices. The paper is to study how knowledge creation practices address theoretical issues and evaluates ideation from the theoretical perspective of knowledge creation. We found ideation elicits individuals‘ tacit knowledge and serves as a facilitator of knowledge creation. The paper is useful for knowledge managers to identify issues in knowledge creation and can also be useful in designing a better knowledge creating practice. The paper attempts to build a bridge between theories and practices. Interactions between theories and practices can offer insight on the application of theories to practices and help improve both theories and practices.

GRANT Park, H.Y., Goggins, K.M., Misra, K., & Reddy, S. SVSU Family Business Research Grant. $15,000, March 2011 – February 2013.

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Mark Potts Assistant Dean, College of Business and Management Appointed to SVSU in 2009 J.D. Thomas M. Cooley Law School B.G.S. University of Michigan

ARTICLE Potts, M., & Puia, G.M. (2011). Entrepreneurship in the European Union: Unified is not uniform. International Journal of E-entrepreneurship and Innovation, 2(3), 11-22. Entrepreneurship research posits that high potential new firms are the leading source of employment growth (Acs et al., 2008), wealth creation (Venkataraman, 1997), and economic development (EC, 1999). The European Union‘s Lisbon Strategy recognized the significant role of entrepreneurs in creating employment (EC, 2000). The authors posit that a Unified Europe‖ is not the same as a ―Uniform Europe.‖ Using states in the United States as a comparative unit of analysis, the authors demonstrate ways in which differences in endowments (e.g., human capital, support for entrepreneurship, and regulatory environment) dynamically influence entrepreneurial outcomes. This analysis identifies challenges faced by local entrepreneurs in the context of Europe 2020.

BOOK CHAPTERS Potts, M. (2011). TESY: Exporting in an uncertain environment. In D. Welsh & S. Carraher (Eds.), Case studies in global entrepreneurship (pp. 78-82). Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt. Potts, M., & Puia, G.M. (2011). Fuel Jet Pro: Developing a market strategy. In D. Welsh & S. Carraher (Eds.), Case studies in global entrepreneurship (pp. 153-161). Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt. Fuel Jet Pro (FJP) is a case study on market entry strategies in an emerging market context. FJP is a designer and manufacturer of automotive fuel injection systems. Like many firms in the auto industry, they see China as the market of the future. FJP‘s managers are divided as to which of two entry strategies that they should pursue. The first

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alternative was to develop a joint venture with a Chinese firm, the second was to build and operate their own factory in China. They need to decide on an entry strategy and do it in a way that preserves team unity.

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George M. Puia Associate Dean, College of Business and Management/ Dow Chemical Company Centennial Chair in Global Business Appointed to SVSU in 1999 Ph.D. University of Kansas M.S. National - Louis University B.S. Edison State College

ARTICLES Puia, G.M. & Potts, M. (2011). Entrepreneurship in the European Union: Unified is not uniform. International Journal of E-entrepreneurship and Innovation, 2(3), 11-22. Entrepreneurship research posits that high potential new firms are the leading source of employment growth (Acs et al., 2008), wealth creation (Venkataraman, 1997), and economic development (EC, 1999). The European Union‘s Lisbon Strategy recognized the significant role of entrepreneurs in creating employment (EC, 2000). The authors posit that a ―Unified Europe‖ is not the same as a ―Uniform Europe.‖ Using states in the United States as a comparative unit of analysis, the authors demonstrate ways in which differences in endowments (e.g., human capital, support for entrepreneurship, and regulatory environment) dynamically influence entrepreneurial outcomes. This analysis identifies challenges faced by local entrepreneurs in the context of Europe 2020. Puia, G.M. (2011). An integrative approach to disruptive innovation strategy. Advances in Global Business Research, 2(8), 531-544. Disruptive innovation strategy (DIS) is an approach for new ventures facing difficult entry barriers. By definition, a disruptive innovation strategy interrupts the equilibrium of existing markets and shifts the basis of competition by exploiting new customer value propositions. New ventures attempt to create and introduce a superior solution to a customer‘s need in ways that minimize or eliminate barriers of reputation, scale, experience, foreignness or newness. Since incumbents have greater resources than market entrants and can retaliate against smaller start-up firms, new ventures must have a combination of strategy and technology to overcome barriers. Scholars disagree as to the antecedent conditions of DIS and the type of strategic responses they stimulate. An integrated approach to DIS

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could lead to both better theory development and more effective application. This paper seeks to add to the literature by developing an integrated approach to disruptive innovation strategy in new ventures.

AWARD Dr. Puia was named a Fellow of The Association for Global Business Advancement at its annual conference in Dalian, China, September 17, 2011. The AGBA Fellow is a distinguished life achievement award given in recognition of a scholar‘s total body of work.

BOOK CHAPTERS Puia, G.M., Simendinger, E. (University of Tampa) and Jasperson, M. (2011), A transição de Carreira da Gerência para a Docência, in Klimkik, Z.M. ed., Transformaçõs e Transições nas carrereiras, Rio de Janeiro: Quality Mark. This article explains the challenges faced when management-practitioners decide to enter the academic environment and teach. The framework for the paper begins with the explanation of a basic model associated with cultural transition. They identify three success factors for transition: task success; social interaction; and cultural understanding and awareness and develop strategies for each. The dual themes of the article are to reinforce the usefulness of practitioners into academia and to help smooth the environmental transition for practitioner-academicians (PAs) by developing strategies for success. This is the first publication of this research in Portuguese. Puia, G.M., & Leaver, H. (2011). Regional diversification. In I. Zuckerberg (Ed.), The Mid-Michigan region: Challenges, responses, the future (pp. 187-194). East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press. Many of the challenges posed by Michigan's economy stem from its lack of diversification. For many years, as went Detroit and its auto industry, so went the state. Under the Mid-Michigan U.S. Department of Labor's Workforce Innovation for Regional Economic Development (WIRED) proposal, Saginaw Valley State University and its partners proposed a three-pronged approach to diversifying the regional economy: entrepreneurship, cluster development, and business diversification. The chapter identifies lessons learned under the WIRED program and makes

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recommendations for future regional economic development directions. Puia, G.M., & Potts, M. (2011). Fuel Jet Pro: Developing a market strategy. In D. Welsh & S. Carraher (Eds.), Case studies in global entrepreneurship (pp. 153-161). Dubuque, IA: Kendall-Hunt. Fuel Jet Pro (FJP) is a case study on market entry strategies in an emerging market context. FJP is a designer and manufacturer of automotive fuel injection systems. Like many firms in the auto industry, they see China as the market of the future. FJP‘s managers are divided as to which of two entry strategies that they should pursue. The first alternative was to develop a joint venture with a Chinese firm, the second was to build and operate their own factory in China. They need to decide on an entry strategy and do it in a way that preserves team unity.

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C. Surender Reddy Professor of Management Appointed to SVSU in 1999 Ph.D. Case Western Reserve University M.B.A. Osmania University M.S. Case Western Reserve University B.S. Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Reddy, C.S., & Surfield, C.J., (2011, November). Mass layoffs, manufacturing and business climate rankings: Do labor regulations matter. Presented at the Southern Economics Association Annual meeting, Washington, D.C. In an examination of data extracted from the Mass Layoffs Statistics and the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages over the 2005 to 2009 time period, we evaluate the effect that a state's business climate has on the mitigation of job losses attributable to a mass layoffs. We adopt multiple dimensions to measure a state's business climate, such as Rightto-Work status and the Forbes Best States for Business rankings. We find that state business climates have little effect in preventing the loss of manufacturing jobs attributable to mass layoff events. Our multivariate estimates suggest that adopting more pro-business policies does not materially affect a state‘s rate of manufacturing job loss, while having higher than average rates of unionization and output growth do. Our results are robust to the various methods used to measures how friendly a state is to business.

GRANT Reddy, C.S., Goggins, K.M., Misra, K., & Park, H.Y. SVSU Family Business Research Grant. $15,000, March 2011 – February 2013.

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Rhonda Ross Assistant Professor of Law Appointed to SVSU in 2008 J.D. Wayne State University M.S. Wayne State University B.S. Wayne State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Ross, R. (2011, June). Criminal prosecution of the asbestos NESHAP: Are the provisions for category II asbestos containing materials void for vagueness. Paper presented and published in Proceedings of the International Air & Waste Management Association at the International Air & Waste Management Association Annual Conference, Orlando, FL.

PANEL PRESENTATION Ross, R. (2011, June). The clean air act: Update on legal issues. Panel presentation at the International Air & Waste Management Association Annual Conference, Orlando, FL.

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Sam Sarkar Professor of Economics Appointed to SVSU in 1969 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. Ranchi University B.S. Ranchi University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Sarkar, S., & Misra, K. (2011, July). Determinants of firm formation: An international perspective. Paper presented at The 86th Annual Western Economic Association International Conference, San Diego, CA. The purpose of this paper is to examine the associated factors which determine the business formation around the European countries. The panel data are used for 15 countries from 2003 to 2006 in this paper. This paper finds significant relationships between days of firm formation and lending interest rates, start-up procedures, taxes and per capita gross domestic product. This analysis demonstrates that formation of a new business in a country is significantly associated with country‘s institutional factors. Hence, to encourage business formation policy makers should develop business friendly institutional tools which will increase interests and capabilities of entrepreneurs to form new businesses.

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Danilo Sirias Professor of Management Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. University of Memphis M.S. University of Memphis B.S. National University of Engineering, Nicaragua

ARTICLE Sirias, D. (2011, Summer). An academic look at the Michigan Sugar Company piling operations. The Newsbeet, 25(2), 8-9. Retrieved from http://www.michigansugar.com/documents/newsbeet/summer11.pdf

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Sirias, D. (2011, August). Using problem solving maps to improve studentsâ€&#x; math skills. Paper presented at the Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics 61st Annual Conference, Macomb, MI. Sirias, D. (2011, November). Using problem-solving maps to improve math education. Paper presented at the Theory of Constraints for Education International Conference, Plock, Poland. Sirias, D., & Savoy, S. (2011, November). Improving patient flow in emergency departments by incorporating a system-wide priority system. Paper presented at the Decision Sciences Institute National meeting, Boston, MA. Sirias, D., & Hoffman, J. (2011, May). Designing a process for teaching the main QFD matrix in the classroom. Paper presented at the Production and Operations Management Society, Reno, NV. Sirias, D., & Hoffman, J. (2011, May). Quality of Work is not Quality of Service. Paper presented at the Production and Operations Management Society, Reno, NV.

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Christopher Surfield Associate Professor of Economics Appointed to SVSU in 2006 Ph.D. University of Southern Carolina - Columbia B.S. Susquehanna University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Surfield, C.J., & Reddy, C.S. (2011, November). Mass layoffs, manufacturing and business climate rankings: Do labor regulations matter. Presented at the Southern Economics Association Annual meeting, Washington, D.C. In an examination of data extracted from the Mass Layoffs Statistics and the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages over the 2005 to 2009 time period, we evaluate the effect that a state's business climate has on the mitigation of job losses attributable to a mass layoffs. We adopt multiple dimensions to measure a state's business climate, such as Rightto-Work status and the Forbes Best States for Business rankings. We find that state business climates have little effect in preventing the loss of manufacturing jobs attributable to mass layoff events. Our multivariate estimates suggest that adopting more pro-business policies does not materially affect a state‘s rate of manufacturing job loss, while having higher than average rates of unionization and output growth do. Our results are robust to the various methods used to measures how friendly a state is to business. Surfield, C.J. (2011, July). Government mandates and atypical work: An investigation of right-to-work states. Presented at the Western Economics Association International Conference, San Diego, CA. Atypical work forms, such as contract, on-call, or temporary work, have been criticized as providing employers with a means to circumvent government-mandated employment protections. In such cases, we would expect to see a lower prevalence of such work in right-to-work states relative to union-shop states. We test for this possibility using data from supplements to the 1995 to 2005 Current Population Surveys. Our empirical results provide a degree of support for this contention as we see

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significantly lower overall fractions of atypical work in right-to-work states than we do in agency- or union-shop states.

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Gail Sype Associate Professor of Management Appointed to SVSU in 1990 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.B.A. University of Michigan B.A. Western Michigan University

ARTICLE Sype, G. (2011). We have built it but they have not come: Preliminary assessment of a minor in entrepreneurship. Journal of Behavioral and Applied Management, 12(3), 217-228.

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Jill L. Wetmore Associate Professor of Accounting Dean, College of Business and Management Professor of Finance Appointed to SVSU in 1981 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.B.A. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Knox College

ARTICLE Wetmore, J., & Chukwuogor, C. (Eastern Connecticut State University). (2011). Market discipline of financial institutions and the crisis of 20072008. North American Journal of Finance and Banking Research, 5(5), 112. We determine if participation in risky mortgages by financial institutions (FIs) prior to and including the period of 2007-08 impacted systematic risk of their stocks risk of their stocks which would affect the required rate of return. We examine the stocks of 59 banks and thrifts rated by American Banker as having the largest amounts of first mortgages on their balance sheets as of December 31, 2006. A GARCH model is used to determine if systematic risk changes over the time studied. We find systematic risk increases each year during the entire period studied (2004-2008) for stock returns of thrifts and to a lesser extent for stock returns of regional banks. Stock returns of large banks show a decline is change in systematic risk in 2005 and 2007. In the case of foreign bank stock returns, systematic risk declines during the years (2004-2005) and shows no significant change in 2006-2008. This suggest that systematic risk is impacted for thrifts and regional banks prior to the crisis but not for large banks until the time of the crisis. In the case of foreign banks, there is no change in systematic risk in 2008 and a decline in 2004 and 2005.

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College of Education Saginaw Valley State University College of Education teacher certification, graduate, specialist, endorsement, and special education approval programs are designed to provide quality educational opportunities for teachers and school leaders. In the College of Education, you will find knowledgeable faculty in small classes, scheduled at convenient times and locations for working professionals. We strive to provide links between research and desirable practices in all courses. We have strong field-based undergraduate programs with professors in classrooms mentoring students and evaluating lessons before student teaching. Our faculty have taught in P12 settings and bring those experiences with them to the classroom. To give our students a competitive edge, we have an excellent reputation for producing exceptional graduates in our many programs of study with an emphasis on best practice. We have strong partnerships with K-12 school districts, both in the Great Lakes Bay Region and around our branch campuses in Macomb and St. Clair County. At the undergraduate level, we have study abroad programs to Italy for our early childhood minors and India for all teacher education students. We provide outreach services through our Literacy and our Math/Science Centers.

Susie B. Emond, Ed.D., Dean College of Education

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Gary G. Abud Adjunct Faculty of Teacher Education-Middle/Secondary Appointed to SVSU in 2010 M.A.T. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Wayne State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Abud, G.G. (2011, July). “For Every” speak: A cognitive approach to teaching, dimensional analysis, unit conversions, and stoichiometry. Presented at the International CHEM Ed Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Abud, G.G. (2011, July). Making thinking visible: Using whiteboarding in the chemistry classroom. Presented at the International CHEM Ed Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Abud, G.G. (2011, July). Before, change, after (BCA) tables. Presented at the International CHEM Ed Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Abud, G.G. (2011, July). The density dunk: A problem-based learning approach to teaching the density concept. Presented at the International CHEM Ed Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Abud, G.G. (2011, November). A modeling approach to teaching Archimedes‟ principle & buoyant force. Presented at the Metro Detroit Science Teachers Association Annual Conference, Madison Heights, MI.

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David M. Callejo Pérez Carl A. Gerstacker Endowed Chair in Education Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ed.D. Florida International University M.A. University of Mississippi B.A. Florida International University

ARTICLES Callejo Pérez, D. (2011). What I learned on the road to Mississauga: Democracy and curriculum. In D. Flinders & P. Uhrmacher (Eds.), Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue 13 (1) (pp. 3-10). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. The essay is the Presidential Address from the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum‘s Conference in 2010. The essay posits that the current anger and acrimonious behavior toward higher education, especially degrees and tenure, stems from a building attack where the anti-intellectual political elements have become emboldened in a myopic view that sees the US as ―losing its values‖ where Civil Rights, equity, and political access are seen as ―European‖ and Liberal is a bad word. The conclusion of the essay asks that we examine these attacks as similar to the re-emerging fascist political movements now seizing power in Europe and examine if we are become a fractured nation. The importance of this for higher educations comes from the belief by the right that universities are places where anti-American behavior is taught. Callejo Pérez, D., & Swan Dagen, A. (West Virginia University). (2011). Teachers as decision makers: Narratives of power in an era of standards. Imagens da Educação, 1(1), 29-35. Doi: 10.4025/imagenseduc.v1i1.12348 In this article, we present a narrative of the journey of teachers who were leaders in their classrooms by working with the community and parents to help urban minority children navigate the school culture and testing in the era of NCLB. Interviews occurred between 2006 and 2008. Approved by West Virginia University IRB 2006.

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BOOK CHAPTERS Callejo Pérez, D. (2011). Dr. William McKinley Robinson (1948-1950). In O. Davis Jr. & M. Spearman (Eds.), A century of leadership: Biographies of Kappa Delta Pi presidents (pp. 43-57). Washington, D.C.: Kappa Delta Pi. A biography of William McKinley Robinson, President of Kappa Delta Pi from 1948-1950, who was influential in working to establish teacher education programs for rural education, increased access to services for rural schools, and generally regarded as one the champions of rural education. The book was commissioned by Kappa Delta Pi in celebration th of its 100 year. Callejo Pérez, D. (2011). Una historia critica de la epistemología del liderazgo intellectual en la educación. In A. Hernanduez Ulloa (Ed.), Epistemología y Formación Nuevos Horizontes para la Investigación Educativa (pp. 289-309). Guanjuato, Mexico: Universidad de Guanajuato. A theoretical analysis of the epistemology of intellectual leadership in education that considers the failure of teacher education and leadership education to the address basic sociological needs in programs that have led to the failure of K-12 education in the US to change society including understandings of race, class, and gender that are at the crux of the increased gap among minorities, the poor and the wealthy in the US. The paper was originally presented as a keynote in a conference on education, diversity and leadership in 2009, Guanajuato, Mexico as a keynote address.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Callejo Pérez, D. (2011, November). Transformational change and schools: Re-thinking leadership in schools as curriculum reform. Paper presented at the University Council for Educational Administration, Pittsburgh, PA. This paper is a philosophical analysis of how to Colleges of Education in the US have become embroiled in an anti-intellectual curriculum in preparing teachers and school leaders without thinking about the role and impact of research. Building on research that demonstrates that the failure of Colleges of Education lies in the inability of its faculty to conduct research—stemming from their own education in subpar doctoral programs that are not housed in research universities—that is at the core

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of change. The paper concludes that advanced graduate programs of education should be limited to research universities. Callejo Pérez, D. (2011, October). The future of the professoriate: The last th years of the doctorate. Paper presented at The 18 Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. This paper examines the current issues in higher education by critiquing the over-production of doctorates, especially by for-profit schools (i.e., University of Phoenix or Capella University) and degree mills (i.e., Central Michigan University or Illinois State University) on the one hand and by certain majors (i.e., Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education) on the other whose students have flooded the market and caused a devaluation of the degree as well as played a part in the reduction of tenure line faculty at Universities causing irreparable damage to the professoriate. Callejo Pérez, D., Clark, L., Gould, J., Hillman, S., & Sparapani, E. (2011, October). A global curriculum? Understanding teaching and learning in the U.S, Taiwan, India, and Mexico: A panel discussion. Presented at the 18th Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. This panel is a collaboration among educators from the Saginaw Valley State University College of Education who examined the similarities and differences among teacher, classroom, and professional education in India, Mexico, and Taiwan in an attempt to draw parallels to education in the United States and inform why and how practice has changed across the world over the last several years. Callejo Pérez, D. (2011, April). Walking with James Meredith: A personal journey of identity at Ole Miss. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. This is an auto-narrative about how the author learned about the long battle for equality at Ole Miss while a student and how that history informed and led to the author‘s seminal and award winning historical work on southern desegregation and schools in the South: Southern hospitality: Identity, schools, and the civil rights movement in Mississippi, 1964-1972 (2001 from Peter Lang).

GRANT Callejo Pérez, D., Dorne, C. (Principal Investigator), Aimar, C., Daly, S., Morgan, S., & Wilson, S. Project PASS (Promoting Success for All

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Students), King-Chavez-Parks Select Student Support Services grant #38-1798800. KCP Initiative of the Michigan Department of Career Development, $684,000, November 2011 to September 2017. Grant received over six years aimed at improving the retention of economically and academically disadvantaged students by providing 145 freshman participants per year intensive academic skill development and social and cultural exposure within three components. Those components are 1) a transition component to assist student in bridging the major thresholds of the college experience to ensure academic success and persistence to graduation; 2) Learning Communities, and 3) tutor training, especially in Writing and Math/Science. These three components will form a synergistic unit to facilitate the development of appropriate academic skills among participating students through personal, academic and career counseling; academic tutoring; remedial instruction; study skills support; cultural events; access to financial aid assistance; academic advisement; and leadership and life skills development. The project will identify a sample of high-risk, high need freshmen students, considering factors such as ACT score, first generation-in-college, and Pell eligibility. Student mentors will encourage students‘ participation in extracurricular activities, such as student organizations, volunteer service, and other forms of campus engagement. A key feature of the student success program is MAP-Works, an online case management system to track referrals and closely follow up with the students in the program. This initiative will also include a sample of high school-age students participating in the Great Lakes Bay Early College program where they can attend college courses and receive college credit prior to graduating high school. The project will also collaborate to a degree with the existing GEAR-UP grant (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs), a bridge program for incoming freshmen offered by SVSU\‘s Office of Diversity Programs. The project will involve extensive data collection, analyses, and assessment.

PANEL PRESENTATIONS Callejo PĂŠrez, D. (2011, October). A retrospective panel on curriculum and theory in the last 20 years: The work of Peter Hlebowitz. An invited panel presented at The 18th Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. In this panel, I presented a response to the work of Peter Hlebowitz, one of the most prolific scholars in curriculum, addressing his ability to question many of the practices of curriculum design practiced in schools. I

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responded to his work which is critical of post-modern scholars and their historical approach to school and curriculum history. Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Cline, D., Millar, D., Mosley, T., & Munoz, T. (2011, April). Policy development and sustainability: Maximizing resources through collaboration and managed change. Panel presentation at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Cline, D., Millar, D., Mosley, T., & Munoz, T. (2011, April). A year on the east side: Impact and change of federal education policies in Saginaw, Michigan. Panel presentation at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. These two panel presentations were around the discussion on the yearlong work process to become involved with Saginaw Public Schools, first analyzing the negotiations about access and trust and second about how we decided on outcomes: 1) student math and science courses being offered at two K-8 Schools and 2) the short-term gains that created long-term friendships for participants but yielded little in research.

REPORT Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Paquette, N. (SVSU student), & Vasold, K. (SVSU student) (2011). Saginaw County, Michigan: Community report card. Report commissioned by Alliance Saginaw and the Saginaw Community Foundation. Retrievable from http://www.alignmentsaginawcountyreport.org/community-report.html The 2011 Saginaw County Community Report Card is a single, comprehensive and interactive document that encompasses important and key indicators that can help describe community conditions relative to children and families, education, economic growth, health and lifestyles, community safety, environmental conditions, and community civic engagement. The information within the document can be used to educate and inform local, state, federal, and private and public interests, planning efforts and policy decisions about Saginaw County. Goals can become measurable outcomes that can determine the direction of the County, help monitor progress, the impact of community projects, and policy decisions that help service providers improve, coordinate, and analyze service delivery to residents of Saginaw County.

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Lacreta M. Clark Associate Professor of Advanced Educational Studies Appointed to SVSU in 2003 Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, Urbana University Ph.D. University of Dayton M.S. Wright State University B.S. Wright State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Clark, L.M. (2011, May). School, family, community partnerships: Collaboration that counts! Presentation at The 7th Annual Central State University Faculty Institute, Wilberforce, OH. Clark, L.M. (2011, June). School, family, community partnerships: Collaboration that counts! Presentation at The 2nd Annual Great Lakes Bay Leadership Institute, University Center, MI. Clark, L.M. (2011, October). Life trajectories as a reflective tool for women in educational leadership. Paper presented at The 25th Annual Women in Leadership Conference, Lincoln, NE.

PANEL PRESENTATION Clark, L.M., Callejo Pérez, D., Gould, J., Hillman, S., & Sparapani, E. (2011, October). A global curriculum? Understanding teaching and learning in the U.S, Taiwan, India, and Mexico: A panel discussion. th Presented at the 18 Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. While educators recognize that teaching and learning are complex activities evolving from social and cultural contexts, pressure is mounting to be internationally competitive. In this panel, the panelists relate a global and responsive discussion of internationalization in education through comparative analyses of current educational discourse in the U.S., Mexico, India, and Taiwan. Each member of the panel contributed a paper [cited below] to identify the structure of education in these nations to develop and relate concepts that offer ―perspective‖ in understanding the

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complex relationships between nations and relations of education and the state. [Paper] In the last decade, the United States educational system has undergone significant changes with nationally developed standards that advocate standards-based education reform, particularly in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), as well as English Language Arts. These nationally developed standards provide a framework for student learning and assessment – what students should know and be able to do. To this end, there have been common goals and standards developed for Math, English Language Arts, and Technology Education, and these standards have been adopted by many of the states. However, science has not yet created one set of common goals and standards, but rather two. Despite the adoption of common goals, there still remain questions about how these goals translate to educational and instructional practices in the classroom for all students.

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David Cline Associate Professor of Teacher Education-Elementary/Special Education Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. Indiana University B.S. University of Indianapolis

PANEL PRESENTATIONS Cline, D., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Millar, D., Mosley, T., & Munoz, T. (2011, April). Policy development and sustainability: Maximizing resources through collaboration and managed change. Panel presentation at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. Cline, D., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Millar, D., Mosley, T., & Munoz, T. (2011, April). A year on the east side: Impact and change of federal education policies in Saginaw, Michigan. Panel presentation at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. These two panel presentations were around the discussion on the yearlong work process to become involved with Saginaw Public Schools, first analyzing the negotiations about access and trust and second about how we decided on outcomes: 1) student math and science courses being offered at two K-8 Schools and 2) the short-term gains that created long-term friendships for participants but yielded little in research.

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Jonathon A. Gould Assistant Professor of Teacher Education-Middle/Secondary Fieldwork Coordinator Secondary Field Placements Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. Central Michigan University Ed.S. Saginaw Valley State University M.Ed. Saginaw Valley State University B.S. Wayne State University

ARTICLE Gould, J.A. (2011). Does it really take a village to raise a child (or just a parent?): An examination of the relationship between the members of the residence of a middle-school student and the student‘s satisfaction with school. Education, 132(1), 28-38.

PANEL PRESENTATION Gould, J.A., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Clark, L., Hillman, S., & Sparapani, E. (2011, October). A global curriculum? Understanding teaching and learning in the U.S, Taiwan, India, and Mexico: A panel discussion. Presented at The 18th Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. This panel is a collaboration among educators from the Saginaw Valley State University College of Education who examined the similarities and differences among teacher, classroom, and professional education in India, Mexico, and Taiwan in an attempt to draw parallels to education in the United States and inform why and how practice has changed across the world over the last several years.

PAPER Gould, J.A. (2011). A global curriculum? Understanding teaching and learning in the U.S, Taiwan, India, and Mexico. Paper presented at The th 18 Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO.

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PRESENTATIONS Gould, J.A. (2011, June). Content literacy strategies: An American perspective. Presented to the faculty and staff of the Kittur Rani Channamma Residential Sanik School for Girls, Kittur, India. Gould, J.A. (2011, August). Understanding the common core state standards initiative for mathematics. Presented as part of professional development for mathematics teachers, grades 6-12, CĂŠsar ChĂĄvez Academy, Detroit, MI. Gould, J.A. (2011, October). Understanding the common core state standards initiative for content literacy strategies across the curriculum. Presented as part of professional development for teachers, grades 5-8, Meridian Junior High School, Sanford, MI.

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Elizabeth Hansen Professor and Chair, Department of Advanced Educational Studies Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. Central Michigan University M.A. Central Michigan University B.A. Western Michigan University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Hansen, E., Hansen, J., & Tapp, A., (2011, March). The use of ecollaboration in educational technology and development courses at Saginaw Valley State University. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Nashville, TN.

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Susan L. Hillman Professor of Teacher Education-Elementary/Special Education Appointed to SVSU in 1999 Ph.D. University of Delaware M.A. Michigan State University B.A. Alma College

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Hillman, S.L., Callejo Pérez, D., Clark, L., Gould, J., & Sparapani, E. (2011, October). A global curriculum? Understanding teaching and learning in the U.S, Taiwan, India, and Mexico: A panel discussion. Presented at The 18th Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. This panel is a collaboration among educators from the Saginaw Valley State University College of Education who examined the similarities and differences among teacher, classroom, and professional education in India, Mexico, and Taiwan in an attempt to draw parallels to education in the United States and inform why and how practice has changed across the world over the last several years. Each member of the panel contributed a paper [cited below] to identify the structure of education in these nations to develop and relate concepts that offer ―perspective‖ in understanding the complex relationships between nations and relations of education and the state. [Paper] Experiencing ways of teaching mathematics in rural and urban India provide an opportunity to examine one‘s own teaching practices. Dimensions of culture provide different lenses to view how international teaching experiences inform and shape practices in mathematics teacher education in the U.S. As research suggests, teaching and learning mathematics as a cultural activity provides a broader and deeper perspective on teaching practices. While international studies and comparisons provide evidence of trends, this paper uses personal experiences with mathematics teachers from India to present a sharper image of what it means to teach mathematics through making sense of different teaching methods in the contexts in which they are used and the role of language in teaching and learning mathematics.

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Hillman, S.L., Beckman, S. (University of Georgia), Moskowitz, S. (Humboldt State University), & Stein, R. (Professor Emeritus, California State University San Bernardino). (2011, January). International teaching experiences informing and shaping our practices in teacher education. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, Irvine, CA. Experiencing and sharing ways of teaching mathematics in schools around the world provide an opportunity to examine our own teaching practices as a cultural activity. Hofstede‘s (2004) five ―dimensions of culture‖ (power distance, individualism, rigidity of gender roles, uncertainty avoidance, and long/short term orientation), long a critical tool of international business, remain largely unused in education. These dimensions will provide different lenses to view how our international teaching experiences have informed and shaped our practices in mathematics teacher education. The ways these international teaching experiences impact the teaching and learning of our teacher education students will be shared, including how we make sense of different teaching methods, and explicit use of mathematical language when communicating with others whose first language is not English.

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Debra Lively Professor of Teacher Education-Elementary/Special Education Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. Michigan State University B.A. Michigan State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Lively, D., Clark, K. (University of Texas at Dallas), Lawrence, C. (Indiana School for the Deaf), & Sullivan, C. (Georgia Pines). (2011, February). Systems jigsaw: Providing deaf/hard of hearing specific family-focused services within a state systemsâ€&#x; context. Paper presented at The 10th Annual Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Conference (EDHI), Atlanta, GA. Lively, D., & Tapp, A. (2011, April). The role of technology and reflective practice. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Conference (AERA), New Orleans, LA. Lively, D., & Tapp, A. (2011, April). Enriching language through science exploration for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Paper presented at the Council for Exceptional Children Convention & Expo (CEC), National Harbor, MD. Lively, D. (2011, April). Strategies to enhance language in natural environments. Paper presented at Michigan Division of Early Childhood Annual Conference (MIDEC), Mt. Pleasant, MI. Lively, D., & Pittman, P. (Utah State University). (2011, May). Beyond SKI HI: Supporting children who are deaf/hard of hearing and their family. Paper presented at the Infant and Early Childhood Conference, Tacoma, WA.

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Dorothy Millar Professor of Educational Technology and Development Appointed to SVSU in 2000 Ph.D. University of Illinois M.Ed. University of Illinois B.A. University of California

PANEL PRESENTATIONS Millar, D., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Cline, D., Mosley, T., & Munoz, T. (2011, April). Policy development and sustainability: Maximizing resources through collaboration and managed change. Panel presentation at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. Millar, D., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Cline, D., Mosley, T., & Munoz, T. (2011, April). A year on the east side: Impact and change of federal education policies in Saginaw, Michigan. Panel presentation at the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA. These two panel presentations were around the discussion on the yearlong work process to become involved with Saginaw Public Schools, first analyzing the negotiations about access and trust and second about how we decided on outcomes: 1) student math and science courses being offered at two K-8 Schools and 2) the short-term gains that created long-term friendships for participants but yielded little in research.

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Deborah L. Smith Associate Professor of Teacher Education-Middle/Secondary Appointed to SVSU in 2003 Ed.D. Montana State University M.A. Northern Arizona University B.A. University of Michigan Flint

ARTICLE Smith, D.L., Sparapani, E.F., & Seo, B. (Chicago State University) (2011). Crossing borders by ‗walking around‘ culture: Three ethnographic reflections. Issues in Teacher Education, 20(2), 53-66.

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Ervin F. Sparapani Professor of Teacher Education-Middle/Secondary Appointed to SVSU in 1985 Ph.D. University of Michigan M.A. Eastern Michigan University B.S. Northern Michigan University

ARTICLES Sparapani, E.F., & Ross McClain, P.L. (2011). Understanding cultural diversity: An analysis of the influence on middle grades teachers. The Journal of Multiculturalism in Education, 7(1), 1-16. Retrieved from http://www.wtamu.edu/webres/File/Journals/MCJ/Volume 7-4/Sparapani Understanding Cultural Diversity.pdf This study explored the changes that occurred in middle grades teachers when they ―got to know‖ and came to understand a family of a different culture or race. Three objectives were addressed: middle grades teachers would develop a relationship with a family unit that was culturally/racially different from them; the relationship would go beyond mere textbook learning; the teachers would change their classroom practice. Thirty-five middle grades teachers and thirty-five families were involved. Teachers kept a journal record of all interactions. Results verified the objectives. Also, four common themes emerged: to make assumption about families based solely on race or ethnicity was inappropriate; communicate with families appropriately; education about sex, substance abuse, and societal norms and mores was important; the influence of peer pressure. This study documented that for teachers to truly understand the diversity of their students, they must also understand their students‘ families. Sparapani, E.F., Seo, B. (Chicago State University), & Smith, D.L. (2011). Crossing borders by ‗walking around‘ culture: Three ethnographic reflections. Issues in Teacher Education, 20(2), 53-66.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Sparapani, E.F. (2011, March). „One-size-fits-all‟ curriculum and its effect on teaching and learning. Invited keynote at the 2011 International

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Conference and Workshop on TEFL & Applied Linguistics, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan.

PRESENTATIONS Sparapani, E.F. (2011, May). The nature of instruction. Presented to the faculty and staff in the departments of Applied Chinese and Applied English, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan. Sparapani, E.F. (2011, July). Cross-cultural communication: Learning to cross cultural boundaries. Presented to students of Xiamen University, China, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan.

PANEL PRESENTATION Sparapani, E.F., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., Clark, L., Gould, J., & Hillman, S. (2011, October). A global curriculum? Understanding teaching and learning in the U.S, Taiwan, India, and Mexico: A panel discussion. Presented at The 18th Annual Conference of the American Association for Teaching and Curriculum, Denver, CO. This panel is a collaboration among educators from the Saginaw Valley State University College of Education who examined the similarities and differences among teacher, classroom, and professional education in India, Mexico, and Taiwan in an attempt to draw parallels to education in the United States and inform why and how practice has changed across the world over the last several years.

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Anne R. Tapp Professor of Educational Technology and Development Appointed to SVSU in 2002 Ed.D. Wayne State University M.A. Oakland University B.S. Central Michigan University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Tapp, A., Hansen, E., & Hansen, J. (2011, March). The use of ecollaboration in educational technology and development courses at Saginaw Valley State University. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Nashville, TN. Tapp, A., & Lively, D. (2011, April). The role of technology and reflective practice. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Conference (AERA), New Orleans, LA. Tapp, A., & Lively, D. (2011, April). Enriching language through science exploration for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Paper presented at the Council for Exceptional Children Convention & Expo (CEC), National Harbor, MD. Tapp, A. (2011, November). The role of technology in reflective practice. Paper presented at the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Annual Conference, Orlando, FL. Tapp, A., & Lively, D. (2011, November). The state mandated integration of early childhood special education into an existing early childhood university program: One universityâ€&#x;s response. Paper presented at the National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators (NAECTE) Annual Conference, Orlando, FL.

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Gardner Umbarger Associate Professor of Teacher Education-Elementary/Special Education Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. University of Kansas M.Ed. Lynchburg College B.A. Washington and Lee University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Umbarger, G. (2011, November). Preparing teacher candidates to support the educational needs of students with multiple disabilities. Paper presented at The 34st Annual Conference, Council for Exceptional Children, Teacher Education Division, Austin, TX.

POSTER SESSION Umbarger, G. (2011, November). Preparing professionals to work with low-incidence disabilities. Paper presented at the 2011 OCALI Conference and Exposition, Columbus, OH.

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Vetta Vratulis Assistant Professor of Teacher Education-Elementary/Special Education Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. University of British Columbia M.A. University of British Columbia

ARTICLES Vratulis, V.K., & Morton, C. (University of British Columbia) (2011). A case study exploring the use of GarageBandTM and an electronic bulletin board in pre-service music education. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 11(4), 1-17. This qualitative research study is an exploration of the merit and shortcomings of using a combination of the music software GarageBand™ and an electronic bulletin board to facilitate musical and peer learning in a 3-month elementary music methods curriculum and instruction course. A pedagogical objective of this assignment was to increase the interaction among pre-service teachers for the purpose of improving the following: (a) their understanding of musical vernacular, genres, and cultures; (b) their appreciation of the relationships among personal, social, and cultural identities; and (c) an introduction to digital learning technologies as a platform for community building. Specifically, sharing their playlists online (as well as their thoughts, feelings, and images about these musical selections) encouraged reflective practice and a process of peer learning, providing opportunities for students to learn about their peers and broaden their participation in a community of inquiry. Vratulis, V.K., Clark, T. (University of British Columbia), Hoban , G. (Monash University), & Erickson, G. (University of British Columbia) (2011). Additive and disruptive pedagogies: The use of slowmation as an example of digital technology implementation. Teacher and Teacher Education: International Journal of Research, 27(8), 1179-1188. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of 35 preservice elementary teachers as they were introduced to ―Slowmation‖ (a form of stop-motion animation) during their 12-month teacher education program. During this presentation I discuss the complexity of digital

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technologies integration in relation to curriculum development and pedagogical practice. Results from this study reveal that pre-service teachers enjoyed using slowmation during the on-campus part of their program; yet very few pre-service teachers used slowmation during their extended practicum. The slow uptake of slowmation by pre-service teachers was found to lie in three domains: weak pedagogical constructs that accompanied the introduction of the initiative on campus, cooperating teacher ambivalence (and, at times, suspicion) in the field setting, and misconceptions of the role of curriculum when integrating digital technologies. Our study highlights the challenges inherent in introducing “disruptive” pedagogies in a teacher education program.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Vratulis, V.K. (2011, April). Exploring “pedagogical shift” in response to the construction of slowmation (stop-motion animation) projects in k-7 classrooms and teacher education. Paper presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies, New Orleans, LA.

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Crystal M. Lange College of Health and Human Services Scholarship in the College of Health and Human Services focuses on improving the physical and mental health of individuals and populations across the lifespan in multiple communities and settings. The College offers undergraduate degrees in athletic training, exercise science, health science, medical laboratory science, nursing, and social work and graduate degrees in health leadership, nursing, and occupational therapy. Each of these programs combines theoretical courses with interprofessional practice experiences to prepare students for professional positions in health and human services. Scholars have access to a new $28 million state of the art facility that has thirteen laboratories and interdisciplinary simulation capabilities. Some of the specific areas examined by the faculty and students in the college include women‘s health issues including cardiovascular disease and depression, gerontology, health promotion, environmental health issues, traumatic brain injury, neurological degenerative diseases, autism, and pediatric development and exercise physiology. Social issues such as transracial foster care, marginalization of genders on the basis of sexual orientation, prison population issues, family development and diversity are examined. Scholarship also focuses on healthcare issues such as medical informatics, quality and safety, interprofessional dynamics and corporate wellness. Within the College of Health and Human Services many faculty engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning focusing on such areas as the impact of curriculum on outcomes, online education, interprofessional simulation, retention and success of diverse students, and cultural competency. The college uses its intellectual and technological resources to ensure that its graduates are ready to meet the complex and changing demands placed on today‘s health and human services professionals.

Judith P. Ruland, Ph.D., Dean Crystal M. Lange College of Health and Human Services

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David Berry Associate Professor of Kinesiology Director, Athletic Training Education Program Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. Ohio University M.A. Western Michigan University M.A.T. Sacred Heart University B.S. University of Massachusetts, Lowell

ABSTRACTS Berry, D.C., & Potter, T.A. (2011). Idiopathic sixth cranial nerve palsy in a female collegiate softball player: A case report. Journal of Athletic Training (Supplement), 46(3), S-148. Retrieved from http://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/Journal-Supplement-46-3.pdf

Berry, D.C., Burningham, D.S., & Hansen, S. (2011). Radial collateral ligament ruptures of the 4th and 5th metacarpophalangeal joints in a collegiate male cheerleader: a case report. Journal of Athletic Training (Supplement), 46(3), S-144. Retrieved from http://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/Journal-Supplement-46-3.pdf

Berry, D.C., & Burningham, D.S. (2011). Effects of kinesio速 taping on ankle proprioception in healthy individuals. Journal of Athletic Training (Supplement), 46(3), S-110. Retrieved from http://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/Journal-Supplement-46-3.pdf

Berry, D.C., & Herzog, V. (2011). Effects of Kinesio速 taping on ankle proprioception in healthy individuals. Journal of Athletic Training (Supplement), 6(1), S17-S18. Retrieved from http://nataej.org/2011-ATEC-Abstracts.pdf

ARTICLES Berry, D.C., & Payne, E.K. (2011). Connecting with your students in the year 2011: Text messaging in the classroom, really? Athletic Training Education Journal, 6(3), 46-50.

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Berry, D.C., & Seitz, R.S. (2011). Educating the educator: Teaching airway adjunct techniques in athletic training. Athletic Training Education Journal, 6(1), 107-116. Berry, D.C., & Hughs, B. (2011). Self-directed learning and the millennial athletic training student. Athletic Training Education Journal, 6(1), 46-50. Berry, D.C. (2011, Summer). Task force on continuation professional education update. Board of Certification Update. Retrieved from http://www.bocatc.org/images/stories/boc_newsletter/cu_summer11.pdf

ELECTRONIC RESOURCE Berry, D.C., & Harrell, J. (2011). EMR Interactive (Interactive training modules). Krames-Staywell Publishing (for the American Red Cross). Retrieved from https://www.shopstaywell.com/OA_HTML/ARCHTML/EMR_Interactive_Sh eet.pdf

PRESENTATIONS Berry, D.C. (2011, November). Improving student learning and retention using Studymate® Author: A how to approach. Presented at the Michigan Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Dearborn, MI. Berry, D.C. (2011, July). Task force on continuing professional education update report. Presented at the Board of Certification Regulatory Conference, Omaha, NE. Berry, D.C. (2011, June). Justifications for the new 2010 CPR and first aid guidelines. Presented at the National Athletic Trainers‘ Association, New Orleans, LA. Berry, D.C. (2011, April). Understanding the new 2010 CPR and first aid guidelines. . Presented at the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, San Diego, CA. Berry, D.C., & Berry, L. M. (2011, April). Using Studymate® improves learning and retention in higher education. Round table seminar presented at the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, San Diego, CA. Berry, D.C., Colucci, A., & Fattal, P. (2011, May). Sudden cardiac arrest in

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student athletes. Invited speaker at the Town Hall Meeting, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Berry, D.C., Burningham, D.S., & Hansen, S. (2011, June). Radial th th collateral ligament ruptures of the 4 and 5 metacarpophalangeal joints in a collegiate male cheerleader: A case report. Poster presented at the National Athletic Trainers‘ Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. Berry, D.C., & Burningham, D.S. (2011, June). Effects of Kinesio® taping on ankle proprioception in healthy individuals. Poster presented at the National Athletic Trainers‘ Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. Berry, D.C., & Herzog, V. (2011, February). Athletic training educators‟ perceptions and preferences for using games and puzzles as pedagogical tools. Poster presented at the National Athletic Trainers‘ Association Educators Conference, Washington, D.C.

REPORT Berry, D.C. (2011, Spring). ACFASP scientific review: Designing and equipping a first aid kit. Report prepared for the American Red Cross Advisory Council for First Aid, Aquatics, Safety, and Preparedness, Washington, D.C.

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Janalou Blecke Professor of Health Sciences Appointed to SVSU in 1977 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.N. University of Washington B.S.N. Capital University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Blecke, J., Decker, S.A., & Barnsteiner, J. (University of Pennsylvania). (2011, June). The ECLIPSE (Endowed Clinical Professor for Service and Education) program. Paper presented at the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) National Forum, Milwaukee, WI. This presentation described an innovative, multifaceted approach to: 1) disseminate the Quality and Safety Education in Nursing (QSEN) competencies to faculty within the Department of Nursing at Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) in Saginaw Michigan; 2) disseminate the QSEN competencies across area schools of nursing through an Annual Patient Safety Conference and 3) strengthen Academic/Practice partnerships through a series of quality improvement/patient safety collaboratives. Applying the Linker model of knowledge diffusion, a parttime, two year faculty appointment was made to the Anderson/Lange Endowed Chair to provide leadership to faculty to promote the dissemination and implementation of the QSEN competencies into the curriculum and to develop and implement a series of learning collaboratives with faculty and clinical partners to improve the quality and safety of health care delivery. This presentation describes the process for disseminating the competencies to faculty, partnering nursing faculty with clinical agency staff to design and complete quality improvement projects, and hosting an annual patient safety conference. Projects included glycemic control across a multi-hospital system; an evidence-based, nurse driven alcohol withdrawal assessment and intervention program; a communication/lateral hostility program in two agencies, and improved usage of telehealth technology in a home health agency. All faculty/clinical projects resulted in significant improvements in patient care and/or nursing satisfaction. SIGNIFICANT OUTCOMES included: 1) Faculty immersion in design and implementation of evidence-

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based practices at clinical agencies which, in turn, has facilitated incorporation of this content and the improvement process into academic teaching. 2) Stronger school/clinical agency partnerships and improved clinical experiences for students. 3) Increased visibility for the SVSU Department of Nursing as a leader in diffusion and implementation of quality and safety content into teaching of students. 4) Stronger Collaboration across clinical agencies including acute care facilities, home care and skilled care facilities promoting one standard across the continuum of care. 5) Greater access to resources for clinical agencies to improve care; and 6) Heightened appreciation by faculty and students of the realities of making changes in complex organizations experiencing constant change.

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Vanessa Brooks Herd Associate Professor of Social Work Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ed.D. Wayne State University M.S.W. Wayne State University B.S. W. Wayne State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Brooks Herd, V. (2011, March). Passport please: Creating space in a BSW th program. Presented at The 4 International Conference on International Social Work, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. Brooks Herd, V. (2011, April). Not another bad hair day: life in the foster care system. Presented at the Michigan Chapter of the National Association of Social Worker State Conference, Dearborn, MI. Brooks Herd, V. (2011, August). Foster parent cultural diversity training. Presented at the Saginaw County Department of Human Services, Saginaw, MI. Brooks Herd, V. (2011, August). Bad hair days: life in the foster care system. Paper presented at the Michigan County Social Services Association Training Conference, Bay City, MI. Brooks Herd, V. (2011, October). Understanding stress triggers. Paper presented at the State of Michigan Recipients Rights Conference, Thompsonville, MI.

GRANT Brooks Herd, V. Wes Moore at SVSU. Saginaw Community Foundation, $1000, January 2011. The Saginaw community was please to host author and activist Wes Moore. The Saginaw Community Foundation in cooperation with Saginaw Valley State University Office of Diversity Programs, the SVSU Foundation and the department of Social Work sponsored a stimulating dialogue with the author. Additional community partners were Independence Bank and the NAACP.

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Karen M. Brown-Fackler Associate Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ed.D. Central Michigan University M.S. University of Michigan B.S.N. University of Michigan

GRANTS Brown-Fackler, K.M. SVSU Scholarships for Disadvantaged Nursing Students. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the United States Department of Health and Human Services, $40,784, FY 2011. Brown-Fackler, K.M. SVSU Scholarships for Disadvantaged Nursing Students. The United States Department of Health and Human Services, $62,182, FY 2011. Brown-Fackler, K.M. SVSU Nurse Faculty Loan Program. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ,The United States Department of Health and Human Services, $27,820, FY 2011. Brown-Fackler, K.M. SVSU Nurse Faculty Loan Program. The United States Department of Health and Human Services, $36,823, FY 2011. Brown-Fackler, K.M. Graduate Nursing Program Traineeships, The US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration for Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship, $33,553, FY 2011. Brown-Fackler, K.M. Nurse Professional Fund Scholarships: MSN in Education, Michigan Department of Community Health, $15,000, Brown-Fackler, K.M. Nurse Professional Fund Scholarships: RN to BSN, Michigan Department of Community Health, $5,000. Brown-Fackler, K.M. Nurse Professional Fund Scholarships: BSN Program, Michigan Department of Community Health, $4,000. Brown-Fackler, K.M. Nurse Professional Fund Scholarships: MSN Post

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Certificate Program, Michigan Department of Community Health, $8,000. Brown-Fackler, K.M. Michigan Nursing Corps Technology Grant, with Elizabeth Roe (Principal Investigator), Michigan Department of Community Health, $72,000. This grant will allow the SVSU TEN Project to increase simulation-based training for BSN students.

PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS Brown-Fackler, K. (2011, May). Student incivility in the classroom. Paper presented at the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Academy Conference, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI. Brown-Fackler, K. (2011, May). Helping your students thrive. Paper presented at the Great Lakes Conference on Teaching and Learning, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI.

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James J. Collins Adjunct Faculty, Health Sciences Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. University of Illinois M.A. University of Missouri B.A. Loras College

ARTICLES Collins, J.J., Moolenar, D.M., Bowler, L.O., Harbourt, T.J., Carson, M., Avashia, B., Calhoun, T., & Vitrano, C., et al., (2011). Results from the US industry-wide phosgene surveillance: The Diller registry. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 53(3), 230-244. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e31820c90cf In 2004, The American Chemistry Council Phosgene Panel established a phosgene exposure registry among US phosgene producers with the primary purpose of monitoring health outcome information for workers with acute exposure. We examine symptoms among 338 workers with phosgene exposure. The phosgene exposures averaged 8.3 ppmminutes ranging up to 159 ppm-minutes with most exposures below 10 ppm-minutes. We found that the level of phosgene exposure in ppmminutes was related to workers reporting mostly irritation symptoms of the nose, throat and eyes within 48 hours of exposure. However, we found no relationship between phosgene exposure and the presence of symptoms 30 days after exposure. These findings lend credence to the theory that prolonged respiratory effects do not occur with doses less than 150 ppm-minutes. Collins, J.J., Bodner, K.M., Aylward, L.L., Wilken, M., & Bodnar, C.M. (2011). Determinants of the decline in dioxins between blood draws among workers with 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol exposures. Organohalogen Compounds, 73, 1567-1570. Collins, J.J., Aylward, L.L., Wilken, M., & Bodnar, C.M. (2011). Death rates among workers exposed to the mixture of dioxins in pentachlorophenol. Organohalogen Compounds, 73, 380-383. Collins, J.J., Aylward, L.L., Bodner, K.M., Wilken, M., Hays, S.M., &

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Bodnar, C.M. (2011). Elimination rates for higher chlorinated polychlorinated dioxin congeners in former trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol worker from Midland, Michigan. Organohalogen Compounds, 73, 367-379. Collins, J.J., Bodner, K.M., Swaen, G., Beard, K., & Lee, M. (2011). Cancer incidence of 2 4-D production workers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 8(9), 3579-3590. Despite showing no evidence of carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) has been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in some human epidemiology studies, albeit inconsistently. We matched an existing cohort of 2,4-D manufacturing employees with cancer registries in three US states resulting in 244 cancers compared to 276 expected cases. The Standardized Incidence Ratio (SIR) for the 14 NHL cases was 1.36 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.74–2.29). Risk estimates were higher in the upper cumulative exposure and duration subgroups, yet not statistically significant. There were no clear patterns of NHL risk with period of hire and histology subtypes. Statistically significant results were observed for prostate cancer (SIR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.57–0.94), and ―other respiratory‖ cancers (SIR = 3.79, 95% CI 1.22–8.84; 4 of 5 cases were mesotheliomas). Overall, we observed fewer cancer cases than expected, and a non-statistically significant increase in the number of NHL cases.

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Sally A. Decker Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 1980 Ph.D. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor M.S.N. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill B.S.N. University of Maryland

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Decker, S.A., & Roe, E.A. (2011, June). Collaborative initiative for evidence-based practice presentations. Paper presented at the Annual Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, Washington, D.C. Currently, the use of evidence is required in a variety of disciplines. Although associated primarily with health care disciplines, there is discussion of Evidence Based Practice (EBP) in a variety of disciplines, including education, business, and engineering. At Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU), a project has been utilized that not only increases the learning related to EBP, but is also beneficial to community partners. Nursing students more fully develop critical thinking, information literacy, and an understanding of the importance of EBP using an inquiry approach. This approach is fostered through collaboration with practicing nurses to identify practice concerns. This approach also addresses the culture, capacity, and infrastructure within the agencies, all of which have been identified as important in the promotion of EBP within nursing practice. The purpose of the initiative has been to foster collaboration with agencies and further the knowledge of EBP in both professional nurses and students. Measures of success include agency use of the evidence presented to change policies, strong attendance at the student presentations, and agencies report of use of the evidence resource books. Nursing students from SVSU and nurses from health care agencies have collaborated on this long-standing initiative which uses the Stetler Model of Research Utilization, inquiry learning strategies and an EBP approach. The project includes the following steps: 1) nurses in the agencies identify practice concerns they would like summarized in an evidence-based presentation, 2) students select and evaluate sources of evidence using an evidence rating system, summarize the results, and make recommendations based on the strength of evidence, and 3) the agency

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nurses add input on fit of the setting, feasibility, and current practice. This project has the advantage of helping students see the relevance of evidence to practice and helping them communicate with the agencies. This project has the advantage of helping agency nurses keep informed on the research literature related to their interventions and helping them develop mentoring skills with the students. The project also has the advantage of increasing communication between the university and health care agencies in many settings. Decker, S.A., Barnsteiner, J. (University of Pennsylvania), & Blecke, J. (2011, June). The ECLIPSE (Endowed Clinical Professor for Service and Education) program. Paper presented at the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) National Forum, Milwaukee, WI. This presentation described an innovative, multifaceted approach to: 1) disseminate the Quality and Safety Education in Nursing (QSEN) competencies to faculty within the Department of Nursing at Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) in Saginaw Michigan; 2) disseminate the QSEN competencies across area schools of nursing through an Annual Patient Safety Conference and 3) strengthen Academic/Practice partnerships through a series of quality improvement/patient safety collaboratives. Applying the Linker model of knowledge diffusion, a parttime, two year faculty appointment was made to the Anderson/Lange Endowed Chair to provide leadership to faculty to promote the dissemination and implementation of the QSEN competencies into the curriculum and to develop and implement a series of learning collaboratives with faculty and clinical partners to improve the quality and safety of health care delivery. This presentation describes the process for disseminating the competencies to faculty, partnering nursing faculty with clinical agency staff to design and complete quality improvement projects, and hosting an annual patient safety conference. Projects included glycemic control across a multi-hospital system; an evidencebased, nurse driven alcohol withdrawal assessment and intervention program; a communication/lateral hostility program in two agencies, and improved usage of telehealth technology in a home health agency. All faculty/clinical projects resulted in significant improvements in patient care and/or nursing satisfaction. SIGNIFICANT OUTCOMES included: 1) Faculty immersion in design and implementation of evidence-based practices at clinical agencies which, in turn, has facilitated incorporation of this content and the improvement process into academic teaching. 2) Stronger school/clinical agency partnerships and improved clinical experiences for students. 3) Increased visibility for the SVSU Department of Nursing as a leader in diffusion and implementation of quality and

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safety content into teaching of students. 4) Stronger Collaboration across clinical agencies including acute care facilities, home care and skilled care facilities promoting one standard across the continuum of care. 5) Greater access to resources for clinical agencies to improve care; and 6) Heightened appreciation by faculty and students of the realities of making changes in complex organizations experiencing constant change. Decker, S.A., & Roe, E.A. (2011, July). Continued improvement of an evidence-based practice assignment. Paper presented at Sigma Theta Tau International's 22nd International Nursing Research Congress, Cancun, Mexico. A major content thread for advanced practice students is Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). Evaluation of a previous EBP assignment and two recent developments in EBP implementation indicated a need to improve this assignment. These two developments were: 1) the release of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies for advanced nursing practice and 2) the publication in 2008 of Nursing Implementation Science: How evidence-Based Nursing Requires Evidence-Based Implementation by Achterberg, Schoonhoven and Grol. This improved assignment resulted in more of the students addressing specifics of the agency and more depth in the exploration of organizational culture.

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Margaret Flatt Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 1976 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. University of Iowa B.S.N. Mercy College

GRANT Flatt, M. (PI). Nursing Workforce Diversity Program (year 2 of 3). The United States Department of Health and Human Services, $285,155.

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Adrienne A. Galbraith Nursing Simulated Learning Laboratory Specialist Appointed to SVSU in 2007 M.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University B.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University

POSTER PRESENTATION Galbraith, A. A. (2011, September). Veteran cultural competence through th a progressive simulation. Poster presented at The 6 Annual Registered Nurses Association in Michigan Conference & Assembly: "Innovations in Nursing Practice," Grand Rapids, MI. With the primary objective of increasing nursing students' awareness of the Veteran culture, and understanding the unique healthcare needs required by this specific population, a progressive simulation was completed. In order to increase awareness of, and exposure to, the Veteran culture, a progressive nursing simulation was created. Additionally, the simulation was designed to meet practicum level program objectives for each semester in the nursing program. Every simulation foci is representative of what is studied at each practicum level and includes broad concepts and hands on clinical skill sets. The progressive simulation focused on exposing students to a number of key health care concerns affecting the Veteran patient population. The simulation evolves with one particular female Veteran and includes components of her life. Her story is told through progressive scenarios and includes one of her family members as a Veteran patient. The Veteran standardized patients in the simulation scenarios were played by actual Veterans, to increase realism. The students were able to care for the Veteran patient in each simulation, and reflect on the simulation and care provided, in the debriefing sessions following each simulation. Post simulation, the students completed an anonymous survey. The survey results indicated that students felt more confident in caring for the Veteran population. The survey results also indentified that the simulation provided opportunities to expand competence in effective communication, evaluate patient outcomes, identify safety risks, and apply the professional nursing role.

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Mark A. Giesler Assistant Professor of Social Work Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. University of Nebraska-Lincoln M.S.W. University of Nebraska-Omaha M.A. University of Northern Iowa B.A. Hanover College

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Geisler, M.A. (2011, February). Using CR groups to enhance diversity competence in an HBSE course. Paper presented at the Baccalaureate Program Director Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, OH. Geisler, M.A. (2011, February). Recruiting male social work students: A primer for BSW program directors. Paper presented at the Baccalaureate Program Director Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, OH. Geisler, M.A. (2011, April). A Barbie boy in a Barbie world? Men‟s perceptions of Barbie as a cultural icon. Paper presented at the American Men‘s Studies Association 19th Annual Conference, Kansas City, MO. Geisler, M.A. (2011, April). Dealing with difficult people in the workplace (without losing your job or your sanity!). Paper presented at the NASWMichigan Chapter 2011 Annual Conference, Dearborn, MI. Geisler, M.A., & Palladino, J. (2011, May). You asked, but will not listen: (Re)framing a phenomenological study about (dis)connections between special education early intervention and foster care. Paper presented at The Qualitatives 2011 Conference, Brantford, ON. Geisler, M.A. (2011, May). Between I-thou” and “we”: Negotiating subjectivity in the qualitative interview. Paper presented at The Qualitatives 2011 Annual Conference, Brantford, ON. Geisler, M. A., & Palladino, J. (2011, June). Emerging, but never diverging: How researcher thought and political wrought affected the thematic coding of a grant-funded foster care project. Paper presented at the Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Conference, Cedarville, OH.

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Geisler, M.A., Aguilar, J., Craig, S., Messinger, L., & Woodford, M. (2011, October). The closeted EPAS: LGBT issues and the implicit curriculum. Paper presented at the Council on Social Work Education Annual Program Meeting, Atlanta, GA. Geisler, M.A. (2011, October). Bringing the elephant into the classroom: Consciousness-raising groups in an HBSE course. Paper presented at the Council on Social Work Education Annual Program Meeting, Atlanta, GA.

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Bonnie McKay Harmer Assistant Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. University of Nebraska, Lincoln M.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University M.S.Ed. Niagara University B.S.N. Michigan State University

ARTICLE Harmer, B.M., Huffman, J., & Johnson, B. (2011). Clinical peer mentoring: Partnering BSN seniors and sophomores on a dedicated education unit. Nurse Educator, 36(5), 197-202. The authors describe a clinical peer mentoring (CPM) program which partnered 16 pairs of senior (mentors) and sophomore (novices) BSN students to provide patient care on a clinical unit. Situated learning theory and Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model provided frameworks for CPM implementation. Survey findings suggested novices and mentors perceived improvements in self-confidence, prioritization, time management, clinical judgments, and evidence-based practice use. Many mentors spontaneously expressed an interest in becoming a preceptor or nurse educator.

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Ellen Herlache Research Coordinator, Occupational Therapy Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ed.D. Argosy University M.A. Central Michigan University B.S. Saginaw Valley State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Herlache, E. & Prast, J. (2011, May). “Wii-habilitation” and occupational therapy: Using technology to improve health and wellness for seniors. Presented at the 20th Annual Synergy Medical Education Alliance Geriatric Conference, Saginaw, MI. With their focus on the use of engaging and meaningful occupations, more and more occupational therapists are utilizing the Nintendo Wii as part of the rehabilitation process. During this presentation, medical professionals learned about evidence supporting the use of the Nintendo Wii as an adjunct to traditional occupational therapy interventions for elderly individuals, and Wii games and modifications that can be utilized to address specific physical, cognitive, and/or psychosocial needs of elderly clients with various diagnoses. The presenters also engaged attendees in hands-on activities that helped them to identify the role of occupational therapy and ―Wii-habilitation‖ in the management of a variety of conditions seen in elderly individuals. Herlache, E., Gainforth, A. (SVSU Student), Halder, B. (SVSU Student), Hennessey, A. (SVSU Student), Jaqua, J. (SVSU Student), & Winkle, M. (2011, March). Techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess emotional readiness of clients: A survey. Paper presented at The 24th Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey study exploring the use and effectiveness of techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess the emotional readiness of clients applying for assistance dogs. Working from the perspective of ―assistance dogs as a form of assistive technology,‖ the researchers presented an overview of the findings of their nationwide survey of Assistance Dogs International-affiliated training

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centers, including information regarding techniques utilized by training centers to assess the emotional readiness of assistance dog applicants, and the relative success of these techniques. The researchers also discussed approaches that professionals (such as occupational therapists) who work with assistance dog teams can use to promote successful client-dog matches.

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Jaime Huffman Assistant Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2006

Ph.D. Wayne State University M.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University B.S.N. Western Michigan University

ARTICLE Huffman, J., Harmer, B.M., & Johnson, B. (2011). Clinical peer mentoring: Partnering BSN seniors and sophomores on a dedicated education unit. Nurse Educator, 36(5), 197-202. doi: 10.1097?NNE.0b012e3182297d17 The authors describe a clinical peer mentoring (CPM) program which partnered 16 pairs of senior (mentors) and sophomore (novices) BSN students to provide patient care on a clinical unit. Situated learning theory and Tanner's Clinical Judgment Model provided frameworks for CPM implementation. Survey findings suggested novices and mentors perceived improvements in self-confidence, prioritization, time management, clinical judgments, and evidence-based practice use. Many mentors spontaneously expressed an interest in becoming a preceptor or nurse educator.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Huffman, J. (2011, October). Clinical nursing education rapid response th (CNERR). Presented at The 16 Annual Nursing and Health Professions Educator Conference, Evansville, IN.

PRESENTATIONS Huffman, J. (2011, May). Pain assessment and management among veterans at end of life. Presented at the Veterans Administration Nurse's Week, Aleda Lutz VA Medical Center Saginaw, MI, and virtually to six offcampus sites. Huffman, J. (2011, June). Palliative care and communication with veterans

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at end of life. Presented to the VA Hospice and Home Care, Gaylord, MI. Huffman, J. (2011, August). Pain assessment and management at end of life: Helping nurse preceptors/clinical instructor to educate effectively. Presented as part of the Clinical Faculty Seminar, Saginaw Valley State University, Crystal M. Lange College of Health and Human Services, University Center, MI. Huffman, J. (2011, September). End of life pain education: EPEC training for physicians and nurses. Presented as part of Palliative Care Grand Rounds, Aleda Lutz VA Medical Center Saginaw, MI.

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Jeremy Knous Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. Michigan State University B.A. University of Texas of the Permian Basin

ARTICLES Knouse, J., Gerlach, J. (Michigan State University), Ode, J., Pivarnik, J. (Michigan State University), Reeves, M., (Michigan State University) & Womack, C. (James Madison University) (2011). Relationship of physical activity and angiotensin i-converting enzyme polymorphism on cardiovascular disease risk factors in young adults. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 579. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000401598.33905.b8 Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a multifactorial disease with modifiable risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity). CVD primarily affects older adults, but young adults (20-30 years of age) are not immune from CVD and/or its risk factors, which are affected by genetic and environmental factors, such as angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphisms and physical activity (PA). With the decline in PA from youth to adulthood, the relationship that PA and ACE I/D polymorphism may have on CVD risk factors in young adults is important. Knous, J., Buckingham, T. (SVSU Student), Lowry, J., Ode, J., & Mospan, J. (2011). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 950. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402655.24410.54 There are multiple semi-professional leagues aimed at preparing hockey players with varying age and experience. Regardless of these variations, a common lab test used to evaluate on-ice performance is the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) as it mimics a hockey shift characterized by high anaerobic capability. It is possible that WAnT performance may vary depending on the league in which an athlete participates.

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Knous, J., Fulton, J. (SVSU Student), Ode, J., Lowry, J., & Peterson, J. (SVSU Student) (2011). Cardiovascular disease risk in volunteer firefighters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 771. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402143.94799.8f Cardiovascular related events are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths in firefighters. Currently, many firefighter divisions rely on volunteer firefighters. With the increased dependence on volunteer firefighters, it is important to evaluate the fitness and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of these individuals. However, few studies have examined the CVD risk in volunteer firefighters.

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Rose M. Lange Associate Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. Wayne State University M.S. University of Michigan B.S. University of Michigan

PAPERS Lange, R.M. (2011, March). The relationship of BMI and perceived exercise self-efficacy in obese and non-obese women. Paper presented at the Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Columbus, OH. Currently, over 34 percent of US Adults have a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 (CDC, 2007). This statistic equates to over 72 million obese Americans (CDC, 2007). Traditionally, an increase in physical activity has been identified as an important factor for weight loss and weight maintenance (USDHHS, 2008).The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) estimates that in 2007 only 49% of adults attained the recommended levels of 30 minutes of physical activity at least 5 times a week (CDC, 2010). The staggering statistics regarding physical activity and obesity rates suggests our current approaches to increasing physical activity in non-obese and obese individuals have been less than effective. This descriptive correlational study examining body mass index and self-efficacy in non-obese and obese women with a focus on the behavioral outcome of physical activity (leisure & lifestyle). A group of 137 women, aged 18-50 participated in this study. The racial background of participants was largely African American (n=56, 41%) and Caucasian (n=37, 41%). In this study, non-obese women had higher levels of exercise self efficacy during or after experiencing personal problems than obese women (t = 2.894, df=134, p=0.004). Non-obese women had lower levels of self-efficacy related to exercise in areas surrounding time commitments and interruptions in everyday life compared to the obese participants. The non-obese participants significantly reported higher levels of self-efficacy related to exercise in areas of depression (t = 2.081,df=134, p=0.039), anxiety (t=2.926, df=134, p=0.004) than the nonobese women. This study provides foundational knowledge into the similarities and differences of non-obese and obese women regarding

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their perceived self-efficacy and the health promoting behavior of physical activity. The findings related to psychosocial barriers to exercise for obese individuals suggests the need for a thorough assessment of depressive symptoms in overweight and obese women. Lange, R.M. (2011, June). Asset-based community assessment to enhance rn-bsn studentâ€&#x;s development and awareness of community partnerships and resources. Paper presented at the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators Conference, Chicago, IL. Traditionally, community health nursing courses teach nursing students how to assess the needs of a community through windshield surveys, examining statistical data, and exploring deficits of a community and its members. Even though this approach provides important community data, students are left with a picture of what needs to be ―fixed‖ in the community. The Asset Based Community Development Model (Kretzman & McKnight, 1993) challenges community members to locate their assets, skills and capacities to better understand and develop partnerships within their communities. This presentation will give an overview of the Asset Based Community Development model and will describe how this model has been successfully used with RN-BSN students in their community health nursing clinical to assess and intervene with a variety of vulnerable populations (i.e. homeless, uninsured, veterans and elderly). This project challenges the student to become more culturally aware and accepting of the communities view of their issues. Students are given the opportunity to develop skills in building partnerships in areas pertinent to their current practice. The blending of key community development strategies in the ABCD model, traditional community assessment techniques, and the nursing process assists students in using an empowering approach to community building. This pedagogical project provides the student with an excellent example of integrating community development models into clinical practice and how this type of model can be used across the continuum of care. Lange, R.M. (2011, March). An overview of the history of obesity measures and standards. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. The incidence of obesity in the U.S. is at epidemic levels (CDC,2009). Currently, over 34 percent of US Adults have a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 (CDC, 2007). This statistic equates to over 72 million obese Americans (CDC, 2007). Is the current Body Mass Index measure presenting a clear picture of obesity in the United States? This

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presentation provides an historical accounting of obesity measurements and standards with emphasis on the effects these measures have on society‘s perception of the obesity. Different measures of ideal body weight and lean body weight will be presented.

POSTER PRESENTATION Lange, R.M., & Lange, G.M. (2011, June). Pedagogic tools for public health nurses about the risks of endocrine disrupting compounds in our environment. Poster presented at the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators Conference, Chicago, IL. Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) are chemicals that enter our body and have the potential to mimic naturally occurring hormones. The sources for these EDCs are varied and can include industrial pollutants, degradation of common household items, and agricultural runoff. EDCs pose a significant threat to health by altering the normal endocrine profile in the body of individuals exposed. This risk is especially pronounced in the prenatal environment, where exposure to EDCs is associated with often severe alteration of development. Society in general and even many health care providers are inadequately aware of EDC exposure risks and the ways to minimize exposure. Additionally, even if knowledgeable about the risks of EDCs, often health care providers do not know how to help inform their patients/clients. In this poster, we identify the most frequently seen EDCs in the general public and describe their effects on health, we outline the pedagogic tools used in course work associated with B.S.N training in our University, and we discuss how Public Health Nurses may best utilize this information and training in their interaction with patients/clients.

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Dorothy S. Lee Associate Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ph.D. Wayne State University M.S.N. Wayne State University B.S.N. Wayne State University

PUBLICATION Lee, D.S., Anthouard, M.N., Badr, M.S., Carney, L.M., Gerst, D.G. III, Mateika, J.H., Qureshi, T., & Yokhana, S.S. (2011). The hypoxic ventilatory response and ventilatory long-term facilitation are altered by time of day and repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia . Journal of Applied Physiology, 110(1), 15-28. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00524. 2010 This study examined whether time of day and repeated exposure to intermittent hypoxia have an impact on the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and ventilatory long-term facilitation (vLTF). Thirteen participants with sleep apnea were exposed to twelve 4-min episodes of isocapnic hypoxia followed by a 30-min recovery period each day for 10 days. On days 1 (initial day) and 10 (final day) participants completed the protocol in the evening (PM); on the remaining days the protocol was completed in the morning (AM). The HVR was increased in the morning compared with evening on the initial (AM 0.83 ± 0.08 vs. PM 0.64 ± 0.11 l·min−1·%SaO2−1; P ≤ 0.01) and final days (AM 1.0 ± 0.08 vs. PM 0.81 ± 0.09 l·min−1·%SaO2−1; P ≤ 0.01, where %SaO2 refers to percent arterial oxygen saturation). Moreover, the magnitude of the HVR was enhanced following daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia in the morning (initial day 0.83 ± 0.08 vs. final day 1.0 ± 0.08 l·min−1·%SaO2−1; P ≤ 0.03) and evening (initial day 0.64 ± 0.11 vs. final day 0.81 ± 0.09 l·min−1·%SaO2−1; P ≤ 0.03). vLTF was reduced in the morning compared with the evening on the initial (AM 19.03 ± 0.35 vs. PM 22.30 ± 0.49 l/min; P ≤ 0.001) and final (AM 20.54 ± 0.32 vs. PM 23.11 ± 0.54 l/min; P ≤ 0.01) days. Following daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia, vLTF was enhanced in the morning (initial day 19.03 ± 0.35 vs. final day 20.54 ± 0.32 l/min; P ≤ 0.01). We conclude that the HVR is increased while vLTF is decreased in the morning compared with the evening in individuals with sleep apnea and that the magnitudes of these phenomena are enhanced following daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia.

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Averetta E. Lewis Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 1994 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University B.S.N. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Saginaw Valley State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Lewis, A.E. (2011, October). Use of spiritual factors in understanding the th health care needs of Zambian women. Paper presented at The 36 Annual Conference of the Transcultural Nursing Society, Las Vegas, NV. Many health care professionals from the United States (U.S.) are providing health care services in Zambia. The review of literature revealed a need for gaining a greater understanding of how to best provide care that is culturally congruent in this environment. For example, most Zambians have strong spiritual and religious beliefs. This study of five Zambian women was conducted to examine spiritual factors and how they are used by these women as it relates to understanding their health care needs. A qualitative, ethno nursing research method was used. The Open inquiry Guide for Use with the Sunrise Model to Assess Culture Care and Health (the Religious/Spiritual/Philosophical Factors domain) by Dr. Madeleine Leininger, was used to guide the interviews. Themes gleaned from these interviews reflected the need for caring individuals, the use of prayer, and complete dependence on God for the health of these women. The themes gleaned and the analysis of these themes has provided information for the understanding of the health care needs of Zambian women. Culturally congruent care is a critical component of nursing care for U.S. nurses providing health care in developing countries such as Zambia. Knowledge of these concepts and how they are reflected in the life ways of Zambian women will provide information for the understanding of their health care needs.

POSTER PRESENTATION Lewis, A.E. (2011, October). The use of NPS as primary care providers in developing countries. Poster presented at The 36th Annual Conference of the Transcultural Nursing Society, Las Vegas, NV.

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There continues to be a critical shortage of primary care providers (PCPs) in developing countries. This phenomenon of limited physicians and health care providers has been extensively published in the literature and was noted through direct observation of the authors while visiting 3 developing countries in Africa. This shortage affects not only the access to health services, but also the quality of care afforded to the people of these countries. Life expectancies of some sub-Saharan African countries have now dropped to 40-59 years and infant mortality remains unacceptably high at more than 90 deaths per 1,000 live births. Nurse Practitioners educated in the United States, Europe, or other developing countries could assist to fill the ever-widening gap of primary care services in these countries. Through teaching, education and service in developing countries, nurse practitioners could improve the quality of health care in these countries. The implementation of such endeavor would require: 1) The development of a partnership between the US and existing nursing programs in developing countries to offer NP education and 2) The development of international or global health education curriculum in the existing NP programs for NPs interested in pursuing professional opportunities abroad. This strategy could increase the number of PCPs in developing countries and begin to improve the overall quality of health in participating countries.

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Cheng-Ching Liu Assistant Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. University of Cincinnati M.S.N. University of Cincinnati M.B.A. Concordia, Mequon B.S.N. National Taipei College of Nursing

PAPER Liao, W-C., Li, C-R., Lin, Y-C., Wang, C-C., Chen, Y-J., Yen, C-H., Lin, H-S. and Lee, M-C. (2011). Healthy behaviors and onset of functional disability in older adults: Results of a national longitudinal study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 59(2), 200-206. doi: doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.03272.x OBJECTIVES: To examine the combined effect of healthy behaviors on the development of functional disability in an elderly cohort. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Taiwan Longitudinal Study in Aging from 1989, 1993, 1996, 1999, and 2003. PARTICIPANTS: A national sample of 1,940 men and 1,247 women aged 60 and older without functional disability at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: Functional disability was defined as difficulty with activities of daily living: taking a bath or walking 200 to 300 m. Time to functional disability was the age at midpoint between the first occurrence of disability onset in the survey year and prior survey year. Considering that the onset of disability is probably a precursor of death, for those who died without disability, time to disability onset was set at the midpoint between the last follow-up and death year. Four healthy behaviors were measured: not smoking, moderate alcohol consumption, regular exercise, and sleeping 6 to 8 hours per day. A Cox proportional hazards model with time-dependent covariates was used to analyze the association between age at the first functional disability and prior healthy behavior, after

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controlling for sex, time-varying disease status, marital status, and education. RESULTS: Healthy behaviors were linked to the onset of functional disability. Participants who performed one or more healthy behaviors were 15% to 75% less likely to be disabled than those who performed none. CONCLUSION: In the population studied, healthy behaviors were associated with lower incidence of functional disability. As the number of healthy behaviors increased, the likelihood of disability decreased.

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John E. Lowry Instructor of Kinesiology Appointed to SVSU in 2002 M.S. University of Oregon B.S. Brigham Young University

ARTICLES Lowry, J., Buckingham, T. (SVSU Student), Knous, J., Mospan, J., & Ode, J. (2011). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 950. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402655.24410.54 There are multiple semi-professional leagues aimed at preparing hockey players with varying age and experience. Regardless of these variations, a common lab test used to evaluate on-ice performance is the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) as it mimics a hockey shift characterized by high anaerobic capability. It is possible that WAnT performance may vary depending on the league in which an athlete participates. Lowry, J., Fulton, J. (SVSU Student), Knous, J., Ode, J., & Peterson, J. (SVSU Student) (2011). Cardiovascular disease risk in volunteer firefighters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 771. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402143.94799.8f Cardiovascular related events are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths in firefighters. Currently, many firefighter divisions rely on volunteer firefighters. With the increased dependence on volunteer firefighters, it is important to evaluate the fitness and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of these individuals. However, few studies have examined the CVD risk in volunteer firefighters.

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Janet Nagayda Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy Appointed to SVSU in 1993 M.S. Western Michigan University B.S. Western Michigan University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Nagayda, J., Beach, J. (SVSU Student), Cruz, C. (SVSU Student), Hartman, J. (SVSU Student), Moyer, S. (SVSU Student). (2011, March). Parent perceptions of the effectiveness of services for their adult children with autism spectrum disorder. Paper presented at The 24th Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO.

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Joshua Ode Associate Professor of Kinesiology Appointed to SVSU in 2006 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.A. Central Michigan University B.A. Saginaw Valley State University

ARTICLES Ode, J., Gerlach, J. (Michigan State University), Knous, J., Pivarnik, J. (Michigan State University), Reeves, M. (Michigan State University), & Womack, C. (James Madison University) (2011). Relationship of physical activity and angiotensin i-converting enzyme polymorphism on cardiovascular disease risk factors in young adults. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 579. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000401598.33905.b8 Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a multifactorial disease with modifiable risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity). CVD primarily affects older adults, but young adults (20-30 years of age) are not immune from CVD and/or its risk factors, which are affected by genetic and environmental factors, such as angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphisms and physical activity (PA). With the decline in PA from youth to adulthood, the relationship that PA and ACE I/D polymorphism may have on CVD risk factors in young adults is important. Ode, J., Buckingham, T. (SVSU Student), Knous, J., Lowry, J., & Mospan, J. (2011). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 950. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402655.24410.54 There are multiple semi-professional leagues aimed at preparing hockey players with varying age and experience. Regardless of these variations, a common lab test used to evaluate on-ice performance is the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) as it mimics a hockey shift characterized by high anaerobic capability. It is possible that WAnT performance may vary depending on the league in which an athlete participates.

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Ode, J., Fulton, J. (SVSU Student), Knous, J., Lowry, J., & Peterson, J. (SVSU Student) (2011). Cardiovascular disease risk in volunteer firefighters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 771. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402143.94799.8f Cardiovascular related events are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths in firefighters. Currently, many firefighter divisions rely on volunteer firefighters. With the increased dependence on volunteer firefighters, it is important to evaluate the fitness and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of these individuals. However, few studies have examined the CVD risk in volunteer firefighters.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Ode, J. (2011, June). Alternative activities to promote learning in the exercise science classroom. Presented at the National American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN. Ode, J. (2011, October). Exercise is medicine: A prescription for womenâ€&#x;s health. Presented at The 16th Annual Women‘s Health Initiative, Saginaw, MI.

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Jean Prast Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy Appointed to SVSU in 2006 O.T.D. Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions M.S.O.T. Saginaw Valley State University O.T. Saginaw Valley State University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Prast, J. & Herlache, E. (2011, May). “Wii™-habilitation” and occupational therapy: Using technology to improve health and wellness for seniors. th Presented at The 20 Annual Synergy Medical Education Alliance Geriatric Conference, Saginaw, MI. With their focus on the use of engaging and meaningful occupations, more and more occupational therapists are utilizing the Nintendo Wii ™ as part of the rehabilitation process. During this presentation, medical professionals learned about evidence supporting the use of the Nintendo Wii ™ as an adjunct to traditional occupational therapy interventions for elderly individuals, and Wii™ games and modifications that can be utilized to address specific physical, cognitive, and/or psychosocial needs of elderly clients with various diagnoses. The presenters also engaged attendees in hands-on activities that helped them to identify the role of occupational therapy and ―Wii™-habilitation‖ in the management of a variety of conditions seen in elderly individuals.

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Elizabeth A. Roe Associate Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 1988 Ph.D. Wayne State University M.S.N. University of Michigan at Ann Arbor B.S.N. Northern Michigan University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Roe, E.A., & Decker, S.A. (2011, June). Collaborative initiative for evidence-based practice presentations. Paper presented at the Annual Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching, Washington, D.C. Currently, the use of evidence is required in a variety of disciplines. Although associated primarily with health care disciplines, there is discussion of Evidence Based Practice (EBP) in a variety of disciplines, including education, business, and engineering. At Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU), a project has been utilized that not only increases the learning related to EBP, but is also beneficial to community partners. Nursing students more fully develop critical thinking, information literacy, and an understanding of the importance of EBP using an inquiry approach. This approach is fostered through collaboration with practicing nurses to identify practice concerns. This approach also addresses the culture, capacity, and infrastructure within the agencies, all of which have been identified as important in the promotion of EBP within nursing practice. The purpose of the initiative has been to foster collaboration with agencies and further the knowledge of EBP in both professional nurses and students. Measures of success include agency use of the evidence presented to change policies, strong attendance at the student presentations, and agencies report of use of the evidence resource books. Nursing students from SVSU and nurses from health care agencies have collaborated on this long-standing initiative which uses the Stetler Model of Research Utilization, inquiry learning strategies and an EBP approach. The project includes the following steps: 1) nurses in the agencies identify practice concerns they would like summarized in an evidence-based presentation, 2) students select and evaluate sources of evidence using an evidence rating system, summarize the results, and make recommendations based on the strength of evidence, and 3) the agency nurses add input on fit of the setting, feasibility, and current practice. This

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project has the advantage of helping students see the relevance of evidence to practice and helping them communicate with the agencies. This project has the advantage of helping agency nurses keep informed on the research literature related to their interventions and helping them develop mentoring skills with the students. The project also has the advantage of increasing communication between the university and health care agencies in many settings. Roe, E.A., & Decker, S.A. (2011, July). Continued improvement of an evidence-based practice assignment. Paper presented at Sigma Theta Tau International's 22nd International Nursing Research Congress, Cancun, Mexico. A major content thread for advanced practice students is Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). Evaluation of a previous EBP assignment and two recent developments in EBP implementation indicated a need to improve this assignment. These two developments were: 1) the release of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies for advanced nursing practice and 2) the publication in 2008 of Nursing Implementation Science: How evidence-Based Nursing Requires Evidence-Based Implementation by Achterberg, Schoonhoven and Grol. This improved assignment resulted in more of the students addressing specifics of the agency and more depth in the exploration of organizational culture. Roe, E.A., & Williams, D. (2011, July). A collaborative multidisciplinary team for evidence-based practice to prevent pressure ulcers. Paper presented at Sigma Theta Tau International's 22nd International Nursing Research Congress, Cancun, Mexico. Since the declaration of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers as a ―never event‖ by regulatory agencies, strategies to decrease the development of pressure ulcers have been even more important. There are many evidence-based guidelines to prevent pressure ulcers, the first developed in 1992 by AHRQ. However, implementation of these guidelines is difficult because it requires support at multiple levels. For over six years Bay Regional Medical Center has had a multidisciplinary skin team that focuses on prevention and treatment of skin issues in the hospitalized patients. Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) has collaborated with Bay Regional Medical Center for many years to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Two years ago a faculty member from SVSU joined the multidisciplinary skin team at the hospital to help increase the awareness and implementation of EBP. Since that time, the team has completed several EBP projects including determining the protocol for skin assessment, the reliability of the Braden scale, preventing skin

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breakdown in the operating room, skin tear protocol, criteria for wound cultures, maggot therapy, albumin and nutritional related risk factors for skin breakdown, and use of photography for wound assessment. From these EBP projects, multiple changes have occurred in practice including the revision and development of new policies and procedures. The use of this multidisciplinary team has also resulted in other benefits including an increase in teamwork and collaboration, increased knowledge regarding EBP, and more current patient care practices. Since the inception of the multidisciplinary skin team the prevalence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers at the agency has decreased from over 10% to below 2%. In addition to the collaboration for the evidence-based practice, BSN nursing students from SVSU have been involved in several projects with the skin team including education, data collection for skin prevalence studies, and EBP reviews. Roe, E.A., & Williams, D. (2011, October). Collaboration between academia and practice for evidence-based practice related to wound care and healing. Paper presented at the Symposium on Advanced Wound Care, The Association for the Advancement of Wound Care Conference, Las Vegas, NV. The purpose is to discuss an initiative between academia and practice to involve faculty and students in a skin team and to and to increase evidence-based practice. Students and faculty from a BSN program have been involved in a collaborative initiative with an acute care agency to implement evidence-based practice for pressure ulcer prevention and wound care and healing. The target audience for this presentation is clinical nurses, educators, and administrators interested in strategies to implement evidence-based care to for pressure ulcer prevention and wound care and healing.

GRANT Roe, E.A. (Principal Investigator), Michigan Nursing Corps Technology Grant, Michigan Department of Community Health, $72,000. This grant will allow the SVSU TEN Project to increase simulation-based training for BSN students.

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Suzanne M. Savoy Associate Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 2005 Ph.D. Loyola University Chicago M.N. University of California, Los Angeles B.S. Columbia University, New York

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Savoy, S.M. (2011, March). Health-promoting lifestyle behaviors mediate the association between depressive symptoms and quality of life in healthy women. Presented at the Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Columbus, OH. Savoy, S.M., & Sirias, D. (2011, November). Improving patient flow in emergency departments by incorporating a system-wide priority system. Paper presented at the Decision Sciences Institute National Meeting, Boston, MA.

POSTER PRESENTATION Savoy, S.M. (2011, March). The dose-response relationship between depressive symptoms, health-promoting behaviors and quality of life in healthy women being screened for cardiovascular disease risk. Poster presented at the Joint 2011 Scientific Sessions of The Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism and The Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention Councils of American Heart Association, Atlanta, GA.

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Marcia Shannon Assistant Professor of Nursing Appointed to SVSU in 1992 M.S.N. Wayne State University B.S.N. Valparaiso University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Shannon, M.E., Butterfield, E.E., Daniels, A.R. (SVSU student), & Kunik, C.M. (SVSU student) (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. With the focus on improving evidence based decisions in nursing, attendees were taught to locate, rate and use evidence to make clinical decisions. Several examples were provided including "Best Practices on Discharge Instructions" (Kunik), "Decubitis Ulcer Healing" (Butterfield) and one topic asked for by STIKES Bali nursing school, "Tuberculosis in Indonesia" (Daniels). Attendees learned how to phrase questions to find the best evidence and then how to rate the evidence in terms of strength and decide whether or not to change practice guidelines. Over 1,000 people attended including nurses from various Indonesian islands and countries, physicians and health-care administrators. Shannon, M.E., Auernhamer, K.L., Grzenia, N.M. (SVSU student), & Latuszek, K.L. (SVSU student) (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. Students from Bali, Thailand and SVSU presented information about nursing in each respective country. Students presented information about their particular university, nursing education, nursing gender statistics, age of nurses, ethnicity/race statistics, salaries and locations where nurses work. Nursing responsibilities were also compared as well as the role of advanced practice nurses. We also discussed some challenges the 3 countries faced in terms of the nursing workforce.

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Shannon, M.E. (2011, October). Teaching EBP from Michigan to China and Indonesia and back again. Paper presented at the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society 41st Biennial Convention, Dallas, TX. An Evidence-based practice initiative has been the focus of a multiple year international exchange between Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) in Michigan and the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University in Guangzhou, China. A new exchange with Indonesia was initiated spring of 2011 to share information about EBP with health-care professionals there. Over the years, questions were solicited from Chinese nurses that could be used by SVSU nursing students for an Evidence Based Practice Project assignment in a Critical Thinking and Communication class (taught by Drs Sally Decker and Elizabeth Roe). Students then researched the topics using the Stetler Model, making sure findings were culturally relevant, and sent the findings back via a SVSU faculty member and students to present to the nurses at Jinan. A similar process was recently initiated in Indonesia. The Chinese nurses then planned follow-up workshops where one of their staff presented EBP concepts and encouraged usage of research in determining care. Each hospital area also identified one EBP question pertinent to specific units, for further study. This presentation highlighted what was learned in China and summarized our new experience in Indonesia. Lessons learned were presented from the faculty, student and hospital personnel viewpoints. Important insights were learned and shared about availability of resources, role of health care professionals and interpretation of EBP in other cultures. Shannon, M.E. (2011, December). Quality and safety in nursing in the th USA. Paper presented at The 5 Chinese and Foreign Nursing Forum and Studies of Modern Nursing Culture Construction and Evaluation, Jinan University Guangzhou, China. This presentation highlighted the current state of quality and safety in the US. Perspectives such as QSEN (Quality and Safety in Education for Nursing) and the Institute of Medicine report were reviewed. Topics such as educational benchmarks, practice initiatives, collaboration benefits, leadership effects and use of data were all presented, along with current evidence and practical examples. Shannon, M.E. (2011, December). Designing evidence-based models for transitioning new nurses to practice: Quality and safety. Paper presented th at The 5 Chinese and Foreign Nursing Forum and Studies of Modern Nursing Culture Construction and Evaluation, Jinan University Guangzhou, China.

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National and international perspectives of transitioning for new nurses to the practicing nursing role from the student nursing role were explored. Examples were shared from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing relating transition to a variety of safety issues, and citing the current evidence. Example programs from several hospitals were shared.

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College of Science, Engineering and Technology As scientific and technological knowledge continually expand, faculty must lead and respond to rapid innovations. Research in the College of Science, Engineering and Technology contributes to advancement in areas as diverse as biological, chemical, physical, and environmental sciences, mechanical and electrical engineering, alternative energy, mathematics and computer science. Faculty members who actively engage in their disciplines can incorporate new developments into courses, ensuring relevant, up-to-date programs for students. SVSU also provides exceptional opportunities for students to collaborate with faculty in research and design projects using modern methods, instrumentation, and equipment. Students contribute directly to the advancement of their disciplines, learning first-hand how knowledge is developed, and experience both the challenges and rewards of original scholarly work. Science and engineering constantly progress through new research and application and in this volume, we recognize the achievements of SE&T faculty and students.

Deborah R. Huntley, Ph.D., Dean College of Science, Engineering & Technology

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Mohammad Saad Alam Assistant Professor Electrical & Computer Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. Tennessee Technological University M.S. Illinois Institute of Technology B.S. Aligarh Muslim University

PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS Alam, M.S., Chalabian, C. (SVSU student), Nitz, J.W. (SVSU student), & Parimoo, V. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered charging station for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles at Saginaw Valley State University. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Alam, M.S., Alqhtani, A. (SVSU student), Barnes, B. (SVSU student), & Hackel, J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility of off-grid residential photovoltaic system utilizing hydrogen storage. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Alam, M.S., Kibbey, K.B. (SVSU student), Malott, A. (SVSU student), & McClelland, M. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Residential versus largescale feasibility of solar panel installation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Alam, M.S., Alghafly, A. (SVSU student), Al Arfaj, F.I. (SVSU student), & Ashalan, A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Interconnection of photovoltaic modules with the grid for the Al-Khaif mosque at Mina in Saudi Arabia. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Alam, M.S., Almarjan, B., Alshalan, F., & Armstrong, D. (2011, March). Solar powered water pump for use in remote areas. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Alam, M.S., Jacobs, H., Plachta, M., & Spreeman, M. (2011, March). Design of a photovoltaic array for the power and energy demand of founders hall at SVSU. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Alam, M.S. (2011, April). Academic potential and challenges in the integration of alternative energy curriculum in the existing engineering programs. Invited presentation delivered to Oakland University, Rochester Hills, MI.

POSTER PRESENTATION Alam, M.S., & Rahman, A.U. (2011, February). Reforming electric energy systems curriculum. Poster presented to the Office of Naval Research/National Science Foundation, Napa Valley, CA.

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Cyrus P. Aryana Associate Professor of Mathematics Appointed to SVSU in 2000 Ph.D. University of Georgia M.S. Sharif University of Technology B.S. University of Tehran

PAPER Aryana, C.P. (2011, January). Direct calculation of the vector Riemann constants corresponding to the marked doubles. Paper presented at the National Joint Mathematics Meeting, American Mathematical society sessions, New Orleans, LA. When a multiply connected planar region D is the conjugate symmetric region obtained from the unit disc by removing g greater than or equal to 1 disjoint closed discs D1,...,Dg centered on the real axis then the double X of such a region has the extra anticonformal involution map Q: X → X of reflection in the real axis. A direct calculation for the vector Riemann constants Δ0 for such double X is given. The calculation is made through marking X by a symmetric canonical homology basis, an earlier work of Gholamreza Akbari Estahbanati (now known as Cyrus P. Aryana) [Proc. of The Amer. Math. Soc., vol. 124, 9 (1996), 2737-2744].

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Stephanie Brouet Assistant Professor of Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. Wayne State University B.S. University of Michigan, Dearborn

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Brouet, S., & Hao, Y. (2011, September). Methodology development of nucleophilic addition to Cefotaxime. Paper presented at the Schaap Chemistry Symposium, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI. Brouet, S., & Stolicker, D. (2011, September). Substitution of Thymol on Cefotaxime. Paper presented at the Schaap Chemistry Symposium, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI. Brouet, S., & Hao, Y. (2011, October). Methodology development of nucleophilic addition to Cefotaxime. Paper presented at the Midwestern Symposium on Undergraduate Research in Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Brouet, S., & Hao, Y. (2011, October). Methodology development of th nucleophilic addition to Cefotaxime. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI. As bacteria grow more and more resistant to current antibiotics, a significant amount of diseases may put the whole human society in danger due to the lack of treatment. Research and production of antibiotics with new moieties is needed. Varying substituents at the C-3 position on cephalosporin cores has been an important strategy in developing new and effective antibiotics. The nucleophiles commonly used generally have heteroatoms that serve as the nucleophilic site. This project will use carbon nucleophiles which appears to be surprising unexploited in the literature. This research project is to associate a nucleophile to cefotaxime to form molecules containing electron

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withdrawing groups. Diethyl malonate is used as one of the nucleophiles, and the procedure of the reaction was adopted from the malonic ester synthesis. Diethyl malonate was the first candidate because malonic ester synthesis is a well-established and relatively straightforward reaction, making this approach promising for pharmaceutical applications. Brouet, S., & Stolicker, D. (2011, October). Substitution of Thymol on th Cefotaxime. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI. rd

Cefotaxime is a member of the 3 generation cephalosporin family of blactam antibiotics. Cefotaxime is given to patients to fight bacterial infections, in particular gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Over time, antibiotics become increasingly less effective in treating bacterial infections due to emerging resistance in bacteria. Cephalosporin molecules, upon their reaction with bacterial components, undergo a mechanism that results in the release of a small molecule from the C-3 position. The design and development of dual-action antibiotics, in which the released small molecules have antibiotic properties of their own, is a possible pathway to more effective drugs. This strategy has been employed previously with other antiseptic molecules and has been shown to increase the efficacy of antibiotics. When thymol, a component of thyme, was mixed with b-lactam antibiotics, it was reported to enhance bacterial inhibition. The goal of this research is to replace an acetate, located at the C-3 position of Cefotaxime, with thymol so that the molecule is embedded into the structure of the cephalosporin. Other essential oils components found to have antiseptic properties shall be explored as well. Ultimately, the effectiveness of any synthesized molecules will be tested using Kirby-Bauer testing.

FUNDED RESEARCH Brouet, S., Randolph, D., Karpovich, D., & Harkness, B. (Delta College). Synthesis of potential antibiotic compounds. American Chemical Society Project SEED, $2500, summer 2011. It can be argued that antibiotics were one of the most important early contributions that chemists have made to modern medicine. Increasing bacterial resistance is a threat to the health and welfare of patients. Our laboratory synthesizes and modifies new and known molecules to enhance antibiotic effectiveness. We accomplish this by studying

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pathways by which bacteria defeat antibiotics so that we can rationally design molecules that could reduce resistance. The laboratory is focusing its efforts towards a variety of projects which involve structural modification of b-lactam antibiotics. In this project the core structure of blactam antibiotics will be synthesized with modifications that include powerful electron withdrawing groups instead of traditional leaving groups and then tested for antibiotic activity.

GRANT Brouet, S. I: Rational Design of Molecules with Potential to Defeat Antibiotic Resistant Microorganisms. II: Development of Water-Tolerant Enantioselective Lewis-Acid Catalyst Systems. Faculty Research Grant, SVSU, $15,000, July 2011 – July 2012.

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Il-Hyung Cho Associate Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems Appointed to SVSU in 2003 Ph.D. Clemson University M.S. Bowling Green State University B.E. Yonsei University

ARTICLE Cho, I-H., Bett, K.E. (University of Saskatchewan), Cheng, C. (Washington State University), Ficklin, S.P. (Washington State University), Jung, S. (Washington State University), Lee, T. (Washington State University), Main, D. (Washington State University), Sanderson, L. (University of Saskatchewan), & Staton, M.E. (Clemson University). (2011). Tripal: A construction toolkit for online genome databases. Oxford Journal, Database: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation, 2011(bar044), doi: 10.1093/database/bar044 As the availability, affordability and magnitude of genomics and genetics research increases so does the need to provide online access to resulting data and analyses. Availability of a tailored online database is the desire for many investigators or research communities; however, managing the Information Technology infrastructure needed to create such a database can be an undesired distraction from primary research or potentially cost prohibitive. Tripal provides simplified site development by merging the power of Drupal, a popular web Content Management System with that of Chado, a community derived database schema for storage of genomic, genetic and other related biological data. Tripal provides an interface that extends the content management features of Drupal to the data housed in Chado. Furthermore, Tripal provides a web-based Chado installer, genomic data loaders, web-based editing of data for organisms, genomic features, biological libraries, controlled vocabularies and stock collections. Also available are Tripal extensions that support loading and visualizations of NCBI BLAST, InterPro, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology analyses, as well as an extension that provides integration of Tripal with GBrowse, a popular GMOD tool. An Application Programming Interface is available to allow creation of custom extensions by site developers, and the look-and-feel of the site is completely customizable through Drupal-based PHP template files.

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Addition of non-biological content and user-management is afforded through Drupal. Tripal is an open source and freely available software package found at http://tripal.sourceforge.net

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Cho, I-H.,Lee, T. (Washington State University), Jung, S. (Washington State University), Main, D. (Washington State University), Peace, C. (Washington State University), & Zheng, P. (Washington State University) (2011, July). Development approach and architecture of GenSAS: The Genome Sequence Annotation Server. Paper presented at the 2011 WORLDCOMP/BIOCOMP International Conference on Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Las Vegas, NV. Advances in DNA sequencing technology have significantly reduced the costs associated with sequencing an organism‘s genome. However, the operating costs of hardware, software, and labor to analyze the sequence data are still too high for most users to process in house. Henceforth, most of the current bioinformatics applications used by bench scientists will be accessible through a Web environment. While there are many individual web-based tools available for gene annotation, there is no onestop website where biologists can run several gene prediction tools and display the results in a graphic viewer for further manual curation. This paper presents GenSAS, the Genome Sequence Annotation Server, a JavaScript-based framework of gene prediction and comparative sequence similarity applications for structural and functional sequence annotation. We present its functionality, the technology used in implementing each functionality, and software architecture of the overall implementation. Cho, I-H., Lee, T. (Washington State University), Jung, S. (Washington State University), Main, D. (Washington State University), Peace, C. (Washington State University), & Zheng, P. (Washington State University). (2011, October). GenSAS: An online integrated genome sequence annotation pipeline. Paper presented at the 4th International Congress on Image and Signal Processing and the 4th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, held jointly, Shanghai, China. We present a web-based genome sequence annotation tool called GenSAS, the Genome Sequence Annotation Server. Advances in DNA sequencing technology and Web technologies have significantly reduced the costs associated with sequencing an organism‘s genome, including

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the operating costs of hardware and software. However, researchers need to use multiple annotation tools to increase the accuracy of the annotation results, and the labor cost of analyzing the sequence data is still high due to the non uniform input and output formats used in each tool. There are many individual web based tools available for gene annotation, but there is no one-stop website where biologists can access several gene prediction tools and have the integrated and optimized results returned to them for manual curation. GenSAS supports multiple gene annotation tools integrated in one web page, allowing users of GenSAS to not have to navigate through different pages to engage in further annotation activities. GenSAS improves the overall performance by distributing the work between the server and client machine. GenSAS provides an easy to use GUI and supports a streamlined workflow that further simplifies the tasks and reduces the overall processing time.

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Anthony J. Crachiola Associate Professor of Mathematics Appointed to SVSU in 2005 Ph.D. Wayne State University M.A. Wayne State University B.A. Wayne State University

PRESENTATION Crachiola, A.J. (2011, May). The curious number 48. Paper presented at the Mathematical Association of America, Michigan Section Meeting, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. About 100 years ago, a famous puzzle master posed the following question: ―The number 48 has this peculiarity, that if you add 1 to it the result is a square number (49, the square of 7), and if you add 1 to its half, you also get a square number (25, the square of 5). Now, there is no limit to the numbers that have this peculiarity, and it is an interesting puzzle to find three more of them – the smallest possible numbers. What are they?‖ The topic of this enchanting problem was discussed from two perspectives: that of an undergraduate student and that of a teacher.

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Alan D. Freed Clifford H. Spicer Chair in Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 2007 Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison M.S. University of Wisconsin, Madison B.S. University of Wisconsin, Madison

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Freed, A.D. (2011, May). A stroll down Oberon Lane. Paper presented at Oberon Day, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, Switzerland. Freed, A.D. (2011, August). Hypo-elastic model for lung parenchyma. Paper presented at The 2nd International Conference on Material Modeling, Paris, France.

ARTICLES Freed, A.D., & Einstein, D.R. (2011). Viscoelastic model for lung parenchyma for multi-scale modeling of respiratory system. Phase I: Hypo-elastic model for CFD implementation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, PNNL-20340 An isotropic constitutive model for the parenchyma of lung has been derived from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The intent is to use it to represent the mechanical response of this soft tissue in sophisticated, computational, fluid-dynamic models of the lung. This demands that the continuum model be accurate, yet simple and efficient. An objective algorithm for its numeric integration is provided. The response of the model is determined for several boundary-value problems whose experiments are used for material characterization. The effective elastic, bulk, and shear moduli, and Poisson‘s ratio, as tangent functions, are also derived. The model is characterized against published experimental data for lung. A bridge between this continuum model and a dodecahedral model of alveolar geometry is investigated, with preliminary findings being reported.

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Freed, A.D., & Einstein, D.R. (2011). Hypo-elastic model for lung parenchyma. Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, 1-17. doi: 10.1007/s10237-011-0333-z A simple, isotropic, elastic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is formulated from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted in the literature as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises naturally from an analysis of isotropic hypo-elastic invariants and is a result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model predictions are compared with published experimental data for dog lung.

FUNDED RESEARCH Freed, A.D. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System. Phase 1: Hypo-Elastic Model for CFD Implementation. The National Institutes of Health. Supported by Award Number R01HL073598 from the National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute. $82,817 September 2010 – September 2012.

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John C. Hansen Professor of Computer Science and Information Systems Appointed to SVSU in 1999 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. Ohio University A.B. University of Miami

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Hansen, E., & Hansen, J., & Tapp, A., (2011, March). The use of ecollaboration in educational technology and development courses at Saginaw Valley State University. Paper presented at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Nashville, TN.

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Olivier Heubo-Kwegna Assistant Professor of Mathematical Sciences Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ph.D. New Mexico State University Diploma, The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics Trieste, Italy M.A. University of YaoundĂŠ I, Cameroon B.A. University of Douala, Cameroon

PAPERS Heubo-Kwegna, O., & Nganou, J. (University of Oregon). (2011). A global local principle for bck-modules. International Journal of Algebra, 5(14), 691-702. The global-local principle for BCK-modules is established and used to study Noetherian and Artinian BCK-algebras. Maximal ideals of infinite implicative BCK-algebras are also investigated. Heubo-Kwegna, O., & Nganou, J. (University of Oregon). (2011). Weakly injective BCK-modules. ISRN Algebra, Article 142403, 9 pages. doi: 10.5402/2011/142403 We introduce the notion of weakly injective BCK-modules and show that Baer's criterion holds for weakly injective BCK-modules but not for injective BCK-modules in general. We also provide examples and counterexamples of weakly injective BCK-modules.

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Ann-Marie Horcher Adjunct Faculty, Computer Science & Information Systems Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. candidate, Nova Southeastern University M.S. University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana B.S. University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Horcher, A.M., & Cohen, M. (2011). Ebook readers: An ipod for your books in the cloud. In Stephanidis, C. (Ed.), Posters, Part II, HCH 2011, Communications in Computer and Information Science 174 (pp. 22-27). doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-22095-1_5 The new way to carry books or literature is to not carry it at all. Not only have computing resources and data moved to the cloud, so has the latest novel or self-help book. The key to the acceptance of this technology is usable design that anticipates a reader‘s needs while still invoking a comfortable form factor – the book [1]. Though e-book readers have been available for a decade, the latest wave of e-book readers has achieved a new level of technology acceptance. This trend and potential acceptance of future models can be understood by applying task-technology fit theory [2] to a usability study of the Barnes and Noble Nook and Amazon Kindle ebook readers.

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Deborah R. Huntley Dean, College of Science, Engineering and Technology Appointed to SVSU in 1998 Ph.D. Cornell University M.S. Cornell University B.S. University of Connecticut

GRANT Huntley, D.R. Agricultural program development grant. Michigan Department of Education, $300,000, December 2010 – July 2012.

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David S. Karpovich H. H. Dow Endowed Chair in Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 1998 Ph.D. Michigan State University B.S. Saginaw Valley State University

PAPERS & CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Karpovich, D.S., Lucio, A.J. (SVSU Student), & Robbins, L. (2011, March). Emulsions utilizing heavy fuel oil and crude glycerin: A surfactant st study. Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Karpovich, D.S., Mankoci, S. (SVSU Student), & Sivy, T. (2011, March). Raman and thermal analyses of novel bioplastics. Paper presented at The 241st American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Karpovich, D.S., Lucio, A.J. (SVSU Student), Polega, J.R. (SVSU Student), & VanWert, M.E. (SVSU Student) (2011, March). “Inspiring youth through chemistry: Outreach where it matters. Paper presented at st The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Karpovich, D.S. (2011, March). Water runs downhill: a perspective on land use and water quality. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Karpovich, D.S., Hart, B., Meisel, E.C. III, Roekle, G., & Schilling, C. (2011, March). Biomass research at Saginaw Valley State University. Presented at the Community Workshop on Agri-Energy, Evart, MI. Invited presentation summarizing bioenergy research at SVSU. Karpovich, D.S., B., Hart, B., Meisel, E.C. III, Roekle, & Schilling, C. (2011 , June). Biodegradable sporting clays from corn-based, agricultural residues: Market study and manufacturability analysis. Presented at the annual meeting of the Corn Marketing Program of Michigan, Lansing, MI.

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A summary of manufacturability studies and market analysis regarding the conversion of ethanol processing wastes to biodegradable sporting clays. Karpovich, D.S., Lucio, A.J. (SVSU Student), Mize, H.E. (SVSU Student), & Robbins, L. (2011, November). Emulsion technology for heavy fuel oil/ th crude glycerin emulsions. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI. Karpovich, D.S., Mankoci, S., Pratama, F., & Sivy, T. (2011, November). Raman spectroscopic analysis of cellulose and soy protein: Bioplastic th building blocks. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI. Karpovich, D.S. (2011, November). Hand-made neem oil: toward a sustainable future in developing countries using local resources. Paper presented at The 67th Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI.

FUNDED RESEARCH & GRANTS Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Lecaptain, D. (Central Michigan University), & Robbins, L. Analysis of fuel oil and crude glycerin emulsions for heating applications. Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee, $34,370, May 2011 – May 2012. Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Arford, M., Baker, D. (Delta College), Hedquist, B., Martin, A., Meisel, E.C. III, Nitz, K. (Delta College), Ross, A., & VanHouten, J. (Delta College). Saginaw Bay - Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship Through Education Network planning grant. National Center for Science and Civic Engagement GLISTEN program, $31,675, May 2011 – May 2012. Saginaw Valley State University and its potential GLISTEN partners reside in the Saginaw Bay Watershed, the largest in Michigan. Land use within the watershed can strongly influence water quality in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron. Nutrient loading, bacterial pollution, erosion, and the spread of invasive plant species are key issues related to land use in the watershed. This GLISTEN cluster will engage college students with regional partners in activities designed to impact the key issues through education, awareness, and service. The GLISTEN partners to be involved in the planning phase include Saginaw Valley State University, Delta

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College, Chippewa Nature Center, and Bay City State Park (MI-DNRE Parks Division). The planning process will include activities involving water quality assessment through sampling and measurements followed by communication of the results. This activity will be a preview of what we envision for the GLISTEN Cluster. Depending on the level of each course, students in GLISTEN activities will be involved in erosion assessments, water quality parameter measurements, beach bacterial monitoring, and source tracking of phosphorus and bacteria. In addition to learning through in-field activities designed to provide data and awareness of water quality issues, students will also be involved in reporting and communicating results to area stakeholders including the Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network and personnel with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Through the Saginaw Bay RC&D, college students will be engaged in watershed based educational outreach to K-12 students. As part of the planning process, we hope to enlist further partners in the watershed. These may include other colleges and universities such as Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Alma College, and Central Michigan University. Our overall goal is to form a network of people and resources that will benefit both education and environment in the region. Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Coopersmith, C., Kearns, K., & Meisel, E.C. III. Greenhouse Service Learning Project. Midwest Campus Compact Consortium, Corporation for National and Community Service - Learn and Serve America Program, $24,997, January 2011 – December 2011. Karpovich, D.S., & Harkness, B. (Delta College). ACS Project SEED. American Chemical Society and Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, $10,000, May 2011 – August 2011. Karpovich, D.S. (coordinator), Hart, B., Sivy, T. (PI), & Stanton, D. (co-PI). Collaboration with BCHD on Rapid bacteria testing method development and analysis. Bay County Health Department, $63,000, July 2011 – December 2012. Karpovich, D.S., Kawkawlin River nutrient and bacteria monitoring. Kawkawlin River Watershed Property Owners Association, $1000, July 2011 – August 2011.

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Kenneth L. Kearns Assistant Professor of Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 2010 Ph.D. University of Wisconsin B.S. Saginaw Valley State University

FUNDED RESEARCH & GRANTS Kearns, K.L., Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Coopersmith, C., & Meisel, E.C. III. Greenhouse Service Learning Project. Midwest Campus Compact Consortium, Corporation for National and Community Service - Learn and Serve America Program, $24,997, January 2011 – December 2011. Kearns, K.L. Effect of nanoscale confinement on the thermal properties of molecules relevant for organic photovoltaics. Michigan Space Grant Consortium, $5000, May 2011 – September 2011. Kearns, K.L. [Faculty PI] & Lucio, A.J. (SVSU student) Summer undergraduate research fellowship. United States Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, $8050, May 2011 – September 2011.

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Emmanuel Kengni Ncheuguim Assistant Professor of Mathematical Science Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. New Mexico State University M.S. University of YaoundĂŠ I, Cameroon B.S. University of Dschang, Cameroon

ARTICLE Ncheuguim, E.K., Mariani, M.C. (University of Texas, El Paso), & Sengupta, I. (University of Texas, El Paso) (2011). Solution to a nonlinear Black-Sholes equation. Electronic Journal of Differential Equations, 2011(158), pp. 10. Retrieved from http://ejde.math.txstate.edu or http://ejde.math.unt.edu ftp ejde.math.txstate.edu Option pricing with transaction costs leads to a nonlinear Black-Scholes type equation where the nonlinear term reflects the presence of transaction costs. Under suitable conditions, we prove the existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain and we extend the results to the whole domain using a diagonal process.

BOOK CHAPTER Ncheuguim, E.K., Mariani, M.C. (University of Texas, El Paso), & Sengupta, I. (University of Texas, El Paso) (2011). Existence of solutions for financial models with transaction costs and stochastic volatility. In I. Florescu, M. Mariani & F. Viens (Eds.), Handbook of Modeling HighFrequency Data in Finance (pp. 383-419). doi:10.1002/9781118204580.ch14

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Kassiani Kotsidou Assistant Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 2009 Ph.D. University of Massachusetts M.S. University of Massachusetts Diploma Aristotelian University of Thessalonica, Greece

INVITED RESEARCH Kotsidou, K., Hart, B., Kline, M.M. (SVSU student), LaVigne, K.J. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. Elastic properties from sound velocity measurements: Effects of powder metallurgical variables. The Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation, unfunded, on-going. In 2011, Drs. Kotsidou and Schilling were invited by the Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation to conduct experimental research on the use of ultrasonics to measure the effects of manufacturing process variables on the elastic properties of powder metallurgical alloys. The aforementioned organizations are providing test samples and chemical analytical services at no cost. The anticipated results are rather meaningful to the powder metallurgical industry and three publications summarizing the work to date are forthcoming. Dr. Schilling was invited to conduct this work based on his previous ultrasonics research with advanced ceramics.

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Thomas E. Kullgren Professor of Mechanical Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 1984 Ph.D. Colorado State University M.S. Stanford University B.S. United States Air Force Academy

FUNDED RESEARCH Kullgren, T.E., & Hart, B. Development of high strength, high fatigue wind blade spars. U.S. Department of Energy, Small Business Innovation Research, $20,000, 2011-2013. The Independent Testing Lab at SVSU is a subcontractor to Fulcrum Composites, Midland, MI, on this grant to test new composite materials intended for use on large wind machines blades. Mr. B. Hart, Lab Manager, and Dr. T. Kullgren, consultant, work with SVSU engineering student assistants to test the axial loading, bending and fatigue properties of a new composite material developed by Fulcrum, as well as with the manufacture of samples, giving students an excellent introduction to both composites and the alternative energy industry as well as broad experience in working with and innovative and entrepreneurial small company. The SVSU ISO-certified Independent Laboratory‘s involvement will include the testing, evaluation and validation of research outcomes for Phase I and II projects. This testing will provide a firm foundation on which to execute Phase III Commercialization. The SVSU Mechanical Engineering Department will collaborate with Dr. T. Kullgren, resulting in broader teaching opportunities utilizing various components of the project as real-world examples. This grant is one of two awarded in Michigan.

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Gary M. Lange Professor of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 1995 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. Central Michigan University B.S. Saginaw Valley State University

PAPERS Lange, G.M., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), & Wallace, S. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Effects of triclosan on development and behavior of the fruit fly (drosophila melanogaster). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Triclosan is a chlorophenol compound that has found widespread use as an antibacterial and antifungal agent in a wide array of consumer products. In use for only the last 40 years, triclosan was initially found most commonly in soaps. However, during the last ten years triclosan has been incorporated into many more everyday items including deodorants, toothpastes, mouthwash, and has been infused into plastics used for kitchen utensils, toys, and refuse and food storage bags. The chemical structure of triclosan is in the class of phenols, and the compound is considered a chlorinated cyclic compound. This means triclosan has a strong potential to mimic steroid hormones in the body if ingested, leading to endocrine system disruption in the body. In this study we will use a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) model to determine and assess the endocrine disruption potential of triclosan on development by examining neural growth, behavior and fecundity in these organisms. Behavioral and locomotor tests are reported for larval, pupae, and adult flies following triclosan exposure and compared to control populations undergoing similar tests. Lange, G.M., Humphries, B. (SVSU student), & Short, J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Assessment of the potential for use of the earthworm (lumbricus rubellus) as a model for studying endocrine disruption: Effects of triclosan on growth, development, & behavior. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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In organisms, the endocrine system is arguably the most sensitive to disruption by exogenous exposure to chemical compounds in the environment. The array of compounds that have been found to disrupt the endocrine system is vast and includes many commonly used compounds in agriculture, manufacturing, and even in day-to-day life. Unfortunately, endocrine disruption of this sort may lead to catastrophic effects on growth, development, behavior, and even fecundity in exposed organisms. In the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at Saginaw Valley State University, we have traditionally studied endocrine disruption utilizing a common rodent model. However, recently we have begun to explore additional research models, especially invertebrate models. We have found significant value in a fruit fly model, but there have been some limitations that warrant us to identify an additional invertebrate model to more completely explore the potential effects of endocrine disruption. In the present work, the reddish brown earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus is assessed for its use in testing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC). The EDC examined in the present work is Triclosan, a chlorophenol compound that has found widespread use as an antibacterial and antifungal agent in a wide array of consumer products. Tests developed to assess endocrine disruption are described and the results of these tests are explored specifically for Triclosan but also for the long-term viability of this species in future EDC work. Lange, G.M., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU Student), Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this

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compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations. Lange, G.M., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State University‟s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%. However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations. Lange, G.M., Beyett, T. (SVSU student), Kuhtic, A. (SVSU student), & Lackey, N.Q. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Behavioral and reproductive effects of exposure to the endocrine disruptor atrazine. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Today, a serious problem facing the Great Lakes region is pollution. One of the most toxic classes of pollutants is herbicides, which accumulate from the large volume of agricultural runoff present in the Midwest. The herbicide atrazine has drawn significant attention for its observed adverse ecological and physiological effects. Atrazine is a chlorinated, general purpose broadleaf herbicide which is a known estrogen mimic with strong endocrine disrupting capabilities. Recent studies have shown low-level chronic exposure to atrazine to be capable of reversing sexual development in male frogs. We report on reproductive, developmental, and behavioral effects of chronic atrazine exposure in Long-Evans rats. Rats received a daily subcutaneous injection of 1 µg atrazine suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose. Various behavioral and reproductive tests are performed

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on pups that were exposed to atrazine in utero. Behavioral tests implemented include elevated-plus mazes, grip strength, and righting response. Reproductive success, litter size, and mating behaviors are also used to assess reproductive related effects. The combination of reproductive and behavioral data can be used to assess the effects of atrazine on organisms in contaminated environments.

GRANT Lange, G.M., & Sweeting, R.M. Science for first generation in college program. Michigan Space Grant Consortium – Pre-College Education Program, $4700, 2010-2012.

POSTER PRESENTATION Lange, G.M., & Lange, R.M. (2011, June). Pedagogic tools for public health nurses about the risks of endocrine disrupting compounds in our environment. Poster presented at the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators Conference, Chicago, IL. Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) are chemicals that enter our body and have the potential to mimic naturally occurring hormones. The sources for these EDCs are varied and can include industrial pollutants, degradation of common household items, and agricultural runoff. EDCs pose a significant threat to health by altering the normal endocrine profile in the body of individuals exposed. This risk is especially pronounced in the prenatal environment, where exposure to EDCs is associated with often severe alteration of development. Society in general and even many health care providers are inadequately aware of EDC exposure risks and the ways to minimize exposure. Additionally, even if knowledgeable about the risks of EDCs, often health care providers do not know how to help inform their patients/clients. In this poster, we identify the most frequently seen EDCs in the general public and describe their effects on health, we outline the pedagogic tools used in course work associated with B.S.N training in our University, and we discuss how Public Health Nurses may best utilize this information and training in their interaction with patients/clients.

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Tai-Chi Lee Professor of Computer Science & Information Systems Appointed to SVSU in 1988 Ph.D. University of Utah M.S. Southeastern Louisiana University M.S. University of Illinois at Chicago B.S. National Taiwan Normal University

ARTICLE Lee, T-C. (2011). An implementation of elliptic curve cryptosystem. International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics, 66(2), 229-244. Retrieved from http://www.ijpam.eu/contents/2011-66-2/12/12.pdf This paper proposes a public key generation for an ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptosystem) using FPGA‘s. To improve the strength of encryption and the speed of processing, the public key and the private key of ECC are used in 3BC (Block Byte Bit Cipher) [1,6,13] algorithm, which generates session keys for the data encryption. We are investigating a novel approach of software/hardware co-design implemented in Verilog Hardware Description Language (VHDL), which produces hardware algorithm components to place onto the FPGAs, thereby creating adaptive software overlays differentiated by use of a Universal Unique Identifier (UUID) as a functional operand to a custom arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU).

PAPERS & CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Lee, T-C., & Gubody, M.J. (2011, March). C++ skip-list optimizated implementation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. In this paper, we study the data structure of a skip-list. A skip-list is a container structure similar to a typical list container, although benefiting in search and insert operations due to being inherently sorted and a nearly binary-search optimization. An implementation is being developed that allows elements to retain both an unsorted push-back insertion and the faster search and insert benefits, while providing a C++ standard library container interface. The project will provide a library consisting of several

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implementations of skip-lists. These implementations will vary, consisting of static or maximum variable skip-list height, unique or non-unique element containment, and the unsorted or sorted internal ordering. Iterators for the implementations will also be provided, in keeping with the std lib container interface. Lee, T-C. (2011, July). Elliptic curve cryptosystems with custom computing machine. Paper presented at the 2011 International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Processing Techniques and Applications, Las Vegas, NV. The majority of products that use public-key cryptography for encryption/ decryption use RSA algorithm. But as we know, the key length for secure RSA has increased over the years. This would demand a heavy computing power for applications, especially for electronic commerce site that process a large number of transaction. Recently, a different approach of generating public key based on elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) has begun to challenge the weakness of RSA. Its security relies on the problem of computing logarithms on the points of an elliptical curve. The main attraction of ECC is that it appears to offer equal security for a smaller key size, thereby saving the processing overhead.

GRANTS Lee, T-C. Development of custom platform with Parallel Application from Rapid Simulation (PARS) Interconnecting DSPs and FPGAs for High Performance Computing. The National Science Foundation, Major Research Instrumentation grant, $123,144, August 2011 – August 2014. Lee, T-C. [Faculty PI] & Pavlicek, A. (2011, October). Securing the mission: An analysis on a proposal of NASA mission software implementation and execution-using Petri-Nets. Michigan Space Grant Consortium undergraduate fellowship grant, $2500, May 2011 – April 2012.

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Enayat Mahajerin Professor of Mechanical Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 1984 Ph.D. Michigan State University M.S. Michigan State University B.S. College of Science and Technology of Tehran

PAPERS Mahajerin, E., & Burgess, G. (Michigan State University). (2011, June). Response to random vibration. Paper presented at the Canadian Conference on Applied Mechanics (CANCAM), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Unlike periodic signals, random vibration analysis requires special statistical or spectral analysis. This paper describes straightforward approaches in the time-domain and in the frequency domain to analyze random vibration data. Mathematical analysis of random vibration can be conducted in the time-domain or in the frequency domain. The main objective is to determine the root sum square of acceleration, Grms. The Grms value is used to run the vibration table in order to simulate the motion process of a truck. The time-domain approach is based on the standard deviation of the time-based data, whereas the frequency-domain approach uses Fourier Transform and the Power Spectral Density (PSD) techniques to determine Grms. Although both methods provide same answers, however, the time-domain analysis is extremely cumbersome. Using samples of the actual recorded accelerations data the method can quickly generate the corresponding PSD curve for determination of the Grms. The resulting Grms is used to simulate random vibration generated from moving machines and components. Mahajerin, E., & Burgess, G. (Michigan State University). (2011, November). Numerical simulation of truck transportation. Paper presented at The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) International Congress & Exposition, Denver, CO. Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of truck transportation involve random vibration which requires spectrum analysis. To simulate truck transportation, the motion of a truck trailer is first recorded by

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mounting accelerometers on the floor of the trailer or on the framework of beams that support it. The floor accelerations in the vertical direction are sampled at regular intervals over the route that is to be simulated. This information is used to create a power spectral density plot (PSD) which contains frequency and amplitude information. The PSD plot is used to drive a vibration table with the product on it following the ASTM D4728 standard test guideline. To operate the table, we generate an acceleration input from the known PSD plot. We can also investigate the response of a product on the table by modeling the product as a mass-spring-damper system with known natural frequency and damping ratio. The resulting dynamic forces on the product can be used to compute the corresponding stresses from which we will be able to investigate product damage assessment during transportation. The process requires communication between the fatigue tools and the PSD plot. Results for several examples indicate that the method can be used to monitor the integrity of a product during transportation.

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Arthur L. Martin Assistant Professor of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. Bowling Green State University B.S. Siena Heights University

GRANT Martin, A., Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Arford, M., Baker, D. (Delta College), Hedquist, B., Martin, A., Meisel, E.C. III, Nitz, K. (Delta College), Ross, A., & VanHouten, J. (Delta College). Saginaw Bay - Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship through Education Network planning grant. National Center for Science and Civic Engagement GLISTEN program, $31,675, May 2011 – May 2012. Saginaw Valley State University and its potential GLISTEN partners reside in the Saginaw Bay Watershed, the largest in Michigan. Land use within the watershed can strongly influence water quality in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron. Nutrient loading, bacterial pollution, erosion, and the spread of invasive plant species are key issues related to land use in the watershed. This GLISTEN cluster will engage college students with regional partners in activities designed to impact the key issues through education, awareness, and service. The GLISTEN partners to be involved in the planning phase include Saginaw Valley State University, Delta College, Chippewa Nature Center, and Bay City State Park (MI-DNRE Parks Division). The planning process will include activities involving water quality assessment through sampling and measurements followed by communication of the results. This activity will be a preview of what we envision for the GLISTEN Cluster. Depending on the level of each course, students in GLISTEN activities will be involved in erosion assessments, water quality parameter measurements, beach bacterial monitoring, and source tracking of phosphorus and bacteria. In addition to learning through in-field activities designed to provide data and awareness of water quality issues, students will also be involved in reporting and communicating results to area stakeholders including the Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network and personnel with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Through the Saginaw Bay RC&D, college students will be engaged in watershed based educational outreach to K-12 students. As part of the planning process, we hope to

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enlist further partners in the watershed. These may include other colleges and universities such as Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Alma College, and Central Michigan University. Our overall goal is to form a network of people and resources that will benefit both education and environment in the region.

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Morteza K. Marzjarani Professor of Computer Science & Information Systems Appointed to SVSU in 1982 Ph.D. Kansas State University M.S. Kansas State University M.S. Tehran University B.S. Tehran University

GRANT Marzjarani, M.K. [Faculty PI] & McNish, G.R. (SVSU student) Statistical analysis of the weather data. Michigan Space Grant Consortium undergraduate fellowship grant, $2500, 2011. NASA satellites are capable of collecting massive data sets about the planets. In particular MISR and MODIS are two NASA instruments providing the researchers with such huge data sets. In this project, I will limit my study to the weather data sets. Weather data are inherently noisy. That is, they have to be cleaned. The next step would be to develop a statistical model which would be appropriate for the data set(s). I will apply functional data methods such as a Bayesian or a hierarchical Bayesian model to analyze the data sets. The results of this research will be presented to the October 2012 meeting of the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, and possibly in another professional conference (such as Joint Statistical Meeting-Stat. Compo Sec). At the conclusion, the outcome of this research will be organized and submitted to a professional journal for publication (such as Proceedings of Stat. Compo Sec).

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Edward C. Meisel III Lecturer of Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 2005 M.E. Saginaw Valley State University B.S. Michigan State University A.S. Delta College

GRANTS Meisel, E.C. III, Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Arford, M., Baker, D. (Delta College), Hedquist, B., Martin, A., Nitz, K. (Delta College), Ross, A., & VanHouten, J. (Delta College). Saginaw Bay - Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship Through Education Network planning grant. National Center for Science and Civic Engagement GLISTEN program, $31,675, May 2011 – May 2012. Saginaw Valley State University and its potential GLISTEN partners reside in the Saginaw Bay Watershed, the largest in Michigan. Land use within the watershed can strongly influence water quality in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron. Nutrient loading, bacterial pollution, erosion, and the spread of invasive plant species are key issues related to land use in the watershed. This GLISTEN cluster will engage college students with regional partners in activities designed to impact the key issues through education, awareness, and service. The GLISTEN partners to be involved in the planning phase include Saginaw Valley State University, Delta College, Chippewa Nature Center, and Bay City State Park (MI-DNRE Parks Division). The planning process will include activities involving water quality assessment through sampling and measurements followed by communication of the results. This activity will be a preview of what we envision for the GLISTEN Cluster. Depending on the level of each course, students in GLISTEN activities will be involved in erosion assessments, water quality parameter measurements, beach bacterial monitoring, and source tracking of phosphorus and bacteria. In addition to learning through in-field activities designed to provide data and awareness of water quality issues, students will also be involved in reporting and communicating results to area stakeholders including the Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network and personnel with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Through the Saginaw Bay RC&D, college students will be engaged in watershed based educational

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outreach to K-12 students. As part of the planning process, we hope to enlist further partners in the watershed. These may include other colleges and universities such as Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Alma College, and Central Michigan University. Our overall goal is to form a network of people and resources that will benefit both education and environment in the region. Meisel, E.C. III, Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Coopersmith, C., & Kearns, K. Greenhouse Service Learning Project grant. Midwest Campus Compact Consortium, Corporation for National and Community Service - Learn and Serve America Program, $24,997, January 2011 – December 2011. Saginaw Valley State University is located in an agriculturally rich region of Michigan. Important crops include corn, soybeans, sugar beets, and a variety of vegetables. Of those, vegetables have the most direct impact on local food. However, other than a few farmers‘ markets, most locally grown vegetables are not readily available in inner city communities, but rather in suburban and rural areas at produce stands and local groceries. Gardening opportunities are also limited in the cities because of limited space and poor or contaminated soils. SVSU has been working on sustainable solutions for urban agriculture for several years. Built with mostly volunteer hands, the SVSU Greenhouse facility employs a range of energy and resource conservation techniques. The greenhouse recycles all of SVSU‘s dining pre-consumer food waste into an excellent compost using vermiculture, and they then use the compost to grow vegetables and herbs to sell back to Aramark, the company that operates the dining facilities on campus. The greenhouse uses innovative space saving technologies such as vertically integrated hydroponics and alternative nutrient sources such as vermiculture extractants to produce food of high quality at a low cost and environmental impact. The technologies in the SVSU Greenhouse facility will form the basis of our service learning activities. We will collaborate with nearby Delta College and the MSU Cooperative Extension Service to incorporate aspects of the greenhouse in undergraduate curriculum and in outreach to communities in Saginaw, Bay City, and Midland. Our work will include expanded outreach to science teachers in the Saginaw Public School District at Saginaw High School to build on our current activities to enhance interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines with their students.

PRESENTATIONS Meisel, E.C. III, Hart, B., Karpovich, D., Roekle, G., & Schilling, C. (2011, March). Biomass research at Saginaw Valley State University. Presented

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at the Community Workshop on Agri-Energy, Evart, MI. Meisel, E.C. III, Karpovich, D.S., Hart, B., Roekle, & Schilling, C. (2011 , June). Biodegradable sporting clays from corn-based, agricultural residues: Market study and manufacturability analysis. Presented at the annual meeting of the Corn Marketing Program of Michigan, Lansing, MI. A summary of manufacturability studies and market analysis regarding the conversion of ethanol processing wastes to biodegradable sporting clays.

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Rajan Murgan Assistant Professor of Physics Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. University of Miami M.S. University of Michigan M.Sc. Universiti Sains Malaysia B.S. National University of Malaysia

ARTICLE Murgan, R. (2011). A note on the IR limit of the NLIEs of boundary supersymmetric sine-Gordon model. Journal of High Energy Physics, 2011(9), (pp. 16). doi: 10.1007/JHEP09(2011)059 We consider the infrared (IR) limit of the nonlinear integral equations (NLIEs) for the boundary supersymmetric sine-Gordon (BSSG) model, previously obtained from the NLIEs for the inhomogeneous open spin-1 XXZ quantum spin chain with general integrable boundary terms, for values of the boundary parameters which satisfy a certain constraint. In particular, we compute the boundary S matrix and determine the ―latticeIR‖ relation for the BSSG parameters.

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Jason J. Pagano Assistant Professor of Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. Florida State University M.S. State University of New York at Oswego B.S. State University of New York at Oswego

ARTICLE Pagano, J.J., Pratama, F.S. (SVSU student), Robinson, H.F. (SVSU student) (2011). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse chemical gardens. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 389(1-3), 127-133. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2011.03.031 Reverse chemical gardens consist of hollow tubular structures that form in a downward direction from a mechanically held silicate crystal immersed in a metal salt solution. As a model case for this reaction–precipitation system, we investigate the composition, morphology, and microstructure of these tubes in the framework of an experimental model based on reselected reactant concentrations and flow rates. In these experiments, the heavier waterglass solution is being injected downward into large volumes of lighter calcium chloride solution. The resulting hollow precipitation tubes have diameters that range from 0.5 to 3.0 mm. The tube walls have a typical width measurement of 40 _m and are gradient materials. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy-dispersive Xray spectral data identify calcium and silicon as the major components within the exterior and interior surfaces, respectively. Finally, we compare the behavior, chemical composition, and morphology of tubular precipitation structures created upon the hydrodynamic injection of calcium chloride into a large volume of sodium silicate solution carried out in the upward direction.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Pagano, J.J., Pratama, F.S. (SVSU student), Robinson & H.F. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse chemical gardens. Paper presented at the annual meeting of

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the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

POSTER PRESENTATIONS Pagano, J.J., Pratama, F.S. (SVSU student), & Robinson, H.F. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse chemical gardens. Poster presented at The 241st American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Pagano, J.J., Berkobien, A.D. (SVSU student) & Jenkins, B.A. (SVSU student) (2011, October). Formation of tubular precipitation structures from seed crystals and flow control. Poster presented at the Midland section of the American Chemical Society Fall Scientific Meeting, Alma, MI. Pagano, J.J., & Bond, A.C. (SVSU student) (2011, October). Growth dynamics and thermal analysis of nickel-silica precipitation tubes. Poster presented at the Midland section of the American Chemical Society Fall Scientific Meeting, Alma, MI.

GRANTS & FUNDED RESEARCH Pagano, J.J. Semiconductor materials from silica gardens. Michigan Space Grant Consortium Seed Grant, $5,000. May 2011 – April 2012. Pagano, J.J. Semiconductor Materials from silica gardens. SVSU Faculty Research Grant. $3,335. July 2011 – June 2012.

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Zhidong “Patrick” Pan Professor of Mathematical Sciences Appointed to SVSU in 1993 Ph.D. University of Connecticut M.S. University of Connecticut B.S. Beijing University, China

ARTICLE Pan, Z., & Li, J. (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) (2011). On derivable mappings, Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications, 374(1), 311322. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2011.03.031 A linear mapping δ from an algebra A into an A-bimodule M is called derivable at c∈A if δ(a)b+aδ(b)=δ(c) for all a,b∈A with ab=c. For a normclosed unital subalgebra A of operators on a Banach space X, we show that if C∈A has a right inverse in B(X) and the linear span of the range of rank-one operators in A is dense in X then the only derivable mappings at C from A into B(X) are derivations; in particular the result holds for all completely distributive subspace lattice algebras, J-subspace lattice algebras, and norm-closed unital standard algebras of B(X). As an application, every Jordan derivation from such an algebra into B(X) is a derivation. For a large class of reflexive algebras A on a Banach space X, we show that inner derivations from A into B(X) can be characterized by boundedness and derivability at any fixed C∈A, provided C has a right inverse in B(X). We also show that if A is a canonical subalgebra of an AF C∗-algebra B and M is a unital Banach A-bimodule, then every bounded local derivation from A into M is a derivation; moreover, every bounded linear mapping from A into B that is derivable at the unit I is a derivation.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Pan, Z. (2011, March). Derivational points of Banach Bimodules. Paper presented at the Southeastern Analysis meeting, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

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Altaf U. Rahman Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 1980 Ph.D. Oklahoma State University M.S. The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda B.S. Osmania University, India

POSTER PRESENTATION Rahman, A.U., & Alam, M.S. (2011, February). Reforming electric energy systems curriculum. Poster presented to the Office of Naval Research/National Science Foundation, Napa Valley, CA.

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Amanda J. Ross Lecturer of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 2010 M.S. Taylor University B.S. Taylor University

GRANT Ross, A., Karpovich, D.S. (PI), Arford, M., Baker, D. (Delta College), Hedquist, B., Martin, A., Meisel, E.C. III, Nitz, K. (Delta College), Ross, A., & VanHouten, J. (Delta College). Saginaw Bay - Great Lakes Innovative Stewardship through Education Network planning grant. National Center for Science and Civic Engagement GLISTEN program, $31,675, May 2011 – May 2012. Saginaw Valley State University and its potential GLISTEN partners reside in the Saginaw Bay Watershed, the largest in Michigan. Land use within the watershed can strongly influence water quality in Saginaw Bay and Lake Huron. Nutrient loading, bacterial pollution, erosion, and the spread of invasive plant species are key issues related to land use in the watershed. This GLISTEN cluster will engage college students with regional partners in activities designed to impact the key issues through education, awareness, and service. The GLISTEN partners to be involved in the planning phase include Saginaw Valley State University, Delta College, Chippewa Nature Center, and Bay City State Park (MI-DNRE Parks Division). The planning process will include activities involving water quality assessment through sampling and measurements followed by communication of the results. This activity will be a preview of what we envision for the GLISTEN Cluster. Depending on the level of each course, students in GLISTEN activities will be involved in erosion assessments, water quality parameter measurements, beach bacterial monitoring, and source tracking of phosphorus and bacteria. In addition to learning through in-field activities designed to provide data and awareness of water quality issues, students will also be involved in reporting and communicating results to area stakeholders including the Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network and personnel with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. Through the Saginaw Bay RC&D, college students will be engaged in watershed based educational outreach to K-12 students. As part of the planning process, we hope to

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enlist further partners in the watershed. These may include other colleges and universities such as Saginaw Chippewa Tribal College, Alma College, and Central Michigan University. Our overall goal is to form a network of people and resources that will benefit both education and environment in the region.

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Arpita Saha Assistant Professor of Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ph.D. University of Florida, Gainesville M.S. Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur

ARTICLES Saha, A., Abboud, K.A. (University of Florida), Christou, G. (University of Florida), Thompson, M. (University of Florida), & Wernsdorfer, W. (Institut Néel, Grenoble, France). (2011). Family of double-cubane Mn4Ln2 (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and Mn4Y2 complexes: A new Mn4Tb2 single-molecule magnet. Inorganic Chemistry, 2011(50), 10476-10485. doi: 10.1021/ic201683p The synthesis and characterization of a family of Mn2IIIMn2IILnIII2 complexes (Ln = Gd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3), and Ho (4)) of formula [Mn4Ln2O2(O2CBut)6(edteH2)2(NO3)2] are reported, where edteH4 is N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine. The analogous Mn4Y2 (5) complex has also been prepared. They were obtained from reaction of Ln(NO3)3 or Y(NO3)3 with Mn(O2CBut)2, edteH4, and NEt3 in a 2:3:1:2 molar ratio. The crystal structures of representative 1 and 2 were obtained, and their core consists of a face-fused double-cubane [Mn4Ln2(μ4-O2–)2(μ3-OR)4] unit. Such double-cubane units are extremely rare in 3d metal chemistry and unprecedented in 3d–4f chemistry. Variable-temperature, solid-state dc and ac magnetic susceptibility studies on 1–5 were carried out. Fitting of dc χMT vs T data for 5 gave Jbb III III –1 II III –1 (Mn ···Mn ) = –32.6(9) cm , Jwb (Mn ···Mn ) = +0.5(2) cm , and g = 1.96(1), indicating a |n, 0, n (n = 0–5) 6-fold-degenerate ground state. The data for 1 indicate an S = 12 ground state, confirmed by fitting of –1 magnetization data, which gave S = 12, D = 0.00(1) cm , and g = 1.93(1) (D is the axial zero-field splitting parameter). This ground state identifies the MnII···GdIII interactions to be ferromagnetic. The ac susceptibility data independently confirmed the conclusions about 1 and 5 and revealed that 2 displays slow relaxation of the magnetization vector for the Mn4Tb2 analogue 2. The latter was confirmed as a single-molecule magnet by observation of hysteresis below 0.9 K in magnetization vs dc field scans on a single crystal of 2·MeCN on a micro-SQUID apparatus. The hysteresis loops also displayed well-resolved quantum tunneling of

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magnetization steps, only the second 3d–4f SMM to do so. Saha, A., Abboud, K.A. (University of Florida), & Christou, G. (University of Florida). (2011). New mixed-valent Mn clusters from the use of N,N,N′,N′Tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (edteH4): Mn3, Mn4, Mn6, and Mn10. Inorganic Chemistry, 2011(50), 12774-12784. doi: 10.1021/ic201916d The syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetochemical characterization are reported for the new mixed-valent Mn clusters II III [Mn2 Mn (O2CMe)2(edteH2)2](ClO4) (1), II III II III t [Mn 2Mn 2(edteH2)2(hmp)2Cl2](Mn Cl4) (2), [Mn 6O2(O2CBu )6(edteH)2(N3)2] III II (3), [Na2Mn 8Mn 2O4(OMe)2(O2CEt)6(edte)2(N3)6] (4), and III II (NEt4)2[Mn8 Mn2 O4(OH)2-(O2CEt)6(edte)2(N3)6](5), where edteH4 is N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine and hmpH is 2(hydroxymethyl)pyridine. 1–5 resulted from a systematic exploration of the effect of different Mn sources, carboxylates, the presence of azide, and other conditions, on the Mn/edteH4 reaction system. The core of 1 consists of a linear MnIIMnIIIMnII unit, whereas that of 2 is a planar Mn4 rhombus within a [MnII2MnIII2(μ3-OR)2] incomplete-dicubane unit. The core of 3 comprises a central [MnIII4(OR)2] incomplete-dicubane on either side of which is edge-fused a triangular [MnIII3(μ3-O)] unit. The cores of 4 and 5 are similar and consist of a central [MnII2MnIII2(μ3-OR)2] incomplete-dicubane on either side of which is edge-fused a distorted [MnIIMnIII3(μ3-O)2(μ3-OR)2] cubane unit. Variable-temperature, solid-state direct current (dc) and alternating current (ac) magnetization studies were carried out on 1–5 in the 5.0–300 K range, and they established the complexes to have ground state spin values of S = 3 for 1, S = 9 for 2, and S = 4 for 3. The study of 3 provided an interesting caveat of potential pitfalls from particularly low-lying excited states. For 4 and 5, the ground state is in the S = 0–4 range, but its identification is precluded by a high density of low-lying excited states.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Saha, A., & Christou, G. (University of Florida). (2011, October). Family of double-cubane Mn4Ln2 (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and Mn4Y2 complexes: A new Mn4Tb2 single-molecule magnet. Paper presented at the Midland Section of The American Chemical Society Fall Scientific Meeting, Alma College, Alma, MI. Polynuclear 3d transition metal cluster chemistry continues to attract scientists from around the world owing to the fascinating structural architectures such molecules often possess, and the fascinating

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properties they often exhibit. Our own interest has centered on manganese chemistry, a metal whose Mn/O cluster chemistry is of relevance to many diverse areas, from bioinorganic chemistry areas such as the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis through molecules with abnormally high spin (S) values including single-molecule magnets (SMMs). SMMs are molecules with a significant barrier to magnetization relaxation as a result of a combination of a high ground state spin (S) value and easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. SMMs also straddle the classical/quantum interface by displaying not just classical magnetization hysteresis but also quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). These properties make SMMs potential candidates for use as quantum bits (qubits) in quantum computation. More recently, mixed 3d-4f clusters have attracted much interest in the SMM field as workers have sought to amalgamate the often large spin and anisotropy of Ln3+ (Ln = lanthanide) ions, particularly Tb3+, Dy3+ and Ho3+, with the propensity of Mnx clusters to possess large spin S values. In the present work, we describe the initial exploration of the potentially hexadentate, alcohol-based chelate N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (edteH4) in Mn-Ln chemistry, in the presence of carboxylate groups as co-ligands. We report the syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic characterization of a family Mn4Ln2 (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) complexes and Mn4Y2 complex. Among them, the Tb analogue has been found to be a new addition to the SMM family.

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Christopher Schilling Charles J. Strosacker Endowed Chair in Engineering Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ph.D. University of Washington M.S. University of California at Los Angeles B.S. California State Polytechnic University

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Schilling, C., Meisel, E.C. III, Hart, B., Karpovich, D., & Roekle, G. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Biomass research at Saginaw Valley State University. Presented at the Community Workshop on Agri-energy, Evart, MI. Invited presentation summarizing bioenergy research at SVSU. Schilling, C., Bond, A.C. (SVSU student), & Roekle, G. (SVSU student), (2011 , April). Biofuels: Waste, crops, production, harvest, processing. Paper presented at the Michigan Bioenergy Conference, Oakland University, Rochester, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels. Schilling, C., Hart, B., Karpovich, D., Meisel, E.C. III, & Roekle, G. (SVSU student), (2011, June). Biodegradable sporting clays from corn-based, agricultural residues: Market study and manufacturability analysis. Presented at the annual meeting of the Corn Marketing Program of Michigan, Lansing, MI. A summary of manufacturability studies and market analysis regarding the conversion of ethanol processing wastes to biodegradable sporting clays. Schilling, C., Bond, A.C. (SVSU student), Hart, B., Roekle, G. (SVSU student) (2011, September). Liquid biofuel feedstocks. Presented at the Great Lakes Bay Region Biomass /Ag Energy Summit, Saginaw, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels.

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GRANTS Schilling, C., Hart, B., Karpovich, D.S., Meisel, E.C. III, Pederson, J.K. (SVSU student), & Roekle, G. (SVSU student). Biodegradable sporting clays from DDG: Market and manufacturability analysis. Michigan Corn Marketing Program, $11,860, June 2010 – June 2011. A materials chemistry and engineering economic analysis on prototyping the manufacture of biodegradable sporting clays from ethanol-processing waste. Schilling, C., Bond, A.C. (SVSU student), & Roekle, G. (SVSU student). st Fuels crops research. The U.S. Department of Energy 21 Century Renewable Fuels, Energy and Materials Initiative at Kettering University, $50,000, July 2010 – June 2012. A cost- and energy-balance for the production of switchgrass and miscanthus and their subsequent conversion to fuel ethanol. Schilling, C. Hart, B., Kline, M. (SVSU student), & McLean, D.M. (SVSU student) Optimization of LED lighting for scalable algae growth. Sequest, LLC, $22,000, March 2011 – March 2012. A prototype development study on the use of LED lighting to manufacture algae for biodiesel and animal feed applications.

POSTER PRESENTATION Schilling, C., Berry, J. (University of Denver), Bond, A. (SVSU student), Das, D. (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands), Keinath, S. (Michigan Molecular Institute), & Roekle, G. (SVSU student). (2011, May). 21st century renewable fuels, energy, and materials initiative. Poster presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Program Review Meeting Washington, DC. A cost- and energy-balance for production of switchgrass and miscanthus and their subsequent conversion to fuel ethanol.

INVITED RESEARCH Schilling, C., Kotsidou, Hart, B., LaVigne, K.J. (SVSU student), & Kline, M.M. (SVSU student). Elastic properties from sound velocity measurements: Effects of powder metallurgical variables. The Metal

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Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation, unfunded, on-going.

In 2011, Drs. Kotsidou and Schilling were invited by the Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation to conduct experimental research on the use of ultrasonics to measure the effects of manufacturing process variables on the elastic properties of powder metallurgical alloys. The aforementioned organizations are providing test samples and chemical analytical services at no cost. The anticipated results are rather meaningful to the powder metallurgical industry and three publications summarizing the work to date are forthcoming. Dr. Schilling was invited to conduct this work based on his previous ultrasonics research with advanced ceramics.

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Steven J. Sepanski Professor of Mathematics Appointed to SVSU in 1996 Ph.D. Texas A&M University – College Station M.S. Michigan State University B.A. University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee

GRANT Sepanski, S.J. [Faculty PI] & Conner, J.A. (SVSU student) Field programmable gate arrays. Michigan Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate and Graduate Fellowship grant, $2500, 2011.

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Sally Shepardson Assistant Professor of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 1991 M.S. University of Maine B.S. University of Maine

ARTICLE Shepardson, S., Bogan, A.E. (Acadia University), Breton, S. (Kent State University), Chapman, E.G. (University of Kentucky, Lexington), Hoeh, W. R. (Kent State University), Piontkivska, H. (Kent State University), Ruminas, A.J. (Kent State University), Stewart, D.T. (Acadia University), & Trdan, R.J. (2011). Novel protein genes in animal mtDNA: A new sex determination system in freshwater mussels (Bivalvia Unionoida). Molecular Biology and Evolution, 28(5), 1645-1659. doi: :10.1093/molbev/msq345 Mitochondrial (mt) function depends critically on optimal interactions between components encoded by mt and nuclear DNAs. mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance (SMI) is thought to have evolved in animal species to maintain mitonuclear complementarity by preventing the spread of selfish mt elements thus typically rendering mtDNA heteroplasmy evolutionarily ephemeral. Here, we show that mtDNA intraorganismal heteroplasmy can have deterministic underpinnings and persist for hundreds of millions of years. We demonstrate that the only exception to SMI in the animal kingdom, that is, the doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance system in bivalves, with its three-way interactions among egg mt-, sperm mt- and nucleus-encoded gene products, is tightly associated with the maintenance of separate male and female sexes (dioecy) in freshwater mussels. Specifically, this mother-through-daughter and fatherthrough-son mtDNA inheritance system, containing highly differentiated mt genomes, is found in all dioecious freshwater mussel species. Conversely, all hermaphroditic species lack the paternally transmitted mtDNA (5 possess SMI) and have heterogeneous macromutations in the recently discovered, novel protein-coding gene (F-orf) in their maternally transmitted mt genomes. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we have localized the F-open reading frame (ORF) protein, likely involved in specifying separate sexes, in mitochondria and in the nucleus. Our results support the hypothesis that proteins coded by the highly divergent

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maternally and paternally transmitted mt genomes could be directly involved in sex determination in freshwater mussels. Concomitantly, our study demonstrates novel features for animal mt genomes: the existence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance and the involvement of mtDNA-encoded proteins in extra-mt functions. Our results open new avenues for the identification, characterization, and functional analyses of ORFs in the intergenic regions, previously defined as ‗‗noncoding,‘‘ found in a large proportion of animal mt genomes.

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Tami L. Sivy Assistant Professor of Chemistry Appointed to SVSU in 2008 Ph.D. University of Colorado, Boulder B.S. Calvin College

ARTICLE Sivy, T.L., Fall, R. (University of Colorado-Boulder), & Rosenstiel, T. N. (Portland State University). (2011). Evidence of isoprenoid precursor toxicity in bacillus subtilis. Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry, 75(12), 2376-2383. The mevalonic acid (MVA) and methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis both culminate in the production of the two-five carbon prenyl diphosphates: dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). These are the building blocks for higher isoprenoids, including many which have industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Despite growing interest in producing commercial isoprenoids through microbial engineering, reports have been made of a toxicity associated with the accumulation of prenyl diphosphates in E.coli expressing a heterologous MVA pathway. Here we explore whether a similar prenyl diphosphate toxicity, related to MEP pathway flux, may also be observed in the bacterium B. subtilis. After genetic and metabolic manipulations of the endogenous MEP pathway in B. subtilis, measurements of cell growth, MEP pathway flux, and DMAPP contents suggest a cytotoxicty related to prenyl diphosphate accumulation in B. subtilis. These results have implications for our understanding of the factors impacting isoprenoid biosynthesis in microbial systems.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Sivy, T.L., Karpovich, D.S., & Mankoci, S. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Raman and thermal analyses of novel bioplastics. Paper presented at st The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Sivy, T.L., & Pollum, M. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Separation and detection of the methylbutenol isomers responsible for a dose-dependent cytotoxicity. Paper presented at The 241st American Chemical Society

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National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Sivy, T.L., & Robinson, H. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Detection of cystathionine ketimine and lanthionine ketimine in the urine of those with st Down syndrome. Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Sivy, T.L., & Stilson, K. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Compounds in helianthus tuberosus as possible antifeedants against leptiontarsa decemlineata on solanum tuberosum cultivars. Paper presented at The 241st American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Sivy, T.L., Karpovich, D. S., Mankoci, S. (SVSU student), & Pratama, F. (SVSU student) (2011, November). Raman spectroscopic analysis of cellulose and soy protein: Bioplastic building blocks. Paper presented at The 67th Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI.

GRANT Sivy, T.L. (PI), Karpovich, D.S. (coordinator), Hart, B., & Stanton, D. (coPI). Collaboration with BCHD on Rapid bacteria testing method development and analysis. Bay County Health Department, $63,000, July 2011 – December 2012.

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Rosalyn M. Sweeting Assistant Professor of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 2005 Ph.D. University of London, UK B.Sc. University of Birmingham, UK

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Sweeting, R.M. (2011, March). From Philadelphia to Gleevec: The history of a chromosome. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, (History of Science and Technology section) Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI

FUNDED RESEARCH Sweeting, R.M., Dunbar, G.L. (Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University, and Field Neurosciences Institute, Saginaw, MI), Lange, G.M., & Rossignol, J. (Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University) Cytogenetic studies to determine tumorigenicity of rat mesenchymal stem cells. SVSU Faculty Research grant, $5000, November 2011 – October 2012. Stem cells are capable of self-renewal and have the ability to develop into a variety of different cell lineages. Hematopoietic stem cells have been used successfully in the treatment of human hematological diseases for a number of years raising the possibility that stem cell therapy could be used to for various other diseases/injuries which are difficult to treat by conventional means. However, there have been reports in the literature that human embryonic stem cells develop chromosome abnormalities after culturing in vitro, and that transplanted stem cells of animal origin can form tumors in experimental animals. Because the relationship between chromosome abnormalities and tumor development is well established, this indicates the need for the genetic screening of stem cells prior to and after transplantation. Current investigations on mesenchymal stem cells have revealed the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in which increase in number after passaging in vitro.

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Sweeting, R.M., Dey, N. (Field Neurosciences Institute, Saginaw, MI), Dunbar, G.L. (Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University, and Field Neurosciences Institute, Saginaw, MI), & Rossignol, J. (Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University). Tumorigenicity study on mesenchymal stem cells. Field Neurosciences Institutes, $5000, 2011-2012.

GRANT Sweeting, R.M., & Lange, G.M. Science for first generation in college program. Michigan Space Grant Consortium – Pre-College Education Program, $4700, 2010-2012. Funds for this project are used to send SVSU undergraduate student tutors to work at two different local high schools to foster understanding of science and to serve as role models for high school students. The primary focus is on assisting high school students, who are potential first generation college students in their family, to pursue a college education

POSTER PRESENTATION Sweeting, R.M., Bavar, A.M., Crane, A.T., Moser, M.N., Rossignol, J., Schloop, M.T., Tharp, M.A. (all Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University), Uchel T. (SVSU student), & Dunbar, G.L.(Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University, and Field Neurosciences Institute, Saginaw, MI). (2011, November). Mesenchymal stem cell transplants in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntingtonâ€&#x;s Disease: Passage and source variations. Paper presented at the Neuroscience 2011 Conference, Washington, DC.

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Stephen W. Taber Associate Professor of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 2004 Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin M.S. Texas Tech University B.S. Texas A&M University

ARTICLES Taber, S.W. (2011). A new species of Boletina Staeger fungus gnat (Diptera: Mycetophilidae). Southwestern Entomologist, 36(3), 335-349. A new species of Boletina Staeger fungus gnat was discovered in western Michigan. Adult males and females were collected in early spring in a Malaise trap in a paper birch, red maple, black cherry woods adjacent to black ash swamp and cattail marsh. The late March collection date is the earliest reported from the eastern United States for any species of the genus according to the literature examined. Boletina Michigana Taber will sometimes key out to Boletina Obscura Johannsen using keys based upon non-genitalic morphology, but male terminalia indicate a specific difference instead. Taber, S.W. (2011). Two parasites of the Green Lacewing Chrysopa chi Fitch (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Southwestern Entomologist, 36(1), 91102. One insect species parasitizing adults of the green lacewing Chrysopa chi Fitch and the cocoon of a second species were encountered in western Michigan. Adult females of the ectoparasitic ceratopogonid midge Forcipomyia eques (Johannsen) were found attached to the forewings of two adult hosts but the cocoon of the endoparasitic species remains unidentified. It appears to be the work of a new species or a described species not yet known to parasitize chrysopids because the cocoon is different from the only such specimen known for the euphorine braconid Chrysopophthorus Americanus Mason, the only U.S. insect suspected as an internal parasite of adult chrysopids. The braconid is rarely encountered but known from Arizona and presumably occurs in other

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southwestern states where the solution to the identity problem might be found. Taber, S.W. (2011). A new species of Docosia Winnertz fungus gnat (diptera: Mycetophilidae). Southwestern Entomologist, 36(4), 451464. A new species of Docosia Winnertz fungus gnat was discovered in western Michigan. Males and females were collected in mid-spring in a Malaise trap in a paper birch, red maple, black cherry woods adjacent to a black ash swamp and cattail marsh. Docosia walpurga Taber resembles Docosia dichroa Loew but male terminalia and female coloration indicate a specific difference instead. A remarkable and yet-unidentified empidid fly that seems to mimic the fungus gnat was found with the new species. Taber, S.W., Keller, O. (SVSU student), & Stine, S.A. (SVSU student), (2011). First Michigan record and second report of a big-headed fly (diptera: Pipunculidae) parasitic upon crane flies (Diptera: Pipunculidae). Michigan Academician, 4(1), 128-134. A recently discovered parasite of crane flies is reported for the first time from Michigan. The single previous report of such a natural enemy was the original discovery in Pennsylvania as published in 2007. A larva of a big-headed fly of the genus Nephrocerus Zetterstedt exited the abdomen of an adult female Tipula tephrocephala Loew that was caught while in flight. The host species and the state are new records for this parasitoid genus. Taber, S.W., & Fleenor, S.B. (2011). A new philomycus mantleslug species from Texas and a key to us philomycus species. Michigan Academician, 40(1), 11-127. A new species of Philomycus mantleslug from eastern Texas, USA, is described. Philomycus texanus Taber and Fleenor is distinguished from the remaining eight currently recognized Nearctic Philomycus species by its internal reproductive anatomy and by its external coloration. It is currently known only from the relict Lost Pines loblolly forest, which is a post-ice age refugium for a variety of animal and plant species not expected to occur so far west of the southeastern United States. A key to the nine recognized species of the genus is provided.

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PAPERS Taber, S.W. (2011, March). First Michigan record and second report of a big-headed fly (diptera: Pipunculidae) parasitic upon crane flies (diptera. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Taber, S.W. (2011, April). A new insect species discovered in Michigan. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Taber, S.W. (2011, September). A new insect species discovered in Michigan. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

POSTER PRESENTATION Taber, S.W., & Keller, O. (SVSU student) (2011, November). The TaberKeller trap: A modification of the Berlese funnel to entrap flying insects. Poster presented at The Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Reno, NV.

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Richard Trdan Professor of Biology Appointed to SVSU in 1976 Ph.D. University of Minnesota M.S. University of Minnesota B.S. St. Cloud State College

ARTICLE Trdan, R.J., Bogan, A.E. (Acadia University), Breton, S. (Kent State University), Chapman, E.G. (University of Kentucky, Lexington), Hoeh, W.R. (Kent State University), Piontkivska, H. (Kent State University), Ruminas, A.J. (Kent State University), Shepardson, S., & Stewart, D.T. (Acadia University). (2011). Novel protein genes in animal mtDNA: A new sex determination system in freshwater mussels (Bivalvia Unionoida). Molecular Biology and Evolution, 28(5), 1645-1659. doi :10.1093/molbev/msq345 Mitochondrial (mt) function depends critically on optimal interactions between components encoded by mt and nuclear DNAs. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) inheritance (SMI) is thought to have evolved in animal species to maintain mitonuclear complementarity by preventing the spread of selfish mt elements thus typically rendering mtDNA heteroplasmy evolutionarily ephemeral. Here, we show that mtDNA intraorganismal heteroplasmy can have deterministic underpinnings and persist for hundreds of millions of years. We demonstrate that the only exception to SMI in the animal kingdom, that is, the doubly uniparental mtDNA inheritance system in bivalves, with its three-way interactions among egg mt-, sperm mt- and nucleus-encoded gene products, is tightly associated with the maintenance of separate male and female sexes (dioecy) in freshwater mussels. Specifically, this mother-through-daughter and fatherthrough-son mtDNA inheritance system, containing highly differentiated mt genomes, is found in all dioecious freshwater mussel species. Conversely, all hermaphroditic species lack the paternally transmitted mtDNA (5possess SMI) and have heterogeneous macromutations in the recently discovered, novel protein-coding gene (F-orf) in their maternally transmitted mt genomes. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we have localized the F-open reading frame (ORF) protein, likely involved in specifying separate sexes, in mitochondria and in the nucleus. Our results

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support the hypothesis that proteins coded by the highly divergent maternally and paternally transmitted mt genomes could be directly involved in sex determination in freshwater mussels. Concomitantly, our study demonstrates novel features for animal mt genomes: the existence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance and the involvement of mtDNA-encoded proteins in extra-mt functions. Our results open new avenues for the identification, characterization, and functional analyses of ORFs in the intergenic regions, previously defined as ‗‗noncoding,‘‘ found in a large proportion of animal mt genomes.

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Robert B. Tuttle Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineer Appointed to SVSU in 2004 Ph.D. University of Missouri at Rolla B.S. Worcester Polytechnic Institute

PAPERS & PRESENTATIONS Tuttle, R.B. (2011, April). Progress report on the machinability of feMnAl alloys project. Paper presented at The 115th Metalcasting Congress, Schaumburg, IL. Tuttle, R.B. (2011, April). A Gage R&R study of the ASTM a609 ultrasonic th testing standard. Paper presented at The 115 Metalcasting Congress, Schaumburg, IL. Ultrasonic testing has become increasingly specified in steel castings with heavy section thicknesses. The increased use of ultrasonic testing has arisen due to safety and regulatory concerns with radiographic sources and greater production of castings for European customers. Because of the nature of ultrasonic testing, there has been a concern among foundries about the repeatability of the process. No systematic study has been performed to identify the actual repeatability and reproducibility of the current ultrasonic testing standard. In this study, five plates were cast with varying levels of shrinkage defects. The plates were x-rayed and ultrasonically tested by five foundries. X-ray ratings showed a dramatic variation between foundries. X-ray readers could not agree on the rating at all. Statistical analysis of the x-ray results found the operator to be a significant contribution to the variation in ratings however, results from the ultrasonic testing resulted in very little disagreement. No statistically significant effect on the ultrasonic rating was found based on the operator making the reading. A method was also developed to predict the ultrasonic rating of a casting with a commercial solidification modeling package. Tuttle, R.B. (2011, April). Role of titanium on the grain refinement of 1030

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th

steel castings. Paper presented at The 115 Metalcasting Congress, Schaumburg, IL. Mechanical and cost requirements for steel castings are continually increasing. Increasing the as-cast strength of steel through grain refinement provides a possible route to meet these needs. A series of tensile bar castings were poured in green sand molds from 1030 steel. Two levels of titanium were examined. Several possible heterogeneous nuclei were also added. The addition of titanium to this alloy increased the yield strength by approximately ten percent. Ductility was below typical values for all the castings poured. The drop in ductility was due to microporosity in the initial tensile bars. No effect was found due to the addition of heterogeneous nuclei. A series of plate castings were then poured to validate the effect of titanium. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that the reduced grain size was likely caused by titanium carbonitrides surrounding the prior austenite grains which limited their growth while cooling.

GRANTS Tuttle, R.B. Acquisition of a Complete Optical Emission Spectrometer and Sample Grinding Station. Office of Naval Research, $59,671, July 2011— June 2012. Tuttle, R.B. Machinability of FeMnAl Alloys, American Foundry Society, $24,700, October 2010 — October 2011. This project is a single year project to develop a basic understanding of the machinability of the FeMnAl alloys. These are a recently developed series of steels with a chemistry of 30% Mn, 10% Al, 1% C, and 1% Si. FeMnAl alloys are 12-18% lighter than traditional steels and exhibit high strength and ductility. SVSU will be pouring test plates that will then be machined by Fullerton Tool. Tool wear, surface finish, and power consumption will be recorded to create basic baseline data for milling and drilling operations. One impediment to employing these alloys is a lack of knowledge about their machinability. The effect of alloy composition on machinability has not been investigated. In fact, no data on machining these new alloys has been published. Nor is any current work on the appropriate cutting parameters or tool geometry being done. Since at some point any product made from these alloys would need some type of machining operation, resources would have to be devoted to elucidate the machining characteristics of these alloys. If this examination and investment had to be done as part of a product development cycle, it is unlikely that any company looking to use the FeMnAl alloys would be

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willing to adopt them. By conducting a basic study of the machinability of FeMnAl alloys, companies will have valuable information that can be used in current and next generation military and transportation products. This project will also enable the development of cutting parameters and tooling geometry appropriate for these. As a direct result of this project and the partnership with Fullerton Tool, foundries will have a supplier of cutting tools that has previous experience with the FeMnAl alloys and suitable tooling. The ability to know that these alloys can be effectively machined would reduce the hesitancy in the marketplace to produce FeMnAl alloys. Therefore, the US military would be able to procure components made from multiple sources. Other possible users, such as the automotive and aerospace markets, would also have an understanding of the basic processing requirements and the necessary information to assist in selecting applications for these alloys. Tuttle, R.B. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels, Office of Naval Research, $233,018, June 2008 — July 2011. This project is on the development of grain refiners for steels. Grain refinement based on manipulation of solidification has been successfully achieved in aluminum, copper, magnesium, and cast iron alloys. The high temperatures of molten steel and ability to thermomechanically refine steel has caused a lack of interest in developing a similar technology in steels. However, the need for increased strength in net-shape components and the advent of strip casting at steel mills has caused interest in this area. The goal of the project is to determine how to manipulate the solidification of steels to cause a fine grained structure in the as-cast condition. A finer structure will increase the strength and ductility without the need for expensive alloying elements. Tuttle, R.B. Understanding Solidification Based Grain Refinement of Steels, Office of Naval Research, $309,686, July 2011 — July 2013. This project is a continuation of a previously funded project. Its goal is to elucidate the nucleation mechanism of rare earth additions. In particular, the project hopes to understand the cause of inconsistent grain refinement and how grain refinement in steels can improve heat treatment response as well as mechanical properties.

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Students

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Faisal F.I. Al Arfaj Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Al Arfaj, F.I., Alam, M.S., Alghafly, A.J. (SVSU student), & Ashalan, A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Interconnection of photovoltaic modules with the grid for the Al-Khaif mosque at Mina in Saudi Arabia. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Abdulmajed M. Alqhtani Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Alqhtani, A., Alam, M.S., Barnes, B.A. (SVSU student), & Hackel, J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility of off-grid residential photovoltaic system utilizing hydrogen storage. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Ahmed Jawad Alghafly Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

PAPER Alghafly, A.J., Alam, M.S., Al Arfaj, F.I. (SVSU student), & Ashalan, A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Interconnection of photovoltaic modules with the grid for the Al-Khaif mosque at Mina in Saudi Arabia. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Bndr S. Almrjan Electrical Engineering major

PAPER Almarjan, B., Alam, M.S., Alshalan, F.F. (SVSU student), & Armstrong, D. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered water pump for use in remote areas. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Anwar Z.M. Alshalan Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Ashalan, A.Z.M., Alam, M.S., Alghafly, A. (SVSU student), & Al Arfaj, F.I. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Interconnection of photovoltaic modules with the grid for the Al-Khaif mosque at Mina in Saudi Arabia. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Faisal F. Alshalan Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Alshalan, F.F., Alam, M.S., Almarjan, B. (SVSU student), & Armstrong, D. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered water pump for use in remote areas. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Christopher M. Applin English major

GRANT Applin, C.M. Gender Studies. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute. $2033, April 2011 – current. To fund research, including travel expenses to attend conferences, and to create an original, innovative essay that explores and expands existing knowledge regarding gender criticism and theory.

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David R. Armstrong Electrical Engineering minor

PAPER Armstrong, D.R., Alam, M.S., Almarjan, B. (SVSU student), & Alshalan, F.F. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered water pump for use in remote areas. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Kara L. Auernhamer Nursing major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Auernhamer, K.L., Grzenia, N.M. (SVSU student), Latuszek, K.L. (SVSU student), & Shannon, M.E. (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. Students from Bali, Thailand and SVSU presented information about nursing in each respective country. Students presented information about their particular university, nursing education, nursing gender statistics, age of nurses, ethnicity/race statistics, salaries and locations where nurses work. Nursing responsibilities were also compared as well as the role of advanced practice nurses. We also discussed some challenges the 3 countries faced in terms of the nursing workforce.

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Bryant A. Barnes Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Barnes, B.A., Alam, M.S., Alqhtani, A. (SVSU student), & Hackel, J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility of off-grid residential photovoltaic system utilizing hydrogen storage. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Jessica S. Beach Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Beach, J., Cruz, C. (SVSU student), Hartman, J. (SVSU student), Moyer, S. (SVSU student), & Nagayda, J. (2011, March). Parent perceptions of the effectiveness of services for their adult children with autism spectrum th disorder. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the findings of their phenomenological study exploring three parents‘ perspectives of the effectiveness of the transition planning services provided to their adult children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The results of parent interviews indicated that their children received varying amounts of transition planning services, which were limited in effectiveness. Parents consistently reported the importance of mainstreaming to allow their children to interact with nondisabled peers in a natural setting. Parents also emphasized the importance of advocacy and involvement in finding services, and ―tough love‖ in helping their children to reach maximal independence in vocational and independent living skills as they transitioned to adulthood. The researchers used their findings to develop recommendations for services that could promote a more successful transition into adulthood.

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Eric D. Becker Spanish major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Becker, E.D., Bond, S.M. (SVSU student), Finta, Z.R. (SVSU student), Wendorf, J.E. (SVSU student) & Hernandez, G. (2011, October). Cultural extravaganza: An afternoon of Spanish cinema. Paper presented at the Michigan World Language Association Conference, Lansing, MI.

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Bethany J. Benson French major

GRANT Benson, B.J. French and English speaking Canadians. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $7000, May 2010 – current. To investigate the cultural differences between the French Canadians and English Canadians in Quebec City, focusing on the larger question of how minority language groups can best be integrated into a multicultural society.

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Amber D. Berkobien Chemistry major

POSTER PRESENTATION Berkobien, A.D., Jenkins, B.A. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011, October). Formation of tubular precipitation structures from seed crystals and flow control. Poster presented at the Midland Section of The American Chemical Society Fall Scientific Meeting, Alma, MI.

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Tyler S. Beyett Biochemistry major

GRANT Beyett, T.S. Molecular Genetic and Behavioral Analysis of the Effects of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds on Sperm Competition in Hybrid Rats. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $9,614, December 2009 – current. To examine the effects of a known endocrine disrupting chemical on sperm competition in rats.

PAPER Beyett, T.S., Kuhtic, A. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., & Lackey, N.Q. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Behavioral and reproductive effects of exposure to the endocrine disruptor atrazine. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Today, a serious problem facing the Great Lakes region is pollution. One of the most toxic classes of pollutants are herbicides, which accumulate from the large volume of agricultural runoff present in the Midwest. The herbicide atrazine has drawn significant attention for its observed adverse ecological and physiological effects. Atrazine is a chlorinated, general purpose broadleaf herbicide which is a known estrogen mimic with strong endocrine disrupting capabilities. Recent studies have shown low-level chronic exposure to atrazine to be capable of reversing sexual development in male frogs. We report on reproductive, developmental, and behavioral effects of chronic atrazine exposure in Long-Evans rats. Rats received a daily subcutaneous injection of 1 Âľg atrazine suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose. Various behavioral and reproductive tests are performed on pups that were exposed to atrazine in utero. Behavioral tests implemented include elevated-plus mazes, grip strength, and righting response. Reproductive success, litter size, and mating behaviors are also used to assess reproductive related effects. The combination of reproductive and behavioral data can be used to assess the effects of atrazine on organisms in contaminated environments.

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Delia R. Blaschka Bachelor of Science in Biology

PAPERS Blaschka, D., Lange, G. M., & Wallace, S. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Effects of triclosan on development and behavior of the fruit fly (drosophila melanogaster). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Triclosan is a chlorophenol compound that has found widespread use as an antibacterial and antifungal agent in a wide array of consumer products. In use for only the last 40 years, triclosan was initially found most commonly in soaps. However, during the last ten years triclosan has been incorporated into many more everyday items including deodorants, toothpastes, mouthwash, and has been infused into plastics used for kitchen utensils, toys, and refuse and food storage bags. The chemical structure of triclosan is in the class of phenols, and the compound is considered a chlorinated cyclic compound. This means triclosan has a strong potential to mimic steroid hormones in the body if ingested, leading to endocrine system disruption in the body. In this study we will use a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) model to determine and assess the endocrine disruption potential of triclosan on development by examining neural growth, behavior and fecundity in these organisms. Behavioral and locomotor tests are reported for larval, pupae, and adult flies following triclosan exposure and compared to control populations undergoing similar tests. Blaschka, D., DuCharme, K., Fetting, B., Lange, G.M., Phillips, R., Uchel, T., & Wall, E. (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of

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mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations. Blaschka, D., DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State Universityâ€&#x;s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%. However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations.

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Aaron C. Bond Chemical Physics major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Bond, A.C., Roekle, G. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C., (2011, April). Biofuels: Waste, crops, production, harvest, processing. Paper presented at the Michigan Bioenergy Conference, Oakland University, Rochester, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels. Bond, A.C., Hart, B., Roekle, G. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. (2011, September). Liquid biofuel feedstocks. Presented at the Great Lakes Bay Region Biomass /Ag Energy Summit, Saginaw, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels.

POSTER PRESENTATION Bond, A.C., Roekle, G. (SVSU student), Schilling, C., Berry, J. (University of Denver), Das, D. (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands), & Keinath, S. (Michigan Molecular Institute). (2011, May). 21st century renewable fuels, energy, and materials initiative. Poster presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Program Review Meeting Washington, DC. A cost- and energy-balance for production of switchgrass and miscanthus and their subsequent conversion to fuel ethanol. Bond, A.C., & Pagano, J.J., & (2011, October). Growth dynamics and thermal analysis of nickel-silica precipitation tubes. Poster presented at the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society Fall Scientific Meeting, Alma, MI.

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Stacy M. Bond International Studies major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Bond, S.M., Becker, E.D. (SVSU student), Finta, Z.R. (SVSU student), Wendorf, J.E. (SVSU student) & Hernandez, G. (2011, October). Cultural extravaganza: An afternoon of Spanish cinema. Paper presented at Michigan World Language Association, Lansing, MI.

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Julie A. Boon Political Science major

GRANT Boon, J. President Gerald Ford‟s relations with Portugal, Indonesia and East Timor in 1975. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $645, January 2011 – August 2011. To examine President Gerald Ford‘s relations with Portugal, Indonesia and East Timor in 1975 to better understand his presidency and political actions.

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Todd M. Buckingham Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science

ARTICLE Buckingham, T.M., Knous, J., Lowry, J., Mospan, J., & Ode, J., (2011). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 950. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402655.24410.54 There are multiple semi-professional leagues aimed at preparing hockey players with varying age and experience. Regardless of these variations, a common lab test used to evaluate on-ice performance is the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) as it mimics a hockey shift characterized by high anaerobic capability. It is possible that WAnT performance may vary depending on the league in which an athlete participates.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Buckingham, T.M. (2011, February). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Paper presented at the Michigan Conference of the American College of Sports Medicine, Gaylord, MI. Buckingham, T.M. (2011, June). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Paper presented at the National Conference of the American College of Sports Medicine, Denver, CO.

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Douglas R. Butterfield Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

GRANT Butterfield, D.R., Haubenstricker, J.E. (SVSU student), & MacMillan, B.M. (SVSU student) Waste for worms initiative. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2000, January 2011 – April 2011. To create an all-in-one vermicomposting device, in which composting and separating occur simultaneously. Once implemented this redesign will reduce the amount of waste being transported to landfills by SVSU and provide an alternative solution to inorganic fertilizers used by the SVSU Greenhouse.

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Emily E. Butterfield Nursing major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Butterfield, E.E., Daniels, A.R. (SVSU student), Kunik, C.M. (SVSU student), & Shannon, M.E. (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. With the focus on improving evidence based decisions in nursing, attendees were taught to locate, rate and use evidence to make clinical decisions. Several examples were provided including "Best Practices on Discharge Instructions" (Kunik), "Decubitis Ulcer Healing" (Butterfield) and one topic asked for by STIKES Bali nursing school, "Tuberculosis in Indonesia" (Daniels). Attendees learned how to phrase questions to find the best evidence and then how to rate the evidence in terms of strength and decide whether or not to change practice guidelines. Over 1,000 people attended including nurses from various Indonesian islands and countries, physicians and health-care administrators.

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Maegan K. Byer Master of Arts in Communication & Digital Media

ARTICLE Byer, M., & Drew, R.S. (2011). Going home for All Tomorrow's Parties: Indie culture, the Borscht Belt, and the romance of ruins. 11(5), 446-452. In 2008 it was announced that All Tomorrow‘s Parties, an independent music festival originating in the U.K., would make its first-ever appearance in the Eastern U.S. at Kutsher‘s Country Club in Monticello, New York. As a die-hard indie music fan who happens to have grown up in Monticello and spent a good part of my youth navigating Kutsher‘s in various roles, this particular harmonic convergence of Borscht Belt culture and indie culture served as an opportunity for reflection, remembrance, and ethnographic investigation. In this paper I watch, wander, converse, and dust off old diaries and photos, tacking between multiple roles as music maven, lapsed Jew, and upstate yokel, trying to make sense of indie‘s mining of the past for authentic experience and of my own ambivalent quest for a home in modernity.

GRANT Byer, M.K. Cassette culture. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $1314, May 2010 – January 2011. To discover why home recording became a pioneering medium in bridging distances among creators and consumers before virtual connections were available.

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Curt S. Chalabian Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Chalabian, C.S., Alam, M.S., Nitz, J.W. (SVSU student), & Parimoo, V. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered charging station for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles at Saginaw Valley State University. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Nicholas T. Chernich Music Education major

MUSICAL COMPOSITION Chernich, Nicholas T. ―Walking Together.‖ For solo marimba (4.5-octave), Medium (ca. 7:00) Greensboro, NC: C. Alan Publications (18130), 2011. The title, Walking Together, comes from a black and white photograph of two children walking down a dirt road lined by oak trees leading to a plantation. I applied this title to walks with my grandmother and imitated the serene atmosphere in the music. The piece begins with a soothing and reflective rolled section that first introduces the main theme in the upper voice. Throughout the piece you can hear this main theme transformed through rhythmic development and variation. It builds to a climax with a joyful flurry of sixteenth notes. The theme returns at the end in a tranquil setting that concludes with a summary of the opening chords. This piece is dedicated to my grandfather, Theophile V. Franek, for his love of education and music that influenced the person I am today.

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Sarah L. Coe Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Coe, S., & Fisher, A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Use of occupationbased interventions by occupational therapists in the clinical setting. th Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the findings of their survey study exploring the perceptions of occupational therapists in the state of Michigan regarding the benefits and barriers associated with the use of occupation-based interventions in clinical settings. The researchers discussed the role of occupation-based practice in occupational therapy, and recent research examining the effectiveness of this approach in a variety of clinical settings. An overview of the results of their study, including findings regarding the use of occupation-based interventions by occupational therapists; their perceptions regarding the benefits and barriers associated with utilizing occupation-based interventions in the clinic; and ways in which therapists are currently implementing occupation-based interventions in the clinical setting; were also provided. Using the feedback from their survey as a guide, the researchers also discussed techniques to overcome challenges associated with using occupationbased interventions in the clinical setting.

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Jeffrey A. Conner Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

GRANT Conner, J.A. [Faculty PI: S. Sepanski] Field programmable gate arrays. Michigan Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate and Graduate Fellowship grant, $2500, 2011.

PAPER Conner, J.A. (2011, March). An elliptic curve cryptosystem over Zp. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. This work studies Elliptic Curve Cryptosystem (ECC). ECC is a form of encryption using elliptic curves to encode messages based on the senders private key and the receivers public key (similar to the RSA algorithm). The overhead on ECC can be significantly reduced compared to the RSA algorithm due to similar security with a much smaller key size. Generating keys by the session allows us to further increase security, without substantial increases to key size. Our implementation will initially be written in the C programming language. If time permits we hope to further optimize encryption by breaking sections of code down using the software/hardware Co-Design. This will allow us to distribute the ECC‘s message encoding over parallel processors (and FPGA clusters) instead of using an entirely software approach.

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Courtney (Cruz) Rex Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Cruz, C., Beach, J. (SVSU student), Hartman, J. (SVSU student), Moyer, S. (SVSU student), & Nagayda, J. (2011, March). Parent perceptions of the effectiveness of services for their adult children with autism spectrum th disorder. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the findings of their phenomenological study exploring three parents‘ perspectives of the effectiveness of the transition planning services provided to their adult children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The results of parent interviews indicated that their children received varying amounts of transition planning services, which were limited in effectiveness. Parents consistently reported the importance of mainstreaming to allow their children to interact with non-disabled peers in a natural setting. Parents also emphasized the importance of advocacy and involvement in finding services, and ―tough love‖ in helping their children to reach maximal independence in vocational and independent living skills as they transitioned to adulthood. The researchers used their findings to develop recommendations for services that could promote a more successful transition into adulthood.

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Samantha J. Danbert Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Danbert, S.J. (2011, February). Exercise is Medicine: How to get involved. Paper presented at the Michigan Conference of the American College of Sports Medicine, Gaylord, MI.

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Amy R. Daniels Nursing major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Butterfield, E.E., Daniels, A.R. (SVSU student), Kunik, C.M. (SVSU student), & Shannon, M.E. (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. With the focus on improving evidence based decisions in nursing, attendees were taught to locate, rate and use evidence to make clinical decisions. Several examples were provided including "Best Practices on Discharge Instructions" (Kunik), "Decubitis Ulcer Healing" (Butterfield) and one topic asked for by STIKES Bali nursing school, "Tuberculosis in Indonesia" (Daniels). Attendees learned how to phrase questions to find the best evidence and then how to rate the evidence in terms of strength and decide whether or not to change practice guidelines. Over 1,000 people attended including nurses from various Indonesian islands and countries, physicians and health-care administrators.

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Kaitlyn M. DuCharme Exercise Science major

PAPERS DuCharme, K., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations. DuCharme, K., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State Universityâ€&#x;s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%.

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However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations.

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281


Noah T. Essenmacher English major

PAPER Essenmacher, N.T., & Segel, K.W. (2011, March). Forugh Farrokhzad: A twentieth-century poetic voice for the twenty-first century. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. th

The 20 -century Iranian poet Forugh Farrokhzad is revered by Iranian both inside Iran in the diaspora and her work has been translated into many languages, including English. Despite these translations, Farrokhzad‘s work is not well known in the English-speaking world. This presentation is designed to introduce Farrokhzad‘s life and poetry, with a goal of encouraging the audience to seek out her works and introduce them to others. Each presenter will introduce and discuss one of her poems– focusing on what drew us to this particular work.

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Brenton J. Fetting Major undecided

GRANT Fetting, B.J. Assessing Ecosystem Health and Pollution in Michigan's Lower Peninsula Using Parasite-Host Relationships in Various Species of Frogs. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $4115, January 2011 – current. To assess Michigan‘s ecosystems by surveying parasite-host relationships along with water sample analysis in order to further increase our knowledge and understanding of parasite-host relationships and habitat conservation.

PAPERS Fetting, B., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State University‟s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%. However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations. Fetting, B., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting

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of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations.

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Zachry R. Finta Major undecided

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Finta, Z.R., Becker, E.D. (SVSU student), Bond, S.M. (SVSU student), Wendorf, J.E. (SVSU student), & Hernandez, G. (2011, October). Cultural extravaganza: An afternoon of Spanish cinema. Paper presented at the Michigan World Language Association Conference, Lansing, MI.

Research Bulletin 2011

285


Allison J. Fisher Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Coe, S., & Fisher, A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Use of occupationbased interventions by occupational therapists in the clinical setting. th Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the findings of their survey study exploring the perceptions of occupational therapists in the state of Michigan regarding the benefits and barriers associated with the use of occupation-based interventions in clinical settings. The researchers discussed the role of occupation-based practice in occupational therapy, and recent research examining the effectiveness of this approach in a variety of clinical settings. An overview of the results of their study, including findings regarding the use of occupation-based interventions by occupational therapists; their perceptions regarding the benefits and barriers associated with utilizing occupation-based interventions in the clinic; and ways in which therapists are currently implementing occupation-based interventions in the clinical setting; were also provided. Using the feedback from their survey as a guide, the researchers also discussed techniques to overcome challenges associated with using occupationbased interventions in the clinical setting.

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Korey J. Force International Studies major

GRANT Force, K.J. Tlatelolco, Mexico Student Massacre of 1968. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2,249, December 2009 – May 2011. To investigate primary historical documents in order to examine the role that Mexican women played in the Tlatelolco, Mexico Student Massacre of 1968 and its aftermath.

Research Bulletin 2011

287


Jade K. Fulton Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Fulton, J., Knous, J., Lowry, J., Ode, J., & Peterson, J. (SVSU student) (2011). Cardiovascular disease risk in volunteer firefighters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 771. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402143.94799.8f Cardiovascular related events are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths in firefighters. Currently, many firefighter divisions rely on volunteer firefighters. With the increased dependence on volunteer firefighters, it is important to evaluate the fitness and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of these individuals. However, few studies have examined the CVD risk in volunteer firefighters.

GRANT Fulton, J.K., & Peterson, J.R. The Effect of a Wellness Program on Injury Prevention, Physical Activity Levels, Cardiovascular Risks, Physical Fitness in Firefighters. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $3500, December 2009 – May 2011. To evaluate changes in physical activity, fitness, cardiovascular disease risk, and injury in firefighters participating in a wellness program.

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Ashley M. Gainforth Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Gainforth, A., Halder, B. (SVSU student), Hennessey, A. (SVSU student), Herlache, E., Jaqua, J. (SVSU student), & Winkle, M. (2011, March). Techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess emotional th readiness of clients: A survey. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey study exploring the use and effectiveness of techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess the emotional readiness of clients applying for assistance dogs. Working from the perspective of ―assistance dogs as a form of assistive technology,‖ the researchers presented an overview of the findings of their nationwide survey of Assistance Dogs International-affiliated training centers, including information regarding techniques utilized by training centers to assess the emotional readiness of assistance dog applicants, and the relative success of these techniques. The researchers also discussed approaches that professionals (such as occupational therapists) who work with assistance dog teams can use to promote successful client-dog matches.

Research Bulletin 2011

289


Erik H. Gibelyou Music major

GRANT Gibelyou, E.H. Rome Festival: Chamber Music Festival. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $6,573, April 2011 – August 2011. To help fund a trip to Rome to take part in the 3 week performanceintensive music event 2011 Chamber Music Seminar of the Rome Festival.

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Joshua D. Gittings Mechanical Engineering major

GRANT Gittings, J.D. Effect of Silicon on the Impact Toughness and Tensile Strength of Plain Carbon Steels. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $5291, January 2011 – current. To assess Michigan‘s ecosystems by surveying parasite-host relationships along with water sample analysis in order to further increase our knowledge and understanding of parasite-host relationships and habitat conservation.

Research Bulletin 2011

291


Lisa M. Golding Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Golding, L., Niedzielski, S. (SVSU student), & Yaklin, K. (SVSU student), (2011, March). Perceptions of the transition from education to the workforce for people with hearing impairments. Paper presented at The th 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the results of their phenomenological study examining the experiences of people with hearing impairments in regards to the services provided by educational and rehabilitation professionals to facilitate the transition from post-secondary education into the workforce. The researchers highlighted participants‘ reported feelings about the helpfulness of services received during the school-to-work transition process; the role of support from family, friends, and rehabilitation professionals in promoting successful transitions; and barriers that affected the job search process. Information regarding supports, practices, and accommodations to promote more successful school-towork transitions for persons with hearing impairments, was also provided. Using the feedback from participants, the researchers provided suggestions for additional skills that should be taught during primary and secondary school to promote improved outcomes for students with hearing impairments who are making the transition from higher education to the workforce.

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Kendall K. Gonyea Occupational Therapy major

POSTER PRESENTATION Gonyea, K., & Jaime, J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Health promotion and obesity prevention through occupational therapy: A survey. Poster presented at The 24th Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey exploring practices utilized by school-based occupational therapists to promote health and prevent obesity within school systems in the state of Michigan, and barriers that prevent therapists from becoming involved with health and wellness programming in schools. The results of the survey indicated a lack of therapists addressing this issue, with many participants expressing their belief that health promotion and obesity prevention is not within the occupational therapy scope of practice. In their poster, the researchers discussed how health and wellness promotion fits into the occupational therapy scope of practice, and highlighted interventions used by respondents to promote health and wellness in schools. Using the feedback from their survey as a guide, the researchers proposed methods that could be used by therapists to address the ―obesity epidemic‖ in the schools, and overcome barriers preventing OT involvement in wellness programming.

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Nicole M. Grzenia Nursing major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Grzenia, N.M., Auernhamer, K.L. (SVSU student), Latuszek, K.L. (SVSU student), & Shannon, M.E. (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. Students from Bali, Thailand and SVSU presented information about nursing in each respective country. Students presented information about their particular university, nursing education, nursing gender statistics, age of nurses, ethnicity/race statistics, salaries and locations where nurses work. Nursing responsibilities were also compared as well as the role of advanced practice nurses. We also discussed some challenges the 3 countries faced in terms of the nursing workforce.

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Michael J. Gubody Electrical Engineering major

PAPER Gubody, M.J., & Lee, T-C. (2011, March). C++ skip-list optimizated implementation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. In this paper, we study the data structure of a skip-list. A skip-list is a container structure similar to a typical list container, although benefiting in search and insert operations due to being inherently sorted and a nearly binary-search optimization. An implementation is being developed that allows elements to retain both an unsorted push-back insertion and the faster search and insert benefits, while providing a C++ standard library container interface. The project will provide a library consisting of several implementations of skip-lists. These implementations will vary, consisting of static or maximum variable skip-list height, unique or non-unique element containment, and the unsorted or sorted internal ordering. Iterators for the implementations will also be provided, in keeping with the std lib container interface.

Research Bulletin 2011

295


Jamey G. Hackel Electrical Engineering major

PAPER Hackel, J., Alam, M.S., Alqhtani, A. (SVSU student), & Barnes, B.A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility of off-grid residential photovoltaic system utilizing hydrogen storage. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

296

Saginaw Valley State University


Elizabeth A. Halder Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Halder, B., Gainforth, A. (SVSU student), Hennessey, A. (SVSU student), Herlache, E., Jaqua, J. (SVSU student), & Winkle, M. (2011, March). Techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess emotional th readiness of clients: A survey. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey study exploring the use and effectiveness of techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess the emotional readiness of clients applying for assistance dogs. Working from the perspective of ―assistance dogs as a form of assistive technology,‖ the researchers presented an overview of the findings of their nationwide survey of Assistance Dogs International-affiliated training centers, including information regarding techniques utilized by training centers to assess the emotional readiness of assistance dog applicants, and the relative success of these techniques. The researchers also discussed approaches that professionals (such as occupational therapists) who work with assistance dog teams can use to promote successful client-dog matches.

Research Bulletin 2011

297


Jerika S. Hartman Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Hartman, J.S., Cruz, C. (SVSU student), Beach, J. (SVSU student), Moyer, S. (SVSU student), & Nagayda, J. (2011, March). Parent perceptions of the effectiveness of services for their adult children with th autism spectrum disorder. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the findings of their phenomenological study exploring three parents‘ perspectives of the effectiveness of the transition planning services provided to their adult children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The results of parent interviews indicated that their children received varying amounts of transition planning services, which were limited in effectiveness. Parents consistently reported the importance of mainstreaming to allow their children to interact with non-disabled peers in a natural setting. Parents also emphasized the importance of advocacy and involvement in finding services, and ―tough love‖ in helping their children to reach maximal independence in vocational and independent living skills as they transitioned to adulthood. The researchers used their findings to develop recommendations for services that could promote a more successful transition into adulthood.

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Jason E. Haubenstricker Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

GRANT Haubenstricker, J.E., Butterfield, D.R. (SVSU student), & MacMillan, B.M. (SVSU student) Waste for worms initiative. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2000, January 2011 – April 2011. To create an all-in-one vermicomposting device, in which composting and separating occur simultaneously. Once implemented this redesign will reduce the amount of waste being transported to landfills by SVSU and provide an alternative solution to inorganic fertilizers used by the SVSU Greenhouse.

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Aimee M. Hennessey Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Hennessey, A., Gainforth, A. (SVSU student), Halder, B. (SVSU student), Herlache, E., Jaqua, J. (SVSU student), & Winkle, M. (2011, March). Techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess emotional th readiness of clients: A survey. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey study exploring the use and effectiveness of techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess the emotional readiness of clients applying for assistance dogs. Working from the perspective of ―assistance dogs as a form of assistive technology,‖ the researchers presented an overview of the findings of their nationwide survey of Assistance Dogs International-affiliated training centers, including information regarding techniques utilized by training centers to assess the emotional readiness of assistance dog applicants, and the relative success of these techniques. The researchers also discussed approaches that professionals (such as occupational therapists) who work with assistance dog teams can use to promote successful client-dog matches.

300

Saginaw Valley State University


Brock A. Humphries Bachelor of Science in Biology

PAPER Humphries, B., Lange, G.M., & Short, J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Assessment of the potential for use of the earthworm (lumbricus rubellus) as a model for studying endocrine disruption: Effects of triclosan on growth, development, & behavior. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. In organisms, the endocrine system is arguably the most sensitive to disruption by exogenous exposure to chemical compounds in the environment. The array of compounds that have been found to disrupt the endocrine system is vast and includes many commonly used compounds in agriculture, manufacturing, and even in day-to-day life. Unfortunately, endocrine disruption of this sort may lead to catastrophic effects on growth, development, behavior, and even fecundity in exposed organisms. In the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at Saginaw Valley State University, we have traditionally studied endocrine disruption utilizing a common rodent model. However, recently we have begun to explore additional research models, especially invertebrate models. We have found significant value in a fruit fly model, but there have been some limitations that warrant us to identify an additional invertebrate model to more completely explore the potential effects of endocrine disruption. In the present work, the reddish brown earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus is assessed for its use in testing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC). The EDC examined in the present work is Triclosan, a chlorophenol compound that has found widespread use as an antibacterial and antifungal agent in a wide array of consumer products. Tests developed to assess endocrine disruption are described and the results of these tests are explored specifically for Triclosan but also for the long-term viability of this species in future EDC work.

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Hillary J. Jacobs Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Jacobs, H.J., Alam, M.S., Plachta, M. (SVSU student), & Spreeman, M. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Design of a photovoltaic array for the power and energy demand of Founders Hall at SVSU. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

302

Saginaw Valley State University


Jessika P. Jaime Occupational Therapy major

POSTER PRESENTATION Jaime, J.P., & Gonyea, K. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Health promotion and obesity prevention through occupational therapy: A survey. th Poster presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey exploring practices utilized by school-based occupational therapists to promote health and prevent obesity within school systems in the state of Michigan, and barriers that prevent therapists from becoming involved with health and wellness programming in schools. The results of the survey indicated a lack of therapists addressing this issue, with many participants expressing their belief that health promotion and obesity prevention is not within the occupational therapy scope of practice. In their poster, the researchers discussed how health and wellness promotion fits into the occupational therapy scope of practice, and highlighted interventions used by respondents to promote health and wellness in schools. Using the feedback from their survey as a guide, the researchers proposed methods that could be used by therapists to address the ―obesity epidemic‖ in the schools, and overcome barriers preventing OT involvement in wellness programming.

Research Bulletin 2011

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Jacquelyn N. Jaqua Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Jaqua, J., Gainforth, A. (SVSU student), Halder, B. (SVSU student), Hennessey, A. (SVSU student), Herlache, E., & Winkle, M. (2011, March). Techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess emotional th readiness of clients: A survey. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers presented the findings of their survey study exploring the use and effectiveness of techniques used by assistance dog organizations to assess the emotional readiness of clients applying for assistance dogs. Working from the perspective of ―assistance dogs as a form of assistive technology,‖ the researchers presented an overview of the findings of their nationwide survey of Assistance Dogs International-affiliated training centers, including information regarding techniques utilized by training centers to assess the emotional readiness of assistance dog applicants, and the relative success of these techniques. The researchers also discussed approaches that professionals (such as occupational therapists) who work with assistance dog teams can use to promote successful client-dog matches.

304

Saginaw Valley State University


Bianca A. Jenkins Guest student

POSTER PRESENTATION Jenkins, B.A., Berkobien, A.D. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011, October). Formation of tubular precipitation structures from seed crystals and flow control. Poster presented at the Midland Section of The American Chemical Society Fall Scientific Meeting, Alma, MI.

Research Bulletin 2011

305


Pamela L. Johnson Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

GRANT Johnson, P.L. A qualitative investigation of the expectations of African American mothers in Saginaw and their impact on their child's academic achievement. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $1131, January 2011 – November 2011. To add qualitative research to previously published quantitative research on maternal expectations and gender differences in academic achievement.

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Saginaw Valley State University


Oliver Keller Biology major

ARTICLE Keller, O., Stine, S.A. (SVSU student), & Taber, S.W. (2011). First Michigan record and second report of a big-headed fly (diptera: Pipunculidae) parasitic upon crane flies (Diptera: Pipunculidae). Michigan Academician, 4(1), 128-134. A recently discovered parasite of crane flies is reported for the first time from Michigan. The single previous report of such a natural enemy was the original discovery in Pennsylvania as published in 2007. A larva of a big-headed fly of the genus Nephrocerus Zetterstedt exited the abdomen of an adult female Tipula tephrocephala Loew that was caught while in flight. The host species and the state are new records for this parasitoid genus.

GRANT Keller, O. The Taber-Keller Trap. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $4,595, April 2011 – current. To modify and enhance the current design of the Taber-Keller Trap and to expand the on-going research.

POSTER PRESENTATION Keller, O., & Taber, S.W., (2011, November). The Taber-Keller trap: A modification of the Berlese funnel to entrap flying insects. Poster presented at The Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, Reno, NV.

Research Bulletin 2011

307


Kayla B. Kibbey Electrical Engineering major

PAPER Kibbey, K.B., Alam, M.S., Malott, A. (SVSU student), & McClelland, M. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Residential versus large-scale feasibility of solar panel installation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Saginaw Valley State University


Matthew M. Kline Mechanical Engineering major

FUNDED RESEARCH Kline, M.M., Hart, B., McLean, D.M. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. Optimization of LED lighting for scalable algae growth. Sequest, LLC, $22,000, March 2011 – March 2012. A prototype development study on the use of LED lighting to manufacture algae for biodiesel and animal feed applications.

INVITED RESEARCH Kline, M.M. (SVSU student), Hart, B., Kotsidou, K., LaVigne, K. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. Elastic properties from sound velocity measurements: Effects of powder metallurgical variables. The Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation, unfunded, on-going. In 2011, Drs. Kotsidou and Schilling were invited by the Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation to conduct experimental research on the use of ultrasonics to measure the effects of manufacturing process variables on the elastic properties of powder metallurgical alloys. The aforementioned organizations are providing test samples and chemical analytical services at no cost. The anticipated results are rather meaningful to the powder metallurgical industry and three publications summarizing the work to date are forthcoming. Dr. Schilling was invited to conduct this work based on his previous ultrasonics research with advanced ceramics.

Research Bulletin 2011

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Alisha L. Kuhtic Pre-Med major

PAPER Kuhtic, A.L., Beyett, T. (SVSU student), Lackey, N.Q. (SVSU student), & Lange, G.M. (2011, March). Behavioral and reproductive effects of exposure to the endocrine disruptor atrazine. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Today, a serious problem facing the Great Lakes region is pollution. One of the most toxic classes of pollutants is herbicides, which accumulate from the large volume of agricultural runoff present in the Midwest. The herbicide atrazine has drawn significant attention for its observed adverse ecological and physiological effects. Atrazine is a chlorinated, general purpose broadleaf herbicide which is a known estrogen mimic with strong endocrine disrupting capabilities. Recent studies have shown low-level chronic exposure to atrazine to be capable of reversing sexual development in male frogs. We report on reproductive, developmental, and behavioral effects of chronic atrazine exposure in Long-Evans rats. Rats received a daily subcutaneous injection of 1 Âľg atrazine suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose. Various behavioral and reproductive tests are performed on pups that were exposed to atrazine in utero. Behavioral tests implemented include elevated-plus mazes, grip strength, and righting response. Reproductive success, litter size, and mating behaviors are also used to assess reproductive related effects. The combination of reproductive and behavioral data can be used to assess the effects of atrazine on organisms in contaminated environments.

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Caitlin M. Kunik Nursing major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Butterfield, E.E., Daniels, A.R. (SVSU student), Kunik, C.M. (SVSU student), & Shannon, M.E. (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. With the focus on improving evidence based decisions in nursing, attendees were taught to locate, rate and use evidence to make clinical decisions. Several examples were provided including "Best Practices on Discharge Instructions" (Kunik), "Decubitis Ulcer Healing" (Butterfield) and one topic asked for by STIKES Bali nursing school, "Tuberculosis in Indonesia" (Daniels). Attendees learned how to phrase questions to find the best evidence and then how to rate the evidence in terms of strength and decide whether or not to change practice guidelines. Over 1,000 people attended including nurses from various Indonesian islands and countries, physicians and health-care administrators.

Research Bulletin 2011

311


Nancy Q. Lackey Biology major

PAPER Lackey, N. Q., Beyett, T. (SVSU student), Kuhtic, A. (SVSU student), & Lange, G.M. (2011, March). Behavioral and reproductive effects of exposure to the endocrine disruptor atrazine. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Today, a serious problem facing the Great Lakes region is pollution. One of the most toxic classes of pollutants is herbicides, which accumulate from the large volume of agricultural runoff present in the Midwest. The herbicide atrazine has drawn significant attention for its observed adverse ecological and physiological effects. Atrazine is a chlorinated, general purpose broadleaf herbicide which is a known estrogen mimic with strong endocrine disrupting capabilities. Recent studies have shown low-level chronic exposure to atrazine to be capable of reversing sexual development in male frogs. We report on reproductive, developmental, and behavioral effects of chronic atrazine exposure in Long-Evans rats. Rats received a daily subcutaneous injection of 1 Âľg atrazine suspended in 0.5% methylcellulose. Various behavioral and reproductive tests are performed on pups that were exposed to atrazine in utero. Behavioral tests implemented include elevated-plus mazes, grip strength, and righting response. Reproductive success, litter size, and mating behaviors are also used to assess reproductive related effects. The combination of reproductive and behavioral data can be used to assess the effects of atrazine on organisms in contaminated environments.

312

Saginaw Valley State University


Kristen L. Latuszek Nursing major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Auernhamer, K.L., Grzenia, N.M. (SVSU student), Latuszek, K.L. (SVSU student), & Shannon, M.E. (2011, May). Evidence based practice in nursing. Paper presented at the Seminar on the Nursing Global Workforce, conducted by Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Bali in collaboration with Nursing College Network, Thailand, Bali, Indonesia. Students from Bali, Thailand and SVSU presented information about nursing in each respective country. Students presented information about their particular university, nursing education, nursing gender statistics, age of nurses, ethnicity/race statistics, salaries and locations where nurses work. Nursing responsibilities were also compared as well as the role of advanced practice nurses. We also discussed some challenges the 3 countries faced in terms of the nursing workforce.

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Kevin J. LaVigne Electrical Engineering major

INVITED RESEARCH LaVigne, K.J., Hart, B., Kline, M.M. (SVSU student), Kotsidou, K., & Schilling, C. Elastic properties from sound velocity measurements: Effects of powder metallurgical variables. The Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation, unfunded, on-going. In 2011, Drs. Kotsidou and Schilling were invited by the Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation to conduct experimental research on the use of ultrasonics to measure the effects of manufacturing process variables on the elastic properties of powder metallurgical alloys. The aforementioned organizations are providing test samples and chemical analytical services at no cost. The anticipated results are rather meaningful to the powder metallurgical industry and three publications summarizing the work to date are forthcoming. Dr. Schilling was invited to conduct this work based on his previous ultrasonics research with advanced ceramics.

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Anthony J. Lucio Chemistry (ACS) major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Lucio, A. J., Karpovich, D.S., & Robbins, L. (2011, March). Emulsions utilizing heavy fuel oil and crude glycerin: A surfactant study. Paper st presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Lucio, A.J., Karpovich, D.S., Polega, J.R. (SVSU student), & VanWert, M.E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Inspiring youth through chemistry: st Outreach where it matters. Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA. Lucio, A.J. (2011, August).Shape evolution of polymer structures with thin residual layers prepared by nanoimprint lithography. (2011). Paper presented at The United States Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology Student Colloquium, Gaithersburg, MD. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is a patterning technique with numerous applications in nanotechnology. Here we measured the shape evolution of nanoimprinted polymer gratings during thermal annealing using a spectroscopic ellipsometer and analyze the data using a rigorouscoupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Previous work on the project successfully characterized the shape evolution of the NIL gratings and it was found that samples with ~10 nm residual layers decay more slowly. The work presented here focuses on polymer gratings of poly (t-butyl styrene) (PtBS), poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS). Highly entangled polymers were annealed above their glass transition temperatures (Tg) for 600 minutes to study the reflow characteristics. Our results indicate that the polymer samples with thin residual layers need to be annealed well above the Tg (at Tg+25째C) in order for the reflow process to occur in a timely manner. All the samples increased in height before eventually decaying. Possible mechanisms include: chemical grafting or crosslinking to the substrate from high temperature and pressure and physical adsorption to the substrate, as a result of the imprinting process. These results suggest that physical adsorption of the polymer to the substrate is the likely mechanism for slow reflow in polymer samples with thin residual layers.

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Lucio, A. J., Karpovich, D.S., Mize, H.E. (SVSU student), & Robbins, L. (2011, November). Emulsion technology for heavy fuel oil/ crude glycerin th emulsions. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI.

GRANT Lucio, A.J. [K.Kearns, faculty PI] Summer undergraduate research fellowship. United States Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, $8050, May 2011 – September 2011.

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Alan J. Malott Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

PAPER Malott, A.J., Alam, M.S., Kibbey, K.B. (SVSU student), & McClelland, M. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Residential versus large-scale feasibility of solar panel installation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Brennan M. MacMillan Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

GRANT MacMillan, B.M., Butterfield, D.R. (SVSU student), & Haubenstricker, J.E. (SVSU student) Waste for worms initiative. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2000, January 2011 – April 2011. To create an all-in-one vermicomposting device, in which composting and separating occur simultaneously. Once implemented this redesign will reduce the amount of waste being transported to landfills by SVSU and provide an alternative solution to inorganic fertilizers used by the SVSU Greenhouse.

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Steven G. Mankoci Biochemistry major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Mankoci, S.G., Karpovich, D.S., Sivy, T.L., & Pratama, F. (SVSU student) (2011, November). Raman spectroscopic analysis of cellulose and soy th protein: Bioplastic building blocks. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI.

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Matthew J. McClelland Chemical Physics major

PAPER McClelland, M.J., Alam, M.S., Kibbey, K.B. (SVSU student), & Malott, A.J. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Residential versus large-scale feasibility of solar panel installation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Denise M. McLean Biology major

FUNDED RESEARCH McLean, D.M., Hart, B., Kline, M.M. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. Optimization of LED lighting for scalable algae growth. Sequest, LLC, $22,000, March 2011 – March 2012. A prototype development study on the use of LED lighting to manufacture algae for biodiesel and animal feed applications.

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Gregory R. McNish Computer Science major

GRANT McNish, G.R. [M. Marzjarani, faculty PI] Statistical analysis of the weather data. Michigan Space Grant Consortium undergraduate fellowship grant, $2500, 2011. NASA satellites are capable of collecting massive data sets about the planets. In particular MISR and MODIS are two NASA instruments providing the researchers with such huge data sets. In this project, I will limit my study to the weather data sets. Weather data are inherently noisy. That is, they have to be cleaned. The next step would be to develop a statistical model which would be appropriate for the data set(s). I will apply functional data methods such as a Bayesian or a hierarchical Bayesian model to analyze the data sets. The results of this research will be presented to the October 2012 meeting of the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, and possibly in another professional conference (such as Joint Statistical Meeting-Stat. Compo Sec). At the conclusion, the outcome of this research will be organized and submitted to a professional journal for publication (such as Proceedings of Stat. Compo Sec).

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Scott R. Merrow Professional & Technical Writing major

ELECTRONIC RESOURCE Merrow, S.R., Arroyo, S., Carter, G.V., & Leston, R. (2011). The chora of the twin towers. Enculturation: A Journal of Rhetoric, Writing, and Culture, (10), retrieved from http://www.enculturation.net/the-chora-of-the-twintowers This project sets a new precedent for sustained scholarly investigation in the medium of video. Determined to examine how the former ground zero and current World Trade Center site could be thought of as a space for invention (but also mourning), the authors draw upon the ancient concept of ―chora.‖ Conceived of by ancient philosophers and reconceived by contemporary rhetoricians as an undecided, undetermined space to be filled by the unknown, the chora has always been a vessel for non-generic possibility. Through combinations and juxtapositions of journalism, art, music, sound, image, and theory, the authors put choric possibilities into play and present a project that plays the post-9/11 world in various tonalities, timbres, and tunings.

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Tyler R. Mietz Electrical Engineering major

POSTER PRESENTATION Mietz, T.R., Alam, M.S., Sponseller, K.T. (SVSU student), & Warzocha, F.K. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility study of a solar powered vehicle charging station. Poster presentation at the Solar Summit, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Hannah E. Mize Chemistry major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Mize, H.E., Karpovich, D.S., Lucio, A.J. (SVSU student), & Robbins, L. (2011, November). Emulsion technology for heavy fuel oil/ crude glycerin th emulsions. Paper presented at The 67 Annual Fall Scientific Meeting of the Midland Section of the American Chemical Society, Alma College, Alma, MI.

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Samantha M. Moyer Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Moyer, S., Beach, J. (SVSU student), Cruz, C. (SVSU student), Hartman, J. (SVSU student), & Nagayda, J. (2011, March). Parent perceptions of the effectiveness of services for their adult children with autism spectrum th disorder. Paper presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the findings of their phenomenological study exploring three parents‘ perspectives of the effectiveness of the transition planning services provided to their adult children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The results of parent interviews indicated that their children received varying amounts of transition planning services, which were limited in effectiveness. Parents consistently reported the importance of mainstreaming to allow their children to interact with non-disabled peers in a natural setting. Parents also emphasized the importance of advocacy and involvement in finding services, and ―tough love‖ in helping their children to reach maximal independence in vocational and independent living skills as they transitioned to adulthood. The researchers used their findings to develop recommendations for services that could promote a more successful transition into adulthood.

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Stephanie R. Niedzielski Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Niedzielski, S.R., Golding, L. (SVSU student), & Yaklin, K. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Perceptions of the transition from education to the workforce for people with hearing impairments. Paper presented at The 24th Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the results of their phenomenological study examining the experiences of people with hearing impairments in regards to the services provided by educational and rehabilitation professionals to facilitate the transition from post-secondary education into the workforce. The researchers highlighted participants‘ reported feelings about the helpfulness of services received during the school-to-work transition process; the role of support from family, friends, and rehabilitation professionals in promoting successful transitions; and barriers that affected the job search process. Information regarding supports, practices, and accommodations to promote more successful school-towork transitions for persons with hearing impairments, was also provided. Using the feedback from participants, the researchers provided suggestions for additional skills that should be taught during primary and secondary school to promote improved outcomes for students with hearing impairments who are making the transition from higher education to the workforce.

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Joseph W. Nitz Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Nitz, J.W., Alam, M.S., Chalabian, C. (SVSU student), & Parimoo, V. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered charging station for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles at Saginaw Valley State University. Presented at the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Nicole R. Paquette Professional & Technical Writing major

REPORT Paquette, N., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., & Vasold, K. (SVSU student) (2011). Saginaw County, Michigan: Community report card. Report commissioned by Alliance Saginaw and the Saginaw Community Foundation. Retrievable from http://www.alignmentsaginawcountyreport.org/community-report.html

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Vishal Parimoo Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

GRANT Parimoo, V. Portable Solar Powered Water Filtration Unit. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2300, January 2011 – May 2011. To create a relatively cost-effective solar-powered water filtration unit that, when completed will have the potential to supply stranded bodies in disaster areas with approximately five hundred gallons of clean water every day.

PAPER Parimoo, V., Alam, M.S., Chalabian, C. (SVSU student), & Nitz, J.W. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Solar powered charging station for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles at Saginaw Valley State University. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Joel T. Parsons Mechanical Engineering major

ARTICLE Anon. (2011, July). Densification of digested solids. BioCycle, 52(7), 16. The editor of the magazine wrote a brief article summarizing the work of two SVSU mechanical engineering students, Joel Parsons and Lindsay White, as well as Bruce Hart (Independent Testing Lab Manager) including research on prototyping a method to produce fertilizer from organic waste.

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Amanda Pavlicek Computer Science major

GRANT Pavlicek, A. [T-C. Lee, faculty PI] (2011, October). Securing the mission: An analysis on a proposal of NASA mission software implementation and execution-using Petri-Nets. Michigan Space Grant Consortium undergraduate fellowship grant, $2500, May 2011 – April 2012.

POSTER PRESENTATION Pavlicek, A. (2011, November). Securing the mission: An analysis on a proposal of NASA mission software implementation and execution-using Petri-Nets. Paper presented at the Annual Fall Conference of the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. This poster presents a research on the implementation and installation on NASA mission software systems and applications. Mission software is based on bettering all phases of a NASA space mission, in which examples of such are ground and flight data systems and on-orbit performance management. This category of software is accountable for the scientific progress of a mission and the safety of NASA astronauts, space shuttle, and other aeronautical equipment. While some mission software systems are successful in their objectives, other software, especially systems purposed in protecting NASA crews in unpredictable situations that need improvement so the risk of danger can decrease. The purpose of this research is to improve the validation and performance of mission safety software. If any programming implementation is necessary, it will be initially written in the C++ programming language using PetriNets. This will help us enhance the security of future NASA missions.

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Jacob K. Pederson Chemistry major

ARTICLE Anon. (2011, May). Saginaw study explores corn waste to energy. BioCycle, 52(5), 8-9. The editor of the magazine wrote a brief article summarizing the work of SVSU chemistry student, Jacob Peterson, as well as Bruce Hart (Independent Testing Lab Manager) including research on prototyping a method to produce biodegradable composites from corn processing waste.

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Jillian R. Peterson Exercise Science major

ARTICLE Peterson, J.R., Fulton, J. (SVSU student), Knous, J., Lowry, J., & Ode, J. (2011). Cardiovascular disease risk in volunteer firefighters. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 771. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402143.94799.8f Cardiovascular related events are the leading cause of on-the-job deaths in firefighters. Currently, many firefighter divisions rely on volunteer firefighters. With the increased dependence on volunteer firefighters, it is important to evaluate the fitness and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk of these individuals. However, few studies have examined the CVD risk in volunteer firefighters.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Peterson, J.R. (2011, February). Cardiovascular disease risk on volunteer firefighters. Paper presented at the Michigan Conference of the American College of Sports Medicine, Gaylord, MI. Peterson, J.R. (2011, June). Cardiovascular disease risk on volunteer firefighters. Paper presented at the National Conference of the American College of Sports Medicine, Denver, CO.

GRANT Peterson, J.R., & Fulton, J.K. The Effect of a Wellness Program on Injury Prevention, Physical Activity Levels, Cardiovascular Risks, Physical Fitness in Firefighters. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $3500, December 2009 – May 2011. To evaluate changes in physical activity, fitness, cardiovascular disease risk, and injury in firefighters participating in a wellness program.

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Ryan J. Phillips Biology major

PAPERS Phillips, R.J., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State Universityâ€&#x;s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%. However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations. Phillips, R., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Uchel, T. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of

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behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations.

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Timothy D. Pionk Biology Major

GRANT Pionk, T.D. Procrastination in college students. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $1000, May 2010 – current. Validity and overlap between subgroups of procrastination in college students as well as comparing several components of personality and self efficacy to methods of procrastination.

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Matthew R. Plachta Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Plachta, M.R., Alam, M.S., Jacobs, H. (SVSU student), & Spreeman, M. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Design of a photovoltaic array for the power and energy demand of Founders Hall at SVSU. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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James R. Polega Biology major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Polega, J.R., Karpovich, D.S., Lucio, A.J. (SVSU student), & VanWert, M.E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). “Inspiring youth through chemistry: st Outreach where it matters. Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

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Marvin M. Pollum Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Pollum, M.M., & Sivy, T.L. (2011, March). Separation and detection of the methylbutenol isomers responsible for a dose-dependent cytotoxicity. st Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

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Fredy S. Pratama Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry

ARTICLE Pratama, F.S., Robinson, H.F. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse chemical gardens. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 389(1-3), 127-133. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.03.031 Reverse chemical gardens consist of hollow tubular structures that form in a downward direction from a mechanically held silicate crystal immersed in a metal salt solution. As a model case for this reaction–precipitation system, we investigate the composition, morphology, and microstructure of these tubes in the framework of an experimental model based on reselected reactant concentrations and flow rates. In these experiments, the heavier waterglass solution is being injected downward into large volumes of lighter calcium chloride solution. The resulting hollow precipitation tubes have diameters that range from 0.5 to 3.0 mm. The tube walls have a typical width measurement of 40 _m and are gradient materials. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy-dispersive Xray spectral data identify calcium and silicon as the major components within the exterior and interior surfaces, respectively. Finally, we compare the behavior, chemical composition, and morphology of tubular precipitation structures created upon the hydrodynamic injection of calcium chloride into a large volume of sodium silicate solution carried out in the upward direction.

PAPER Pratama, F.S., Robinson, H.F. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011, March). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse chemical gardens. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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POSTER PRESENTATION Pratama, F.S., Robinson, H.F. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011, March). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse st chemical gardens. Poster presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

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Jeremy R. Reinert Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

PAPER Reinert, J., & Peterson, G. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Effects of red clothing on ratings of attractiveness and dominance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Hannah F. Robinson Biochemistry major

ARTICLE Robinson, H.F., Pratama, F.S. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse chemical gardens. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 389(1-3), 127-133. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2011.03.031 Reverse chemical gardens consist of hollow tubular structures that form in a downward direction from a mechanically held silicate crystal immersed in a metal salt solution. As a model case for this reaction–precipitation system, we investigate the composition, morphology, and microstructure of these tubes in the framework of an experimental model based on reselected reactant concentrations and flow rates. In these experiments, the heavier waterglass solution is being injected downward into large volumes of lighter calcium chloride solution. The resulting hollow precipitation tubes have diameters that range from 0.5 to 3.0 mm. The tube walls have a typical width measurement of 40 _m and are gradient materials. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy-dispersive Xray spectral data identify calcium and silicon as the major components within the exterior and interior surfaces, respectively. Finally, we compare the behavior, chemical composition, and morphology of tubular precipitation structures created upon the hydrodynamic injection of calcium chloride into a large volume of sodium silicate solution carried out in the upward direction.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Robinson, H.F., & Sivy, T.L. (2011, March). Detection of cystathionine ketimine and lanthionine ketimine in the urine of those with Down syndrome. Paper presented at The 241st American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

PAPER Robinson, H.F., Pratama, F.S. (SVSU student), & Pagano, J.J. (2011, March). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse

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chemical gardens. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

POSTER PRESENTATION Robinson, H.F., Pagano, J.J., & Pratama, F.S. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Spatially resolved analysis of calcium-silica tubes in reverse st chemical gardens. Poster presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

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Gretchen M. Roekle Biochemistry major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS Roekle, G., Hart, B., Karpovich, D., Meisel, E.C. III, & Schilling, C. (2011, March). Biomass research at Saginaw Valley State University. Presented at the Community Workshop on Agri-energy, Evart, MI. Invited presentation summarizing bioenergy research at SVSU. Roekle, G., Schilling, C., & Bond, A. (SVSU student), (2011, April). Biofuels: Waste, crops, production, harvest, processing. Paper presented at the Michigan Bioenergy Conference, Oakland University, Rochester, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels. Roekle, B., Hart, B., Karpovich, D., Meisel, E.C. III, & Schilling, C. (2011, June). Biodegradable sporting clays from corn-based, agricultural residues: Market study and manufacturability analysis. Presented at the annual meeting of the Corn Marketing Program of Michigan, Lansing, MI. A summary of manufacturability studies and market analysis regarding the conversion of ethanol processing wastes to biodegradable sporting clays. Roekle, G., Bond, A.C. (SVSU student), Hart, B., & Schilling, C. (2011, September). Liquid biofuel feedstocks. Presented at the Great Lakes Bay Region Biomass /Ag Energy Summit, Saginaw, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels.

POSTER PRESENTATION Roekle, G. (SVSU student), Schilling, C., Berry, J. (University of Denver), Bond, A. (SVSU student), Das, D. (Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands), & Keinath, S. (Michigan Molecular Institute). (2011, May).

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st

21 century renewable fuels, energy, and materials initiative. Poster presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Program Review Meeting Washington, DC. A cost- and energy-balance for production of switchgrass and miscanthus and their subsequent conversion to fuel ethanol.

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Danielle M. Scian Biochemistry major

GRANT Schian, D.M. Going greener: Using "On Water" reactions to recycle catalytic species. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2910, January 2011 – current. To determine if it is possible to recycle catalytic species through the utilization of an immiscible mixture of aqueous and organic solvent.

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Jessica A. Short Biology major

PAPER Short, J.A., Humphries, B. (SVSU student), & Lange, G.M. (2011, March). Assessment of the potential for use of the earthworm (lumbricus rubellus) as a model for studying endocrine disruption: Effects of triclosan on growth, development, & behavior. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. In organisms, the endocrine system is arguably the most sensitive to disruption by exogenous exposure to chemical compounds in the environment. The array of compounds that have been found to disrupt the endocrine system is vast and includes many commonly used compounds in agriculture, manufacturing, and even in day-to-day life. Unfortunately, endocrine disruption of this sort may lead to catastrophic effects on growth, development, behavior, and even fecundity in exposed organisms. In the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at Saginaw Valley State University, we have traditionally studied endocrine disruption utilizing a common rodent model. However, recently we have begun to explore additional research models, especially invertebrate models. We have found significant value in a fruit fly model, but there have been some limitations that warrant us to identify an additional invertebrate model to more completely explore the potential effects of endocrine disruption. In the present work, the reddish brown earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus is assessed for its use in testing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC). The EDC examined in the present work is Triclosan, a chlorophenol compound that has found widespread use as an antibacterial and antifungal agent in a wide array of consumer products. Tests developed to assess endocrine disruption are described and the results of these tests are explored specifically for Triclosan but also for the long-term viability of this species in future EDC work.

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Kyle T. Sponseller Electrical Engineering major

POSTER PRESENTATION Sponseller, K.T., Alam, M.S., Meitz, T.R. (SVSU student), & Warzocha, F.K. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility study of a solar powered vehicle charging station. Poster presentation at the Solar Summit, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Matthew E. Spreeman Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

PAPER Spreeman, M.E., Alam, M.S., Jacobs, H. (SVSU student), & Plachta, M.R. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Design of a photovoltaic array for the power and energy demand of Founders Hall at SVSU. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Kristina M. Stilson Secondary Education major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Stilson, K., & Sivy, T.L. (2011, March). Compounds in helianthus tuberosus as possible antifeedants against leptiontarsa decemlineata on st solanum tuberosum cultivars. Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

GRANT Stilson, K.M. Artichoke deterrent for potato beetles. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2500, May 2010 – April 2011. To determine if possible antifeedant compounds in Jerusalem Artichoke foliage, stem, and tubers can serve as a deterrent for Colorado Potato Beetles.

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Sarah A. Stine Bachelor of Science in Biology

ARTICLE Stine, S.A., Keller, O. (SVSU student), & Taber, S.W. (2011). First Michigan record and second report of a big-headed fly (diptera: Pipunculidae) parasitic upon crane flies (Diptera: Pipunculidae). Michigan Academician, 4(1), 128-134. A recently discovered parasite of crane flies is reported for the first time from Michigan. The single previous report of such a natural enemy was the original discovery in Pennsylvania as published in 2007. A larva of a big-headed fly of the genus Nephrocerus Zetterstedt exited the abdomen of an adult female Tipula tephrocephala Loew that was caught while in flight. The host species and the state are new records for this parasitoid genus.

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Jennifer M. Strandbergh Occupational Therapy major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Strandbergh, J. (2011, March). Perceptions of individuals who participated in the healthRHYTHMS protocol: A phenomenological study. Paper th presented at The 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researcher presented the findings of her phenomenological study exploring the perceptions of five women who participated in the HealthRHYTHMS group drumming protocol for the purposes of teambuilding, increasing cohesiveness with a staff/team, and/or decreasing stress. The researcher provided a brief review of current research regarding the use of the HealthRHYTHMS protocol with various populations, and how this group drumming program fits into occupational therapy‘s focus on holistic health care. The researcher then provided an overview of the findings of her study, which indicated that participants found the protocol allowed them to engage in a unique form of selfexpression which enabled them to balance their ―energy‖ and develop a sense of ―connection‖ to themselves and others. The researcher discussed how findings from this study can help clinicians, including occupational therapists, in determining if the HealthRHYTHMS protocol would be an appropriate, meaningful group intervention for use with their clients as part of psychosocial practice.

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Ashley R. Tupper Nursing major

GRANT Tupper, A.R. No falls on my watch. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $2,827, 2011. A 6-month ―No Falls on My Watch‖ initiative for proposed dissemination at each of five local partnering hospitals.

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Toribiong A. Uchel Biology major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Sweeting, R.M., Bavar, A.M., Crane, A. T., Moser, M.N., Rossignol, J., Schloop, M.T., Tharp, M.A. (all Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University), Uchel T. (SVSU student), & Dunbar, G.L.(Field Neurosciences Institute Laboratory for Restorative Neurology, Central Michigan University, and Field Neurosciences Institute, Saginaw, MI). (2011, November). Mesenchymal stem cell transplants in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington‟s Disease: Passage and source variations. Paper presented at the Neuroscience 2011 Conference, Washington, DC.

PAPERS Uchel, T.A., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State University‟s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%. However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations. Uchel, T.A., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), & Wall, E. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting

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of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations.

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Meaghan E. VanWert Secondary Education major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION VanWert, M.E., Karpovich, D.S., Lucio, A.J. (SVSU student), & Polega, J.R. (SVSU student) (2011, March). “Inspiring youth through chemistry: st Outreach where it matters. Paper presented at The 241 American Chemical Society National Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

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Kerri L. Vasold Exercise Science major

REPORT Vasold, K.L., Callejo PĂŠrez, D., & Paquette, N. (SVSU student) (2011). Saginaw County, Michigan: Community report card. Report commissioned by Alliance Saginaw and the Saginaw community foundation. Retrievable from http://www.alignmentsaginawcountyreport.org/community-report.html

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Elizabeth A. Wall Biology major

PAPERS Wall, E.A., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), & Uchel, T.A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A case study of reproductive morphology in Saginaw Valley State Universityâ€&#x;s Norway rats (rattus norvegicus) used in research and general population maintenance. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Prior to the fall of 2009, the rates of successful pregnancies maintained in SVSU‘s Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) population was roughly 70%. However, a sharp decline in successful pregnancies (i.e. litters) has resulted in our exploration of environmental conditions that may have impacted our population and its reproductive success. This case study explores the factors we have thus far explored in regards to this decline in offspring. We report on the testing of hypotheses regarding the Bruce Effect, mating environment and holding environment. Furthermore, we explore via histology the male and female reproductive morphology of our populations. Wall, E.A., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), DuCharme, K. (SVSU student), Fetting, B. (SVSU student), Lange, G.M., Phillips, R. (SVSU student), & Uchel, T.A. (SVSU student) (2011, March). A preliminary study of the behavioral effects of the endocrine disruptor diisononyl phthalate on neonatal rats (rattus norvegicus). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Diisononyl Phthalate (DINP), a known endocrine disruptor, is widely used as a plasticizer in paints, dyes, adhesives, coatings on electrical wires and cables, plastic tubing and plastic food containers. Previous research suggests that exposure to DINP can increase weight gain and insulin resistance in human males and act as an antiandrogen in the body of mammals. Previous research conducted in the Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Laboratory (BNEL) at Saginaw Valley State University suggests that DINP also plays a role in altering an array of behaviors of organisms. This study assesses the effects of DINP exposure

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at the neonatal level in the Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus). Neonatal exposure could potentially induce far different effects on growth, development and behavior than has been seen in our previous experiments using this compound when exposure was at the prenatal or adult level alone. Anogenital statistics and righting responses are recorded at parturition for all pups. Anxiety, as tested using the elevated plus maze, neuromuscular development, balance and coordination are all tested and recorded. These data are compared to control populations.

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Sienna J. Wallace Bachelor of Science in Biology

PAPER Wallace, S.J., Blaschka, D. (SVSU student), & Lange, G.M. (2011, March). Effects of triclosan on development and behavior of the fruit fly (drosophila melanogaster). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI. Triclosan is a chlorophenol compound that has found widespread use as an antibacterial and antifungal agent in a wide array of consumer products. In use for only the last 40 years, triclosan was initially found most commonly in soaps. However, during the last ten years triclosan has been incorporated into many more everyday items including deodorants, toothpastes, mouthwash, and has been infused into plastics used for kitchen utensils, toys, and refuse and food storage bags. The chemical structure of triclosan is in the class of phenols, and the compound is considered a chlorinated cyclic compound. This means triclosan has a strong potential to mimic steroid hormones in the body if ingested, leading to endocrine system disruption in the body. In this study we will use a fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) model to determine and assess the endocrine disruption potential of triclosan on development by examining neural growth, behavior and fecundity in these organisms. Behavioral and locomotor tests are reported for larval, pupae, and adult flies following triclosan exposure and compared to control populations undergoing similar tests.

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Katherine E. Warren Nursing major

GRANT Warren, K.E. Advanced Practice Nurses' Health Policy Involvement. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $5733, January 2011 – current. To examine Advanced Practice Nurses‘ health policy involvement, as well as their perceptions (powerlessness and self efficacy) regarding health policy.

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Filip K. Warzocha Electrical Engineering major

POSTER PRESENTATION Warzocha, F.K., Alam, M.S., Meitz, T.R. (SVSU student), & Sponseller, K.T. (SVSU student) (2011, March). Feasibility study of a solar powered vehicle charging station. Poster presentation at the Solar Summit, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, MI.

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Jamie E. Wendorf English major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Wendorf, J.E., Becker, E.D. (SVSU student), Bond, S.M. (SVSU student), Finta, Z.R. (SVSU student), & Hernandez, G. (2011, October). Cultural extravaganza: An afternoon of Spanish cinema. Paper presented at the Michigan World Language Association Conference, Lansing, MI.

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Lucinda M. Wenzlick Bachelor of Science in Biology

GRANT Wenzlick, L.M. The effects of the neuromodulator serotonin on muscle activity. SVSU Student Research & Creativity Institute, $4,619, December 2009 – January 2011. To examine how muscle activity and strength are modified by serotonin within crayfish.

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Lindsay C. White Mechanical Engineering Major

ARTICLE Anon. (2011, July). Densification of digested solids. BioCycle, 52(7), 16. The editor of the magazine wrote a brief article summarizing the work of two SVSU mechanical engineering students, Joel Parsons and Lindsay White, as well as Bruce Hart (Independent Testing Lab Manager) including research on prototyping a method to produce fertilizer from organic waste.

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Kayla Yaklin Occupational Therapy Major

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Yaklin, K., Golding, L. (SVSU student), & Niedzielski, S. (SVSU student), (2011, March). Perceptions of the transition from education to the workforce for people with hearing impairments. Paper presented at The th 24 Annual Midwest Deans‘ Occupational Therapy Research Conference, St. Louis, MO. The researchers discussed the results of their phenomenological study examining the experiences of people with hearing impairments in regards to the services provided by educational and rehabilitation professionals to facilitate the transition from post-secondary education into the workforce. The researchers highlighted participants‘ reported feelings about the helpfulness of services received during the school-to-work transition process; the role of support from family, friends, and rehabilitation professionals in promoting successful transitions; and barriers that affected the job search process. Information regarding supports, practices, and accommodations to promote more successful school-towork transitions for persons with hearing impairments, was also provided. Using the feedback from participants, the researchers provided suggestions for additional skills that should be taught during primary and secondary school to promote improved outcomes for students with hearing impairments who are making the transition from higher education to the workforce.

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University Wide

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Craig Aimar Assistant Vice President/Director of Retention for Enrollment Management Appointed to SVSU in 2002 Ed.S. Saginaw Valley State University M.Ed. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Saginaw Valley State University

GRANT Aimar, C., Callejo PÊrez, D., Dorne, C. (Principal Investigator), Daly, S., Morgan, S., & Wilson, S. Project PASS (Promoting Success for All Students), King-Chavez-Parks Select Student Support Services grant #38-1798800. KCP Initiative of the Michigan Department of Career Development, $684,000, November 2011 – September 2017. Grant received over six years aimed at improving the retention of economically and academically disadvantaged students by providing 145 freshman participants per year intensive academic skill development and social and cultural exposure within three components. Those components are 1) a transition component to assist student in bridging the major thresholds of the college experience to ensure academic success and persistence to graduation; 2) Learning Communities, and 3) tutor training, especially in Writing and Math/Science. These three components will form a synergistic unit to facilitate the development of appropriate academic skills among participating students through personal, academic and career counseling; academic tutoring; remedial instruction; study skills support; cultural events; access to financial aid assistance; academic advisement; and leadership and life skills development. The project will identify a sample of high-risk, high need freshmen students, considering factors such as ACT score, first generation-in-college, and Pell eligibility. Student mentors will encourage students' participation in extracurricular activities, such as student organizations, volunteer service, and other forms of campus engagement. A key feature of the student success program is MAP-Works, an online case management system to track referrals and closely follow up with the students in the program. This initiative will also include a sample of high school-age students participating in the Great Lakes Bay Early College program where they can attend college courses and receive college credit prior to graduating high school. The project will also collaborate to a degree with the existing GEAR-UP grant (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs), a bridge

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program for incoming freshmen offered by SVSU\'s Office of Diversity Programs. The project will involve extensive data collection, analyses, and assessment.

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Lilianna Aniol-Jedrzejek International Guest Scholar Poznan University of Technology, Poland Winter, 2011 Ph.D. Jagiellonian University, Physics Department, Krak贸w M.S. Jagiellonian University, Physics Department, Krak贸w

BOOK CHAPTER Aniola-Jedrzejek, L., & Boehm, D. (2011). From myopia to global vision via international collaboration: Lessons from research and experience. In S. Kelsey & K. St. Amant (Eds.), Computer-Mediated Communication: Issues and Approaches in Education (pp. 120-134). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. One effective strategy to prepare students to be successful participants in a globalized world is the use of online collaborative projects with students from other countries. New technologies and new opportunities for such collaboration may reshape teaching practices in unexpected ways. Three challenges need to be addressed for such projects to be successful: the specific circumstances of the classes, the structure and patterns of team interactions, and the technologies for collaboration; strategies include careful student preparation, well-designed assignments, monitoring of student progress, and a vision of the workplace of the future.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Aniola-Jedrzejek, L. & Boehm, D. (Poznan University of Technology, Poland) (2011, February). A template for self-analysis of common errors in English that occur with speakers of polish (adaptable for other languages). Paper presented at The 4th International Conference on Writing Research, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. Speakers of other languages struggle with patterns of error in those aspects of English that most differ from their first language. The presentation provided a template for self-analysis of common errors in English that occur with speakers of Polish, based on common error categories identified by scholars such as Dana Ferris and others. Such a template can be an invaluable tool for self-analysis, assisting Polish

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speakers of English to identify and overcome their common patterns of error; the template is adaptable for speakers of other languages.

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Tamara Barrientos Director, Regional Mathematics and Science Center Appointed to SVSU in 2001 Ed.D. candidate, Central Michigan University M.A.T. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Saginaw Valley State University

GRANTS Barrientos, T.A. Algebraic thinking across grades 3-8. Michigan Department of Education, $231,530, January 2010 – September 2011. Barrientos, T.A. 2010-2011 Mathematics and Science Center, Michigan Department of Education – Mathematics and Science Centers Program, $58,209, October 2010 – September 2011. Barrientos, T.A. SMEK plus – STEM summer camp. Saginaw Community Foundation, $5250, April 2011 – July 2011. Barrientos, T.A. Moving mathematical thinking forward. Michigan Department of Education, $223,535, June 2011 – September 2012. Barrientos, T.A. 2011-2012 Mathematics and Science Center, Michigan Department of Education – Mathematics and Science Centers Program, $58,209, October 2011 – September 2012.

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Diane Boehm Director, University Writing Program Director, Instructional Support Programs Appointed to SVSU in 1995 M.A. University of Wisconsin at Madison B.A. Concordia College, Chicago

ARTICLE Boehm, D., Blumner, J. (University of Michigan-Flint), Crawford, M.A. (Central Michigan University), Raica-Klotz, H., & Wynn Perdue, S. (Oakland University) (2011). Writing center data: What do we need and how should we use it? East Central Writing Centers Association Newsletter (fall). Retrieved from http://ecwca.org/newsletter/fall-2011issue/ Writing Center data collection varies from one Center to the next; the data we collect and analyze depend on numerous factors: the programs and systems we use to collect the data, the questions we bring to our analysis, and the arguments we wish to make about the quality and quantity of our work. This article presented a comparison of the instruments, methods, rationale and usage of data in each Writing Center, followed by a narrative from each Writing Center discussing its current data collection practices and their impact.

BOOK CHAPTER Boehm, D., & Aniola-Jedrzejek, L. Poznan (University of Technology, Poland) (2011). From myopia to global vision via international collaboration: Lessons from research and experience. In S. Kelsey & K. St. Amant (Eds.), Computer-Mediated Communication: Issues and Approaches in Education (pp. 120-134). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. One effective strategy to prepare students to be successful participants in a globalized world is the use of online collaborative projects with students from other countries. New technologies and new opportunities for such collaboration may reshape teaching practices in unexpected ways. Three challenges need to be addressed for such projects to be successful: the specific circumstances of the classes, the structure and patterns of team

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interactions, and the technologies for collaboration; strategies include careful student preparation, well-designed assignments, monitoring of student progress, and a vision of the workplace of the future.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATION Boehm, D., & Aniola-Jedrzejek, L. (Poznan University of Technology, Poland) (2011, February). A template for self-analysis of common errors in English that occur with speakers of polish (adaptable for other languages). th Paper presented at The 4 International Conference on Writing Research, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. Speakers of other languages struggle with patterns of error in those aspects of English that most differ from their first language. The presentation provided a template for self-analysis of common errors in English that occur with speakers of Polish, based on common error categories identified by scholars such as Dana Ferris and others. Such a template can be an invaluable tool for self-analysis, assisting Polish speakers of English to identify and overcome their common patterns of error; the template is adaptable for speakers of other languages.

GRANT Boehm, D., & Hunyadi, E.T. Saginaw Bay Writing Project grant. National Writing Project, $35,000, July 1 2011 – June 30, 2012.

PANEL PRESENTATION Boehm, D., Blumner, J. (University of Michigan-Flint), Crawford, M.A. (Central Michigan University), Raica-Klotz, H., & Wynn Perdue, S. (Oakland University) (2011, March). Writing center data: What do we need and how should we use it? Panel presentation at the East Central Writing Centers Association Conference, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI. Panel members from four different Michigan Writing Centers presented the data collection methods used in each writing center, including the tools used to collect the data and the ways each uses the data. Each Writing Center presented its own view on data collection and the need for data. Perspectives ranged from those who see data collection as essential to research-based practice, to those who believe data collection may detract from student-centeredness. The panel concurred that consistent data

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collection is essential to carrying out a writing center‘s mission.

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Sara Brooks Clark Studio Arts Technician Appointed to SVSU in 1992 M.F.A. Ohio University B.F.A. Illinois Wesleyan

ART EXHIBITIONS Brooks Clark, S. (Artist). (2011, February-March). Rainy Daze and Tuning In. University Faculty and Student Exhibition, Creative 360, Midland, MI. Brooks Clark, S. (Artist). (2011, June-July). Rx and daily agenda. Area Universities Invitational. Alden B. Dow Museum of Science and Art, Midland, MI. Brooks Clark, S. (Artist). (2011, August). Geode vases and bowls. Made in Michigan, Area Artist Showcase Gallery Walk, Bay City MI. Brooks Clark, S. (Artist). (2011, September-November). 18 new works, including Ablution, 5 Views and Aspirations. Art in the Heart of the City [4 person invitational exhibit], Saginaw Art Museum, Saginaw, MI. Brooks Clark, S. (Artist). (2011, November). 12 pieces from Geode and Vase series including Big Hairy Deal. Michigan Clay & Porcelain Artists Invitational, Greater Flint Arts Council, Flint, MI Brooks Clark, S. (Artist). (2011, December). Vase and Little Black Dress bottle. Art in the Heart of the City, Saginaw Art Museum Regional Exhibit, Saginaw, MI

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Stephen Daly Data Analyst Appointed to SVSU in 2011 B.B.A. Saginaw Valley State University

GRANT Daly, S., Aimar, C., Callejo PÊrez, D., Dorne, C. (Principal Investigator), Morgan, S., & Wilson, S. Project PASS (Promoting Success for All Students), King-Chavez-Parks Select Student Support Services grant #38-1798800. KCP Initiative of the Michigan Department of Career Development, $684,000, November 2011 – September 2017. Grant received over six years aimed at improving the retention of economically and academically disadvantaged students by providing 145 freshman participants per year intensive academic skill development and social and cultural exposure within three components. Those components are 1) a transition component to assist student in bridging the major thresholds of the college experience to ensure academic success and persistence to graduation; 2) Learning Communities, and 3) tutor training, especially in Writing and Math/Science. These three components will form a synergistic unit to facilitate the development of appropriate academic skills among participating students through personal, academic and career counseling; academic tutoring; remedial instruction; study skills support; cultural events; access to financial aid assistance; academic advisement; and leadership and life skills development. The project will identify a sample of high-risk, high need freshmen students, considering factors such as ACT score, first generation-in-college, and Pell eligibility. Student mentors will encourage students' participation in extracurricular activities, such as student organizations, volunteer service, and other forms of campus engagement. A key feature of the student success program is MAP-Works, an online case management system to track referrals and closely follow up with the students in the program. This initiative will also include a sample of high school-age students participating in the Great Lakes Bay Early College program where they can attend college courses and receive college credit prior to graduating high school. The project will also collaborate to a degree with the existing GEAR-UP grant (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs), a bridge program for incoming freshmen offered by SVSU\'s Office of Diversity Programs. The project will involve extensive data collection, analyses, and assessment.

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Clifford Dorne Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management & Professor of Criminal Justice Appointed to SVSU in 1998 Ph.D. University at Albany, State University of New York M.A. University at Albany, State University of New York M.P.A. C.W. Post Center of Long Island University B.A. C.W. Post Center of Long Island University

GRANT Dorne, C. (Principal Investigator), Aimar, C., Callejo PÊrez, D., Daly, S., Morgan, S., & Wilson, S. Project PASS (Promoting Success for All Students), King-Chavez-Parks Select Student Support Services grant #38-1798800. KCP Initiative of the Michigan Department of Career Development, $684,000, November 2011 – September 2017. Grant received over six years aimed at improving the retention of economically and academically disadvantaged students by providing 145 freshman participants per year intensive academic skill development and social and cultural exposure within three components. Those components are 1) a transition component to assist student in bridging the major thresholds of the college experience to ensure academic success and persistence to graduation; 2) Learning Communities, and 3) tutor training, especially in Writing and Math/Science. These three components will form a synergistic unit to facilitate the development of appropriate academic skills among participating students through personal, academic and career counseling; academic tutoring; remedial instruction; study skills support; cultural events; access to financial aid assistance; academic advisement; and leadership and life skills development. The project will identify a sample of high-risk, high need freshmen students, considering factors such as ACT score, first generation-in-college, and Pell eligibility. Student mentors will encourage students' participation in extracurricular activities, such as student organizations, volunteer service, and other forms of campus engagement. A key feature of the student success program is MAP-Works, an online case management system to track referrals and closely follow up with the students in the program. This initiative will also include a sample of high school-age students participating in the Great Lakes Bay Early College program where they can attend college courses and receive college credit prior to graduating high school. The project will also collaborate to a degree with the existing GEAR-UP grant (Gaining

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Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs), a bridge program for incoming freshmen offered by SVSU\'s Office of Diversity Programs. The project will involve extensive data collection, analyses, and assessment.

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Bruce Hart Manager, Independent Testing Lab Center for Business & Economic Development Appointed to SVSU in 1993 B.S. Saginaw Valley State University

ARTICLES Anon. (2011, May). Saginaw study explores corn waste to energy. BioCycle, 52(5), 8-9. The editor of the magazine wrote a brief article summarizing the work of SVSU chemistry student, Jacob Peterson, as well as Bruce Hart (Independent Testing Lab Manager) including research on prototyping a method to produce biodegradable composites from corn processing waste. Anon. (2011, July). Densification of digested solids. BioCycle, 52(7), 16. The editor of the magazine wrote a brief article summarizing the work of two SVSU mechanical engineering students, Joel Parsons and Lindsay White, as well as Bruce Hart (Independent Testing Lab Manager) including research on prototyping a method to produce fertilizer from organic waste.

PRESENTATIONS Hart, B., Karpovich, D., Meisel, E.C. III, Roekle, G. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. (2011, March). Biomass research at Saginaw Valley State University. Presented at the Community Workshop on Agri-energy, Evart, MI. Invited presentation summarizing bioenergy research at SVSU. Hart, B., Karpovich, D., Meisel, E.C. III, B., Hart, B., Roekle, & Schilling, C. (2011 , June). Biodegradable sporting clays from corn-based, agricultural residues: Market study and manufacturability analysis. Presented at the annual meeting of the Corn Marketing Program of Michigan, Lansing, MI.

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A summary of manufacturability studies and market analysis regarding the conversion of ethanol processing wastes to biodegradable sporting clays. Hart, B., Bond, A. C., Roekle, G., (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. (2011, September). Liquid biofuel feedstocks. Presented at the Great Lakes Bay Region Biomass /Ag Energy Summit, Saginaw, MI. Invited presentation on recent advances in the cultivation of perennial grasses and their conversion to biofuels.

FUNDED RESEARCH Hart, B., Kline, M.M, (SVSU student), McLean, D.M. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. Optimization of LED lighting for scalable algae growth. Sequest, LLC, $22,000, March 2011 – March 2012. A prototype development study on the use of LED lighting to manufacture algae for biodiesel and animal feed applications. Hart, B., & Kullgren, T.E. Development of high strength, high fatigue wind blade spars. U.S. Department of Energy, Small Business Innovation Research, $20,000, 2011-2013. The Independent Testing Lab at SVSU is a subcontractor to Fulcrum Composites, Midland, MI, on this grant to test new composite materials intended for use on large wind machines blades. Mr. B. Hart, Lab Manager, and Dr. T. Kullgren, consultant, work with SVSU engineering student assistants to test the axial loading, bending and fatigue properties of a new composite material developed by Fulcrum, as well as with the manufacture of samples, giving students an excellent introduction to both composites and the alternative energy industry as well as broad experience in working with and innovative and entrepreneurial small company. The SVSU ISO-certified Independent Laboratory‘s involvement will include the testing, evaluation and validation of research outcomes for Phase I and II projects. This testing will provide a firm foundation on which to execute Phase III Commercialization. The SVSU Mechanical Engineering Department will collaborate with Dr. T. Kullgren, resulting in broader teaching opportunities utilizing various components of the project as real-world examples. This grant is one of two awarded in Michigan.

INVITED RESEARCH Hart, B., Kline, M.M. (SVSU student), Kotsidou, K., LaVigne, K.J. (SVSU student), & Schilling, C. Elastic properties from sound velocity

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measurements: Effects of powder metallurgical variables. The Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation, unfunded, on-going. In 2011, Drs. Kotsidou and Schilling were invited by the Metal Powder Industry Federation and the North American Hoganas Corporation to conduct experimental research on the use of ultrasonics to measure the effects of manufacturing process variables on the elastic properties of powder metallurgical alloys. The aforementioned organizations are providing test samples and chemical analytical services at no cost. The anticipated results are rather meaningful to the powder metallurgical industry and three publications summarizing the work to date are forthcoming. Dr. Schilling was invited to conduct this work based on his previous ultrasonics research with advanced ceramics.

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Elaine Hunyadi Co-Director, Saginaw Bay Writing Project Appointed to SVSU in 2007 M.A. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. State University of New York

GRANT Boehm, D., & Hunyadi, E.T. Saginaw Bay Writing Project grant. National Writing Project, $35,000, July 2011 – June 2012.

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Harry Leaver Executive Director, Center for Business and Economic Development Appointed to SVSU in 2003 B.B.A. Northwood University

BOOK CHAPTER Leaver, H., & Puia, G. M. (2011). Regional diversification. In I. Zuckerberg (Ed.), The Mid-Michigan region: Challenges, responses, the future (pp. 187-194). East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University Press. Many of the challenges posed by Michigan's economy stem from its lack of diversification. For many years, as went Detroit and its auto industry, so went the state. Under the Mid-Michigan U.S. Department of Labor's Workforce Innovation for Regional Economic Development (WIRED) proposal, Saginaw Valley State University and its partners proposed a three-pronged approach to diversifying the regional economy: entrepreneurship, cluster development, and business diversification. The chapter identifies lessons learned under the WIRED program and makes recommendations for future regional economic development directions.

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Saginaw Valley State University


Sherry Morgan Student Progress Coordinator Appointed to SVSU in 2011 M.Ed. Saginaw Valley State University B.A. Saginaw Valley State University

GRANT Morgan, S., Aimar, C., Callejo PÊrez, D., Dorne, C. (Principal Investigator), Daly, S., & Wilson, S. Project PASS (Promoting Success for All Students), King-Chavez-Parks Select Student Support Services grant #38-1798800. KCP Initiative of the Michigan Department of Career Development, $684,000, November 2011 – September 2017. Grant received over six years aimed at improving the retention of economically and academically disadvantaged students by providing 145 freshman participants per year intensive academic skill development and social and cultural exposure within three components. Those components are 1) a transition component to assist student in bridging the major thresholds of the college experience to ensure academic success and persistence to graduation; 2) Learning Communities, and 3) tutor training, especially in Writing and Math/Science. These three components will form a synergistic unit to facilitate the development of appropriate academic skills among participating students through personal, academic and career counseling; academic tutoring; remedial instruction; study skills support; cultural events; access to financial aid assistance; academic advisement; and leadership and life skills development. The project will identify a sample of high-risk, high need freshmen students, considering factors such as ACT score, first generation-in-college, and Pell eligibility. Student mentors will encourage students' participation in extracurricular activities, such as student organizations, volunteer service, and other forms of campus engagement. A key feature of the student success program is MAP-Works, an online case management system to track referrals and closely follow up with the students in the program. This initiative will also include a sample of high school-age students participating in the Great Lakes Bay Early College program where they can attend college courses and receive college credit prior to graduating high school. The project will also collaborate to a degree with the existing GEAR-UP grant (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs), a bridge program for incoming freshmen offered by SVSU\'s Office of Diversity

Research Bulletin 2011

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Programs. The project will involve extensive data collection, analyses, and assessment.

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Saginaw Valley State University


Jessica Mospan Human Performance Laboratory Coordinator Appointed to SVSU in 2010 M.Ed. Bowling Green State University B.A. Baldwin-Wallace College

ARTICLE Mospan, J., Buckingham, T. (SVSU student), Knous, J., Lowry, J., & Ode, J. (2011). Comparison of anaerobic power between two semi-professional ice hockey teams. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 43(5), 950. doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000402655.24410.54 There are multiple semi-professional leagues aimed at preparing hockey players with varying age and experience. Regardless of these variations, a common lab test used to evaluate on-ice performance is the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) as it mimics a hockey shift characterized by high anaerobic capability. It is possible that WAnT performance may vary depending on the league in which an athlete participates.

Research Bulletin 2011

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Andrea Ondish Curator of Education, Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum Appointed to SVSU in 2001 B.F.A. Marywood University M.A. Eastern Illinois University M.F.A. Indiana State University

ART WORKS Ondish, A. (2011, September). Andrea Ondish: Recent work. Art presented at Studio 23, Bay City, MI. Ondish, A. (2011, August). INprint Exhibition. Art presented at Unitarian Universalists Campus, Indianapolis, IN.

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Saginaw Valley State University


Shawn Wilson Director, Office of Multicultural Services Appointed to SVSU in 2011 Ed.D. candidate, Central Michigan University M.Ed. Saginaw Valley State University B.A.A. Central Michigan University

GRANT Wilson, S., Aimar, C., Callejo PÊrez, D., Dorne, C. (Principal Investigator), Daly, S., & Morgan, S. Project PASS (Promoting Success for All Students), King-Chavez-Parks Select Student Support Services grant #38-1798800. KCP Initiative of the Michigan Department of Career Development, $684,000, November 2011 – September 2017. Grant received over six years aimed at improving the retention of economically and academically disadvantaged students by providing 145 freshman participants per year intensive academic skill development and social and cultural exposure within three components. Those components are 1) a transition component to assist student in bridging the major thresholds of the college experience to ensure academic success and persistence to graduation; 2) Learning Communities, and 3) tutor training, especially in Writing and Math/Science. These three components will form a synergistic unit to facilitate the development of appropriate academic skills among participating students through personal, academic and career counseling; academic tutoring; remedial instruction; study skills support; cultural events; access to financial aid assistance; academic advisement; and leadership and life skills development. The project will identify a sample of high-risk, high need freshmen students, considering factors such as ACT score, first generation-in-college, and Pell eligibility. Student mentors will encourage students' participation in extracurricular activities, such as student organizations, volunteer service, and other forms of campus engagement. A key feature of the student success program is MAP-Works, an online case management system to track referrals and closely follow up with the students in the program. This initiative will also include a sample of high school-age students participating in the Great Lakes Bay Early College program where they can attend college courses and receive college credit prior to graduating high school. The project will also collaborate to a degree with the existing GEAR-UP grant (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs), a bridge program for incoming freshmen

Research Bulletin 2011

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offered by SVSU\'s Office of Diversity Programs. The project will involve extensive data collection, analyses, and assessment.

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Saginaw Valley State University


Alphabetical Index of Main Entries Abud, Gary G. Aimar, Craig Al Arfaj, Faisal F.I.

108 372-373 249

Brown-Fackler, Karen M. Buckingham, Todd M. Burkart, Gina

Alam, Mohammad Saad

181-182

Butterfield, Douglas R.

270

Alghafly, Ahmed Jawad Almrjan, Bndr S. Alqhtani, Abdulmajed M.

251 252 250

Butterfield, Emily E. Byer, Maegan K. Callejo PĂŠrez, David M.

271 272 109-113

Alshalan, Anwar Z.M.

253

Carter, Geoffrey V.

Alshalan, Faisal F. Aniol-Jedrzejek, Lilianna Applin, Christopher M.

254 374-375 255

140-141 269 14

15-17

Chalabian, Curt S. Chernich, Nicholas T. Cho, Il-Hyung

273 274 187-189

Clark, Basil A. Clark, Lacreta M.

18-19 114-115 116 275 142-143 276

Arford, Martin Armstrong, David R.

12-13 256

Aryana, Cyrus P. Auernhamer, Kara L. Barnes, Bryant A. Barrientos, Tamara

183 257 258 376

Cline, David Coe, Sarah L. Collins, James J. Conner, Jeffrey A.

Beach, Jessica S. Becker, Eric D.

259 260

Crachiola, Anthony J. Cruz, Courtney (Rex)

Benson, Bethany J. Berkobian, Amber D.

261 262

Dallas, Fenobia Daly, Stephen

190 277 20-21 381

Berry, David Beyett, Tyler S. Blaschka, Delia R. Blecke, Janalou

134-136 263 264-265 137-138

Danbert, Samantha J. Daniels, Amy R. Decker, Sally A. Dix, Monika

278 279 144-146 22

Boehm, Diane Bond, Aaron C.

377-379 266

Donahue, Jesse Dorne, Clifford

23 382-383

267 268 380

Drew, Robert DuCharme, Kaitlyn M. Elfakhani, Said M.

24-25 280-281 78

139 184-186

Essenmacher, Noah T. Fetting, Brenton J.

282 283-284

Bond, Stacy M. Boon, Julie A. Brooks Clark, Sara Brooks Herd, Vanessa Brouet, Stephanie

Research Bulletin 2011

395


Finta, Zachry R. Fisher, Allison J.

285 286

Hillman, Susan L. Hinderer, Drew E.

120-121 35-36

Flatt, Margaret

147

Hitt, James

37

Force, Korey J.

287

Hoffman, Joyce

81

Foss, Julie A. Freed, Alan D. Fulton, Jade K.

26 191-192 288

Horcher, Ann-Marie Huffman, Jaime Humphries, Brock A.

195 154-155 301

Gainforth, Ashley M. Galbraith, Adrienne A. Gardner, Eric Geisler, Mark A.

289 148 27 149-150

Huntley, Deborah R. Hunyadi, Elaine Jacobs, Hillary J. Jaime, Jessika P.

196 387 302 303

Gibelyou, Erik H.

290

Jaksa, Joseph J.

Gittings, Joshua D. Goggins, Kylie M. Golding, Lisa M. Gonyea, Kendall K.

291 79 292 293

Jaqua, Jacquelyn N. Jenkins, Bianca A. Johnson, J. Blake Jorgensen, Beth

304 305 39 40-41

Gould, Jonathon A. Grzenia, Nicole M. Gubody, Michael J. Hackel, Jamey G.

117-118 294 295 296

Johnson, Pamela L. Kaczynski, John L. Karpovich, David S. Kearns, Kenneth L.

306 42 197-199 200

Halder, Elizabeth A. Hansen, Elizabeth

297 119

307 43

Hansen, John C.

193

Keller, Oliver Kelley, Emily Kengni Ncheuguim, Emmanuel

Harmer, Bonnie McKay Harmon, Mary Hart, Bruce Hartman, Jerika S. Hastings, Phyllis G. Haubenstricker, Jason E. Hedquist, Brent C. Hennessey, Aimee M. Herlache, Ellen Hernandez, Gladys Herzog, Bradley Heubo-Kwegna, Olivier

396

38

201

151 28 384-386 298 29-30

Keough, Sara Beth Kibbey, Kayla B. Kline, Matthew M. Knous, Jeremy Koperski, Jeffrey

44-45 308 309 158-157 46

299 31-32

Kotsidou, Kassiani Kuhtic, Alisha L.

202 310

Kullgren, Thomas E.

203

152-153

Kunik, Caitlyn M.

311

33 34 194

Lacey, Kimberly Lackey, Nancy Q. Lange, Gary M.

47-50 312 204-207

300

Saginaw Valley State University


Lange, Rose M. Latuszek, Kristen L.

158-160 313

Nadavulakere, Shiva Nagayda, Janet

88 167 327

LaVigne, Kevin J.

314

Niedzielski, Stephanie R.

Leaver, Harry

388

Nisula, Eric

57

Lee, Dorothy S. Lee, Tai-Chi Lewis, Averetta E.

161 208-209 162-163

Nitz, Joseph W. Ode, Joshua Ofori-Dankwa, Joseph

328 168-169 89

Liu, Cheng-Ching Lively, Debra Lowry, John E. Lucio, Anthony J.

164-165 122 166 315-316

Ondish, Andrea Pagano, Jason J. Pan, Zhidong "Patrick" Paquette, Nicole R.

392 219-220 221 329

Mackie, Wayne

81

Parimoo, Vishal

330

MacMillan, Brennan M. Mahajerin, Enayat Malott, Alan J. Mankoci, Steve G.

318 210-211 317 319

Park, Hong Y. Parsons, Joel T. Pavlicek, Amanda Pederson, Jacob K.

90-91 331 332 333

Martin, Arthur L. Marzjarani, Morteza K. Mathur, Nameeta McClelland, Matthew J.

212-213 214 51 320

Peterson, Gerald Peterson, Jillian R. Phillips, Ryan J. Pionk, Timothy D.

58 334 335-336 337

McLean, Denise M. McNish, Gregory R. Meisel, Edward C. III Merrow, Scott R.

321 322 215-217 323

Plachta, Matthew R. Polega, James R. Pollum, Marvin M. Potts, Mark

Mietz, Tyler R. Millar, Dorothy

338 339 340 92-93

324 123

Prast, Jean Pratama, Fredy S.

170 341-342

Millikin, Marsha Misra, Kaustav

52 82-87

Puia, George M. Rahman, Altaf U.

94-96 222

Mize, Hannah E. Morgan, Sherry

325 389-390

Raica-Klotz, Helen Ravuri, Evelyn D.

59-60 61

Mosher, Michael R. Mospan, Jessica Moyer, Samantha M. Munn, Paul T. Murgan, Rajan

Research Bulletin 2011

53-55 391 326 56 218

Reddy, C. Surender Reinert, Jeremy R. Renna, Thomas J. Rex, Courtney (Cruz) Robinson, Hannah F.

97 343 62 277 344-345

397


Roe, Elizabeth A. Roekle, Gretchen M.

171-173 346-347

Tupper, Ashley R. Tuttle, Robert B.

355 243-245

Ross, Amanda J.

223-224

Uchel, Toribiong A.

356-357

98

Umbarger, Gardner

128

Ross, Rhonda Rzeszutek, David Saha, Arpita Sarkar, Sam

63 225-227 99

VanWert, Meaghan E. Vasold, Kerri L. Vratulis, Vetta

358 359 129-130

Savoy, Suzanne M. Schilling, Christopher Scian, Danielle M. Segel, Kerry W.

174 228-230 348 64-65

Wall, Elizabeth A. Wallace, Sienna J. Warren, Katherine E. Warzocha, Filip K.

360-361 362 363 364

Sepanski, Steven J.

231

Wendorf, Jamie E.

Shannon, Marcia Shepardson, Sally Sherlock, Steve Short, Jessica A.

175-177 232-233 66-67 349

Wenzlick, Lucinda M Wetmore, Jill L. White, Lindsay C. Wilson, Shawn

Sirias, Danilo Sivy, Tami L. Smith, Deborah L. Sparapani, Ervin F.

100 234-235 124 125-126

Yaklin, Kayla Zimmermann, Carol A. Zivich, Matthew

Sponseller, Kyle T. Spreeman, Matthew E. Stilson, Kristina M. Stine, Sarah A.

354 101-102

Sweeting, Rosalyn M. Sype, Gail

236-237 103

Taber, Stephen W. Tapp, Anne R.

238-240 127

Thomas, Brian J. Trdan, Richard Trebing, Diana

68-69 241-242 70

398

366 104 367 393-394 368 73 74

350 351 352 353

Strandbergh, Jennifer M. Surfield, Christopher

Trepanier, Lee D. Trump, Erik

365

71 72

Saginaw Valley State University


Mission The University creates opportunities for individuals to achieve intellectual and personal development through academic, professional, and cultural programs. By fostering an environment of inquiry and openness that respects the diversity of all whom it serves, the University prepares graduates whose leadership and expertise contribute to the advancement of a pluralistic society. The University serves as a cultural and intellectual center dedicated to the pursuit and propagation of knowledge.

Vision The University will provide academic, professional, and cultural programs at the highest level of quality and service; it will achieve national recognition for its programs of distinction. The University‘s graduates shall distinguish themselves and their University through meritorious service, accomplishments, and leadership in the economic, cultural, and civic affairs of a diverse and global society. Through exemplary teaching, research, and engagement with the greater community, the University will also be the premier cultural and intellectual resource for the region‘s schools, governments, businesses, and people.

- Adopted by the Board of Control on March 21, 2005

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Editing, layout and cover design: Laura Peil â—? Printing: SVSU Graphics Center

7400 Bay Road â—?University Center, MI 48710 svsu.edu

SVSU does not discriminate based on race, religion, color, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, age, physical impairment, disability, or veteran status in the provision of education, employment, and other services.

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Saginaw Valley State University


2012 SVSU Research Bulletin