Page 5

In Pucca Saharana Village, again toilets and tube wells were visited. All latrines in village are Dhamaka type. Depth of toilet pits varied from 30 to 40 ft. Toilet seats smelled badly. Plenty of flies were noticed in toilet seat enclosures. In one house, for waste water management also ‘Kui’ was dug. In many places, waste water was collected in small shallow pits and twice a day, accumulated water was sprinkled on the street where it would evaporate naturally. The shallow pits could not soak water. In this village one dry dug well of about 100 ft. depth was seen. Very adjacent to the well, a large water tank or johad was present. But water from tank was not percolating to the well indicating the impervious nature of the floor of the tank. On 29.03.07, a meeting with the Collector, Sriganganagar was arranged. During discussion it was revealed that, govt. has set up a norm that in villages with less than 4000 population house hold water connections are not given. Therefore, in these villages many households depend on their own private bore wells. In Village 3 Y also all latrines in the village are Dhamaka type. In one house, as an exception, vent pipe was fixed on pit, the toilet seat being offset with pan but no trap. The latrine was clean and without flies. On enquiry, it was informed that this was suggested by the mason. This village has a dug well where water level was about 40ft deep. This water was found to be polluted during routine monitoring by PHED. Private bore wells are in use in the village. In Village 3 G (Kaliyan) Dhamaka latrines were similar type. Here, due to nearness to Sriganganagar town, tendency towards construction of septic tank toilet is increasing. Effluent from these septic tanks is let out in open surface drain. The effluent from these drains passes out to a johad formed by waste water from the village. The soil doesn’t absorb sullage from the village. The bore well adjacent to this johad was found to be heavily polluted as reported during the monitoring by PHED. Thus, septic tanks might become problematic for the village. In Village 4 ML, households have similar type of Dhamaka toilets. Here in a school, latrine with pan, trap, chamber and two ‘Kuis’, similar to twin pit latrine were constructed but was not brought into use because of apprehension and non availability of tap water connection. In this village many houses had Dhamaka toilets with latrine pan, trap and occasionally vent pipe. The percentage coverage with Dhamaka Latrines is very high. Any where between 70% to 90% households have such latrines in some villages. Pit for the toilet is dug manually by charging a labour rate at about 6 to 8 Rupees per foot of depth. Hence it is affordable for most of the families. During the field visit, it was noticed that in most of the cases the urine was getting into the drop hole in very haphazard manner as the channel for the passage of urine was very haphazard. Further, the obnoxious odour pervaded the toilet seat enclosure. The 5

Dhamaka latrines in Rajasthan, India.  
Dhamaka latrines in Rajasthan, India.  

Study about appropriateness of design, possibility of conversion to sanitary latrine and extent of groundwater pollution caused Dhamaka lat...

Advertisement