Issuu on Google+

WI NTER2017


BAY AREA

NONPROFITS Rich Borell ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERS Founder & CEO

S

or

Ken Packer Treasurer

Gay Krause Frank Ponikvar Executive Director Secretary Krause Center for Linda Holland Board Member InnovationFoothill College Advisory Council Members

Karen Tucker

Gay Krause Executive Director CEO Churchill Club Krause Center for Innovation Foothill College Karen Tucker CEO Churchill Club

CONNECTING VOLUNTEERS & DONORS TO LOCAL Porcia Silverberg NON PROFITS

Leadership Development

Porcia Silverberg Leadership DevelopmentFacilitator Facilitator & Retreat Convener & Retreat Convener

Foust CONNECTING Rich Borell CEO &Rosanne President, SAMCEDA Rosanne Foust Founder & CEOSan&Mateo County Economic VOLUNTEERS CEO & President, SAMCEDA Development Association San Mateo County Economic DONORS TO LOCAL Frank Ponikvar Shane Jacksteit Advisor Development Association NONTreasurer PROFITS Financial Edward Jones

Bay Area NonProfits is a 501 (c)(3) Registered NonProfit Organization. Re duction in whole or in part of any text or photographs without the written

mission from the CEO is strictly prohibited. The magazine is not responsible

unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or photographs. The opinions expresse

Bay Area NonProfits Magazine are of the authors and do not necessarily refl

the views of the Board Members or Management team. The Magazine assu

no responsibility or liability for claims made by advertisers in the Magaz

All rights reserved. Bay Area NonProfits Board Members, Management Te

and Advertisers shall be held blameless for any and all errors, along with

expired dates typing errors or trademark infringements. If any errors are fou

we will correct when brought to our attention within 48 hours. For all inqui contact us at rich@bayareanonprofits.org

Linda Holland Secretary

Shane Jacksteit Financial Advisor Edward Jones

CONNECTING VOLUNTEERS & DONORS TO LOCAL NON PROFITS

Bay Area NonProfits is a 501 (c)(3) Registered NonProfit Organization. Reproduction in whole or in part of any text or photographs without the written per-

mission from the CEO is strictly prohibited. The magazine is not responsible for

Bay Area NonProfits is a 501 (c)(3)oregistered NonProfit Oganization. Reproduction in whole or in part of any text or photographs without the written permission unsolicited manuscripts, artwork photographs. The opinions expressed in from the CEO is strictly prohibited. is not responsible forreflect unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or photographs. The opinions expressed in Bay Area NonBay Area NonProfits Magazine are ofThe themagazine authors and do not necessarily Profits Magazine are of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Board Members or Management team. The Magazine assumes no responsibility the views of the Board Members or Management team. The Magazine assumes or liability for claims made by advertisers in the Magazine. All rights reserved. Bay Area NonProfits Board Members, Management Team and Advertisers shall be no responsibility or liability for claims made by advertisers in the Magazine. held blameless for any and all errors, along with any expired dates typing errors or trademark infringements. If any errors are found, we will correct when brought All rights reserved. Bay Area NonProfits Board Members, Management Team to our attention within 48 hours. For all inquiries, contact us at rich@bayareanonprofit.org and Advertisers shall be held blameless for any and all errors, along with any

expired dates typing errors or trademark infringements. If any errors are found,


BAY AREA

NONPROFITS Would Like To Extend Our Deepest Gratitude For Our Greatly Appreciated Community Supporters CORPORATE SUPPORTERS $10,000 + Therma Corporation

LOCAL BUSINESS SUPPORTERS $5,000 +

Elephant Bar Restaurant IL Postale Italian-American Bistro & Bar La Fiesta Mexican Restaurant

LOCAL BUSINESS SUPPORTERS $1,500 +

Edward Jones, Financial Advisor, Shane Jacksteit Maggiano’s Little Italy

LOCAL BUSINESS SUPPORTERS $500 + Graniterock Heavenly Greens Palo Alto Bicycles

PRIVATE SUPPORTERS Black Angus Steakhouse Borell Family Trust Buca di Peppo Dish Dash Restaurant Frank & Ann Ponikvar Lucy Borell Family Trust Marit D’Eliscu Scheiber Outback Steakhouse Patrick Wall Scott’s Seafood Restaurant Timothy Weidman Victoria Armigo

BAY AREA NONPROFITS THANKS THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR GENEROUS IN-KIND GOODS AND SERVICES Bay Area Mags LLC Google UPS Store, Santa Clara


T H E

proudly sponsored by

B O R E L L

F A M I L Y

T R U S T

WILDLIFE CARE ASSOCIATION BANP: What is it about Wildlife Care Association that

GIVING WILDLIFE A SECOND CHANCE

us maintain a great quality of life.

made you want to help sick, orphaned, and injured wildlife? What do you do when you volunteer and how long

BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others?

have you been doing it? TB: There is so much opportunity for people to help wildTB: I have always been an

life. WCA takes in more than

animal lover. After finding

5,000 sick, orphaned, and in-

2 injured birds in my yard

jured wild animals every year.

and taking them to Wildlife

Most of those animals have

Care Association, I decided

been victims of mankind in-

to start volunteering, which

cluding habitat destruction

was in 2001. I have since

and free-roaming pets.

become a home rehabilitator, rehabbing squirrels,

BANP: When you volunteer,

opossums, and various other

seeing what you see and

species. I also am the head

Theresa Bielawski, President

of the fundraising team and

doing what you do, do you often think and hope how

have served on the Board of Directors for 10 years; this is

others, too, could join in and help make a bigger, more

my 8th year as President.

positive difference?

BANP: What do you love most about what you do when

TB: We are always in need of volunteers. There are so

you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like?

many things people can do to help the animals brought to us, even if they do not want to have direct contact

TB: I really love animals, so it is very satisfying knowing

with the animals; everything from answering phones

that what I do is helping animals, whether it is raising

and cleaning to hands-on feeding and medical care. No

funds, or physically taking care of a sick, orphaned, or in-

experience is necessary as we have a comprehensive

jured wild animal.

training program. People wanting to help these animals

WE ARE DEDICATED TO THE RESCUE, REHABILITATION, AND RELEASE OF LOCAL WILDLIFE

in need are heroes in the community and are ultimately BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for

helping the quality of life for everyone living there.

you or a particular joy you get when you volunteer? TB: It always makes my heart happy when I am releasing animals back into the wild, where they belong. It is very satisfying knowing that animal may not have survived without my help. All wildlife serves a purpose and helps

To Donate: WCA PO Box 680, North Highlands, CA 95660 www.wildlifecareassociation.com Non Profit # 94-2528504

Hotline: (916) 965-WILD (9453) 5211 Patrol Road, McClellan, CA 95652

www.wildlifecareassociation.com


T H E

proudly sponsored by

B O R E L L

F A M I L Y

T R U S T

WILDLIFE CARE ASSOCIATION

GIVING WILDLIFE A SECOND CHANCE

BANP: What is it about Wildlife Care Association that helps us maintain a great quality of life. made you want to help sick, orphaned, and injured wildlife? What do you do when you volunteer and how BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others? long have you been doing it?

TB: There is so much opportunity for people to help wildlife. WCA takes in more than 5,000 sick, orphaned,

TB: I have always been an

and injured wild animals ev-

animal lover. After finding

ery year. Most of those an-

2 injured birds in my yard

imals have been victims of

and taking them to Wildlife

mankind including habitat

Care Association, I decided

destruction and free-roam-

to start volunteering, which

ing pets.

was in 2001. I have since be-

BANP: When you volunteer,

come a home rehabilitator, rehabbing squirrels, opossums, and various other

seeing what you see and

Theresa Bielawski, President

species. I also am the head of the fundraising team and have served on the Board of Directors for 10 years; this is my 8th year as President. BANP: What do you love most about what you do when you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like? TB: I really love animals, so it is very satisfying knowing that what I do is helping animals, whether it is raising funds, or physically taking care of a sick, orphaned, or injured wild animal.

doing what you do, do you often think and hope how

others, too, could join in and help make a bigger, more positive difference? TB: We are always in need of volunteers. There are so many things people can do to help the animals brought to us, even if they do not want to have direct contact with the animals; everything from answering phones and cleaning to hands-on feeding and medical care. No experience is necessary as we have a comprehensive training program. People wanting to help these animals

BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for

in need are heroes in the community and are ultimately

you or a particular joy you get when you volunteer?

helping the quality of life for everyone living there.

very satisfying knowing that animal may not have sur-

To Donate: WCA PO Box 680, North Highlands, CA 95660 www.wildlifecareassociation.com

vived without my help. All wildlife serves a purpose and

Non Profit # 94-2528504

TB: It always makes my heart happy when I am releasing animals back into the wild, where they belong. It is

WE ARE DEDICATED TO THE RESCUE, REHABILITATION, AND RELEASE OF LOCAL WILDLIFE

Hotline: (916) 965-WILD (9453) 5211 Patrol Road, McClellan, CA 95652

www.wildlifecareassociation.com


• • • COMMUNITY SUPPORTER • • •

The Heart Is In THE SUPPORTING – A Shining Example Is The UPS Store In Santa Clara An Interview With Ravinder Lal, Owner BANP: What is the story behind your store’s supporting of nonprofits and great causes?

BANP: What does your store like to do for Nonprofits and great causes in the community?

RL: A great man once told me,” If you make a little bit of money, you give back a little bit of money; if you make a lot of money, you give back a lot of money. It’s our obligation … there will always be somebody worse off than you.”

RL: There are several ways we like to help nonprofits and great causes. The first way we help is with our time. We volunteer and get involved with community and many causes that are close to our hearts.

I have tried to live my life that way and run my business in the same manner. Let me first say that it was never intentional to be in the position that we are in now. It all started innocently enough when one of our local private schools was doing a shoe drive and they needed to ship all of the shoes they collected to New York, then to be shipped to Africa.

Of course, we make monetary donations, as well, but there is one area that we truly thrive. Six years ago, I turned my little “The UPS Store” franchise into a full service print shop. When we changed our focus to the print business, it really changed how we were able to help nonprofits.

The employee and the director of the school approached me and asked if I could give them a discount on shipping to help with their shoe drive. I thought about it for about two seconds and said, “I’ll ship them for free”. They were so grateful to me for such a small act it was unbelievable. The following day they asked me if I could pick the shoes up at the school and take a few pictures with the 1st and 2nd graders giving me the shoes to send off. I said, “Of course”. Little did I know that when I got there they had a whole presentation set up for me with pictures they drew up for me and they even sang me a song. I was blown away and nearly in tears. I always knew that giving back was the right thing to do, but I didn’t know it could feel so good to give back. Ever since that moment, we have strived to give back to our community in every way possible. We even changed our mission statement to include the phrase: “fulfilling our passion of giving back to our community and helping others help others”.

We began by doing simple things like donating banners for the Cancer Relay for Life. Then it grew to branding events for fundraisers and printing all of the things that go along with that, like signs, programs and tickets. The final thing we started doing was printing newsletters, designing and printing direct mail campaigns and finally helping them with the actual mailing of these items. Besides our expertise in working with nonprofits, they work with us because sometimes we are able to donate product, and graphic design time, and if we can’t donate, then we offer steep discounts and guidance on how to save them money on their projects. It’s really a win-win for everyone. In our hearts, we wish we could donate everything, but unfortunately we are a small business and we do everything in our power to save as much money as possible for the organizations that we work with. We are indeed very grateful for the opportunity that we have to serve our community for which we are very proud of.


Our 2016 Sunnyvale Art & Wine Festival Fundraiser Was A Big Success! Bay Area Nonprofits would like to extend our deepest gratitude to our sponsors below. Because of their generous help and support … our 2016 Sunnyvale Art & Wine Festival Fundraiser was extremely rewarding to the many Local Nonprofits - and the many people who will benefit - we help every day!

• Bay Area Mags LLC • Buca di Beppo • Deep Reflections Auto Detail • Dishdash Restaurant • Duxiana • Edward Jones – Shane Jacksteit, Financial Advisor • Elephant Bar Restaurant • Graniterock • Heavenly Greens • IL Postale Italian-American Bistro & Bar • La Fiesta Restaurant • Maggiano’s Little Italy • Palo Alto Bicycles • Scott’s Seafood And to all of the many in community that stopped by our booth and participated in our fundraiser. We wholeheartedly thank you for your generous support of Bay Area Nonprofits and the achieving of our goal of helping many local nonprofits - and benefiting many people in community - all year!

Thank You!

Bay Area Nonprofits


2016 Yearbook Champion!

Congratulations Shane Jacksteit! On behalf of the Board of Directors of Bay Area Nonprofits, we would like to extend our deepest gratitude to Shane Jacksteit for being an honored “Champion of the Year!” in helping us towards our community effort in helping many local nonprofits.

Thank You, Shane Jacksteit! A graduate of Vanguard University of Southern California, I hold a bachelor’s degree in business with an emphasis in organizational management.

I have been active in business and civic affairs in

Sunnyvale for many years. I am a member of the board of directors of the Sunnyvale Silicon

Valley Chamber of Commerce. I am also currently serving as the incoming president of the board of directors for Sunnyvale Community

Services, one of Silicon Valley’s most recognized

and respected nonprofit organizations. This is in

Shane Jacksteit Sunnyvale, CA

addition to my serving the community

as a member of the Sunnyvale Rotary Club, and many other service-oriented leadership roles.


Silicon Valley Non-Profits

I

Introducing Silicon Valley Non-Profits!

n this day and age, many of us are looking for purpose and asking ourselves how we can help make a difference in our community and our world. If we were to ask ourselves, where would we be without our Non-Profits, that’s a good question - they do a lot! With them, it’s hard enough in our world. Without them, it would be unthinkable. Indeed, we have many Non-Profits doing great works and they are always looking for people, like you, who can and would like to help.

At the same time, there are many people, like you and me, who wonder what specifically more we can do with our money or, especially, just by volunteering – indeed, what a difference that does and will make. The greatest gift of all is in the giving and what a big positive difference it makes in the lives of others. In Silicon Valley Non-Profits, learn about various great people and great organizations doing great things. May it become a growing Resource for you and many others, there’s nothing like teamwork, that can help us all in making a big positive difference for a better community here at Home.


VOLUNTEER KEVIN PATTON “Helping my fellow veterans with spinal cord dysfunction is important to me because I know firsthand the feeling of not knowing what is next.” BANP: What is it about BAWPVA that helped you in choosing to become a volunteer? KP: I became a member of the PVA when I sustained my injury in 1986. I saw how they helped me and veterans with spinal cord injuries and I knew I wanted to help. I actually started as an employee by becoming a National Service Officer. A few years ago, I came back to the chapter as a board member and Sports Director. I wanted to help even more and decided to run for President. Helping my fellow veterans with spinal cord dysfunction is important to me because I know firsthand the feeling of not knowing what is next. In the military, there is a saying “leave no one behind” and because of PVA I get to go into the hospital and the community and have an opportunity to reach those who may feel left behind. BANP: What do you do when you volunteer? KP: As President, I help our executive director to ensure all of the programs are being operated properly. This means showing up for events, helping set up, working with other volunteers and supporters, and speaking about what the organization does, not only for me, but all veterans and persons with disabilities. Our office is located right in the VA in Palo Alto. When I am there I am

able to visit with inpatients which can include new injuries as well as those who are there healing from other injuries and sicknesses. I make sure they are receiving the health care and benefits they are entitled to. The most important part is that they get to see someone like them who has gone through what they are going through. Also, I am there to answer any questions that they may have.

improving

quality of life

for all our wounded

heroes.

BANP: Is there a special experience you would like to share? KP: Just recently I got to help a veteran with getting his first accessible vehicle. This was a vehicle which was donated by a member that passed away. It was special to me because the day we went to the DMV to do the transfer paperwork for the vehicle was the anniversary date of my injury. I just know what a feeling it is to get that first feeling of independence back in your life and seeing it on his face. Getting an opportunity to be a part of that is what makes what we do so special. BANP: Why would you recommend BAWPVA to someone who is looking to be a volunteer? KP: We are an organization that works directly with our veterans. As a volunteer, you can see exactly how we are helping improve the lives of paralyzed veterans there is nothing more rewarding than that!

(650) 858-3936 • 1-800-273-6789 toll free Email: info@bawpva.org • www.bawpva.org

The Bay Area & Western Chapter of the Paralyzed Veterans of America is dedicated to the task of improving the quality of life of Veterans with paralysis due to spinal cord dysfunction and to the protection of their civil rights. We are committed to the duty of assisting paralyzed Veterans by advocating for unfettered access to the VA health care and barrier-free access to the community. Our goal is to ensure the fulfillment of the need for the health and well-being of our Members, and all paralyzed Veterans, through education, information and referral, medical research, and physical, psychological, and recreational therapy.


VOLUNTEER KEVIN PATTON “Helping my fellow veterans with spinal cord dysfunction is important to me because I know firsthand the feeling of not knowing what is next.” BANP: What is it about BAWPVA that helped you in choosing to become a volunteer? KP: I became a member of the PVA when I sustained my injury in 1986. I saw how they helped me and veterans with spinal cord injuries and I knew I wanted to help. I actually started as an employee by becoming a National Service Officer. A few years ago, I came back to the chapter as a board member and Sports Director. I wanted to help even more and decided to run for President. Helping my fellow veterans with spinal cord dysfunction is important to me because I know firsthand the feeling of not knowing what is next. In the military, there is a saying “leave no one behind” and because of PVA I get to go into the hospital and the community and have an opportunity to reach those who may feel left behind. BANP: What do you do when you volunteer? KP: As President, I help our executive director to ensure all of the programs are being operated properly. This means showing up for events, helping set up, working with other volunteers and supporters, and speaking about what the organization does, not only for me, but all veterans and persons with disabilities. Our office is located right in the VA in Palo Alto. When I am there I am

able to visit with inpatients which can include new injuries as well as those who are there healing from other injuries and sicknesses. I make sure they are receiving the health care and benefits they are entitled to. The most important part is that they get to see someone like them who has gone through what they are going through. Also, I am there to answer any questions that they may have.

improving

quality of life

for all our wounded

heroes.

BANP: Is there a special experience you would like to share? KP: Just recently I got to help a veteran with getting his first accessible vehicle. This was a vehicle which was donated by a member that passed away. It was special to me because the day we went to the DMV to do the transfer paperwork for the vehicle was the anniversary date of my injury. I just know what a feeling it is to get that first feeling of independence back in your life and seeing it on his face. Getting an opportunity to be a part of that is what makes what we do so special. BANP: Why would you recommend BAWPVA to someone who is looking to be a volunteer? KP: We are an organization that works directly with our veterans. As a volunteer, you can see exactly how we are helping improve the lives of paralyzed veterans there is nothing more rewarding than that!

(650) 858-3936 • 1-800-273-6789 toll free Email: info@bawpva.org • www.bawpva.org

The Bay Area & Western Chapter of the Paralyzed Veterans of America is dedicated to the task of improving the quality of life of Veterans with paralysis due to spinal cord dysfunction and to the protection of their civil rights. We are committed to the duty of assisting paralyzed Veterans by advocating for unfettered access to the VA health care and barrier-free access to the community. Our goal is to ensure the fulfillment of the need for the health and well-being of our Members, and all paralyzed Veterans, through education, information and referral, medical research, and physical, psychological, and recreational therapy.


Gatepath

Jeff Fallick

Volunteer & Donor

BANP: How did you first become connected to Gatepath?

Board Chair during my second term in 2013-2014.

JF: Becoming a dad changed my world enormously, as it does for most first-time parents. There are so many natural concerns, intense emotions, and systems of care to navigate. But when your child has a disability (as did our daughter Zoe), parenthood is even more challenging. My wife Shannon and I faced many choices about Zoe’s care. After exploring several organizations, we knew immediately that Gatepath was the one for us. Gatepath’s head of children’s services instantly made us feel like family, and we were very impressed by the entire staff. Zoe, who was born with Down syndrome and ultimately diagnosed with autism too, received pediatric therapy services at Gatepath from 10 weeks to age three. She then attended Gatepath’s Learning Links preschool program in Burlingame.

BANP: What do you wish other people knew about Gatepath?

BANP: What is it about Gatepath that helped you in choosing to become a supporter and volunteer? JF: After seeing firsthand how dedicated Gatepath’s staff is to making a difference in the lives of people with special needs and disabilities, I wanted to immerse myself in their mission. One of the ways I decided to help at first was through fundraising, so I started Gatepath’s annual Golf Classic. In the 11 years since we started the event, we’ve raised about $1.2 million. I hope to raise even more at our 12th Annual Golf Classic on Monday, September 12, 2016. As I became more involved with Gatepath, I realized I wanted to give back more than just financially; I wanted to give my time to help make Gatepath even better. That led me to join the Board of Directors in 2006 and ultimately served as

JF: Those of us who are familiar with Gatepath like to say that we’re the best kept secret in San Mateo County in terms of the amazing services we provide. Unless you’re immersed in the world of special needs and disabilities as a caregiver or service provider, you don’t understand the importance of these services and the safety net that Gatepath provides for so many families. I wish more people knew about the challenges faced by all nonprofits, and that they could see how hard the staff works and how dedicated they are to the mission of enriching people lives. It’s truly inspiring – people don’t work in this sector for money or recognition, but to truly make a difference. BANP: Why would you recommend Gatepath to someone who is looking to be a donor? JF: I think it’s important for people to embrace Gatepath’s mission of “creating a world where people of all abilities are fully included, respected, and valued in our community.” By contributing to Gatepath, you’re helping those with special needs reach their full potential, whether that’s by providing life-changing therapy for a child or helping an adult thrive in a great job. I’d also encourage people to make a legacy gift to Gatepath. You’ll be securing the safety net for future generations and ensuring a better quality of life for people with special needs and disabilities.


Creating

first

words

a world

where people of all abilities are fully included, respected and valued for more than 95 years.

Accept. Respect. Include.

first

jobs

OUR SERVICES Early Intervention | Pediatric Therapy Services Family Resource Center | Inclusive Preschool Assistive Technology Library | Creative Arts for Youth Adult Vocational Training | Job Coaching and Placement Professional Workshops

Gatepath.org |


A Stronger Community Is A Huge Win For All of Us! CEN – CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE IN NONPROFITS

Janice Fry, Board Member & Donor BANP: What is it about CEN that helped you in choosing to become a supporter? JF: First, I believe that the nonprofit sector today brings essential programs and services to our community. These programs and services help to fill critical gaps that have a huge impact on the quality of life. And second, I believe in the importance of strong, effective leadership. I have seen, in many different settings, how it can rally enthusiasm, create paths forward and propel great things into motion. I have also seen how debilitating ineffective leadership can be. Based on these beliefs, it was an easy choice for me to become involved with and support the unique efforts of CEN, an organization that strengthens the nonprofit sector by first strengthening those dedicated individuals who lead our nonprofits.   BANP: What changes have you seen since becoming a donor and what brings you the greatest joy? JF: I have seen a number of exciting changes that range from new staff members who are bringing new ideas, energy and approaches, to a number of new programs being offered. Our staff does an amazing job of ongoing “needs analysis” to ensure that we can prioritize opportunities for doing the most impactful work. As a result, CEN has begun to address the prevalent needs of the sector’s emerging leaders and now offers a Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program in partnership with local community colleges. We have also deepened our work with nonprofit boards and broadened the spectrum of consulting services offered. And in terms of what brings me the most joy – without a doubt it is seeing leaders who experience CEN programs as helping “transform” their lives and organizations in some positive, meaningful way. BANP: What is your personal philosophy about being able to help a great cause such as CEN?

JF: I dedicated my professional life to a career in Human Resources in technology companies. That experience taught me how very important it is to focus on “building capacity”, especially investing in the development of current and future leaders. Strong leaders are one of the “essential ingredients” for driving quality, growth and impact. CEN embodies this philosophy and is all about building capacity in our nonprofit leaders! BANP: What would you say to others about donating / volunteering, etc., with CEN and in general? JF: In my view, the opportunity to work with and support an organization when I have real passion for the mission is a privilege. Whether we each decide to offer our time and talents or make a donation, it literally “takes a village” to make sure that our nonprofit organizations are healthy and sustainable so that they can keep serving our community in such essential ways. I have served on a number of nonprofit boards and have seen, first hand, how impactful it can be when both individual leaders and boards clarify their roles and have tools to execute those roles with quality.   BANP: What do you wish other people knew about CEN? JF: I wish more people understood that supporting CEN is one of the most highly leveraged and highly effective ways of making a difference in our community. As our nonprofit leaders become more effective, their organizations become stronger, and as a result, offer stronger and more effective programs and services. A stronger community is a huge win for all of us! I am so very proud of the work CEN does to help make this happen.


Nonprofit Leadership Matters

ship Matters

Nonprof

WE MAKE AN IMPACT • WE EMPOWER THROUGH INFORMATION

WE BUILD COMMUNITY • WE ARE PERSONAL

cated to serving and For over 20 yea leaders providing As theby only organization of its kind in Silicon Valley, CEN has a proven track record in developing highly efstrengthening S d a network of support. fective nonprofit leaders. CEN has been turning good leaders into great ones by providing access to best-inprofessional de class resources and programs, peer support networks, and personal consultation to over 200 Silicon Valley nonprofit organizations. We continually strive to help members of the CEN Community become the most well-respected and effectively managed organizations in Silicon Valley and beyond.

steering the course Today’s nonp our community. Fostering highly effective leaders and vibrant nonprofits toward gr that transform the quality of life in our communities

h the power of great

Join us as we work together to unleash the Join us as we w nonprofit leade power of great nonprofit leadership!

www.CEN.org


CEN – The Center for Excellence in Nonprofits DEDICATED TO SERVING AND STRENGTHENING SILICON VALLEY NONPROFIT LEADERS An Interview With JENNIFER SIMMONS, Executive Director BANP: What is CEN (Center for Excellence in Nonprofits) about and what do you all do? JS: At CEN, we believe that the most effective way to increase the capacity of the nonprofit sector is to strengthen and sustain the staff and board leaders of nonprofit organizations. To do this, we have a unique approach to leadership development which focuses on building long term relationships and providing high touch programs (such as our Leaders Institute, Board Consulting Engagements, Executive Director Roundtables and Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program). BANP: What do you love most about CEN and the work that you all do? JS: What I love most is seeing the transformation in the leaders we work with every day. The role of Executive Director/CEO can be an extremely stressful and lonely job. Running a nonprofit organization is really hard – you are continually under resourced, under staffed and there is little to no money available for continuing education, yet you are tasked with figuring out how to provide society’s most needed services. I originally came to CEN when I was in my first role as Executive Director, at the time leading Habitat for Humanity Silicon Valley. I was struggling and didn’t know if I could continue – I was on my way to burnout and probably a nervous breakdown. Right around this time, I was approached to participate in CEN’s Leaders Institute… it changed my life! The program taught me how to sustain myself and ultimately how to sustain my staff and organization. I developed a strong peer network that gave me confidence and showed me that I was not alone. My cohorts were dealing with similar issues and together we could help coach each other through these difficulties. Leaders Institute also offered a valuable curriculum that helped me make the strategic decisions necessary to be an effective leader and to strengthen

the impact of my organization for years to come. Since joining CEN I have had the great pleasure of facilitating three new classes of Leaders Institute and each time I’m amazed at the transformation of the participants. I am inspired everyday by their work and love having the opportunity to impact their growth and be a part of this journey. BANP: How has CEN made an impact and what do you wish yet to see? JS: CEN works with hundreds of leaders each year, positively impacting thousands of individuals and families that rely on the services of local nonprofits to survive. We work with these leaders to build and strengthen the infrastructure of their nonprofit, cultivate the talent in their organizations... and ultimately become more strategic and impactful. Unfortunately we are only scratching the surface. As we look to the future we want to do more to develop the nonprofit talent pool and are expanding our programming to better address the needs of these emerging nonprofit leaders! BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers? Why is CEN so special? JS: When you support CEN, you are directly supporting the development of a nonprofit leader in our community. As each leader progresses through our programs, they acquire the skills needed to effectively manage and cultivate the talent in their organizations, increasing the impact of your initial support. An effective team is then able to be more strategic and impactful, often growing the capacity of their organization in the process. Ultimately, this means that those most in need are better served, and illustrates the deep community impact of your support. An investment in CEN is truly a leveraged investment in our community! For more information, please visit www.cen.org.


Nonprofit Leadership Matters For over 20 years, CEN has been dedicated to serving and strengthening Silicon Valley nonprofit leaders by providing professional development training and a network of support.

Today’s nonprofit leaders are steering the course toward greater impact in our community. Join us as we work together to unleash the power of great nonprofit leadership!

www.CEN.org


Dana Fenwick, CASSY Supporter

BANP: What is it about CASSY that helped you in choosing to become a supporter?

BANP: What do you wish other people knew about CASSY?

DF: The Mission – to de-stigmatize mental health DF: That CASSY is in 44 schools now and should services - is really important considering all the be in 4400 schools! Twenty-percent of our chilpressures there are in growing up today. CASSY’s dren have unmet mental health concerns; that is approach to ensuring youth have access to quality unacceptable and our kids deserve better. CASSY’s and comprehensive mental health support is to de- model works and is changing the way people think liver services in a place that makes sense for them, about mental health support. CASSY’s school and right on school

community

part-

campuses. Pro-

ners value the ser-

viding mental

vices because they

health services

enhance the school

in schools is im-

community, lower-

portant because it’s the way the Mission is brought ing school discipline issues and giving kids the opto life. Year after year, the demand for the services portunity to focus on school. is higher because the walls are coming down. BANP: Why would you recommend CASSY to BANP: What brings you the greatest joy?

someone who is looking to be a donor?

DF: Watching it grow! I’ve been a supporter of the DF: I can’t think of a better use of your investment organization since the beginning and each new and funds if you want to help the mental health wave of development has been great. I’ve watched equation in your community. CASSY provides it expand from one school to eight districts. From youth the metal health services they lack because two staff to fifty-five staff in just seven years. Each of access issues, monetary issues, or other barriers. year brings something new and exciting, whether Mental health support ensures our youth have the it’s additional schools or schools asking for addi- social and emotional support they need to navitional CASSY therapists to support all of their stu- gate life during and beyond their school years. It dents. It’s phenomenal.

just makes sense!


CASSY PARTNERS WITH SCHOOLS TO PROVIDE A MENTAL HEALTH SAFETY NET TO 33,000 YOUTH IN 44 SCHOOLS IN SANTA CLARA AND SAN MATEO COUNTIES PROVIDE 70,000 HOURS OF MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT ANNUALLY

Here to Help Youth CASSY IS A SILICON VALLEY NONPROFIT AGENCY THAT PARTNERS WITH LOCAL SCHOOLS TO SUPPORT STUDENTS’ SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING THROUGH CRISIS INTERVENTION, ONGOING COUNSELING, AND PROACTIVE MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION.

C A S S Y B AYA R E A . O R G • 4 0 8 . 4 9 3 . 5 2 8 9


CHRISTY HAYES E X E C U T I V E

D I R E C T O R

BANP: What is Counseling and Support Services for Youth

in

(CASSY) about and what do you all do?

experience

California,

depression, CH: CASSY partners with local schools to place competent,

anxiety,

compassionate therapists on school campuses in order to re-

ing

duce the stigma of mental health care and provide comprehen-

academic stress, low self-esteem, and substance abuse. Mental

sive mental health services to all enrolled students at no charge.

health issues cross socioeconomic boundaries and affect youth

We envision a world where students have the continuity of men-

regardless of their financial resources. Studies have shown that

tal health support they need, from the first day of kindergarten

students are far more likely to seek counseling when it is avail-

until they graduate from high school, so they can be successful

able at their school, especially if it is free. The best way to reach

in school and in life.

kids in need is to provide high-quality, mental health services

eat-

disorders,

directly on campus. Ninety-percent of students who engage in We currently partner with 44 elementary, middle, and high

CASSY services improve their overall functioning; the vast ma-

schools throughout the Bay Area, providing a mental health

jority of kids who receive the support we provide experience im-

safety net for over 33,000 children and adolescents. CASSY sup-

proved relationships with their peers and family, attend school

ports kids through individual, group, and family counseling,

more regularly, and report that counseling changed their lives.

while also offering crisis support and intervention, staff and par-

In partnership with school districts, their boards, service clubs,

ent consultations, and classroom lessons on bully prevention,

and educational foundations, we fund a portion of these par-

depression, and suicide awareness.

amount services. Due to limited community resources, we currently reach only one-third of the students who need mental

BANP: What do you love most about CASSY and the work you

health services.

all do? BANP: What is so special about CASSY and how can people CH: Hearing stories of hope and success from our therapists

make a difference?

warms my heart. We shape kids’ outlook on life and provide them with an opportunity to talk through challenging situa-

CH: CASSY is the youth mental health leader for Bay Area com-

tions while providing them with the social and emotional skills

munities and in the last year has expanded services to over

necessary to focus on school. Collectively, we are committed

10,000 additional students in the communities served. This

over 70,000 hours annually working with kids, their parents and

work is made possible by individuals, organizations, and corpo-

teachers, and their communities to open the door to mental

rations who believe in our mission and advocate for services in

health support.

their community, whether it’s through financial support or connecting school communities who need us. We continue to seek

BANP: How has CASSY made a difference and what impact do

ambassadors for youth mental health and communities who are

you still wish to see CASSY make?

committed to their youth!

CH: Twenty-percent of youth, a staggering 1.8 million kids


CASSY PARTNERS WITH SCHOOLS TO PROVIDE A MENTAL HEALTH SAFETY NET TO 33,000 YOUTH IN 44 SCHOOLS IN SANTA CLARA AND SAN MATEO COUNTIES PROVIDE 70,000 HOURS OF MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT ANNUALLY

Here to Help Youth CASSY IS A SILICON VALLEY NONPROFIT AGENCY THAT PARTNERS WITH LOCAL SCHOOLS TO SUPPORT STUDENTS’ SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING THROUGH CRISIS INTERVENTION, ONGOING COUNSELING, AND PROACTIVE MENTAL HEALTH EDUCATION.

C A S S Y B AYA R E A . O R G • 4 0 8 . 4 9 3 . 5 2 8 9


Every Person Deserves A Safe Place To Call Home Our Mission Is To End Homelessness In Our County

Linda Chin, Board Member

BANP: What is it about HomeFirst that helped you in choosing to

and cleaning items for every client that is placed into permanent

become a volunteer/donor?

housing. It’s incredibly satisfying to re-purpose gently used items that would otherwise be recycled or thrown away, to gladden the

LC: HomeFirst has been a leader in the fight against homelessness

hearts of clients who are immensely grateful for a helping hand.

since it was founded over 35 years ago as the Emergency Housing Consortium. Every or-

BANP: Is there a special experience you

ganization says their donors and volunteers

would like to share?

make a difference – and that’s true – but it’s particularly true at HomeFirst. Unlike many

LC: At the end of the Cold Weather Season,

other nonprofits that already have deep

we hold a huge linen sorting event, where

personal connections to donors – schools,

we sort, fold, and count all the sheets, tow-

medical organizations, religious institutions

els and blankets that are in good enough

– HomeFirst has to work extra hard to at-

condition to be bagged up for use the next

tract donors and volunteers. There are many

season. Volunteers work alongside our New

myths about why people are homeless, and

Start team members, who are clients that

the best way to dispel those myths is to get

are eligible for extended stays at our main

first-hand knowledge about the challenges

shelter in return for helping out with jani-

that homeless people face. It’s easy for peo-

torial, kitchen, and other tasks there. Their

ple to say: “they” should solve homelessness,

stories really bring home the fact that so

when the truth is that it will take a united

many people are just one disaster away

community effort to address both the causes and solutions to this

from homelessness, and yet many of our clients, who have been

urgent issue. Every volunteer and donor at HomeFirst furthers our

homeless for years, display a level of compassion, humor and resil-

mission to end homelessness in our County. Every person deserves

ience that is humbling.

a safe place to call home. BANP: What do you wish other people knew about HomeFirst? BANP: What do you do when you volunteer? LC: We do everything we can to help people overcome the chalLC: I chair the Fund Development Committee on the Board of Di-

lenges that caused their homelessness and prevent them from

rectors, helping HomeFirst staff with both long-term strategy and

dying on our streets. But solving homelessness is not just the com-

immediate implementation of fundraising initiatives. But my fa-

passionate thing to do – it’s also the most effective use of our com-

vorite job is leading a group of volunteers every Tuesday. We sort

munity dollars. Detailed, long-term studies have indicated that the

all the in-kind donations from corporations, hotels, community

top 5% of our chronically homeless population cost $83,000 per

groups, and individuals. Those donations provide urgently needed

year in emergency medical, judicial, and other costs. Housing our

supplies of linens and toiletries for our emergency shelters and our

most vulnerable clients costs just a fraction of that.

outreach programs, as well as for move-in kits of bedding, kitchen,


Anyone is at risk of homelessness. Everyone deserves a decent place to live. HomeFirst helps people find and keep permanent housing. With your support, we can end homelessness.

www.HomeFirstSCC.org


SMYTHE FAMILY FOUNDATION BANP: What is it about BGCSV that helped you in be a key for me to keep the joy in my heart and soul. choosing to become a supporter? BANP: What do you wish other people knew about SFF: This organization changes lives. It provides a BGCSV? safe place for these kids to go after school … where otherwise they would be vulnerable to gang violence,

SFF: Sometimes I’ve heard it said that our clubs are

drug use and other damaging behavior. These kids the biggest secret in the valley. This has to change. are growing up in poor neighborhoods

This organization has been around for over

and in most cases are being raised by

70 years. I think our new CEO, Max Dug-

a single parent working one or two

gane is going to change this. He and

jobs to make ends meet. Many of the

his team will, without a doubt, put the

kids I’ve talked to call the club

Boys and Girls Clubs of Sili-

their home. Some call it their

con Valley on the map and

salvation. That is why I be-

in the news. The “what”?

lieve in this organization.  

is well explained in my answer to your first question.

BANP: What brings you the greatest joy? BANP: Why would you recommend BGCSV to someSFF: Interesting question? As far as the clubs are con- one who is looking to be a donor? cerned the greatest joy comes from watching these SFF: Visit the clubs. Go to three or four of the clubs kids develop into contributing members of our com- in Silicon Valley between 3pm-6pm. Listen in on the munity. Watching the lights come on as their lives be- power hour … partake in the various club activities. come more about possibilities and opportunities than Witness firsthand the tremendous difference this orthey’ve ever dreamed. Personally I find joy in many

ganization is having on our underserved youth. Do

things. My family … my wife ... my relationships with

this and I’m pretty sure you will join us in keeping the

friends. Helping others and being of service seems to

dream alive.


A

t Boys & Girls Clubs of Silicon Valley, we dream of a world where every child is given the opportunity to succeed in life and experience a brighter future. Together, we can provide safe and stable environments where hundreds of youth in our community can thrive every day. Across our 9 locations in Silicon Valley we serve about 3,000 members annually, giving them a safe place to learn and grow. Youth Development Outcomes: Through daily participation in quality programs, Club members develop important life skills and attitudes, and gain critical development assets.      

Positive Self-Identity Health and Wellbeing Positive Values Commitment to Learning Social Competency Community and Civic Involvement

Key Elements of Youth Development: These key elements drive our efforts and allow us to have a sustained impact on youth.      

Safe and Positive Environment Mentoring Relationships with Caring Adults Opportunities and Expectations Goal Setting and Achievement Recognition FUN!


QUESTIONS FOR THE CEO / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Max Duganne BANP: What is BGCSV about and what do you all do? 

for our kids, as well as all of us who get to work here.

MD: The Boys & Girls Clubs of Silicon Valley is a tremendous

BANP: How has BGCSV made a difference and what impact

community support system, which focuses on after school en-

do you still wish to see BGCSV make?

richment for kids aged 6-18. As someone who personally grew

MD: The need is always growing, so we must as well. We

up at a Boys & Girls Club, I know the transformative power of

are in an area of the country where the socioeconomic di-

a clubhouse. The mentoring and coaching I received allowed

vide is at its worst. For every Google or Facebook, there

me fill the gaps in what I wasn’t getting

are homeless, jobless and struggling.

in school, and to discover new opportu-

It’s primarily for those people and

nities and interests that would not have

their children that make our pres-

presented themselves had it not been for

ence necessary. I hope to continue

my clubhouse. Now 20 years later, the

to bridge that divide through part-

work we do at BGCSV greatly surpasses

nerships within the valley, which can

what I once received, specifically in the

lead to necessary physical growth for

form of our STEM programming, fine arts

our organization, as well as a way out

programming, Khan Academy partner-

for our youth. The perpetual down-

ship, and vast network of volunteers. I am

ward spiral of poverty in east San Jose

blown away by what we now offer, as we

is a tremendous problem. For most

care for the entire child in a way no other

adults, escaping that reality is almost

afterschool program can.

impossible. That’s why we target the

BANP: What do you love most about

youth of this community, because for

BGCSV and the work you all do?

them, there’s still hope.

MD: As someone from the for-profit fi-

BANP: What is so special about BGCSV

nance world originally, the love I have for going to work every

and how can people make a difference?

day at BGCSV is a love of work I didn’t know possible. I tell

MD: There’s a great quote from Mahatma Gandhi that says,

people I have 2 kids at home and 1,500 at work. I like to finish

“The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service

every day at one of our 9 clubhouses, reminding myself of the

of others.” I find this so true for myself as well as for our staff

real work that is happening on a daily basis. I love to sit down

and volunteers. We are all fortunate to already know what this

during Power Hour and help a kid with homework, or jump

club can do for kids as well as anyone involved. So I’d offer this

into a STEM class where we work on capturing the speed of

advice to someone looking to make a difference: volunteer!

sound or building a robot, among countless other projects.

It’s no secret that our organization is one that depends great-

I’m a very hands-on manager and always like to have my hand

ly on donations, but I find that one’s time is so much more

on the pulse of our organization and the work we do. But ulti-

valuable. I also find that once a person sets foot into one of

mately, I love the outcomes. I love the stories. I love the con-

our clubhouses, they very quickly decide how much of them-

stant reminder of why we do what we do. BGCSV is a blessing

selves they want to give.


A

t Boys & Girls Clubs of Silicon Valley, we dream of a world where every child is given the opportunity to succeed in life and experience a brighter future. Together, we can provide safe and stable environments where hundreds of youth in our community can thrive every day. Across our 9 locations in Silicon Valley we serve about 3,000 members annually, giving them a safe place to learn and grow. Youth Development Outcomes: Through daily participation in quality programs, Club members develop important life skills and attitudes, and gain critical development assets.      

Positive Self-Identity Health and Wellbeing Positive Values Commitment to Learning Social Competency Community and Civic Involvement

Key Elements of Youth Development: These key elements drive our efforts and allow us to have a sustained impact on youth.      

Safe and Positive Environment Mentoring Relationships with Caring Adults Opportunities and Expectations Goal Setting and Achievement Recognition FUN!


Marco Lillo VOLUNTEER, Sacred Heart Community Service

BANP: What is it about Sacred Heart Commu- ML: Yes, I had a really nice experience last Christnity Service that helped you in choosing to be- mas. I was shooting family portraits for families come a volunteer? in Sacred Heart. Some of these people did not have money to pay ML: I try to find a good for this job, because place to work in the it’s expensive. I took volunteer program, these photos for free, with nice people and but these families for a great cause. paid me with a beautiful letter, and lots of BANP: What do you love. That is the bigdo when you volungest present from my teer? last Christmas. ML: I photograph BANP: Why would the different internal you recommend Saevents and the images are used in the website cred Heart to someone who is looking to be a and brochures. volunteer? BANP: Is there a special experience you would ML: Because it is a great cause, and a good oplike to share? portunity to help, and work with nice people.


Here at Sacred Heart Community Service, we are determined to create a community free from poverty by creating hope, opportunity, and action. We could not do the work that we do without all the individuals in our community! Whether you are volunteering your time, donating goods, or sharing your family’s experiences, you make Sacred Heart what it is. Thank you for being a part of our community!

DONATE

VOLUNTEER

SERVICES

SACRED HEART COMMUNITY SERVICE 1381 SOUTH FIRST ST. SAN JOSÉ, CA 95110 • T: (408) 278-2160 SACREDHEARTCS.ORG


BANP: What is it about FACES that helped you in choosing to become a supporter? Melissa: For me, spending time with FACES was a logical next step in my volunteer work. I have spent the last 10 years providing bullying prevention programs in my boy’s schools and that work is coming to a close in a year and a half as my youngest moves on to High School. Silicon Valley FACES provides assistance to not just children, but the community as a whole, and that’s very appealing to me.

BANP: What changes have you seen since becoming a donor and what brings you the greatest joy? Melissa: Since becoming a donor, it’s brought me joy to learn more

about the incredible programs FACES offers. I was actually able to attend one day of Camp Everytown (a youth leadership development program for HS kids), which was really important to me so I can see where my money goes. I know that camp has improved over the years, with updated and new activities. The organization is always trying to improve and better their programs and that’s impressive to me.

BANP: What is your personal philosophy about being able to help a great cause such as FACES? Melissa: I was bullied for a year when I was young and that experience created a desire to work with kids. My overall philosophy is to just be kind. You don’t have to like and feel connected to everyone you meet, it would be strange if you did, but we can all be kind to one another. FACES embodies kindness and caring and empowers kids to lead their lives in that way. FACES does such important work building a community free of bias, stereotypes, bigotry and violence. That mission resonates with me and is so important as my children and their friends become contributing members of society.

BANP: What would you say to others about donating / volunteering, etc., with FACES and in general? Melissa: Donating and volunteering with FACES is about making the world

a better place. About empowering kids to do the right thing and accept themselves and others for who they are. FACES has multiple programs for kids that focus on self-worth, leadership, breaking down the barriers of race, ethnicity, culture, gender, sexual orientation and religion. These programs are programs that ALL of our kids should be exposed to. So when I think about where and who I want to give my money and time to, Silicon Valley FACES is the perfect organization.

BANP: What do wish other people knew about FACES? Melissa: I wish more people

knew about FACES and the amazing work they do for the community. I wish more of our schools knew about the programs they offer and were more willing to incorporate them into standard curriculum, and I wish more people knew how life-changing a program like Camp Everytown is for High School students.

408-286-9663 ▌ www.SVFACES.org

Q& A Melissa Schwartz

Coach 2 Executives Executive Presentation Skills Coach FACES Ambassador and Donor


Building a community free of bias, bigotry and violence by transforming youth into community builders.

FACES IMPACT annually

▌Educate over 3,000 youth and adults on social emotional intelligence: peaceful conflict resolution, appreciation of differences and upstanding leadership skills

CAMP EVERYTOWN

A 4-day leadership experience for high school students to create communities of empathy, respect and inclusion.

COMMON GROUND

A week-long enrichment and leadership program for incoming middle and high school students.

BUILDING CONNECTIONS An in-class diversity education program for K-5.

"

To this day, my Camp Everytown experience remains very impactful because it reminds me that no matter where you are in life, you have to remember to look back, to look forward and

408-286-9663 ▌ www.SVFACES.org

"

next to you, and be there for each other. ― Thy Truong Camp Everytown alumna 2005


Next Door Solutions to

Domestic Violence. Melissa Hollatz, Partner at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and Board Member BANP:  What is it about Next Door Solutions  that helped you in choosing to become a supporter? What do you do when you volunteer and how long have you been doing it? MH: I am lucky enough to work for a law firm (Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati) that is supportive of doing pro bono work, and my first introduction to Next Door Solutions was through negotiating a merger for them 10 years ago. I fell in love with Next Door Solutions based on that work and became a board member in 2006. I didn’t know much about domestic violence prior to my being introduced to them, but I think it would be impossible to learn about what an amazing organization Next Door Solutions is, or what a compelling cause domestic violence is, and not want to get involved.

Hope

Now we are safe

&

Empowerment great cause such as Next Door Solutions? MH: I truly believe the adage that when you give to others, whether it’s time or money, the person who benefits the most is yourself. I am so fortunate to have met a group of people who scale mighty mountains on a tiny budget, and I want to do everything I can to be a part of moving the organization forward. It’s such a rewarding feeling to feel like I can be part of the solution to domestic violence. BANP: What would you say to others about donating / volunteering, etc., with Next Door Solutions?

MH: I would ask people to get to know Next Door Solutions, and I think they will fall in love with the organization and the wonderful people behind it, as I have. There aren’t very many places where a relatively small financial gift or a few hours of your time BANP: Is there a particular moment that can make such an enormous impact. I can’t Melissa Hollatz stands out for you or a particular joy you get describe how fulfilling it has been for me. when you volunteer/donate to Next Door Solutions? I think sometimes people hesitate because they don’t think they have the time or that they can make a difference. I wish everyone MH: My favorite moments are talking to former clients of Next Door could see what a huge difference it makes every time someone Solutions. Hearing from someone who has escaped a violent rela- overcomes that hesitation, steps forward, and gets involved. tionship and blossomed into a happy, self-confident person fuels a desire to want to help as many other people as I can. I find their sto- BANP: What do wish other people knew about Next Door? ries extraordinary and their resilience inspiring. I am also constantly impressed by the staff, who somehow manage to take a complex MH: I wish people knew how badly Next Door Solutions needs and often frustrating problem and transform it into a source of hope support. There are so many people who need their services, and and joy. resources are so scarce. I wish everyone would write a check, spend some time getting to know us, and just talk more about domestic BANP: What is your personal philosophy about being able to help a violence so we can spread awareness about this critical issue.

Empowering women to achieve safety and self-sufficiency

Our mission is to end domestic violence in the moment and for all time. To learn how you can get involved, visit our website at:

www.nextdoor.org

234 E. Gish Road, Suite 200, San Jose, CA 95112 Phone: 408-501-7550 24-hour hotline: 408-279-2962


Now we are safe

Empowering women to achieve safety and self-sufficiency

Our mission is to end domestic violence in the moment and for all time. To learn how you can get involved, visit our website at:

www.nextdoor.org

234 E. Gish Road, Suite 200, San Jose, CA 95112 Phone: 408-501-7550 24-hour hotline: 408-279-2962


Tony Huynh

Summer Search Alumnus ... And Now

A Successful College Graduate Tony Huynh, Customer Success Manager at Elance-oDesk and Summer Search Alumnus BANP:  What challenges did you face in getting into and finishing college? TH: Middlebury College felt very much like a third Summer Search trip. It was difficult to go from my school of nearly all low-income students of color to one where everyone was more affluent and predominantly white. I struggled on a socioeconomic and racial basis and felt isolated. I didn’t feel like many people could validate or cared about my experiences growing up with a single mom in a low-income neighborhood. BANP: What was your relationship like with your mentor?

universities in California. Summer Search pushed me to reconcile that the world was much bigger than I thought and there was still so much I didn’t know or understand. It was a catalyst for me to push myself out of my comfort zone and explore the world to learn more about myself. BANP: What outside experiences did Summer Search give you and how did these affect you? TH: I still remember that my second Summer Search trip to Paraguay with American Field Service was where I had my big epiphany about the world. I was working on a co-operative farm in a rural town an hour outside the capital. I was homesick and I was struggling with speaking Spanish to get by. And through my misery, I knew that this trip which I initially thought would be a fun, easy summer turned into one where I had to self-reflect and think that my concept of the world being just the San Francisco Bay Area was limiting.

TH: I don’t think I’ve told anyone as much about my life, my insecurities, and my aspirations than Meghan Kirkpatrick, my mentor. I never struggled with the weekly hour of silence that was our check-ins. It was Tony Huynh just an hour for me to talk and vent and have someone who really was there for me provide an objective opinion and guidance in my life. She made me more self-reflec- BANP: What is different about how you approach the world due tive! When I was in college in Vermont, Meghan had moved to to your experiences with Summer Search? New York and I actually saw her a few times when I was visiting friends in Manhattan! TH: I’m always up for an adventure! One of the best years of my life was when I studied abroad for a full year in England and in BANP: How did Summer Search help transform what you China during college. A full year to myself to explore the world thought you could accomplish in school and in life? and myself! It’s something I couldn’t have done or felt excited about it if it hadn’t been for Summer Search. If anything, Summer TH: Summer Search transformed my thoughts on the world. Search has pushed me to think that if something scares or terriI think growing up in my neighborhood, I thought life was the fies me, I should probably do it. It’s probably the most liberating Bay Area and not much else and college only consisted of the aspect of my life, why limit myself?

HELPING YOUNG PEOPLE SOAR... TOGETHER. Summer Search’s mission is to help low-income teenagers transform what they believe is possible for themselves and develop the skills they need to become college-educated leaders who give back to their families and communities.

Summer Search San Francisco 500 Sansome Street, Suite 350 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 362-5225

Summer Search Silicon Valley 255 N. Market Street, Suite 200 San Jose, CA 95110 (408) 291-0062

WWW.SUMMERSEARCH.ORG


Tony Huynh

Summer Search Alumnus ... And Now

A Successful College Graduate Tony Huynh, Customer Success Manager at Elance-oDesk and Summer Search Alumnus BANP:  What challenges did you face in getting into and finishing college? TH: Middlebury College felt very much like a third Summer Search trip. It was difficult to go from my school of nearly all low-income students of color to one where everyone was more affluent and predominantly white. I struggled on a socioeconomic and racial basis and felt isolated. I didn’t feel like many people could validate or cared about my experiences growing up with a single mom in a low-income neighborhood. BANP: What was your relationship like with your mentor?

universities in California. Summer Search pushed me to reconcile that the world was much bigger than I thought and there was still so much I didn’t know or understand. It was a catalyst for me to push myself out of my comfort zone and explore the world to learn more about myself. BANP: What outside experiences did Summer Search give you and how did these affect you? TH: I still remember that my second Summer Search trip to Paraguay with American Field Service was where I had my big epiphany about the world. I was working on a co-operative farm in a rural town an hour outside the capital. I was homesick and I was struggling with speaking Spanish to get by. And through my misery, I knew that this trip which I initially thought would be a fun, easy summer turned into one where I had to self-reflect and think that my concept of the world being just the San Francisco Bay Area was limiting.

TH: I don’t think I’ve told anyone as much about my life, my insecurities, and my aspirations than Meghan Kirkpatrick, my mentor. I never struggled with the weekly hour of silence that was our check-ins. It was Tony Huynh just an hour for me to talk and vent and have someone who really was there for me provide an objective opinion and guidance in my life. She made me more self-reflec- BANP: What is different about how you approach the world due tive! When I was in college in Vermont, Meghan had moved to to your experiences with Summer Search? New York and I actually saw her a few times when I was visiting friends in Manhattan! TH: I’m always up for an adventure! One of the best years of my life was when I studied abroad for a full year in England and in BANP: How did Summer Search help transform what you China during college. A full year to myself to explore the world thought you could accomplish in school and in life? and myself! It’s something I couldn’t have done or felt excited about it if it hadn’t been for Summer Search. If anything, Summer TH: Summer Search transformed my thoughts on the world. Search has pushed me to think that if something scares or terriI think growing up in my neighborhood, I thought life was the fies me, I should probably do it. It’s probably the most liberating Bay Area and not much else and college only consisted of the aspect of my life, why limit myself?

HELPING YOUNG PEOPLE SOAR... TOGETHER. Summer Search’s mission is to help low-income teenagers transform what they believe is possible for themselves and develop the skills they need to become college-educated leaders who give back to their families and communities.

Summer Search San Francisco 500 Sansome Street, Suite 350 San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 362-5225

Summer Search Silicon Valley 255 N. Market Street, Suite 200 San Jose, CA 95110 (408) 291-0062

WWW.SUMMERSEARCH.ORG


PARENTSHELPINGPARENTS

Building Bright Futures for Children with Special Needs

Global research consultant for cultural competency in human services for people with special needs Delores Springs, MA, Board Member BANP: What do you love most about what do when you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like?

PHP for guidance as the staff advocated for culturally competent services cultivating self-esteem, confidence, and self-sufficiency. My sister attended a workshop on safety and social skills. It brings my mom and I joy watching my sister learn from her experience at the PHP workshop. She began to build her esteem encouraging her to exercise confidence leading to resolving conflict and positive choices to stay in school. When I volunteer I am filled with joy knowing the support I provide assures optimal health and underscores the well-being of people with special needs.

DS: Serving as a board member and a volunteer evokes satisfaction knowing loved ones, like my sister, benefit from Parents Helping Parents support services. A vital part of volunteering involves advocacy for education and awareness. As a board member I love investing my time to address gaps in service delivery, encourage collaborative partnerships among child serving systems, and promoting awareness to create sustainable resources for individuals with special needs. BANP:  What is it about Parents Helping Volunteering at PHP enlarges my scope of Parents that helped you in choosing to beprovisions to be a part of an agency providcome a supporter?  ing services which uplifts countless families experiencing hopelessness and isolation. DS: Parents Helping Parents has been a savPHP’s support network creates opportuniing grace to my family as well as countless ties to build community partnerships while others. PHP walked with us through pitfalls promoting family driven success plans exand celebrated victories. We developed panding service provisions based upon inlifelong relationships and strategic partnerDelores Springs terdependent provider relationships. It is a ships with people honoring the strengths, joy to see the quality of life improve for those benefiting from cultures, traditions, and expertise that everyone brings to comPHP resources. Parents Helping Parents (PHP) volunteers assist prehensive care. I understand and appreciate the ripple effect in promoting thriving family-centered services. of giving to support initiatives. I challenge others to commit and serve creating a sense of community and interdependence BANP:  Is there a particular moment that stands out for you or through bridging gaps between professionals and families.   a particular joy you get when you volunteer? PHP is one of few organizations striving for excellence in best DS: Parents Helping Parents sets the bar high by providing practices, multi-culturally competent service delivery, and unconditional care. When my sister was diagnosed with a dis- individualized care. I am honored to be affiliated with and ability requiring managed care and therapeutic services, we donate to an agency that increases commitment for change prayed for her to flourish in a healthy lifestyle experiencing a forging unity, fostering continuity of care, and implementing life filled with attainable hopes and dreams. Unfortunately my a working plan marketing strategies essential for sustainabilsister dealt with a multitude of problems including her refusal ity and opulence for excellence in service for individuals with to attend school after being bullied repeatedly. We turned to special needs and their families.


Your child has just been diagnosed with a developmental, medical, psychological, learning or other issue — what now?

You are not alone.

Parents Helping Parents strives to improve the quality of life for any child with any special need of any age, through educating, supporting and training their primary caregivers.

Parents Helping Parents Sobrato Center for Nonprofits–San Jose 1400 Parkmoor Avenue Suite 100 San Jose, CA 95126 www.php.com | (408) 727-5775


BANP: How has Parents Helping Parents made a difference and what impact do you wish yet to see? MEP: We are especially fortunate at PHP because we hear inspirational stories almost every day. Just last month the mother of a fourth-grader told one of our Education Specialists, “Since speaking and meeting with you, things have been looking up for us. I feel like we are finally on the right track and it’s all thanks to you. Your ability to see through all confusion and provide us with razor sharp focus helped me to identify our problem and ask the right questions, request the appropriate things, find the right people, and now we are getting help from people that are making a difference.”

Building Bright Futures for Children with Special Needs!

PHP parents are warriors every day.

AN INTERVIEW WITH

MARY ELLEN PETERSON, CEO BANP: What is Parents Helping Parents about, and what do you all do?

Because the majority of our staff and volunteers (including our Board) are par-

MEP: Parents Helping Parents (PHP) was created in 1976 by two moms – both

MEP: Well that’s a fairly easy question for me to answer. I love that the work we do

with children with Down syndrome. They quickly realized the power of validat-

is so relevant and has such a powerful impact. Did you know that one in six Ameri-

ing their experience by sharing the highs and lows, the dreams recalibrated to

can children have a developmental or learning disability? That’s an increase of 17%

fit reality, the possibilities for looking beyond a diagnosis to the whole child.

during the past 10 years, an increase that will require more health and education

I found PHP when my son Joe was an infant. Doctors said, “He’ll be a vegetable.

services according to researchers from the Center for Disease Control.

Put him in a state hospital. He will never walk or talk.” I couldn’t, I wouldn’t believe my beautiful baby had no future. Luckily for me, through PHP I found

I love the staff and volunteers of PHP – so many who are parents of children

other parents who had children with special needs who were doing well. That

with special needs. In the past, strong extended family networks were there

gave me hope and I knew I was not alone, that if other people could care for

to help families meet the challenges of life with a child with special needs. But

their children with special needs, I could care for mine.

today’s increased mobility and decreased interdependence means that the extended family often lives far away. Natural support systems no longer exist and

Today Joe is 40. Not only does he walk and talk, he has very definite likes and

the family faces continual crises alone. Before connecting with PHP, parents

dislikes. He’s a big imposing guy who tells the truth – even when it makes oth-

often feel lost and alone. The entire family can be affected by a lack of support;

ers uncomfortable. He’s taught me countless lessons and because of Joe and

PHP has grown its services to meet the needs of families as their children with

so many children like him, I’ve been a PHP staff member for nearly four decades.

special needs grow into adulthood.

championing their cause.

ents of children with special needs, we know how vital that ‘razor sharp focus’ is in creating a path for each individual child.

Yet all parents want their children, whatever their special healthcare needs, to have the same rights and opportunities that other children experience. When

Another parent wrote, “Can’t say enough nice things about this organization.

you’re in the community and you experience a child with a challenging behav-

They are so helpful to families with children with special needs (all kinds of

ior, accept that we can all have a bad day now and then; and remember to value

special need). Sometimes you just need a little help to focus when you’re so

the individual and to honor their differences.

exhausted and that’s what PHP does.” BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers?  Why is That sense of exhaustion is common among the families we serve and it doesn’t

Parents Helping Parents so special?

just affect the parents; the entire family may experience significant stress in ev-

MEP: PHP envisions a world where our communities are not overwhelmed by

eryday life and can find solace and strength in talking to peers about the chal-

the challenges of parenting a child with special needs because there are ad-

lenges they face. That can make an immeasurable difference.

equate resources for families. This world will include and embrace all people

BANP: What do you love most about Parents Helping Parents and the work that you all do?

A very grown up Joe with his Mom

with special needs. Their lives and the lives of their families will be filled with In looking forward, I expect to see the communities fully accessible and inclu-

hope, fun and meaningful opportunities that reflect an optimism and sense of

sive, and valuing all individuals regardless of their abilities.

security about the future.

BANP: What would you like the world to know about  Parents Helping Par-

We are dreaming BIG. Your time, as a volunteer, and treasure, as a donor or

ents and how can people help make a difference?

sponsor, are investments in those big dreams.

MEP: Our clients are families of children born with birth defects or Fetal Al-

• Help us achieve greater name recognition for PHP – locally, nationally and in-

cohol Syndrome, victims of accidents, those with chronic and life threatening

ternationally – to meet the needs of families near and far who can benefit from

illnesses, the 1 out of 10 children with autism, ADHD and learning disabilities.

our expertise and experience.

One in 68 children in the US experiences Autism Spectrum Disorder.  In Califor-

• Make it possible to place PHP staff and parent liaisons in local hospitals,

nia of the 6.2 million K-12 public school students, 12% are in special-ed with

schools and community centers throughout the county.

disproportionate representation by ethnicity such that 55% identify as Hispan-

• Visit, support and help us grow the innovative I-tech Center, a leader in Assis-

ic, 9% as African American, 7% as Asian/Pacific Islander and 3% as Multi-ethnic.

tive Technology for children and adults with special needs. • Provide the means to research and develop web-enabled products and ser-

This issue is relevant to all of us. A recent study found that 9+% of employees in

vices that increase PHP efficacy and efficiency without increasing cost.

the US care for a family member with a disability – parents and siblings balanc-

Together, we can empower parents to advocate for their children with mastery,

ing work responsibilities with therapy, medical appointments, education plans.

advocating on potential rather than limits. We can support, teach and train

PHP is uniquely family-centered, focusing not just on the child, but on the in-

families to look beyond diagnoses of disabilities, to speak up with confidence

herent strengths of the family as the central unit of support for the child – no

I love it that we work to make and sustain that connection. The long tenure of

matter how old. Our mission is to help children and adults with special needs

so many of the staff, volunteers and supporters is a testament to the strength of

receive the support and services they need to reach their full potential by pro-

this connection. But I want you to know that this is not just our cause. Our mis-

viding information, training and resources to build strong families and improve

sion should be everyone’s concern because how we support the most vulnerable

systems of care. Last year, almost 6,000 parents and professionals contacted

members of our community will directly affect our overall quality of life and how

PHP and we provided over 22,000 direct services.

we value others in the community.

Most parents are warriors occasionally on behalf of their children – infants

on behalf of their children throughout the life cycle from infancy through

through adulthood. PHP parents are warriors every day. For their children who

adulthood and grow self-advocates to be leaders and to have their own voice

cannot effectively communicate, they are their eyes, ears and voices. For those

to share with all of us the bright futures that living intentional lives fosters.

who cannot self-regulate, they are monitors, moderators and often staunch defenders of rights and access. As the first and sometimes only advocates for their children, they need to have current information and tools for effectively


BANP: How has Parents Helping Parents made a difference and what impact do you wish yet to see? MEP: We are especially fortunate at PHP because we hear inspirational stories almost every day. Just last month the mother of a fourth-grader told one of our Education Specialists, “Since speaking and meeting with you, things have been looking up for us. I feel like we are finally on the right track and it’s all thanks to you. Your ability to see through all confusion and provide us with razor sharp focus helped me to identify our problem and ask the right questions, request the appropriate things, find the right people, and now we are getting help from people that are making a difference.”

Building Bright Futures for Children with Special Needs!

PHP parents are warriors every day.

AN INTERVIEW WITH

MARY ELLEN PETERSON, CEO BANP: What is Parents Helping Parents about, and what do you all do?

Because the majority of our staff and volunteers (including our Board) are par-

MEP: Parents Helping Parents (PHP) was created in 1976 by two moms – both

MEP: Well that’s a fairly easy question for me to answer. I love that the work we do

with children with Down syndrome. They quickly realized the power of validat-

is so relevant and has such a powerful impact. Did you know that one in six Ameri-

ing their experience by sharing the highs and lows, the dreams recalibrated to

can children have a developmental or learning disability? That’s an increase of 17%

fit reality, the possibilities for looking beyond a diagnosis to the whole child.

during the past 10 years, an increase that will require more health and education

I found PHP when my son Joe was an infant. Doctors said, “He’ll be a vegetable.

services according to researchers from the Center for Disease Control.

Put him in a state hospital. He will never walk or talk.” I couldn’t, I wouldn’t believe my beautiful baby had no future. Luckily for me, through PHP I found

I love the staff and volunteers of PHP – so many who are parents of children

other parents who had children with special needs who were doing well. That

with special needs. In the past, strong extended family networks were there

gave me hope and I knew I was not alone, that if other people could care for

to help families meet the challenges of life with a child with special needs. But

their children with special needs, I could care for mine.

today’s increased mobility and decreased interdependence means that the extended family often lives far away. Natural support systems no longer exist and

Today Joe is 40. Not only does he walk and talk, he has very definite likes and

the family faces continual crises alone. Before connecting with PHP, parents

dislikes. He’s a big imposing guy who tells the truth – even when it makes oth-

often feel lost and alone. The entire family can be affected by a lack of support;

ers uncomfortable. He’s taught me countless lessons and because of Joe and

PHP has grown its services to meet the needs of families as their children with

so many children like him, I’ve been a PHP staff member for nearly four decades.

special needs grow into adulthood.

championing their cause.

ents of children with special needs, we know how vital that ‘razor sharp focus’ is in creating a path for each individual child.

Yet all parents want their children, whatever their special healthcare needs, to have the same rights and opportunities that other children experience. When

Another parent wrote, “Can’t say enough nice things about this organization.

you’re in the community and you experience a child with a challenging behav-

They are so helpful to families with children with special needs (all kinds of

ior, accept that we can all have a bad day now and then; and remember to value

special need). Sometimes you just need a little help to focus when you’re so

the individual and to honor their differences.

exhausted and that’s what PHP does.” BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers?  Why is That sense of exhaustion is common among the families we serve and it doesn’t

Parents Helping Parents so special?

just affect the parents; the entire family may experience significant stress in ev-

MEP: PHP envisions a world where our communities are not overwhelmed by

eryday life and can find solace and strength in talking to peers about the chal-

the challenges of parenting a child with special needs because there are ad-

lenges they face. That can make an immeasurable difference.

equate resources for families. This world will include and embrace all people

BANP: What do you love most about Parents Helping Parents and the work that you all do?

A very grown up Joe with his Mom

with special needs. Their lives and the lives of their families will be filled with In looking forward, I expect to see the communities fully accessible and inclu-

hope, fun and meaningful opportunities that reflect an optimism and sense of

sive, and valuing all individuals regardless of their abilities.

security about the future.

BANP: What would you like the world to know about  Parents Helping Par-

We are dreaming BIG. Your time, as a volunteer, and treasure, as a donor or

ents and how can people help make a difference?

sponsor, are investments in those big dreams.

MEP: Our clients are families of children born with birth defects or Fetal Al-

• Help us achieve greater name recognition for PHP – locally, nationally and in-

cohol Syndrome, victims of accidents, those with chronic and life threatening

ternationally – to meet the needs of families near and far who can benefit from

illnesses, the 1 out of 10 children with autism, ADHD and learning disabilities.

our expertise and experience.

One in 68 children in the US experiences Autism Spectrum Disorder.  In Califor-

• Make it possible to place PHP staff and parent liaisons in local hospitals,

nia of the 6.2 million K-12 public school students, 12% are in special-ed with

schools and community centers throughout the county.

disproportionate representation by ethnicity such that 55% identify as Hispan-

• Visit, support and help us grow the innovative I-tech Center, a leader in Assis-

ic, 9% as African American, 7% as Asian/Pacific Islander and 3% as Multi-ethnic.

tive Technology for children and adults with special needs. • Provide the means to research and develop web-enabled products and ser-

This issue is relevant to all of us. A recent study found that 9+% of employees in

vices that increase PHP efficacy and efficiency without increasing cost.

the US care for a family member with a disability – parents and siblings balanc-

Together, we can empower parents to advocate for their children with mastery,

ing work responsibilities with therapy, medical appointments, education plans.

advocating on potential rather than limits. We can support, teach and train

PHP is uniquely family-centered, focusing not just on the child, but on the in-

families to look beyond diagnoses of disabilities, to speak up with confidence

herent strengths of the family as the central unit of support for the child – no

I love it that we work to make and sustain that connection. The long tenure of

matter how old. Our mission is to help children and adults with special needs

so many of the staff, volunteers and supporters is a testament to the strength of

receive the support and services they need to reach their full potential by pro-

this connection. But I want you to know that this is not just our cause. Our mis-

viding information, training and resources to build strong families and improve

sion should be everyone’s concern because how we support the most vulnerable

systems of care. Last year, almost 6,000 parents and professionals contacted

members of our community will directly affect our overall quality of life and how

PHP and we provided over 22,000 direct services.

we value others in the community.

Most parents are warriors occasionally on behalf of their children – infants

on behalf of their children throughout the life cycle from infancy through

through adulthood. PHP parents are warriors every day. For their children who

adulthood and grow self-advocates to be leaders and to have their own voice

cannot effectively communicate, they are their eyes, ears and voices. For those

to share with all of us the bright futures that living intentional lives fosters.

who cannot self-regulate, they are monitors, moderators and often staunch defenders of rights and access. As the first and sometimes only advocates for their children, they need to have current information and tools for effectively


The Rewards Are Limitless, And I Am So Happy I Can Help. Carolyn Qi, Fundraising Chair of the PACE Youth Leadership Committee (YLC) BANP: What is it about PACE that made you want to choose PACE? What do you do when you volunteer and how long have you been doing it? CQ: Pacific Autism Center for Education is nothing like any other organization that I considered joining before Junior year. As a Freshman and Sophomore, I worked with another organization over the summer, helping hold a summer camp for children with special needs. With them, I did a lot of hands on work and really got to know the children. With PACE, I got the exceptional experience to work behind the scenes and help the children from all aspects. Working hands on, I could only help one child at a time, but working with PACE, I could help raise enough money to pay a professional to teach an entire class of children. With one hour, I could benefit 10 children instead of just one. BANP: What do you love most about what you do when you volunteer? Is there a favorite "something" you like?

CQ: We usually work behind the scenes to raise money and awareness, but occasionally get to see our hard work get put into action. That, in itself, makes the hours put into a benefit concert or local fundraiser worth it. One day, I went in during school hours to speak with Rachel, and I had to wait for a couple minutes while she was in a meeting. Within those 15 minutes, 3 students walked by me accompanied by an adult. They all said a cheerful hello to me as they went on walks, on school trips, and other various activities provided by the school. Just seeing how my work has benefited so many students makes my day. They may not know me and I may not know them, but yet, I got to feel that connection and that joy when they smiled at me. BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others? CQ: Only for those who are dedicated to helping others. It takes a while to see your hard work pay off when you are only working behind the scenes and not hands on. Without the immediate gratification, it takes a lot of dedication. But the rewards are limitless. The award at the finish line is doubled because the wait for it is long.

CQ: The sense of success. After Volunteer, Carolyn Qi hours and hours of making cold calls to restaurants and local stores, it feels phenomenal to get someone who picks up the phone and donates. Whenever we hold an in-restaurant fundraiser, I always get to see BANP: When you volunteer, seeing what you see family and friends eating together, and I feel and doing what you do, do you often think and hope butterflies in my stomach knowing that they came to how others, too, could join in and help make a bigger, support something I stand for. When I see young more positive difference? adults learn about children with Autism, I feel a sense a joy that more people are being exposed to the CQ: Everyone can make a simple donation that can Autism community and will become as accepting as I go to helping others. Every penny counts. If they am to these special individuals. have the time, they can volunteer at a local organization, working one on one with children with BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out Autism. It brings me joy to see that there are others for you or a particular joy you get when you out there that support the same cause as I do, so volunteer? naturally I appreciate any form of help from others. Everything helps make our work easier.


Pacific Autism Center for Education Connect • Support • Educate

Pacific Autism Center for Education provides for the educational and residential needs of children and adults with autism and other developmental disabilities. Specialists in speech and language development, occupational therapy, behavior management and special education instruction work as a team to serve the diverse needs of our clients through our innovative Children’s Therapeutic Services for toddlers to school aged, Sunny Days Preschool, The PACE School for ages 6-22, and Residential Group Homes for those aged 6-59.

Now accepting students!

(408) 245-3400 | info@pacificautism.org 1880 Pruneridge Avenue, Santa Clara, CA www.pacificautism.org


BANP: How has PACE made a difference and what impact do you wish yet to see?

At PACE – A World In Which People of All Abilities Live Fulfilled Lives An Interview With

Kurt Ohlfs, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

BANP: What is PACE (Pacific Autism Center for Educa- Residential Group Homes - PACE operates two children’s tion) about and what do you all do? and four adult group homes, and one Supported Living Services home in Santa Clara County, each licensed to KO: The Pacific Autism Center for Education (PACE) serve residents from 6 to 59+ years of age. Each group provides high quality programs for individuals with au- home houses six individuals and is managed by an adtism living in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our mission ministrator who is assisted by a team of trained residenis to: Enhance the lives of people impacted by autism tial staff members, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. through innovation, exceptional education and compassionate care. Our programs include: BANP: What do you love most about PACE and the work The PACE School - a CA certified K-12 school serving stu- that you all do? /www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1212608128755196&set=gm.10153841368544059&type=3 dents ages 6-22 who live with moderate to severe autism, with a specific emphasis on non-verbal students KO: After 10 years at the helm of PACE, the thing I love and those with especially challenging behaviors and most is the development and growth of staff in encommunication disorders. gaging in this field of work.  Through interactions with Children’s Services - this program provides critical com- students and clients, I see not only staff growth, but a prehensive options in early intervention for young chil- disbursement of knowledge to our clients’ circle of comdren diagnosed with autism.  These options include Fac- munity supports.  As the staff builds competence and es, an intensive behavioral early intervention program compassion in their work, the quality of service to the in Redwood City and Connections, an affect-based early students and clients served by PACE becomes enhanced intervention program in San Jose that offers therapy, as we strive to realize our agency vision of: A world in parent training and the Sunny Days Preschool. which people of all abilities live fulfilled lives.

KO: Since our founding 26 years ago, the need for services for individuals with an autism diagnosis has grown exponentially and outstripped our ability to keep up with the need.  We need to provide direct education in the home and we have launched an online learning platform to do just that with Project Porchlight.  The Porchlight Autism Education Series is a resource designed for parents and caregivers of people living with autism. The series focuses on education and solutions to help with behavioral change at home. Porchlight is meant to be an easily accessible resource for those who need it, and at their own pace.  There are four learning areas including: Understanding Autism / Tools for Caregivers; Help with Daily Routines / Self Help; Social Skills / Communication / Safety; and Behaviors.

ing agencies like ours who help those families in need. BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers?  Why is PACE so special?

KO: We see our role as not simply education, but as developing connections. Our basic tenant is “connect, support, educate”.  It’s our mission to communicate with the entire support network of people with special needs. It’s like creating a social media of special needs - the more you know, the more you can do. If Porchlight can help parents or caregivers with one specific topic like ‘Evoking Positive Behavior’, we open The PACE of the past was bounded by bricks and mortar up a world of positive possibilities for the entire family.  in the direct community we served, but today we have This information might spread from this family to the no such boundaries and can provide learning to caregreater community. givers throughout the world, 24/7. We’re in the business of building community connecBANP: What would you like the world to know about tions.  I can illustrate this in a quick story.  If a parent has PACE and how can people help make a difference? a connection to his barber for many years, he could ask the barber if his adult child with special needs might KO: PACE has had a limited footprint in the region it help out in the shop, say sweeping up the floor a few serves.  With a stronger online component and outward hours a week. This is a great opportunity for everyone teaching emphasis, we have the ability to reach a global involved.  The adult child has learned how to help, the community.  Education is the same here as all over the barber has learned more about those with special needs world - it just needs to be culturally translated.  This is an and the parent has deepened community relationships. ongoing project for PACE, as our students, clients and residents align exactly with the SF Bay Area diversity.  It’s in the area of these social connections that we can We serve many ethnicities and nationalities at PACE.  We support and educate not just the autism community, recognize that the solution to Autism support is found but the community at large.  Our ongoing task is to figin a robust community of educated support.  The comure out how to push out new programs like Porchlight, munity at large can help make a difference by educating while still maintaining our commitment to providing themselves about developmental disabilities, providing the highest quality of care to the families, clients and support to families in need of a little extra support and children we service directly. understanding.  And, people might consider support-


BANP: How has PACE made a difference and what impact do you wish yet to see?

At PACE – A World In Which People of All Abilities Live Fulfilled Lives An Interview With

Kurt Ohlfs, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

BANP: What is PACE (Pacific Autism Center for Educa- Residential Group Homes - PACE operates two children’s tion) about and what do you all do? and four adult group homes, and one Supported Living Services home in Santa Clara County, each licensed to KO: The Pacific Autism Center for Education (PACE) serve residents from 6 to 59+ years of age. Each group provides high quality programs for individuals with au- home houses six individuals and is managed by an adtism living in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our mission ministrator who is assisted by a team of trained residenis to: Enhance the lives of people impacted by autism tial staff members, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. through innovation, exceptional education and compassionate care. Our programs include: BANP: What do you love most about PACE and the work The PACE School - a CA certified K-12 school serving stu- that you all do? /www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1212608128755196&set=gm.10153841368544059&type=3 dents ages 6-22 who live with moderate to severe autism, with a specific emphasis on non-verbal students KO: After 10 years at the helm of PACE, the thing I love and those with especially challenging behaviors and most is the development and growth of staff in encommunication disorders. gaging in this field of work.  Through interactions with Children’s Services - this program provides critical com- students and clients, I see not only staff growth, but a prehensive options in early intervention for young chil- disbursement of knowledge to our clients’ circle of comdren diagnosed with autism.  These options include Fac- munity supports.  As the staff builds competence and es, an intensive behavioral early intervention program compassion in their work, the quality of service to the in Redwood City and Connections, an affect-based early students and clients served by PACE becomes enhanced intervention program in San Jose that offers therapy, as we strive to realize our agency vision of: A world in parent training and the Sunny Days Preschool. which people of all abilities live fulfilled lives.

KO: Since our founding 26 years ago, the need for services for individuals with an autism diagnosis has grown exponentially and outstripped our ability to keep up with the need.  We need to provide direct education in the home and we have launched an online learning platform to do just that with Project Porchlight.  The Porchlight Autism Education Series is a resource designed for parents and caregivers of people living with autism. The series focuses on education and solutions to help with behavioral change at home. Porchlight is meant to be an easily accessible resource for those who need it, and at their own pace.  There are four learning areas including: Understanding Autism / Tools for Caregivers; Help with Daily Routines / Self Help; Social Skills / Communication / Safety; and Behaviors.

ing agencies like ours who help those families in need. BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers?  Why is PACE so special?

KO: We see our role as not simply education, but as developing connections. Our basic tenant is “connect, support, educate”.  It’s our mission to communicate with the entire support network of people with special needs. It’s like creating a social media of special needs - the more you know, the more you can do. If Porchlight can help parents or caregivers with one specific topic like ‘Evoking Positive Behavior’, we open The PACE of the past was bounded by bricks and mortar up a world of positive possibilities for the entire family.  in the direct community we served, but today we have This information might spread from this family to the no such boundaries and can provide learning to caregreater community. givers throughout the world, 24/7. We’re in the business of building community connecBANP: What would you like the world to know about tions.  I can illustrate this in a quick story.  If a parent has PACE and how can people help make a difference? a connection to his barber for many years, he could ask the barber if his adult child with special needs might KO: PACE has had a limited footprint in the region it help out in the shop, say sweeping up the floor a few serves.  With a stronger online component and outward hours a week. This is a great opportunity for everyone teaching emphasis, we have the ability to reach a global involved.  The adult child has learned how to help, the community.  Education is the same here as all over the barber has learned more about those with special needs world - it just needs to be culturally translated.  This is an and the parent has deepened community relationships. ongoing project for PACE, as our students, clients and residents align exactly with the SF Bay Area diversity.  It’s in the area of these social connections that we can We serve many ethnicities and nationalities at PACE.  We support and educate not just the autism community, recognize that the solution to Autism support is found but the community at large.  Our ongoing task is to figin a robust community of educated support.  The comure out how to push out new programs like Porchlight, munity at large can help make a difference by educating while still maintaining our commitment to providing themselves about developmental disabilities, providing the highest quality of care to the families, clients and support to families in need of a little extra support and children we service directly. understanding.  And, people might consider support-


POSITIVECOACHINGALLIANCE

BETTER ATHLETES BETTER PEOPLE

Robyn Varellas, Volunteer

Providing a Positive, Character-Building Experience For All Youth Athletes

BANP:  What is it about Positive Coaching Alliance that RV: I recall a Triple-Impact Competitor® Scholarship Awards made you want to choose the Positive Coaching Alliance ... Ceremony Presented by Deloitte, where we honor high What do you do when you volunteer and how long have school athletes of exceptional character. One of the Waryou been doing it? riors’ players who was scheduled to speak had a last-minute RV: My husband, Larry, a partner at Deloitte (a corporate conflict - so off the bench came Andre Iguodala a great role supporter of PCA), has been on the Board of Positive Coach- model! ing Alliance for seven years.  Our entire family has been involved with athletics at many levels BANP: Do you recommend or suggest and had the benefits of positive coaches this to others? and character-building sports experiencRV: Absolutely!! The Positive Coaching es. Understanding the lifetime impact Alliance National Advisory Board Memon youth of positive sports experiences bers, National Board Members, and staff made it an easy decision to focus on Posiat the Mountain View headquarters and tive Coaching Alliance. Chapters across the country are some of As a volunteer, I get to spend a lot of the most talented, energetic, intelligent hands-on time working with PCA staff, as and inspirational people I have met.  I feel well as interacting with student-athletes, like I should thank them every time I get board members and donors. I have been to help with an event and interact with involved for the last four years with PCA’s this group!  I have learned so much from annual National Youth Sports Awards Dinthe PCA staff and management team, as Robyn Varellas ner and Auction Sponsored by Deloitte, as well as from the coaches, athletes, parwell as other donor and student-athlete recognition events. ents and students we support. What a great opportunity to learn, have fun and make a difference!  Any individual, BANP: What do you love most about what you do when corporation or group that values team play and character you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like?  throughout life would love to support PCA.  RV: I love seeing the coaches and student-athletes whom BANP: When you volunteer, seeing what you see and doing we honor at events each year. Hearing their stories of how what you do, do you often think and hope how others, too, positive coaching has been life changing for them makes could join in and help make a bigger, more positive differme proud to be a part of PCA. Volunteering also gives me ence? a chance to develop skills I enjoy – so it’s a double benefit! RV: I do!  Just think of the impact on nonprofits if everyone took a passion of theirs and put it to work for a cause they BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for you believe in!  Nonprofits would be stronger than ever and the or a particular joy you get when you volunteer? world would be a better place!


POSITIVECOACHINGALLIANCE

BETTER ATHLETES BETTER PEOPLE

Robyn Varellas, Volunteer

Providing a Positive, Character-Building Experience For All Youth Athletes

BANP:  What is it about Positive Coaching Alliance that RV: I recall a Triple-Impact Competitor® Scholarship Awards made you want to choose the Positive Coaching Alliance ... Ceremony Presented by Deloitte, where we honor high What do you do when you volunteer and how long have school athletes of exceptional character. One of the Waryou been doing it? riors’ players who was scheduled to speak had a last-minute RV: My husband, Larry, a partner at Deloitte (a corporate conflict - so off the bench came Andre Iguodala a great role supporter of PCA), has been on the Board of Positive Coach- model! ing Alliance for seven years.  Our entire family has been involved with athletics at many levels BANP: Do you recommend or suggest and had the benefits of positive coaches this to others? and character-building sports experiencRV: Absolutely!! The Positive Coaching es. Understanding the lifetime impact Alliance National Advisory Board Memon youth of positive sports experiences bers, National Board Members, and staff made it an easy decision to focus on Posiat the Mountain View headquarters and tive Coaching Alliance. Chapters across the country are some of As a volunteer, I get to spend a lot of the most talented, energetic, intelligent hands-on time working with PCA staff, as and inspirational people I have met.  I feel well as interacting with student-athletes, like I should thank them every time I get board members and donors. I have been to help with an event and interact with involved for the last four years with PCA’s this group!  I have learned so much from annual National Youth Sports Awards Dinthe PCA staff and management team, as Robyn Varellas ner and Auction Sponsored by Deloitte, as well as from the coaches, athletes, parwell as other donor and student-athlete recognition events. ents and students we support. What a great opportunity to learn, have fun and make a difference!  Any individual, BANP: What do you love most about what you do when corporation or group that values team play and character you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like?  throughout life would love to support PCA.  RV: I love seeing the coaches and student-athletes whom BANP: When you volunteer, seeing what you see and doing we honor at events each year. Hearing their stories of how what you do, do you often think and hope how others, too, positive coaching has been life changing for them makes could join in and help make a bigger, more positive differme proud to be a part of PCA. Volunteering also gives me ence? a chance to develop skills I enjoy – so it’s a double benefit! RV: I do!  Just think of the impact on nonprofits if everyone took a passion of theirs and put it to work for a cause they BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for you believe in!  Nonprofits would be stronger than ever and the or a particular joy you get when you volunteer? world would be a better place!


development to Elevate teachers over the course of the summer. Even after the summer Elevate [Math] program has concluded, our teachers take the teaching strategies that they learned over the course of the pro-

Silicon Valley Education Foundation (SVEF) Champions Learning for Today’s Tech-Savvy World

gram into their classrooms during the regular school year where each teacher impacts, on average, an additional 175 students. We’re proud to say that many of our former Elevate students are now eligible to attend top four-year colleges. Our programs change the life trajectory of young students, showing them that they can succeed in mastering critical subjects and get into a good college. Our drumbeat has always been “College Begins in Middle School.” BANP: How has SVEF made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see the foundation make? MC: WestEd, the regional laboratory of the U.S. Department of Education,

An Interview With

MUHAMMED CHAUDHRY, President and CEO

Muhammed Chaudhry sits in on an Elevate (Math) class to help students solve a math problem.

recently published an independent study that confirmed the effective-

people help make a difference?

ness of our flagship program, Elevate [Math]. The year-long, randomized

MC: The Silicon Valley Education Foundation is one of the Valley’s most

controlled trial showed that Elevate [Math] increased the algebra readi-

prominent voices in education, particularly in underserved communi-

ness level of students by 2.4 times compared to the control group. The

ties. We believe that the best way to close the racial, socio-economic,

study also concluded that the effect of our program is more than twice

and gender achievement gaps is through education. We are a strong

the typical effect found among similar summer intervention programs.

voice for innovation, especially championing STEM education and im-

We are also making a difference with our policy advocacy. Two years ago,

plementation of education technology in the classroom. SVEF’s strategy

we created the East Side Alliance. This partnership brings the East Side

is to partner with corporations and other organizations that understand

Union High School District and its elementary feeder districts together

the need to prepare our next generation of students for skilled profes-

to provide a seamless learning experience for students and boost aca-

sional jobs in the global marketplace.

demic achievement across the district. In addition, SVEF has advocated

With generous financial support from organizations such as Applied

for school districts to adopt “A-G” requirements - standards high school

Materials, Flextronics, Chevron, SanDisk, Adobe, Intel, and the 49ers

students must meet to be eligible for California’s UC and CSU systems.

Foundation, SVEF has developed STEM-focused initiatives and math and science intervention programs that have become state and national

BANP: What is Silicon Valley Education Foundation about, and what do

BANP: What do you love most about SVEF and the work that you all do?

The number of students who were enrolled into a default A-G curriculum

you all do?

MC: Changing children’s lives. We love that we are changing the learn-

rose from 12% to almost 70% over the last six years, thanks in large part

models for changing the lives of previously underserved students.

MC: I’ve built SVEF around the belief that a new kind of organization was

ing landscape in Silicon Valley in a significant way. More than 8,000

to SVEF’s policy advocacy efforts. 

SVEF also helps teachers fund projects that school budgets are unable

needed – one with a different philosophy and approach to the challeng-

middle school students have gone through our summer Elevate [Math]

Another major impact has been SVEF’s Learning Innovation Hub (iHub),

to support. Through corporate and private fundraising, we have built

es in legacy systems. I saw the need to create a non-profit resource and

program, a 75-hour (four week) intervention course that prepares in-

which has been at the forefront of education technology implementa-

a Teacher Innovation Grant program, which offers teachers funding for

advocate for students and educators. As it stands, only 50% of our high

coming 8th graders for Algebra I (or the Common Core equivalent), a

tion. iHub connects EdTech entrepreneurs with classrooms across Sili-

field trips and innovative classroom projects. Field trips give many stu-

school graduates are eligible to apply to UC or CSU. Here at SVEF, we are

critical gatekeeper to college success. By providing these students with

con Valley, giving students a chance to live test the most cutting-edge

dents from less-advantaged communities unique opportunities to ex-

obsessed with putting all students on track for college and career read-

a strong academic foundation in 8th grade, we ensure that they are both

technology while simultaneously providing feedback to developers to

perience off-campus “learning labs,” such as the California Academy of

iness. By focusing on the critical areas of science, technology, engineer-

prepared for rigorous high school coursework and set up for success in

ensure that their product will best serve students. iHub has elevated

Sciences in San Francisco or the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

ing, and math (STEM), we help students develop skills that will prepare

college. Elevate [Math], which we offer at no cost to students or their

learning for several hundred students by providing them with new tools

SVEF welcomes volunteers to make a difference in the lives of children by

them for the demands of the 21st century workforce.

families, targets students from under-served schools who score at the

that enhance their classroom experience.

helping tutor and mentor students in our Elevate [Math] classes.

To this end, we’re addressing the issues on three fronts: we work directly

“Standard Nearly Met” level on the math portion of their SBAC examina-

A final innovative program is our 49ers STEM Leadership Institute, in con-

with school districts and stakeholders to promote positive policy chang-

tion.

junction with the 49ers Foundation. Now in its second year, the program

BANP: What is it you like to say to potential donors and volunteers? Why

es for all students, provide direct programming for students in subjects

The Elevate [Math] program was designed with the goal of closing the

has enrolled 120 middle school students in a rigorous STEM curriculum

is SVEF so special?

that put them on track to succeed in college, and support innovative ini-

racial “achievement gap” in Silicon Valley – the measured discrepancy in

within the Santa Clara Unified School District. Students are exposed to

MC: We make a difference in children’s lives by placing some of the most

tiatives to bring better technologies into our classrooms.

academic performance between students of color and their white peers.

a high-tech environment with cutting-edge tools, such as laser cutters,

academically and economically-challenged students in our proven pro-

SVEF’s programs and initiatives include math intervention courses

In serving a population of students in which the majority are students of

a 3D printer, and robotics kits to help them strengthen their math and

grams with the goal of providing them support and a pathway to college

called Elevate [Math]; our 49ers STEM Leadership Institute that serves

color, Elevate [Math] works to ensure that all students are afforded the

engineering skills as they aim for admission to top-tier colleges in STEM

and successful careers. We are changing the education landscape by sig-

high-achieving students from underserved schools; the Learning Inno-

educational opportunities necessary to succeed in college and beyond

fields. We’re now building on our early success by expanding the pro-

nificantly improving student achievement in STEM subjects through our

vation Hub (iHub) that connects Bay Area classrooms with EdTech entre-

regardless of their background.

gram into high school.

academic programs and supporting technological innovation that trans-

preneurs; East Side Alliance that joins the East Side Union High School

Over the past two years, the Elevate [Math] program has aligned its cur-

We hope to lead the charge in expanding opportunities for education

form students’ classroom experiences. In partnering with underserved

District and elementary feeder districts to provide seamless learning

riculum to the new Common Core State Standards. In doing so we hope

technology implementation and pushing for computer science educa-

districts that predominantly serve students of color, we are resolved to

and advocates for district adoption of “A-G” standards. We also provide

to acquaint students with the new standards so that they will enter their

tion to become part of all schools’ core curriculum.

ensure that all students in Silicon Valley are given access to educational

Teacher Innovation Grants and community education forums.

8th grade math course more confident in their ability to succeed. We are also excited to provide 35 hours of Common Core-aligned professional

opportunities that pave the way to college so we can develop the next BANP: What would you like the world to know about SVEF and how can

generation of Silicon Valley’s leaders and innovators.


development to Elevate teachers over the course of the summer. Even after the summer Elevate [Math] program has concluded, our teachers take the teaching strategies that they learned over the course of the pro-

Silicon Valley Education Foundation (SVEF) Champions Learning for Today’s Tech-Savvy World

gram into their classrooms during the regular school year where each teacher impacts, on average, an additional 175 students. We’re proud to say that many of our former Elevate students are now eligible to attend top four-year colleges. Our programs change the life trajectory of young students, showing them that they can succeed in mastering critical subjects and get into a good college. Our drumbeat has always been “College Begins in Middle School.” BANP: How has SVEF made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see the foundation make? MC: WestEd, the regional laboratory of the U.S. Department of Education,

An Interview With

MUHAMMED CHAUDHRY, President and CEO

Muhammed Chaudhry sits in on an Elevate (Math) class to help students solve a math problem.

recently published an independent study that confirmed the effective-

people help make a difference?

ness of our flagship program, Elevate [Math]. The year-long, randomized

MC: The Silicon Valley Education Foundation is one of the Valley’s most

controlled trial showed that Elevate [Math] increased the algebra readi-

prominent voices in education, particularly in underserved communi-

ness level of students by 2.4 times compared to the control group. The

ties. We believe that the best way to close the racial, socio-economic,

study also concluded that the effect of our program is more than twice

and gender achievement gaps is through education. We are a strong

the typical effect found among similar summer intervention programs.

voice for innovation, especially championing STEM education and im-

We are also making a difference with our policy advocacy. Two years ago,

plementation of education technology in the classroom. SVEF’s strategy

we created the East Side Alliance. This partnership brings the East Side

is to partner with corporations and other organizations that understand

Union High School District and its elementary feeder districts together

the need to prepare our next generation of students for skilled profes-

to provide a seamless learning experience for students and boost aca-

sional jobs in the global marketplace.

demic achievement across the district. In addition, SVEF has advocated

With generous financial support from organizations such as Applied

for school districts to adopt “A-G” requirements - standards high school

Materials, Flextronics, Chevron, SanDisk, Adobe, Intel, and the 49ers

students must meet to be eligible for California’s UC and CSU systems.

Foundation, SVEF has developed STEM-focused initiatives and math and science intervention programs that have become state and national

BANP: What is Silicon Valley Education Foundation about, and what do

BANP: What do you love most about SVEF and the work that you all do?

The number of students who were enrolled into a default A-G curriculum

you all do?

MC: Changing children’s lives. We love that we are changing the learn-

rose from 12% to almost 70% over the last six years, thanks in large part

models for changing the lives of previously underserved students.

MC: I’ve built SVEF around the belief that a new kind of organization was

ing landscape in Silicon Valley in a significant way. More than 8,000

to SVEF’s policy advocacy efforts. 

SVEF also helps teachers fund projects that school budgets are unable

needed – one with a different philosophy and approach to the challeng-

middle school students have gone through our summer Elevate [Math]

Another major impact has been SVEF’s Learning Innovation Hub (iHub),

to support. Through corporate and private fundraising, we have built

es in legacy systems. I saw the need to create a non-profit resource and

program, a 75-hour (four week) intervention course that prepares in-

which has been at the forefront of education technology implementa-

a Teacher Innovation Grant program, which offers teachers funding for

advocate for students and educators. As it stands, only 50% of our high

coming 8th graders for Algebra I (or the Common Core equivalent), a

tion. iHub connects EdTech entrepreneurs with classrooms across Sili-

field trips and innovative classroom projects. Field trips give many stu-

school graduates are eligible to apply to UC or CSU. Here at SVEF, we are

critical gatekeeper to college success. By providing these students with

con Valley, giving students a chance to live test the most cutting-edge

dents from less-advantaged communities unique opportunities to ex-

obsessed with putting all students on track for college and career read-

a strong academic foundation in 8th grade, we ensure that they are both

technology while simultaneously providing feedback to developers to

perience off-campus “learning labs,” such as the California Academy of

iness. By focusing on the critical areas of science, technology, engineer-

prepared for rigorous high school coursework and set up for success in

ensure that their product will best serve students. iHub has elevated

Sciences in San Francisco or the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

ing, and math (STEM), we help students develop skills that will prepare

college. Elevate [Math], which we offer at no cost to students or their

learning for several hundred students by providing them with new tools

SVEF welcomes volunteers to make a difference in the lives of children by

them for the demands of the 21st century workforce.

families, targets students from under-served schools who score at the

that enhance their classroom experience.

helping tutor and mentor students in our Elevate [Math] classes.

To this end, we’re addressing the issues on three fronts: we work directly

“Standard Nearly Met” level on the math portion of their SBAC examina-

A final innovative program is our 49ers STEM Leadership Institute, in con-

with school districts and stakeholders to promote positive policy chang-

tion.

junction with the 49ers Foundation. Now in its second year, the program

BANP: What is it you like to say to potential donors and volunteers? Why

es for all students, provide direct programming for students in subjects

The Elevate [Math] program was designed with the goal of closing the

has enrolled 120 middle school students in a rigorous STEM curriculum

is SVEF so special?

that put them on track to succeed in college, and support innovative ini-

racial “achievement gap” in Silicon Valley – the measured discrepancy in

within the Santa Clara Unified School District. Students are exposed to

MC: We make a difference in children’s lives by placing some of the most

tiatives to bring better technologies into our classrooms.

academic performance between students of color and their white peers.

a high-tech environment with cutting-edge tools, such as laser cutters,

academically and economically-challenged students in our proven pro-

SVEF’s programs and initiatives include math intervention courses

In serving a population of students in which the majority are students of

a 3D printer, and robotics kits to help them strengthen their math and

grams with the goal of providing them support and a pathway to college

called Elevate [Math]; our 49ers STEM Leadership Institute that serves

color, Elevate [Math] works to ensure that all students are afforded the

engineering skills as they aim for admission to top-tier colleges in STEM

and successful careers. We are changing the education landscape by sig-

high-achieving students from underserved schools; the Learning Inno-

educational opportunities necessary to succeed in college and beyond

fields. We’re now building on our early success by expanding the pro-

nificantly improving student achievement in STEM subjects through our

vation Hub (iHub) that connects Bay Area classrooms with EdTech entre-

regardless of their background.

gram into high school.

academic programs and supporting technological innovation that trans-

preneurs; East Side Alliance that joins the East Side Union High School

Over the past two years, the Elevate [Math] program has aligned its cur-

We hope to lead the charge in expanding opportunities for education

form students’ classroom experiences. In partnering with underserved

District and elementary feeder districts to provide seamless learning

riculum to the new Common Core State Standards. In doing so we hope

technology implementation and pushing for computer science educa-

districts that predominantly serve students of color, we are resolved to

and advocates for district adoption of “A-G” standards. We also provide

to acquaint students with the new standards so that they will enter their

tion to become part of all schools’ core curriculum.

ensure that all students in Silicon Valley are given access to educational

Teacher Innovation Grants and community education forums.

8th grade math course more confident in their ability to succeed. We are also excited to provide 35 hours of Common Core-aligned professional

opportunities that pave the way to college so we can develop the next BANP: What would you like the world to know about SVEF and how can

generation of Silicon Valley’s leaders and innovators.


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For Youth & Adults: Career, education and benefits counseling Self-Advocacy Employment exploration and preparation with workshops, job shadowing, informational interviews Job Placement and support Assistive Technology which modifies the computer workstation for persons with specific functional limitations, such as limited movement, blindness, learning disability or a work related injury Autism at Work Expandability Staffing Boot Camp for job search, social and life management skills OTAY for youth with mental health disabilities CA Promise for youth with severe disabilities receiving SSI

Get Involved, Make A Difference

Your company can work with us to develop strategies to employ people with disabilities that meet your business needs.  Offer paid internships for people with disabilities  Use Exandability Staffing for your temporary hiring needs  Contract with Expandability for outsourced business functions such as mail room services, document control, and customer service Services for Employers Assistive Technology Accommodations Disability Awareness Training Effective strategies for ensuring contingent workforce is inclusive  Recruitment strategies for hiring persons with disabilities of all skill levels     

74% of students placed into jobs by Expandability achieved paid employment for over 90 days


The best reason to hire a person with disabilities is because he or she is qualified. Employers also benefit in other ways by:  Reducing training and recruitment costs. People with disabilities have higher performance rates and are less likely to leave.  Increasing productivity in work groups. People with disabilities motivate other employees.  Diversifying your workforce to appeal to a diverse customer base. One in five Americans has a disability, representing $1 trillion in purchase power.  Utilizing tax credits.

Expandability 1150 S. Bascom Avenue Suite #7A San Jose, CA. 95128 Tel: (408) 278-2000 Fax: (408) 278-2010 Email: maria@expandability.org

Issues Facing People With Disabilities

With Disability

Without Disability

Employment Rate

39%

73%

High School Graduation Rate

64%

83%

Household Income

$42,800

$66,200

Completion of 1 Year of College

5%

28%

Poverty Rate

Double

92.5% of high school seniors served by Expandability complete high school

Last year 85% of high school seniors served transitioned or made plans to transition to postsecondary education


35 YEARS OF FEEDING THE HUNGRY The mission of Loaves & Fishes Family Kitchen is providing no cost hot, nutritious meals and support services in a dignified, safe, and caring environment. We offer our services to all in need with a special emphasis on families, seniors, and the homeless. Our vision is to serve as many struggling individuals as possible with a focus on geographical areas of greatest need. Loaves & Fishes began with a simple meal of fish and bread for 11 adults and 15 children in February, 1980. Today, we are one of the most respected nonprofits in the Bay Area, serving over 2,500 meals a week. The Need Research shows that 31% of Santa Clara County households—185,000 families—were vulnerable to hunger. Hunger and malnutrition have severe and long-lasting consequences. Hungry children have trouble focusing at school, thus jeopardizing their ability to do well in their studies and thereby create better lives in the future. Malnourished seniors are at greater risk of losing their independence. Poor nutrition leads to obesity (especially in children) and increases the risk of diabetes and heart disease. Malnutrition in a pregnant woman can seriously affect her child’s health. Through our nutritious hot meals, Loaves & Fishes Family Kitchen plays a vital role in helping to keep children, adults, and seniors healthy and productive.


Current Programs Loaves & Fishes serves meals seven days per week (including holidays) throughout the Bay Area. We expect to serve at least 150,000–200,000 meals at those locations in FY 2014–2015. Also, we are planning to add at least two more meal-service locations this year. We are committed to nutritionally balanced meals, and is one of the few soup kitchens in Northern California that has it’s own organic garden and emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables, along with healthy protein items, rather than canned or processed foods that tend to be high in sugar and/or sodium. Special meals are prepared on Thanksgiving and Christmas, providing warmth and compassion. These meals are an opportunity to enjoy a hot meal while spending the holiday with others. For those who need to prepare food at home, Loaves & Fishes provides monthly grocery bags filled with staple items, such as pasta, peanut butter, and fresh produce. In Fiscal Year 2014–15, we expect to provide approximately 2,000 bags to local families.

WWW.LOAVESFISHES.ORG


Josh Russell and Steve Wozniak on the set of Signature Silicon Valley with Janice Edwards, executive producer and host. Signature Silicon Valley shows every Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. on Comcast Silicon Valley Channel 30 in San Jose and Campbell.

PARTNER WITH CREATV SAN JOSE It’s good for the community. CreaTV San Jose, a non–profit community media center, gives diverse communities powerful tools to tell their stories and express their views through video.

VIDEO PRODUCTION Low–cost, professional video production. DISTRIBUTION Free airtime for your TV show — cablecast to 150,000 Comcast households. Free live streaming and video–on–demand of your show at CreaTVsj.org. PROFESSIONAL TRAINING & EDUCATION Low–cost media training, facilities and equipment.

www.CreaTVsj.org


CreaTV Pro Services A full array of video production services and equipment for your production needs at competitive rates including:

Get Your Custom Quote 408.295.8815 ext. 305 | info@creatvpro.com www.creatvpro.com Proceeds support CreaTV San Jose, a non-profit community media center. 255 West Julian Street, Suite 100, San Jose, California 95110


What is ichthyosis? Ichthyosis is a family of genetic skin disorders characterized by dry, scaling skin that may be thickened or very thin. The prefix “ichthy” is taken from the Greek root for the word fish. Each year, more than 16,000 babies are born with some form of ichthyosis. Ichthyosis affects people of all ages, races and gender. The disease usually presents at birth, or within the first year, and continues to affect the patient throughout their lifetime. What is FIRST? FIRST is a vibrant, growing foundation connected to its members and families by the special skin and unique management needs of individuals and families with ichthyosis and related skin types. FIRST supports families across the country and around the world. An example of how FIRST can have an immediate impact in your community

is the online ‘Tele-Ichthyosis’ tool: http://www. firstskinfoundation.org/content.cfm/Ichthyosis/ Tele-Ichthyosis/page_id/762 If a baby is born with a rare skin disorder, doctors can upload images, documents or questions to the Tele-Ichthyosis web portal and receive guidance from an expert panel. What causes ichthyosis? Most forms of ichthyosis are very rare. The genetic mutation that causes the disorder is passed from parent to child. In some cases however, neither parent exhibits the disorder themselves, but they are carriers of the defective gene. When two carriers pass their mutated gene on to a new life, the child will inherit the disorder. In some very rare cases, the genetic mutation occurs spontaneously in the affected generation.


Dane’s Friends for FIRST Concert Our son, Dane Christian Phelps, showed signs of ichthyosis at 6 weeks old. His rare form of ichthyosis, which was likely caused by a spontaneous gene mutation, also affected his heart. Although Dane only lived to be 3 ½ years old, he touched many lives and will continue to reach thousands more with Dane’s Friends for FIRST Concert. Please join us on September 12th, 2015, for an inspirational night of music and dance at the Flint Center (De Anza College, Cupertino, CA). There will also be a silent auction. We would love for you to join us! For more information please visit: https://www.facebook.com/DanesFriendsForFIRST Article submitted by Suzanne and Eric Phelps of San Jose, CA.

The ‘Sons of Serendip’ are a talented musical quartet from Massachussetts. You may recognize them as the 4th place finishers on season 9 of America’s Got Talent (2014). We are honored that they will be performing for our next concert at the Flint Center in Cupertino on September 12th, 2015. What a blessing. You won’t want to miss it and we’d love to see you there! www.sonsofserendip.com


25

YEARS

Family Giving Tree

HOLIDAY WISH DRIVE HO

P

E

O

TM

SE

IN

NEED

SHARING

Family Giving Tree AN

D JOY WITH

TH

One-quarter of California’s children are living below the federal poverty line* Because no child should feel forgotten during the holidays, the Family Giving Tree is bringing joy to children in need by fulfilling their exact holiday wishes. And, for 25 years, it’s been our honor to share the hope and joy of the holidays with Bay Area children and their families. * September, 2014 Public Policy Institute of California

Join Us in Sharing Hope and Joy

1

Visit Us Online

2

Make a Donation

3

www.FamilyGivingTree.org

Lead a Drive


Family Giving Tree

BACK-TO-SCHOOL DRIVE

Education is key to breaking the cycle of poverty In the Bay Area, 74% of low-income 10th graders score below Algebra standards. When 80% of jobs created in next decade will require STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) skills, not having the proper school supplies can be a barrier to learning. The Family Giving Tree’s Backto-School Drive gets kids started off on the right foot!

“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” – William Butler Yeats

Join Us in Sharing Hope and Joy

1

Visit Us Online

2

Make a Donation

3

Lead a Drive


The

San Francisco 49ers

Community Relations and

49ers Foundation

A PROUD TRADITION BOTH ON AND OFF THE FIELD

ncer sula with Breast Ca m To Jim h ac Co ad 49ers He r 2014 Warriors in Octobe

49ers Linebacke rs visit Good Samaritan Hos pital


H

ow do you define a Class Organization? From the very top on down. An organization that, internally, has everyone’s attention and 100% participation. Pride that’s felt everywhere and amongst everyone. Like one big family that cares. That’s the 49ers. The Season is actually 12 months long for the 49ers – as they like to say, “There is no off-season” – both on and off the field. As the on-field football season ends, the Foundation gets to work, hosting charitable events that raise millions of dollars to benefit non-profit organizations in alignment with the 49ers Foundation’s mission to keep kids “Safe, On Track, and In School.” During the season,

ving dinner to Serving Thanksgi at Loaves & Fishes homeless families

each week on the players’ day off, the 49ers orchestrate community events that transform people’s lives. The San Francisco 49ers Foundation is the non-profit community funding extension of the 49ers, now in its 23rd year.

TE Vernon Davis host ing kids a a Player t VISA Sho p With

49ers honor breast cancer survivors at an October home game


The Foundation supports programs for underserved youth that keep them “Safe, On Track and In School.” Over the past 23 years, the Foundation has donated nearly $30.6 million - $4.6 million in 2014, including a $1 million gift to launch the 49ers STEM Leadership Institute in collaboration with the Silicon Valley Education Foundation and the Santa Clara Unified School District with significant support from Chevron. The philanthropic efforts of the 49ers Foundation are highly focused and strategic; remaining true to the well-developed mission statement and purpose and committed to creating measurable results through transformational grants and impact programs. In 2014, 49ers players participated in more than 50 events, donating over 400 hours of volunteer time, impacting over Joanne Pasternack 80,000 people in Director of Community need annually. Relations and the In 2014, 100% 49ers Foundation of the players participated in one-or-more community events. Meet Joanne Pasternack, the Director of Community Relations and the 49ers Foundation for the San Francisco 49ers. Joanne attended high school in the Bay Area. Her father was a dedicated fan of the 49ers and Joanne grew up cheering for the 49ers as well. She went to college at the University of Pennsylvania, then to law school at Santa Clara University. Following law school, she went to Washington, DC, where she worked with the Kennedy and Shriver families for the extraordinary non-profit, Special Olympics. At Special Olympics, she found a perfect marriage of her two passions – sports and philanthropy. It was the beginning of Joanne’s path towards a position that seems tailor-made for her interests and skills.

After working a World Winter Games for Special Olympics in Alaska, Joanne returned to the Bay Area where she secured a job with the City of Mountain View in the City Manager’s Office and the Police Department. While there, she co-founded the Mountain View Police Activities League (MVPAL), where she once again found a natural proclivity for event management, charitable outreach and using sports as a vehicle to transform perceptions and, in turn, a community. She was at the City of Mountain View in a variety of roles for over six years when, one day, she saw a job posting. She remembers how her heart began beating with excitement as she read the position description. “Looking for the right person … The San Francisco 49ers … Community Relations.” She couldn’t believe what she was reading. This would be her dream job and she wanted to go for it and boy, did she! Joanne was interviewed extensively. It was a very thorough process - it was that important to them. They certainly knew that they found the right person and she certainly knew that she found the right organization! They complete each other, on and off the field. Her words: “I live this … I breathe this … and I love this job.” Joanne told me about the 49ers and their overall commitment to charitable work. Their concept of Sports and Philanthropy was no afterthought. Leading by example, are John and Denise and Jed York and their entire family. John, Denise and Jed live and breathe philanthropy, vigorously engaging in activities and throwing considerable energy, effort and support towards the team’s charitable endeavors. John and Denise’s daughters, Jenna and Mara, are active participants in nearly every community event, sharing their zeal for transforming the lives of at-risk youth through hands on service. Their brother, Tony, is also involved and spent time with his father in New Orleans, visiting a school that had been ravaged by Hurricane Katrina and taking time to get to know the students, among other activities. Daughter-in-law, Danielle (Jed’s wife), is a former school teacher and worked for years in an underserved middle school deep in the heart of one of the most challenged parts of San Francisco. From the top down, it’s the


49ers honor troops aboard the USS America

culture, the fabric, the very spirit. Their desire has always been, and will always be, to see “Philanthropic change through sports.” Indeed, they want to be not just the best in the NFL, but in all sports. In 2013, they achieved this goal and were named the national recipients of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s prestigious Steve Patterson Award for excellence in sports philanthrophy. They were also one of four finalists for the Global Beyond Sport Award for outstanding sports team. The San Francisco 49ers Foundation was honored by the San Jose/Silicon Valley Business Journal for being No. 13 in corporate philanthropic giving in 2014. Not bad for a company that has only 250 employees. The No. 2 Company, by comparison, was Cisco, with 72,000 employees. There are many examples of their contributions. The San Francisco 49ers Academy – a school for low income middle school youth in East Palo Alto – not only bears the name of the 49ers football team, but it is also indelibly stamped with the spirit of their storied franchise. The school focuses on the underlying socioeconomic situations that were barriers to the students’ success by collaborating with teachers, police officers and strong mentors. Recognizing the challenges faced by youth in the economically disadvantaged community of East Palo Alto and seeing an opportunity to make a measurable difference for these youth, the 49ers Foundation has been a part of the Academy since 1996, giving grants while also providing

Coach Tomsula Greeting Football Camp for the Stars Participants - a camp for athletes with Down syndrome

49ers STEM Leadership Institute

hands on support through collaboration, 1000s of game tickets, mentorship, facility enhancement, and donations. With an increase in obesity rates among our nation’s youth, the 49ers have incorporated the PLAY 60 youth fitness program into the Academy to increase the students’ overall health, building a $75,000 outdoor fitness zone and bringing national visibility to the school and its commitment to fitness through a partnership with Matthew McConaughey. With the 49ers involvement, test scores have skyrocketed to the highest level in the school district – on par with far wealthier ZIP codes. In 2014, the 49ers Foundation facilitated $750K in contributions to the Academy, hosted eight events and dedicated countless volunteer hours to assist the youth. And there is so much more! Breast Cancer Awareness, helping feed the homeless, where Jed has been the Food and Fund Drive CoChairman for Second Harvest Food Bank for


LB Patrick Willis with Make-A-Wish recipient

QB Colin Kaepernick with a Make-A-Wish guest

two years. The Bayview Hunters Point YMCA near Candlestick Park is another place they love supporting. They are also strong supporters of City Year San Jose/Silicon Valley, Hedge Funds Care (eradication of child abuse), the Center for Youth Wellness, Fresh Lifeline for Youth (FLY), and the Football Camp for the Stars (a camp for athletes with Down syndrome), and many others. The 49ers Taube/Koret Touchdowns for Kids program is another wonderful example of the giving spirit of the 49ers. For every Touchdown, Field Goal, Interception and Sack, in partnership

with the Taube Family Foundation and the Koret Foundation, the 49ers, philanthropist Tad Taube and Koret have raised $1.25 million to help support Bay Area charitable organizations. Again, here is a collaborative commitment that helps improve the life, safety and educational opportunities for the children of the communities they serve. The 49ers host two very popular — and philanthropically productive — fundraising events. One is the Pasta Bowl. This has become their popular annual kick-off to the new season, the night before pre-season training begins. All the players come together and literally serve their designated table of admiring fans with food and pictures and fun. All proceeds go to benefit the community. There is also the 49ers Foundation Winter Fest, held in March in Lake Tahoe. This event always sells out. It’s a fun time for all and in 2014, the 49ers Foundation brought in $2 million during the weekend to support local Bay Area charities. That primarily is the Foundation side. There is also the Community Relations side. Each week, the players have one day off. Typically it is on Monday. On their day off, the Community Relations team organizes community events where players have an opportunity to participate in hands-on service events where they can directly impact those in need in the Bay Area. From hosting a board game tournament for youth with serious illness at the Ronald McDonald House to building a playground in East Palo Alto, inspiring incarcerated youth to choose a different and more productive path and so very much more, for the 49ers philanthropic outreach efforts, it is always about the people and for those in need in our community. There are a good number of players who can relate to coming from hard upbringings and they pour their hearts into the events. FLY is a perfect example, where the players and students talk about issues and goals. The players inspire and make a difference for the kids they personally reach through such community visits. Even on the road, like when they have traveled to Youngstown to train in between East Coast games, they made a huge difference visiting a local hospital, school, and community center. In October 2010 and 2013, when


dedication and passion. they traveled to London to play in the NFL “The key here is that the members of the International Series game, they had one day off. Instead of site-seeing, they arranged special 49ers family recognize that they have been blessed with a special opportunity - one that days with a hugely popular Premier League is not to be taken for granted,” Joanne said. team – Tottenham Hotspur – and together, in “The 49ers take this responsibility seriously. one of the poorer districts of London, they held That is why we do what we do. Whether it a collaborative event for 100 low-income youth is a rookie or a seasoned veteran, ownership showcasing the PLAY 60 movement and the or a 49ers alumnus, we are so very proud of importance of getting out to play, 60 minutes a day, through both football and soccer. It was an amazing day. The 49ers were the first to host such a large scale event while playing the International Series game. The following year, another team repeated this warm, monumental gesture. The 49ers are also very active in spreading the messaging of the NFL “Play 60” Campaign to inspire children to be active and keep healthy. Vernon Davis has been a 49ers spokesperson. 2014 49ers Foundation Contribution Announcement at Levi’s® Stadium One year, inspired by the youth’s our 49ers and their authentic commitment to commitment to the campaign, he hosted a transforming the lives of those in need.” team of 15 students from the 49ers Academy Indeed, when I visited with Joanne, there who participated in a competition to write a was definitely an energy, a spirit that touched commercial for “Play 60.” Vernon arranged for a Limo ride to a special evening held at his home everything and everyone there. It was obvious – all about helping benefit community – and with an Academy Awards Red Carpet look, plus infectiously and fantastically impactful. The Paparazzi and Oscar-like statues for the kids. A fun, memorable event for everyone for a life time! 49ers feel that community has done so much to benefit them as an organization and, as Another example of the tremendous a result, the organization in turn is happy player participation is Joe Staley who, with and proud to be able to give back to the a librarian for a mother, loves reading to community - as it has and will continue to in elementary students and was honored with perpetuity. If there were a Super Bowl Trophy a national accolade for helping build literacy among youth. It does make a difference. And given to the organization based on what they do off the field, as well, no doubt the San the list of what all the 49ers do, individually, Francisco 49ers would be winners of that one as a Team and as an organization is a very each and every year. long one. All without fanfare, but with total


SUCCESS STORY

Year Up empowers young adults to go

from poverty to a professional career

IN A YEAR.

WHO ARE WE?

WHO DO WE SERVE?

Since opening its doors in 2008, Year Up Bay Area has served more than 1,100 young adults. We train 320 students at our San Francisco and Silicon Valley campuses each year.

To qualify, students must:

Year Up’s model combines the development of marketable job skills, an educational stipend, an internship, college credits and support to help place young adults on a viable path to economic self-sufficiency.

WHO ARE OUR PARTNERS?*

• Have a high school diploma or GED • Be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or have legal right to work in the U.S.

* partial listing of Year Up Bay Area’s more than 40 Corporate Partners

OUR IMPACT

360 students

100%

SERVED ANNUALLY

INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT

“I feel powerful,”

says Marla Bell, a San Francisco native and recent graduate of Year Up Bay Area. “I’ve accomplished so much in one year. Imagine what I’m going to accomplish in the years to come.” A year ago, Marla was working a dead-end job. Today, she is working full-time at AutoDesk, a software company, as a Training and Organizational Development Assistant. Before Year Up, Marla considered college, but it was not a feasible option due to financial constraints. She was hungry for an opportunity. That’s when she discovered Year Up. Year Up students attend classes for six months in a rigorous academic setting, learning the technical and professional skills necessary to succeed in entry-level technology-based positions. They then put their newlyacquired skills to work at a six-month internship with some of the top companies in the Bay Area.

• Be between the ages of 18 – 24

• Be highly-motivated to learn technical and professional skills for a career in Information Technology (IT)

Visit yearup.org for more student success stories

94%

WORKING OR STUDYING FULL TIME1

$21.00 $7.25 Federal

Year Up Bay Area Graduate

minimum wage

HOURLY WAGE2

GIVE | VOLUNTEER | HOST | HIRE

Help Us Close The Opportunity Divide! PLEASE VISIT YEARUP.ORG FOR MORE INFO

1. Weighted average wage of employed Year Up Bay Area graduates from most recent class; minimum wage: http://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/q-a.htm. 2. Positive Outcomes defined as working or in school full time within 4 months of graduation from program.

Marla majored in Project Management and landed her role at AutoDesk as a Training and Organizational Development Intern where she assisted her team with organization and preparation. “Transitioning from being a Year Up intern to a full-time employee felt like I was taking the training wheels off,” admits Marla. “But I’ve learned that personal growth is endless.” Marla proudly stood on stage as the Master of Ceremonies with her job offer already in hand. She is dedicated to uplifting her Bayview-Hunter’s Point community and plans to pursue higher education in Africana studies and eventually start her own nonprofit.

Underrepresented youth have even more reason to work harder. It’s difficult to work hard if you don’t have the tools and resources, and

that’s where Year Up thankfully steps in.

San Francisco Campus, 80 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 | 415.512.7588 Silicon Valley Campus, 100 West San Fernando Street, Suite 103, San Jose, CA 95113 | 408.513.3004


SUCCESS STORY

Year Up empowers young adults to go

from poverty to a professional career

IN A YEAR.

WHO ARE WE?

WHO DO WE SERVE?

Since opening its doors in 2008, Year Up Bay Area has served more than 1,100 young adults. We train 320 students at our San Francisco and Silicon Valley campuses each year.

To qualify, students must:

Year Up’s model combines the development of marketable job skills, an educational stipend, an internship, college credits and support to help place young adults on a viable path to economic self-sufficiency.

WHO ARE OUR PARTNERS?*

• Have a high school diploma or GED • Be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or have legal right to work in the U.S.

* partial listing of Year Up Bay Area’s more than 40 Corporate Partners

OUR IMPACT

360 students

100%

SERVED ANNUALLY

INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT

“I feel powerful,”

says Marla Bell, a San Francisco native and recent graduate of Year Up Bay Area. “I’ve accomplished so much in one year. Imagine what I’m going to accomplish in the years to come.” A year ago, Marla was working a dead-end job. Today, she is working full-time at AutoDesk, a software company, as a Training and Organizational Development Assistant. Before Year Up, Marla considered college, but it was not a feasible option due to financial constraints. She was hungry for an opportunity. That’s when she discovered Year Up. Year Up students attend classes for six months in a rigorous academic setting, learning the technical and professional skills necessary to succeed in entry-level technology-based positions. They then put their newlyacquired skills to work at a six-month internship with some of the top companies in the Bay Area.

• Be between the ages of 18 – 24

• Be highly-motivated to learn technical and professional skills for a career in Information Technology (IT)

Visit yearup.org for more student success stories

94%

WORKING OR STUDYING FULL TIME1

$21.00 $7.25 Federal

Year Up Bay Area Graduate

minimum wage

HOURLY WAGE2

GIVE | VOLUNTEER | HOST | HIRE

Help Us Close The Opportunity Divide! PLEASE VISIT YEARUP.ORG FOR MORE INFO

1. Weighted average wage of employed Year Up Bay Area graduates from most recent class; minimum wage: http://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/q-a.htm. 2. Positive Outcomes defined as working or in school full time within 4 months of graduation from program.

Marla majored in Project Management and landed her role at AutoDesk as a Training and Organizational Development Intern where she assisted her team with organization and preparation. “Transitioning from being a Year Up intern to a full-time employee felt like I was taking the training wheels off,” admits Marla. “But I’ve learned that personal growth is endless.” Marla proudly stood on stage as the Master of Ceremonies with her job offer already in hand. She is dedicated to uplifting her Bayview-Hunter’s Point community and plans to pursue higher education in Africana studies and eventually start her own nonprofit.

Underrepresented youth have even more reason to work harder. It’s difficult to work hard if you don’t have the tools and resources, and

that’s where Year Up thankfully steps in.

San Francisco Campus, 80 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 | 415.512.7588 Silicon Valley Campus, 100 West San Fernando Street, Suite 103, San Jose, CA 95113 | 408.513.3004


You a r e

CoRdIAllY INVITed to a

SpeCIAl ToUR of

VAlleY MedICAl CeNTeR in San JoSe

Join us for a special insider’s tour which will include a look at our state-of-the-art Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Rehabilitation Center and highlight the new construction on the VMC campus.

Schedule Your Tour

About VMC Foundation

Tours are scheduled on an ongoing basis. If you are interested, please call 408.885.5206 or email vmcfoundation@hhs.sccgov.org. Individuals and groups—large and small—are welcome.

VMC Foundation raises donations from the community on behalf of our hospital and the entire Santa Clara Valley Health & Hospital System. The Foundation seeks these funds for programs that support community well-being, improve the quality of care, and promote access to medical treatment for all residents of Santa Clara County regardless of their ability to pay.

Valley Medical Center 751 South Bascom Avenue, San Jose, CA 95128


CHANGE THE WAY YOU LOOK AT IDEAS.

For over 25 years, the Churchill Club has been a place in Silicon Valley for important people to say important things. We encourage an open exchange of ideas and different perspectives in pursuit of innovation, economic growth, and societal benefit. That’s a noble cause, no matter how you see the world.

churchillclub.org

™


The Art of Helping Many Where Help is Needed A VISIT WITH DR. EMMETT CARSON & SILICON VALLEY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION “Lifelong Philanthropy - Here in Silicon Valley, we have a front-row seat to view trends, not only in the tech sector that gives us our name but also in philanthropy. Here, where the ceiling for wealth is high, and so are the needs of those without it, we’re seeing a major shift … “We are seeing more people embrace philanthropy … Developing ways to partner with them in achieving their charitable passions is our job … Philanthropy is becoming a lifelong pursuit, one that addresses a wide range of problems, issues and needs … The effect this trend will have on our communities is up to all of us.” - Dr. Emmett Carson A VERY SPECIAL MERGER It was October, 2006, when Dr. Emmett Carson was recruited to oversee the merger of the Peninsula Community Foundation (San Mateo County) and the Community Foundation Silicon Valley (Santa Clara County). The merger took place in January, 2007, and for Dr. Carson it meant moving to California from Minnesota to undertake the unprecedented challenge of merging two separate community foundations – an attempt to unite donors in two very different counties, as well as bridge many different business communities and city politics. Predictably, there would be a lot of resistance. Dr. Carson accepted this challenge, becoming CEO and President in late 2006. He is the first to say that the merger of the two entities – whose staffs

were almost completely unknown to one another – was a collaboration that took shape over time. As CEO, Dr. Carson has continued to lead a unified Silicon Valley Community Foundation to new heights. The nonprofit organization has grown exponentially thanks to the great staff, the many wonderful relationships built, the overall inspiring group of partners, and its many donors. Silicon Valley Community Foundation has become the largest community foundation in the nation and in the world. SVCF’s work in the community locally, nationally and globally continues to grow. “Our grantmaking activity in 2014 is just one example of the incredible generosity of individuals and corporations throughout the Bay Area,” said Dr. Carson. In addition, SVCF launched the Center for


Early Learning, reinforcing its commitment to Silicon Valley’s young children and their families. Research completed last year included the 2014 Silicon Valley Index in partnership with Joint Venture Silicon Valley, and a report on human trafficking in Silicon Valley, completed in partnership with Juniper Networks Foundation Fund and Not For Sale. The first project of the Center for Early Learning was the Parent Story Project, a first-of-its-kind on the well-being of Silicon Valley parents. Plus SVCF also was honored to co-host a historic meeting at the White House of representatives from more than 150 community foundations and government agencies. SVCF “By The Numbers” 2014: Contributions: $1.96 Billion … Assets under management $6.5 Billion Grants: $474 Million (awarded from all funds) … Number of Grants: 65,500, including those from matching gift programs Grants: $216 Million to Bay Area charities ... Grants: $18 Million to International Charities … Countries: 57 received grants, including the U.S.

attended Chicago public schools, then Morehouse College and then Princeton University. When he was very young he experienced a tragedy when a neighbor’s child was shot and killed. Dr. Carson’s family quickly picked up and moved across town. He remembers, it was between 3rd and 4th grade. His life, he said, changed. The family moved just 30 blocks away and, yet, it was a world of difference. He saw and he experienced the differences in inequality and social justice. It was two worlds apart. This would impact him and his work - his entire life - to this very day. Role models were his mom and dad. They taught him about “Heroes” and “Sheros” in black history. His father would read to him every night about successful African-American professionals, which truly inspired the young Dr. Carson. He had learned so much about African-American professionals, and all minorities, that it fed him a sense of wanting to make a difference for many, for all people. This spoke to him: “Hey, the world can be what you make of it.” At Morehouse, he EXPERIENCING AN thought he would go to law ALL-IMPORTANT school and be an attorney. PARTNERING But he had a professor With its individual, (who was kidding at family and corporate the time) who said he donors, as well as nonprofit would not endorse him partners, Silicon Valley for law school (he would SVGives, hosted by SVCF, raised $8 million Community Foundation have, he later admitted). for local charities in one day in 2014. is working to make a big Instead, he recommended positive difference for many Economics and Public of our nonprofits and our community as a whole. Policy, saying: “It would be a stronger major for Dr. Carson added, “There are many who live you … that you can influence people every day.” and work in Silicon Valley, who are wonderful It would be more impactful for Dr. Carson, he supporters of Silicon Valley Community suggested, and as things have turned out, he was Foundation, who are from all around the world. right. He was Dr. Carson’s advisor in school … Many donors are multi-dimensional. They see and is one of his “Heroes.” themselves as global citizens. It is important to them where they want to make a difference, for PREPARATION FOR THE WORK TO BE DONE where they have come from, and also for a better Morehouse, Dr. Carson said, prepared him very world.” When asked if he thinks philanthropists well. It was a time when being African-American can move mountains, Dr. Carson responded, “I felt challenging and that the education he received hope so.” there gave him confidence … and a feeling that he was ready, prepared, for the highs and the lows of THE ROAD TO SILICON VALLEY attending Princeton. Dr. Carson was born and raised in Chicago. He The mental preparedness was so helpful, being


just one of a handful of African-American students to complete that program … and the first to have been accepted in the middle of the year. There would be positives and negatives … It was a whole new world, he felt. “Someone’s got to be first, so being a first at anything, you have to carry your own weight.” FIRST DESTINATION: THE FORD FOUNDATION. WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? Fresh out of Princeton, the young Dr. Emmett Carson was recruited to work for the Ford Foundation. “It was a fantastic opportunity,” he said. “There were many brilliant people all around me. It was like a university with some of the most brilliant people … together there to create a better world.” He had a mentor while there, from whom he learned much about philanthropy. He learned plenty, he said, about what philanthropy can do and how to work it effectively. This helped prepare him early on and very well for what was to come. NEXT DESTINATION: THE MINNEAPOLIS FOUNDATION. WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? From the Ford Foundation, he was recruited to become the CEO of The Minneapolis Foundation. At the young age of just 33, he was already being asked to be the CEO of one of the largest community foundations in the country. Emmett shared, “The pressure was, for example, when making a $500,000 decision on something … making sure I got it right. I learned it was so important to know the people, the histories, the politics … who over-promises and who under-delivers. It’s about big risky things. It’s not as risky when we know the actors and who we are betting on. It’s also very important to be a part of the community.” THEN THE WEST COAST CALLED … WELCOME TO SILICON VALLEY At that time came this challenge, this opportunity, to come to Silicon Valley. Dr. Carson shared: “It was exciting to come here, to execute a merger that was unprecedented. (1) Can you get this merger off the ground; can you get it to work? (2) Can you be an advocate on important issues, where it would be tough, and still raise the money and the support needed? (3) Can you bring our partners, our companies, our governments

together to approach and find solutions for these large issues facing us? Dr. Carson, as we have seen, was up to it … and also with the great art of collaborating. Here and now, working closely together with Carl Guardino, the CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, is a perfect example. He discussed the importance of “the three-legged stool” functioning right, together, in this case, namely: Nonprofits, Business and Government. It’s imperative that we need to work together for rightful solutions. Just the night before our meeting, he and Carl went together as a team to Sacramento (Dr. Carson representing the nonprofits community sector and Carl the business community sector) and met with our legislative leaders (representing the government community sector). Their

Emmett Carson greets families in December, 2014, at Caltrain Holiday Train presented by SVCF.

message was this: “If we don’t address these pressing issues that we face today in housing, transportation and education, if we don’t take action, it has certainly reached the crisis point that we will choke off our own success … for our present and our future.” ARE YOU OPTIMISTIC? When asked if he’s optimistic, without hesitation, Dr. Carson responded, “I’m very optimistic because we have all the raw materials here. We have amazing smart people here who have figured out such amazing things. We have resources here that are financial to help us get what we will need. And we have a state of mind


regarding changing rapidly, a cultural mind set, to change. What’s been missing has been the political will. And we have reached a point, especially with housing, transportation and education, a convenience for some and a problem for others. It has become a problem for everyone … that has become intolerable for all.

many together, making a big positive difference. A SPECIAL DAY AND CAUSE OF CARING: SILICON VALLEY GIVES. Another great example is “Silicon Valley Gives.” Initially, it was to have been a one-dayonly event. There have been Days of Giving in other cities - some successful, some not. Here, there would be challenges … In Santa Clara and THE THREE-LEGGED STOOL AND A PLAN IN San Mateo Counties, where there are 41 different PLACE? communities. People are busy, tens of thousands “Do we have a 5-10 year plan that we of commuters from the South Bay heading north presented or are things on the drawing board? and tens of thousands heading south. Unlike No, I think it’s somewhere in between … where other cities, where there is a central city, with a we have a good idea where the Valley is … central media, newspaper and social network: institutions where we’re doing well … and where “which you could depend on for a successful we’re falling down. Now the issue is to see if the campaign” … not so here, this was totally political energy is there to move forward with unchartered waters. some of the issues that we face. Now, it’s a matter Key sponsors stepped forward in 2014: The of the government to make specific bills and turn John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and them into action. To hopefully get enough support Microsoft, also the Sobrato Family Foundation and behind them … and then hopefully a Governor’s the David & Lucile Packard Foundation and PayPal, signature on them.” meaning the costs would be met and everything raised would benefit local grant-making initiatives. FROM WORKING TOGETHER COMES The staff at Silicon Valley Community Foundation POSSIBILITY diligently researched how other communities were What is Dr. Carson’s vision? He sees that there successful … and a significant commitment of time are a lot of nonprofit and for-profit leaders who are across the organization was allocated to plan and heroes, too many to mention or single out, plus implement for the overall event. many partners that they are very blessed to work Silicon Valley Gives 2014 was a wonderful with. “It is a pleasure and privilege to meet with success. By The Numbers: $8,000,833 was raised, people every day to help make their dreams into 674 nonprofits participated and benefited. There reality … and our community a great and better were 14,889 donors, 21,869+ unique donations place to live and work.” and $233 was the average gift size. All in one He added, “It is this belief that is so inspiring day, a day no one was sure about, speaks well of for our community and the world … So what’s Possibility. exciting is that we get together with donors and discuss with them ‘Possibility Starts Here’ and how WHERE WOULD WE BE WITHOUT OUR NON they would like to see our community benefit, how PROFITS? WHERE WOULD OUR NON PROFITS they would like to see change in the world. Our BE WITHOUT SVCF? donors are generous to all kinds of great causes.” P.S. There’s great news ahead. On May 5, 2015, there will be a Silicon Valley Gives II ! What WHAT CAN PEOPLE DO TO HELP? a Cinco de Mayo it will be. There’s also a Silicon Two great examples. One is “The Big Lift” in Valley Gives 2016 planned now, too. What a San Mateo County. This effort to ensure all the Big Positive Difference this will make in helping county’s children can read well by third grade benefit many nonprofits and our community. has been undertaken by a consortium of over It is these special partnerships and the many 100 nonprofit organizations, including the county people working together that make these kind Board of Education. A federal grant of $7.5 of Possibilities real for our today and tomorrow. million in private donations will help the entire These are but a few examples where Silicon Valley county. It’s not one single effort, but many, where Community Foundation has done much and each one is important, and this represents so continues to help many where help is needed.


Fth Estate

We at Fth feel strongly about helping the homeless community with their most pressing needs. With that in mind, we are purchasing and filling up backpacks with essential supplies for survival out on the street. These kits contain things like Clif bars, first aid kits and socks, which with your help, we will eventually be able to refill at our Sunnyvale distribution center. Our cost is currently $60 per kit.

Food is an immediate need. In order to address this issue in a mobile, agile fashion we thought, what better way to feed people than by taking the food to them? To test the feasibility of this idea, we began talking to food truck owners and found that many of them already feed the homeless on their own and they would be more than happy to join our food truck network for the homeless!

Although the majority of our funding comes from internal volunteers and board members, it still takes a strong network of donors to make a sustainable impact on the issues of homelessness, hunger and ultimately survival of these less fortunate but still incredibly valuable members of our society. As a 501c3 organization, all donations are eligible for a charitable tax deduction.

2 yr Goal: 7,693 backpacks and supplies distributed to the entire Bay Area homeless community.

2 yr Goal: mobile app developed to dispatch a network of food truck drivers to people in need.

2 yr. Goal: bring in $500k to purchase a food truck and 7k + backpacks for the homeless.

instagram.com/FthEstate

facebook.com/FthEstate

@Fthestate

fthestate.tumblr.com

Http://Fth.estate is a 5013c non-profit organization based in Sunnyvale , Ca. For volunteer, sponsorship or media inquiries, email Kristine@fth.estate


we can see we can see the end of cancer thesee end of cancer we can from here. from he end of here. cancer

rom here.

T h e sepe o plearea ne w ge ne rat io n o fblo o d c anc e r pat ie nt s.T h e yliveno rmal live s,so me managing t h e irare c o ndit io n ge wit h o ut lo so o fpills o r t re at nt s s. wit h disc o uraging e f f e c t s, T h e sepe o ple a ne w ne rat io nt f blo o d c anc e r me pat ie nt T h e ylive no rmalside live s, so me t h ank s t ot disc ve rie s io f unde dh in T h eo L uk e mia &s L y mph o ma So c ie t y . Ande t h e se managing h e iro c o ndit n wit o utpart lo t s by o fpills re t re at me nt wit hdisc o uraging side f f e c t s, disc o ve rie s apply t o many dif f e re nt k inds o f c anc e r. Almo st h alf t h e ne w c anc e r t h e rapie s t h ank s rat t o disc o ve rie f unde inie part by T h eL e uk e mia & so L y mph o ma So c ie t y .And t h e se epe o plearea ne w ge ne io n o f blo o ds c anc e rdpat nt s.T h e y live no rmal live s, me appro ve d sby t h eF D A many be t we e nf 2 0 0 0k and 2 0 1 2 we re first appro ve dh f o r blo o dc c anc e pat ie nt s, disc o ve rie apply t o dif e re nt inds o f c anc e r. Almo st h alf e ne w anc e r rt h e rapie s ng t h e ir c o ndit io n wit h o ut lo t s o fpills o r t re at me nt s wit hdisc o uraging side e f f e c t s,t many wit h re se arc h suppo rt e d by L L S. F o rge t so me day . We ’ re mak ing c ure s h appe n t o day . Are appro d by t h e F D Ae be t we e n2 0 0 and 2 0 1 2So we re first appro ve df o r blo o dc anc e r pat ie nt s, t odisc o ve rie s f unde dve in part by T h L e uk e mia &0 L y mph o ma c ie t y .And t h e se y o u aware o f h o w c lo se we are t o many ne w lif e saving bre ak t h ro ugh s? O r h o w y o u c an h e lp? e rie s applyt omany dif f e re nt k inds o fc anc e r. st h alf t h e w c anc e r t h e rapie sing c many wit h re se arc h suppo rt e dAlmo byL L S. F o rge tne so me day . We ’ re mak ure sh appe nt o day .Are F i nd o ut at l l s .o rg/ gba o r c al l 4 0 8.4 9 0 .2 6 6 6 . e d byt h eF D A be t we e n 2 0 0 0 and 2 0 1 2 we re first appro ve d f o r blo o d c anc e r pat ie nt s, y o u awareo fh o wc lo sewearet omanyne w lif e saving bre ak t h ro ugh s? O rh o wy o uc an h e lp?

wit hre se arc hsuppo rt e do by L S. F o rge t so me .We ’ re mak ing6 c ure appe nt o day .Are F i nd utL at l l s .o rg/ gba o rday c al l4 0 8.4 9 0 .2 6 6 . sh Make a donation. Volunteer your time. Be an ambassador for LLS areo fh o wc lo sewearet omanyne w lif e saving bre ak t h ro ugh s? O rh o wy o uc an h e lp? within your community. Help us make someday today. o utatl l s .o rg/ gba o rc al l4 0 8.4 9 0 .2 6 6 6 . Greater Bay Area Chapter San Francisco Office 221 Main Street, Ste. 1650 San Francisco, CA 94105 Silicon Valley & Monterey Bay Office 675 N. First Street, Ste. 1100 San Jose, CA 95112


HEALTHY FUN SUMMER LEARNING Summer Camps YMCA OF SILICON VALLEY

What makes Y camps different? Our campers… • Learn values and positive behaviors • Practice healthy habits • Participate in fun activities • Develop leadership skills • Discover talents and potential • Develop a sense of responsibility • Gain independence and confidence • Build character • Explore nature • Make new friends and learn social skills • Go home with memories to last a lifetime

et rest you and g Find the Y nea mp guide at your summer ca

mmercamp ymcasv.org/su

Our day and overnight camps… • Are accredited by the American Camp Association • Meet the highest standards in nearly 300 areas, including health, safety, personnel, transportation and facilities • Are staffed by caring people trained in safety, CPR, First Aid and child development We offer financial assistance if you need it. We inspire kids in camps spanning from Morgan Hill to Redwood City and in the beautiful Santa Cruz Mountains at Camp Campbell. YMCA OF SILICON VALLEY 1922 The Alameda 3rd Floor, San Jose, CA 95126 | 408 351 6400 | ymcasv.org/summercamp


Nothing Else Matters When You’re Hungry.

Give What Matters Today!

When Bella’s parents lost their jobs and home, they turned to Second Harvest Food Bank to feed their family. Bella is not alone. Nearly 250,000 people in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties rely on Second Harvest each month to receive the healthy food they need to survive. Every $1 you donate will provide 2 nutritious meals for a family like Bella’s.

Thank you to Silicon Valley Local Magazine for donating this advertising space.

SHFB.org

866-234-3663


Join the STEM movement at STEMpower[ed]!

At Silicon Valley Education Foundation, we support STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education as the gateway to 21st century jobs. Our STEMpower[ed] website is an easy-to-use site to help parents and educators find the best STEM programs to create that critical spark in their students.

Visit stempowered.svefoundation.org for the one-stop-shop for STEM education in the Silicon Valley. About SVEF: Silicon Valley Education Foundation (SVEF) is a not-for-profit resource and advocate for students and educators. We are dedicated to raising student performance in the critical areas of STEM.


Thanks to you and thousands of people like you, United Way Silicon Valley is working to improve community conditions by helping local people become financially stable and independent. We have been privileged during this tough economy to expand our work. We’ve grown programs and partnerships that help more young children learn to read. We’ve provided one-on-one credit coaching for low-income adults and we’ve funded some of the most innovative and effective programs in the county. Everything we do, we do with your help. Please consider donating to United Way Silicon Valley today and help us continue to improve community conditions and change lives.

“Only 16% of the charities we rate have received at least 2 consecutive 4-star evaluations, indicating that United Way Silicon Valley outperforms most other charities in America.” Ken Berger, CEO Charity Navigator

www.uwsv.org


BAY AREA

NON PROFITS


Peninsula

Non-Profits

I

Introducing Peninsula Non-Profits!

n this day and age, many of us are looking for purpose and asking ourselves how we can help make a difference in our community and our world. If we were to ask ourselves, where would we be without our Non-Profits, that’s a good question - they do a lot! With them, it’s hard enough in our world. Without them, it would be unthinkable. Indeed, we have many Non-Profits doing great works and they are always looking for people, like you, who can and would like to help.

At the same time, there are many people, like you and me, who wonder what specifically more we can do with our money or, especially, just by volunteering – indeed, what a difference that does and will make. The greatest gift of all is in the giving and what a big positive difference it makes in the lives of others. In Peninsula Non-Profits, learn about various great people and great organizations doing great things. May it become a growing Resource for you and many others, there’s nothing like teamwork, that can help us all in making a big positive difference for a better community here at Home.


Over the last 5 years, our graduates have earned $43,000,000, spent locally to support the community

MEET Nora Sobolov, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF

• What is JobTrain about and what do you all do? JobTrain began with this vision: when you level the playing field, provide the right supports, and believe in people, everyone has the potential to succeed. JobTrain helps the most needy individuals and families in Silicon Valley to transform their lives from poverty and unemployment to self-sufficiency and sustainable careers. JobTrain does this by providing a range of services including full-time vocational training programs at no cost to the students to prepare them for careers in high-demand fields. Our comprehensive services provide “whole person” support, which means students not only learn skills but they can also access job placement support, counseling, benefits, legal support and job success training. Training programs at JobTrain include Business Administration Skills, Culinary Arts, Laborers Construction Fundamentals, Medical Assistant, Professional Health Care Worker, Project Build/Green Technology/Carpenter Pre-Apprenticeship, and our brand new, Web Developer Coding Bootcamp. In addition, we also provide childcare for children of trainees and the broader community. The JobTrain campus also houses a Peninsula One-Stop Center for job

seekers and Single Stop which helps individuals and families enroll in public benefits such as Cal-Fresh and health care as well as help with legal and immigration issues. We also have GED prep, skills upgrade and English language classes. Our program is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). In JobTrain’s 50 years of serving the San Francisco Bay Area, the organization has a proven track record of helping people transform their financial and personal situations. • What do you love most about JobTrain and the work that you all do? Recently, during our Trainee of the Month program – a time when we celebrate the accomplishments of our students and they, in turn, share their stories – a young man performed a rap poem about his life. He talked about all that he had overcome to join our construction class, his experience with racism, his conflict with the law and his determination to become successful and keep his infant son from experiencing what he had experienced. The students are my inspiration: hearing their stories, seeing them in their red robes at graduation, and listening to students ring the

82%

Graduates Placed in Careers bell to tell everyone in the community that they have a job are what I love most about JobTrain. • How has JobTrain made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see JobTrain make? Since we began in 1965, over 190,000 individuals have benefited from JobTrain’s programs and services. Over the past 5 years, our graduates have earned more than $43,000,000 and the money they earn is spent in the local community, helping to support families and community businesses and institutions. Our strong partnerships with local employers ensure that our programs continue to meet the needs of the current job market. Each vocational training program works closely with a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) who ensures our curriculum is up to date and provides internships and jobs for graduates. We work with over 70 employers which helps to explain our 82% placement rate and close to 90% rate of people working a year later. Plus the Sheriff’s office tells us that those who were previously incarcerated and go through our program go back to jail at a much lower rate.

90%

Placements with Jobs One Year Later quoia Adult School and Cañada College on pathways that allow people to train for better paying jobs immediately but also access college credits to further expand their possibilities.

We have exciting partnerships with the Laborers and Carpenters Unions which provide a road to construction jobs and, with our partners at Goodwill of Silicon Valley, we have opened a second cohort of our Laborers construction program in San Jose. We have just begun a partnership with the Sequoia Union High School District to offer JobTrain programs for students at Redwood High School, a continuation school. And we have just opened our first of many social enterprises with our partner CALSO: WISE SV’s Rendezvous Café and catering, at the Sobrato Center in Redwood Shores.

• What would you like the world to know about JobTrain and how can people help make a difference? JobTrain is uniquely positioned to help those most in need. JobTrain services are free, and to help them remain free, contributions to cover the cost for training our students and providing them the support they need are invaluable and make a lasting contribution to our community as our students move into careers. We also have many volunteers who teach in our Essential Skills program which is quickly becoming the gold standard for other programs like ours. As teachers, mentors and role models, individuals and companies from across the Bay Area help teach skills essential to getting and keeping a job, including one-time volunteers who review resumes or conduct mock interviews. Many others participate as guest lecturers in our programs. • What is it you would like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers? Why is JobTrain so special? It’s important to remember that in the Bay Area, so many people are one paycheck away from homelessness. One of our students, Louisa, had a husband who worked in technology while she provided home-based care. Her husband passed away unexpectedly as did her employer and instantly she had no income and a great tragedy to overcome. JobTrain gave her an opportunity to not only train for a career and find a new pathway, but also a community of support that helped her with the myriad of other challenges that people in her situation face.

JobTrain would like to expand our impact by increasing the number of people who can access our existing programs by taking our programs to locations throughout the Bay Area, through train the trainer, online access and evening programs. The need is great; in fact, we have over 150 on our waiting lists just for our medical assistant and coding boot camp. We are also trying to increase the opportunities for our students. We are partnering with both Se-

And that, in a nutshell, is the magic of JobTrain. Training alone is not enough. We have to create a launch pad for people to move to the next level of employment. We create the winning combination through our program and our ties to many employer partners, volunteers, donors, foundations, community groups, education groups, government and stakeholders. Together, we ensure that those most in need succeed.


Over the last 5 years, our graduates have earned $43,000,000, spent locally to support the community

MEET Nora Sobolov, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF

• What is JobTrain about and what do you all do? JobTrain began with this vision: when you level the playing field, provide the right supports, and believe in people, everyone has the potential to succeed. JobTrain helps the most needy individuals and families in Silicon Valley to transform their lives from poverty and unemployment to self-sufficiency and sustainable careers. JobTrain does this by providing a range of services including full-time vocational training programs at no cost to the students to prepare them for careers in high-demand fields. Our comprehensive services provide “whole person” support, which means students not only learn skills but they can also access job placement support, counseling, benefits, legal support and job success training. Training programs at JobTrain include Business Administration Skills, Culinary Arts, Laborers Construction Fundamentals, Medical Assistant, Professional Health Care Worker, Project Build/Green Technology/Carpenter Pre-Apprenticeship, and our brand new, Web Developer Coding Bootcamp. In addition, we also provide childcare for children of trainees and the broader community. The JobTrain campus also houses a Peninsula One-Stop Center for job

seekers and Single Stop which helps individuals and families enroll in public benefits such as Cal-Fresh and health care as well as help with legal and immigration issues. We also have GED prep, skills upgrade and English language classes. Our program is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC). In JobTrain’s 50 years of serving the San Francisco Bay Area, the organization has a proven track record of helping people transform their financial and personal situations. • What do you love most about JobTrain and the work that you all do? Recently, during our Trainee of the Month program – a time when we celebrate the accomplishments of our students and they, in turn, share their stories – a young man performed a rap poem about his life. He talked about all that he had overcome to join our construction class, his experience with racism, his conflict with the law and his determination to become successful and keep his infant son from experiencing what he had experienced. The students are my inspiration: hearing their stories, seeing them in their red robes at graduation, and listening to students ring the

82%

Graduates Placed in Careers bell to tell everyone in the community that they have a job are what I love most about JobTrain. • How has JobTrain made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see JobTrain make? Since we began in 1965, over 190,000 individuals have benefited from JobTrain’s programs and services. Over the past 5 years, our graduates have earned more than $43,000,000 and the money they earn is spent in the local community, helping to support families and community businesses and institutions. Our strong partnerships with local employers ensure that our programs continue to meet the needs of the current job market. Each vocational training program works closely with a Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) who ensures our curriculum is up to date and provides internships and jobs for graduates. We work with over 70 employers which helps to explain our 82% placement rate and close to 90% rate of people working a year later. Plus the Sheriff’s office tells us that those who were previously incarcerated and go through our program go back to jail at a much lower rate.

90%

Placements with Jobs One Year Later quoia Adult School and Cañada College on pathways that allow people to train for better paying jobs immediately but also access college credits to further expand their possibilities.

We have exciting partnerships with the Laborers and Carpenters Unions which provide a road to construction jobs and, with our partners at Goodwill of Silicon Valley, we have opened a second cohort of our Laborers construction program in San Jose. We have just begun a partnership with the Sequoia Union High School District to offer JobTrain programs for students at Redwood High School, a continuation school. And we have just opened our first of many social enterprises with our partner CALSO: WISE SV’s Rendezvous Café and catering, at the Sobrato Center in Redwood Shores.

• What would you like the world to know about JobTrain and how can people help make a difference? JobTrain is uniquely positioned to help those most in need. JobTrain services are free, and to help them remain free, contributions to cover the cost for training our students and providing them the support they need are invaluable and make a lasting contribution to our community as our students move into careers. We also have many volunteers who teach in our Essential Skills program which is quickly becoming the gold standard for other programs like ours. As teachers, mentors and role models, individuals and companies from across the Bay Area help teach skills essential to getting and keeping a job, including one-time volunteers who review resumes or conduct mock interviews. Many others participate as guest lecturers in our programs. • What is it you would like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers? Why is JobTrain so special? It’s important to remember that in the Bay Area, so many people are one paycheck away from homelessness. One of our students, Louisa, had a husband who worked in technology while she provided home-based care. Her husband passed away unexpectedly as did her employer and instantly she had no income and a great tragedy to overcome. JobTrain gave her an opportunity to not only train for a career and find a new pathway, but also a community of support that helped her with the myriad of other challenges that people in her situation face.

JobTrain would like to expand our impact by increasing the number of people who can access our existing programs by taking our programs to locations throughout the Bay Area, through train the trainer, online access and evening programs. The need is great; in fact, we have over 150 on our waiting lists just for our medical assistant and coding boot camp. We are also trying to increase the opportunities for our students. We are partnering with both Se-

And that, in a nutshell, is the magic of JobTrain. Training alone is not enough. We have to create a launch pad for people to move to the next level of employment. We create the winning combination through our program and our ties to many employer partners, volunteers, donors, foundations, community groups, education groups, government and stakeholders. Together, we ensure that those most in need succeed.


Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA Annamarie Azevedo, Volunteer & Donor

BANP: What is your personal philosophy about being able to help a great cause such as the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA? AA: I try to make a difference no matter how big or small that might be. So why not make your heart happy by making that difference in the lives of deserving animals. Since the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA has an open door policy –meaning, they accept all animals, not just those who are highly adoptable -- it was an easy decision for me to help them.  BANP: What would you say to others about donating/volunteering with the Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA and in general? AA: Being both a donor and volunteer I get to see donations being utilized first hand. It's extremely fulfilling seeing so many wonderful animals being loved, fed and cared for, and then re-homed. We can make such a huge difference in these animals’ lives, as well as our own, just knowing we’ve helped better these little angels. So many come to PHS/SPCA injured, sick, scared and emaciated. Without donations, they couldn’t be saved.

BANP: What do you love most about what you do when you volunteer?  Is there a favorite "something" you like? AA: I love the unwavering love that dogs give, regardless of their previous life and treatment. They bring sunshine on the gloomiest of days. Whether I take them for a walk outside or for playtime inside, the happiness they exhibit is heartwarming. They show us how to enjoy the smallest of life's pleasures that we humans take for granted. My favorite thing is the cuddle time at the end of each play session.

BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for you or a particular joy you get when you volunteer? AA: Some dogs get overlooked because they're older or have special needs. They might be hearing or sight impaired, missing a leg, ears cropped too short or maybe they are just overly shy. When these guys get adopted, it doesn't get any better. The most unforgettable was Raphael who was aged, blind, and partially deaf, with thinning hair. His owners had moved out and left him behind to fend for himself. He was the first dog I walked at PHS/SPCA and I was there the day he was adopted. Pure JOY! BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others? AA: I would recommend volunteering to people from all walks of life, all economic backgrounds and ages. No matter who we are, stressful things pop up daily. I can't think of a better way than volunteering to forget them and, at the same time, bring much needed and deserved love and joy into an animal’s life. You will get back much more than you could ever give. The animals make you feel loved, help you get exercise, fresh air… and you can't find a better listener. Give it a try. You won't be sorry.


Warm. Inspiring. Fun.

Visit Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA’s Center for Compassion at 1450 Rollins Road in Burlingame. 650/340-7022 | phs-spca.org

Photo by Nick Elias


Making A Positive Difference Providing A Lifetime of Impact For a Child in Foster Care CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) of San Mateo County Patrick Goodenough, CASA Volunteer and Donor BANP: What is it about CASA of San Mateo County that made you want to become a CASA Volunteer? What do you do when you volunteer and how long have you been doing it? PG: The role of CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) revolves around participating in court decisions relating to the welfare of children placed in foster care. When I retired, I volunteered to teach art to kids who were on probation. Fifteen-yearold Juan’s talent took my breath away and while I was nurturing his art skills our connection deepened. At his request, I took the training to become a CASA Volunteer so I could help Juvenile Court Judges make well-informed decisions about Juan’s home placements, visitation rights with family members, education or anything that impacted his health, safety and general well-being. Now Juan is 23 and out of foster care but our friendship has endured.

he received. The fact that only two weeks later he lost the job represented the other side of the coin. Young people who have experienced crisis and are healing from trauma have large ups and downs. A CASA Volunteer tries to help the child absorb the disappointments. Even though the mentoring relationship can be warm and productive, teens are apt to test adults and the relationship can be fragile. It takes longer to build real trust with a child who has felt abandoned but Juan learned that I would always stand by him. I’ve enjoyed watching him follow his dream to be a professional artist.

BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this volunteer work to others? PG: I encourage others to volunteer. I’ve often heard retired men and women express dissatisfaction with their quality of life. I think working with youth of very different backgrounds can be deeply rewarding. BANP: What do you love most about what Juan repeatedly tells me I’m like a father you do when you volunteer? Is there a fato him. He credits me with proving that vorite “something” you like? relationships can be supportive and endurPatrick Goodenough PG: Through a close, one-on-one relationing. In my experience, the role of a CASA ship, I understood how a history of abuse and neglect led Juan Volunteer led me to self-examination and personal growth. I’ve to make bad choices. He was placed in foster care after experi- learned more from my relationship with Juan then I have in a encing domestic violence and was bounced around to so many lifetime. different group homes. He got involved with the wrong crowd and so ended up on probation for petty crime. I developed re- BANP: What do you wish other people knew about CASA? spect for Juan’s challenges and gained insight into his anxiety PG: I consistently recommend CASA to people seeking worthy about his future. Fortunately, as a CASA Volunteer, I was empow- non-profits to support. The mission is straight forward as it cenered by the courts to offer him stability and hope. I felt that I was ters on children with great need. CASA has had a long history able to use my skills and collaborate with individuals in the child of successfully supporting children in crisis. The organization’s welfare system to make a truly lasting difference. structure is uncomplicated, with just a few employees supervising nearly 300 volunteers. As both a volunteer and a donor, I have BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for you or a watched the agency grow and win the confidence of partners in particular joy you get when you volunteer? the community. I’m happy to help spread the word about CASA to PG: One is rewarded in unexpected moments. Juan’s high potential donors so that the organization can realize its vision of school graduation was momentous as was the first paycheck providing a CASA Volunteer to every child who needs one.


MALE MENTORS NEEDED

MALE MENTOR NEEDED Be a powerful voice Be a role model Be an advocate

Be a CASA Volunteer

Take the first step and join us for a brief info session

Empowerment ∙ Encouragement ∙ Achievement

EMPOWERMENT ∙ ENCOURAGEMENT ∙ ACHIEVEMENT CASA of San Mateo County is in critical need of male volunteers to a CASA of San Mateo County is in critical need of male volunteers to advocate for and mentor boys and teens who have been abused or neglected are in the fosterhave care system. and mentor boys and and teens who been abused or neglected and foster care system. What do CASA Volunteers do? They listen first. Then they act. They get to know the child by visiting with them weekly and then inform judges and others of what the child needs. They provide consistent support and make sure the child’s needs are not overlooked and that the child doesn’t get lost in the system. Women are also very welcome to volunteer!

MALE MENTO NEEDED

What do CASA Volunteers do? They listen first. Then they act. They child by visiting with them weekly and then inform judges and other child needs. They provide consistent support and make sure the chi not overlooked and that the child doesn’t get lost in the system.

Empowerment ∙ Encouragement ∙ Achievement

CASA of San Mateo County is in critical need of male volunt Women are also very welcome to volunteer! and mentor boys and teens who have been abused or negle foster care system.

What do CASA Volunteers do? They listen first. Then they ac child by visiting with them weekly and then inform judges a Follow us! child needs. They consistent and make sure Join us for an upcoming Infoprovide Session fromsupport 6-7pm not overlooked and that the child doesn’t get lost in the s

Please email natalie@casaofsanmateo.org Women are also very welcome to volunteer! or visit www.casaofsanmateo.org Follow us! for upcoming dates.

Follow us!


L E G A L A I D S O C I E T Y O F S A N M AT E O C O U N T Y

Justice For All Matters Very Much To Us All

SH: The Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County has made an impact on hundreds of thousands of persons since our founding in 1959. With legal assistance, they were able to overcome legal obstacles and stabilize their lives. Many have achieved wonderful things: they have learned English, graduated from high school, graduated from college, found

An Interview With Stacey Hawver, Executive Director

jobs and helped others. My wish is to be able to expand our services in two im-

BANP: What is the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo Coun-

BANP: What do you love most about the Legal Aid So-

portant areas: to increase resources de-

ty about and what do you all do?

ciety of San Mateo County and the work that you all do?

voted to housing issues, and geograph-

SH: The Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County has been

SH: Justice for all matters very much to me and to the en-

ically, to reach more of the San Mateo

changing lives in our commu-

tire staff at the Legal Aid Soci-

county coastline. With today’s cost of

nity for more than 50 years.

ety of San Mateo County. Our

housing skyrocketing ever higher, we

Our mission is to improve

attorneys are graduates of

see over 100 clients monthly trying des-

access to justice for the poor,

some of the finest law schools

perately to preserve their housing in our

the elderly, veterans, families

in America and approach their

three weekly clinics. Our resources are

in crisis, immigrants: those

work with passion for justice

stretched thin as we try to both provide

who are most in need.

and profound empathy for

direct services and address issues relat-

their clients. Nearly 500 legal

ing to housing on a systemic level. We

In 2015, we helped over

professionals volunteered in

also know that there are low-income residents on the

2,400 clients. More than half

2015. I am proud of our long-

coast in need of legal assistance for a variety of issues.

were defined as extremely

term collaborations with our

low income, with over 300

community partners includ-

BANP: What would you like the world to know about

Mateo so special?

having no current income at

ing other nonprofit organiza-

the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County and how

SH: Equal access to justice is about everyone’s ability

all. Nearly 55% faced housing

tions, hospitals, schools and

can people help make a difference?

to participate in our legal system regardless of how

issues, including the threat

local and state government

SH: There is still poverty in our community despite a

much money they have. The Legal Aid Society takes on

of homelessness, as county

agencies. The Legal Aid Soci-

fast-growing economy; the average annual income

the special responsibility to aid those who are in need,

rents continued to rise at an

ety of San Mateo County is an

of a Legal Aid client in 2015 was $16,000. In order to

but who cannot afford legal services. We are always

unprecedented rate. Hundreds more needed our help to

integral part of making sure that everyone has access to

achieve our dreams of providing additional assistance

seeking volunteers with a legal background; and, of

access healthcare and other safety net benefits to which

justice, regardless of their ability to pay.

in housing, and to reach more clients out on the coast,

course, contributions to the Legal Aid Society of San

we need to hire an additional attorney and a project

Mateo County will help us provide life-changing equal

they were entitled, to be protected from the threat of el-

day, at our website at www.legalaidsmc.org. BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers?   Why is the Legal Aid Society of San

der abuse or domestic violence, or to get the educational

BANP: How has the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo Coun-

coordinator. While we seek funding regularly, readers

access to justice for thousands in need. To help today

services their children need to succeed in school.

ty made an impact and what do you wish yet to see?

can make an immediate difference with a donation to-

go to www.legalaidsmc.org.


L E G A L A I D S O C I E T Y O F S A N M AT E O C O U N T Y

Justice For All Matters Very Much To Us All

SH: The Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County has made an impact on hundreds of thousands of persons since our founding in 1959. With legal assistance, they were able to overcome legal obstacles and stabilize their lives. Many have achieved wonderful things: they have learned English, graduated from high school, graduated from college, found

An Interview With Stacey Hawver, Executive Director

jobs and helped others. My wish is to be able to expand our services in two im-

BANP: What is the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo Coun-

BANP: What do you love most about the Legal Aid So-

portant areas: to increase resources de-

ty about and what do you all do?

ciety of San Mateo County and the work that you all do?

voted to housing issues, and geograph-

SH: The Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County has been

SH: Justice for all matters very much to me and to the en-

ically, to reach more of the San Mateo

changing lives in our commu-

tire staff at the Legal Aid Soci-

county coastline. With today’s cost of

nity for more than 50 years.

ety of San Mateo County. Our

housing skyrocketing ever higher, we

Our mission is to improve

attorneys are graduates of

see over 100 clients monthly trying des-

access to justice for the poor,

some of the finest law schools

perately to preserve their housing in our

the elderly, veterans, families

in America and approach their

three weekly clinics. Our resources are

in crisis, immigrants: those

work with passion for justice

stretched thin as we try to both provide

who are most in need.

and profound empathy for

direct services and address issues relat-

their clients. Nearly 500 legal

ing to housing on a systemic level. We

In 2015, we helped over

professionals volunteered in

also know that there are low-income residents on the

2,400 clients. More than half

2015. I am proud of our long-

coast in need of legal assistance for a variety of issues.

were defined as extremely

term collaborations with our

low income, with over 300

community partners includ-

BANP: What would you like the world to know about

Mateo so special?

having no current income at

ing other nonprofit organiza-

the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County and how

SH: Equal access to justice is about everyone’s ability

all. Nearly 55% faced housing

tions, hospitals, schools and

can people help make a difference?

to participate in our legal system regardless of how

issues, including the threat

local and state government

SH: There is still poverty in our community despite a

much money they have. The Legal Aid Society takes on

of homelessness, as county

agencies. The Legal Aid Soci-

fast-growing economy; the average annual income

the special responsibility to aid those who are in need,

rents continued to rise at an

ety of San Mateo County is an

of a Legal Aid client in 2015 was $16,000. In order to

but who cannot afford legal services. We are always

unprecedented rate. Hundreds more needed our help to

integral part of making sure that everyone has access to

achieve our dreams of providing additional assistance

seeking volunteers with a legal background; and, of

access healthcare and other safety net benefits to which

justice, regardless of their ability to pay.

in housing, and to reach more clients out on the coast,

course, contributions to the Legal Aid Society of San

we need to hire an additional attorney and a project

Mateo County will help us provide life-changing equal

they were entitled, to be protected from the threat of el-

day, at our website at www.legalaidsmc.org. BANP: What is it you like to say to potential Donors and Volunteers?   Why is the Legal Aid Society of San

der abuse or domestic violence, or to get the educational

BANP: How has the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo Coun-

coordinator. While we seek funding regularly, readers

access to justice for thousands in need. To help today

services their children need to succeed in school.

ty made an impact and what do you wish yet to see?

can make an immediate difference with a donation to-

go to www.legalaidsmc.org.


SAMARITAN HOUSE A Key Principle At Samaritan House Is About

“Neighbor Helping Neighbor”

Patty Hsiu, longtime dedicated Volunteer and Donor, Advisory Council

Member, Development Committee Member and former Board President, on why she supports Samaritan House: BANP: What is it about Samaritan House that made you

PH: I like helping folks that need help. I also like helping

want to choose Samaritan House?

folks that want to give time as their contribution. Teaching

PH: It’s local and helps people that live where I live.  The

community members, especially students, about the con-

help that Samaritan House provides is basic: food, shelter,

text of the work they do while volunteering is satisfying.  A

medical, etc. I understand and

key principle at Samaritan

see the needs, and feel like I can

House is about ‘Neighbor help-

make an impact. The areas that

ing Neighbor’.  I live in a better

Samaritan House covers are im-

community because we have an

portant to the wellbeing to ev-

organization that puts together

ery person and not having these

people that can help with those

things has far reaching conse-

that need it.  

quences.

BANP: Is there a particular mo-

BANP: What do you do when

ment that stands out for you or

you volunteer and how long

a particular joy you get when

have you been doing it?

you volunteer?

PH: I currently help with fundraising, recruiting volunteers,

PH: It’s especially fun when other volunteers that I’ve co-

distributing and serving food, and toys, collecting and

ordinated or connected with Samaritan House are grateful

transporting donations, and even photographing events.  I

to be able to help.  Both the helpers and the helped are

also volunteer on the Advisory Council, the Development

grateful and it’s a wonderful thing.

Committee, and the Main Event Committee.  When I was

BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others?

the Board President, I helped lead strategic initiatives and

PH: Yes! It’s gratifying and it’s the right thing to do if you

governance. I’ve done some sort of volunteering for Sa-

want to help create a healthy community. And get your

maritan House for about 20 years.

kids involved too; it will stay with them throughout their

BANP: What do you love most about what you do when

lives.

you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like?

Since 1974, Samaritan House has become San Mateo’s leading non-profit that brings a new level of hope, dignity, and empowerment to people living in poverty as they fulfill immediate needs and guide people toward self-reliance. Samaritan House is the largest food distribution agency in the county. Other free services include shelter and housing assistance; medical and dental clinics; clothes for children; personalized case management and much more. The entire community benefits from Samaritan House’s steadfast mission to mobilize all available resources and work hand-in-hand to break the cycle of poverty.

RECEIVED:

650-341-4081 • Mon-Fri, 9:00 – 5:00 • 4031 Pacific Blvd., San Mateo, CA 94403 www.samaritanhousesanmateo.org


SAMARITAN HOUSE A Key Principle At Samaritan House Is About

“Neighbor Helping Neighbor”

Patty Hsiu, longtime dedicated Volunteer and Donor, Advisory Council

Member, Development Committee Member and former Board President, on why she supports Samaritan House: BANP: What is it about Samaritan House that made you

PH: I like helping folks that need help. I also like helping

want to choose Samaritan House?

folks that want to give time as their contribution. Teaching

PH: It’s local and helps people that live where I live.  The

community members, especially students, about the con-

help that Samaritan House provides is basic: food, shelter,

text of the work they do while volunteering is satisfying.  A

medical, etc. I understand and

key principle at Samaritan

see the needs, and feel like I can

House is about ‘Neighbor help-

make an impact. The areas that

ing Neighbor’.  I live in a better

Samaritan House covers are im-

community because we have an

portant to the wellbeing to ev-

organization that puts together

ery person and not having these

people that can help with those

things has far reaching conse-

that need it.  

quences.

BANP: Is there a particular mo-

BANP: What do you do when

ment that stands out for you or

you volunteer and how long

a particular joy you get when

have you been doing it?

you volunteer?

PH: I currently help with fundraising, recruiting volunteers,

PH: It’s especially fun when other volunteers that I’ve co-

distributing and serving food, and toys, collecting and

ordinated or connected with Samaritan House are grateful

transporting donations, and even photographing events.  I

to be able to help.  Both the helpers and the helped are

also volunteer on the Advisory Council, the Development

grateful and it’s a wonderful thing.

Committee, and the Main Event Committee.  When I was

BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others?

the Board President, I helped lead strategic initiatives and

PH: Yes! It’s gratifying and it’s the right thing to do if you

governance. I’ve done some sort of volunteering for Sa-

want to help create a healthy community. And get your

maritan House for about 20 years.

kids involved too; it will stay with them throughout their

BANP: What do you love most about what you do when

lives.

you volunteer?  Is there a favorite “something” you like?

Since 1974, Samaritan House has become San Mateo’s leading non-profit that brings a new level of hope, dignity, and empowerment to people living in poverty as they fulfill immediate needs and guide people toward self-reliance. Samaritan House is the largest food distribution agency in the county. Other free services include shelter and housing assistance; medical and dental clinics; clothes for children; personalized case management and much more. The entire community benefits from Samaritan House’s steadfast mission to mobilize all available resources and work hand-in-hand to break the cycle of poverty.

RECEIVED:

650-341-4081 • Mon-Fri, 9:00 – 5:00 • 4031 Pacific Blvd., San Mateo, CA 94403 www.samaritanhousesanmateo.org


THE STORE THAT BUILDS

homes & hope

When you support the ReStore by shopping, donating or volunteering, you’re supporting local families. Your tax-deductible donations of new or gently-used building materials, appliances and furniture help Habitat for Humanity Greater San Francisco raise funds to build homes and hope in Marin, San Francisco and the Peninsula. For more details about the ReStore or to get involved, visit our website at

www.habitatgsf.org/restore 1411 Industrial Road, San Carlos, CA 94070 1-800-SHOP-090 | restore@habitatgsf.org


Discover Your Open Space

Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District is right in your own backyard. We offer 26 preserves, 62,000 acres, and over 225 miles of trails, plus hiking and nature programs nearly every day of the week, free of charge! Discover scenic baylands or majestic redwood forests just minutes away from Silicon Valley.

www.openspace.org


FEATU

S T N E V E • S E T A D P U • RES

http://bit.ly/bayareanonprofits www.bayareanonprofits.org


San Francisco Non-Profits

I

Introducing San Francisco Non-Profits!

n this day and age, many of us are looking for purpose and asking ourselves how we can help make a difference in our community and our world. If we were to ask ourselves, where would we be without our Non-Profits, that’s a good question - they do a lot! With them, it’s hard enough in our world. Without them, it would be unthinkable. Indeed, we have many Non-Profits doing great works and they are always looking for people, like you, who can and would like to help.

At the same time, there are many people, like you and me, who wonder what specifically more we can do with our money or, especially, just by volunteering – indeed, what a difference that does and will make. The greatest gift of all is in the giving and what a big positive difference it makes in the lives of others. In San Francisco Non-Profits, learn about various great people and great organizations doing great things. May it become a growing Resource for you and many others, there’s nothing like teamwork, that can help us all in making a big positive difference for a better community here at Home.


Steve Countouriotis Member, Board of Directors

Lieutenant Colonel, US Army (Ret.) NCIRE – The Veterans Health Research Institute BANP: What is it about NCIRE that helped you in choosing to

research on post-traumatic stress (PTS) and traumatic brain

become involved?

injury (TBI) has been dramatic, NCIRE has hit on so many new

SC: I was impressed by NCIRE’s outreach to Veterans and the

Veterans health issues. The military and wars today are different

general community. In recent years, NCIRE has presented its The

than in previous decades. We’re seeing a large number of blast

Brain at War conference where research-

injuries from explosions and IEDs. The

ers discuss health problems that are

amount of body armor has increased,

unique to combat Veterans. They share

and almost every Veteran I know from

what they have learned from working

Iraq and Afghanistan has a neck, back

with and treating Veterans. And it’s not

or hip injury. And I don’t know a Veteran

just researchers at the conference. Mil-

who doesn’t have some form of hearing

itary leaders, health care workers, com-

loss from gunfire, helicopters, genera-

munity leaders and Veterans themselves

tors or other noise exposure. We’re also

and family members attend. I don’t know

seeing the physical and psychological

of any organization that does anything

effects of war on our increasing num-

like this. NCIRE is not just a bunch of sci-

ber of women combat Veterans. NCIRE

entists looking through microscopes all

is meeting so many research challenges.

day. The researchers are constantly engaged with Veterans to learn what ails

BANP: Why would you recommend

them. And they work full speed ahead to

NCIRE to someone who is looking to be

address those health issues.

a board member or donor? SC: NCIRE gets things done. It is the

BANP: What brings you the greatest joy?

leading nonprofit research institute in the U.S. devoted to ad-

SC: I have two sons, a daughter, a son-in-law and two nephews

vancing Veterans health research, so your dollars would be wise-

who served in combat during the Iraq and/or Afghanistan wars.

ly spent. Because of its partnerships with the San Francisco VA

They may be okay now, but researchers are finding that many

Health Care System and UCSF, it collaborates with some of the

Veterans health issues – like post-traumatic stress and physical

other top scientists in the world and has access to the most cut-

pain and illnesses – show up long after they leave the battle-

ting-edge technology. For example, it has the most advanced

fields. I served 13 years overseas in command and other leader-

and powerful MRI in the VA health system to study PTS, TBI, Alz-

ship positions, and I saw what soldiers had to endure every day.

heimer’s and other neurocognitive disorders. Veterans only rep-

Many now suffer devastating problems, but because of NCIRE, I

resent one percent of the population, so sometimes their needs

know they won’t be forgotten.

get swept under the rug. NCIRE pours all its resources into Veterans health, and it is 100 percent for the men and women who

BANP: What do you wish other people knew about NCIRE? SC: People don’t realize the wide scope of NCIRE’s research. While

have sacrificed for our country.


VETERANS HEALTH MATTERS One Mission, One Goal: Veterans Health NCIRE – The Veterans Health Research Institute supports a thriving community of more than 200 scientists and clinicians who investigate and treat the wide range of diseases and disabilities suffered by service members and Veterans. Our research portfolio is deeply rooted in the relationship between scientists and the patients they serve and catalyzed by the evolving needs of the Veteran population. NCIRE-supported researchers are conducting pioneering research in traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, aging, heart disease, chronic pain, cancer, and women warriors health. Along with our partners at the San Francisco VA Healthcare System and the University of California, San Francisco, we provide care for Veterans; discover and develop effective treatments for military injuries and diseases; train new researchers in Veterans health; and prepare new generations of providers to care for Veterans in the years to come.

Serving Veterans. Benefiting Us All. www.milvali.com

NCI R E www.ncire.org

The Veterans Health Research Institute


STEPHEN MORANGE, I N T E R I M

E X E C U T I V E

D I R E C T O R

NCIRE – THE VETERANS HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE BANP: What is NCIRE and what do you all do?

Orange, led the largest observational study of Alzheimer’s and

SM: NCIRE’s mission is to advance Veterans health through re-

demonstrated novel heart disease drugs. More recently, they

search and education. There are approximately 22 million Veter-

linked TBI to early onset of dementia and identified biomarkers

ans who have served our country, but they suffer health problems

to help track and improve treatment for PTS. Today, researchers

at rates higher than the general population. At NCIRE, we support

test new software and smartphone applications to retrain brains

more than 200 scientists and clinicians who investigate and treat

damaged by trauma and stress. We’ve accomplished a lot, but

a wide range of diseases and condi-

we’re finding that Veterans now from

tions that afflict Veterans – from trau-

Iraq and Afghanistan wars have unique

matic brain injury (TBI)and post-trau-

needs rooted to mental and physical

matic stress (PTS) to diseases such as

wounds. Every new era of Veterans of-

Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, cancer

fers new challenges. For example, we

and heart ailments; many of these at-

see more and more women Veterans –

tributable to the increased risks from

the first women to see expanded com-

service. NCIRE-supported researchers

bat. While we have established model

and health care providers – all affili-

programs for our women warriors, we

ated with the University of California,

must fully identify and address their

San Francisco and the San Francisco VA

unique health needs.

Health Care System – are pioneers in

BANP: What is so special about NCIRE

developing treatments for Veterans.

and how can people make a differ-

BANP: What do you love most about

ence?

NCIRE and the work you all do?

SM: The brilliance and dedication of

SM: I’m fortunate to be part of such a

the researchers and clinicians we sup-

noble cause. Everybody knows at least

port makes us special. In addition to

one Veteran – as a family member or friend – and we all appreciate

our UCSF and SFVAHCS affiliations, we manage a broad portfolio

their service. It is a privilege to work with people who are so ded-

of projects funded by the National Institutes of Health and have

icated to improving the lives of Veterans and their families. NCIRE

an extensive partnership with the Department of Defense. Our

supports researchers who have already developed many innova-

board and supporters include community leaders and Veterans

tive therapies for Veterans, and they strive to do even more. And

themselves. They are an important voice as we continually assess

while the research targets Veterans, the broader community ben-

our research direction. Also, in the Bay Area – historically, the hot-

efits when these scientists find clues to and treatments for neuro-

bed of innovation and technology—we explore partnerships with

logical disorders, heart disease, cancer and more. As we improve

the technology sector, which can help us speed these discoveries

the health of our Veterans, we impact global health, too.

to treatments for Veterans. But federal research budget cuts jeop-

BANP: How has NCIRE made a difference and what impact do you

ardize our research momentum. Support from new donors will aid

still wish to see?

us in our quest to advance Veterans health.

SM: NCIRE-supported researchers studied the effects of Agent


VETERANS HEALTH MATTERS NCIRE in the Community In 2008—amid growing concerns about the effect of traumatic brain injury on the physical and mental health of combat Veterans—NCIRE convened its first The Brain at War conference. Scientists, health care providers, military leaders, policy makers, and Veterans gathered to discuss new research and emerging health needs of Veterans. This conference brings together a diverse and dynamic group of experts with a common cause: to heal and prevent the mental and physical wounds suffered by the men and women who go to war for our country. At these conferences, we delve into the groundbreaking research on traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress and learn of the harsh effects of these conditions throughout the body. We report about technologies to detect these conditions at an early stage, and new innovations to ward off symptoms of brain injury. Chronic pain, tinnitus, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Women Warriors health concerns, and sleep disorders have all been explored. And most importantly, we learn firsthand from war Veterans about the urgency to speed research to the clinic. NCIRE is proud to host this event, which provides a critical public service to the the scientific and Veterans communities by speeding advances in Veterans health research from the laboratory to the clinic. Learn more here: http://ncire.org/TheBrainatWar/

www.milvali.com

NCI R E www.ncire.org

The Veterans Health Research Institute


AMANDA HEIER

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION BANP: What is San Francisco General Hospital Foundation about and what do you do?    AH: Our mission statement is broad – “to promote excellence in research, education and care for all at Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center.” To do that, we take diverse approaches to support the work of the hospital – from our recently completed Capital Campaign, which raised a historic $141 million, to our Hearts Grants program, which gives approximately $500,000 each year to hospital programs to help them meet their needs, everything from state-of-theart technology to teddy bears and stools for a children’s waiting room.  Since 1994, we’ve raised over $220 million to support the hospital, its staff and its patients.   BANP: What do you love most about San Francisco General Hospital Foundation and the work you do?   AH: Our office is close to the hospital, and when we are on the hospital campus we are continually inspired by the work of the staff and gratified to see the grateful, often emotional, responses of the patients.  We know the hospital is the safety net for the city, treating one in eight San Franciscans each year, and it’s incredibly rewarding to know that our work makes a difference in people’s day to day lives, especially our most vulnerable patients. We have a talented and dedicated board and staff, and for a small group, we produce amazing results.  All of this makes me feel I am at the center of positive change and energy.   BANP: How has San Francisco General Hospital Foundation made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see San

Francisco General Hospital Foundation make?  AH: In 2008, the city passed a bond measure that allowed for construction of our beautiful new hospital building. The city also identified additional funds earmarked to equip the new building, but not the total amount needed, so the task of raising the funds to fully equip and furnish this state-of-the-art structure fell to us. The task was daunting, but through dedication of our Capital Campaign team and the incredible generosity of our donors, we were able to raise everything needed to allow the hospital to open on time in May, which will affect tens of thousands of San Franciscans and visitors to our beautiful city.  We are able to make a great impact on the San Francisco community and northern San Mateo County, by helping to support so many health programs on campus at Zuckerberg San Francisco General that are national models and centers of excellence.   BANP: What is so special about San Francisco General Hospital Foundation and how can people make a difference? AH: Again, we operate with a very small staff, a diverse and talented group from a variety of backgrounds who share the desire to use our skills to make a difference.  We’re always grateful to receive donations of any amount. Or, if anyone wished to volunteer a few hours a week at the hospital, that would be much appreciated as the need is great. While the Foundation is the fiscal manager for the hospital’s Volunteer Services program, any questions regarding volunteer opportunities would ideally be directed to the Volunteer Coordinator. I am sure your readers would find the energy at the hospital is amazing, and the work highly rewarding.


Muttville BANP: What is it about Muttville that helped you in choosing to become a Volunteer? SM: I was familiar with Muttville through the Menlo Charity Horse Show.  I have been volunteering for that event for 14 years and Muttville has attended for quite a few years.  Many of my friends have adopted dogs from Muttville.  It didn’t occur to me to adopt a dog until one of my friends was doing a fund-raiser and the recipient was Muttville.  I got on their web-site and the first picture I saw was “our dog”.  My stepson had introduced us to Pit Bulls and we fell in love with them.  Our precious dog is somewhere between 7 - 10 and we think might have been used for fighting.  She had had numerous teeth removed before we adopted her and had severe ear infections, causing her ears to become “cauliflower ears”.  She has painful arthritis and numerous abrasions,

cated with me via email, so I hadn’t met them.  We at-

we assume from other animals. 

tended their annual Gala and were overwhelmed with the caring and true passion for Muttville.  I am so im-

BANP: What brings you the greatest joy?

pressed with their caring for these special animals and for the smiles these wonderful creatures bring to all of

SM: Muttville found our dog (Mollie) in Los Angeles on

us who adopt them. 

the streets, so we don’t have any idea of what her his-

BANP: Why would you recommend Muttville to some-

tory might be.  All we know is how loving she is.  She is

one who is looking to be a donor?

not fond of other animals, but cannot be without human touch.  We have never experienced such love for an

SM: I think it is so important for dog lovers to know

animal before.  Mollie gets into your soul.  Her eyes tell

about Muttville and how crucial it is for us to take them

you everything. 

in.  Adopting an older dog has so many rewards.  I truly feel that these dogs know they have been rescued. 

BANP: What do you wish

Since we adopted Mollie, the increase in hearing about

other people knew about

people rescuing a dog has been so inspiring.  Sherri

Muttville?

asked her Gala audience how many of us had adopted a dog....she paused and asked.....”how many dogs have

SM: Sherri and Kristen communi-

rescued you?”  That says it all. 


Muttville’s mission is to provide rescue, foster, adoption, and hospice for senior dogs, and support and education for the people that love them.

Photos courtesy Jane Goldman and Patty Stanton. ©2016 Muttville MUT T VILLE IS A 501(c)(3) NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION. TAX ID: 26-0416747 Headquarters: 255 Alabama St., San Francisco, CA 94103


Sherri Franklin EXECUTIVE

DIRECTOR

BANP: What is Muttville about and what do you all do?

SF: Muttville has rescued over 3700 dogs and continues to grow.

SF: Muttville is a senior dog rescue in San Francisco. We rescue

One of the most gratifying developments is seeing how we’ve in-

dogs slated for euthanasia from all over California. So many shel-

fluenced the way others think about and treat older dogs. Other

ters aren’t equipped to handle treating, housing or finding homes

shelters have seen our success at finding great homes for these

for older dogs, and the seniors end up first to die. Many times

senior dogs, dogs that they considered unadoptable, so they are

we are the only thing standing between life and death for these

putting more of them up for adoption.

wonderful dogs. We want to continue to promote the human-animal bond, esWe have a special program, Seniors for Seniors, that matches dogs

pecially the impact a dog can have on the life of a senior citizen.

with senior humans. We waive fees for seniors and have special

We have an outreach program called Cuddle Club, we invite se-

adoption counselors that assist in making a great match.

nior humans to come and cuddle, socialize and walk dogs. Many groups are now participating, making new friends and creating a

BANP: What do you love most about Muttville and the work you

community. Even if you can’t adopt a dog, you can get some dog

all do?

love!

SF: Working at Muttville is incredibly rewarding. We not only have the privilege of saving lives, but we see so much joy! We see the

BANP: What is so special about Muttville and how can people

dogs on their way to happy new lives. Almost daily we get an

make a difference?

email or a letter from an adopter with their stories and photos of

SF: Muttville is the first cage-free animal shelter. Being in a tradi-

their Muttville dog how the dog has brought something special

tional shelter is very stressful for a dog, and by offering our dogs

to their life, made them happy to be alive.

a home-like environment, they stay more adoptable and are relaxed while they are meeting potential family.

Some of our success is bittersweet. We see so many people who need to give up a beloved pet due to health or loss, and it is so

But it’s also good for humans! Muttville is not a sad place to go. It’s

hard for them. But when we say we can take their dog, their relief

fun and lively – it’s like being in a big living room with lots and lots

is palpable. And we know that that dog is going to have a won-

of dogs! We also have a large foster base, so many of our dogs go

derful second home.

into temporary homes while they await their forever home. We want to make a great match, and we involve foster families and

BANP: How has Muttville made a difference and what impact do

volunteers in the process as well as our own staff. We strive for

you still wish to see Muttville make?

success with every life we touch, canine and human.


Muttville’s mission is to provide rescue, foster, adoption, and hospice for senior dogs, and support and education for the people that love them.

Photos courtesy Jane Goldman and Patty Stanton. ©2016 Muttville MUT T VILLE IS A 501(c)(3) NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION. TAX ID: 26-0416747 Headquarters: 255 Alabama St., San Francisco, CA 94103


EDUCATION OUTSIDE The Joy of Connecting Urban Children To Nature and Good Food

PATTY UNTERMAN,

Chef and Co-founder of the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market

BANP: What is it about Education Outside that made you want to help bring garden-based education to public-school children? ... What do you do when you volunteer and how long have you been doing it? Patty: As a chef and founder of the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market, food and food issues are very important to me. Knowing where our food comes from, how it’s grown, and developing a palate for fresh produce is critical for our children -- especially those who live in the city and may not have a connection to their food sources. In my years of experience (and as a parent) I have seen that when you engage kids in planting and preparing their own food, they have a whole new outlook on it. When I learned about what Education Outside is doing to bring these garden experiences to San Francisco’s public schools, I was blown away. All this great work of connecting urban

up -- and then eating it happily. Seeing these young palates being expanded, and watching children gain a connection to this small patch of green, is just so rewarding. BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others?

At Education Outside, we're committed to advancing science in public schools, outdoors.

Patty: I want everyone to know about this great program reaching

We transform school gardens into lush, living laboratories where learning comes naturally.

14,000 children in San Francisco’s public schools. I was so impressed after my first visit, I decided that I could help by tapping my network of chefs event -- we called it City Picnic. So I reached out and asked more than a dozen local chefs to contribute a dish to Education Outside’s fundraiswhelmingly positive. We just held our second annual very successful, sold-out

pening in my own backyard, and I never

City Picnic event - which just shows how

knew it.

much interest there is - and plan to do it every year.

BANP: What do you love most about what you do when you volunteer?  Is there a fa-

BANP: When you volunteer, seeing

vorite “something” you like?

time. It’s a powerful moment, and you can almost see their young minds expanding. Education Outside’s program combines these formative experiences with standards-based science lessons that give children lots of opportunities for hands-on learning. It isn’t just sitting in a classroom and listening to a lecture. Seeing kids experience their education with all their senses is very powerful. BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for you or a particular joy you get when you volunteer? Patty: A year and a half ago, I first visited an Education Outside school and watched a class harvest, prepare, and then eat this amazing brassica fried rice. These were young kids, picking kale and broccoli, chopping it

14,000 schoolchildren each year.

ing dinner, and the response was over-

hands-on science experiments was hap-

watching a child pick something from the garden and taste it for the first

Our innovative program brings science and nature directly into the hands of more than

and restaurants to support Education Outside with a fun fundraising

children to nature and good food through

Patty: You just can’t beat the experience of

WE BRING SCIENCE TO LIFE IN SCHOOL GARDENS.

what you see and doing what you do, do you often think and hope how others, too, could join in and help make a bigger, more positive difference? Patty: I love how democratic Education Outside is -- they are making these important garden-based learning experiences available to kids at schools all throughout San Francisco. Through our City Picnic events, we’ve introduced hundreds of San Franciscans to Education Outside’s work in San Francisco’s public schools. If we can keep spreading the word, then Education Outside can keep expanding their program so that even more Bay Area kids can have these life-changing experiences.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR WORK: W W W. E D U C AT I O N O U T S I D E . O R G • 4 1 5  3 5 5  6 9 7 9 E X T. 1 5 6 6


EDUCATION OUTSIDE The Joy of Connecting Urban Children To Nature and Good Food

PATTY UNTERMAN,

Chef and Co-founder of the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market

BANP: What is it about Education Outside that made you want to help bring garden-based education to public-school children? ... What do you do when you volunteer and how long have you been doing it? Patty: As a chef and founder of the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market, food and food issues are very important to me. Knowing where our food comes from, how it’s grown, and developing a palate for fresh produce is critical for our children -- especially those who live in the city and may not have a connection to their food sources. In my years of experience (and as a parent) I have seen that when you engage kids in planting and preparing their own food, they have a whole new outlook on it. When I learned about what Education Outside is doing to bring these garden experiences to San Francisco’s public schools, I was blown away. All this great work of connecting urban

up -- and then eating it happily. Seeing these young palates being expanded, and watching children gain a connection to this small patch of green, is just so rewarding. BANP: Do you recommend or suggest this to others?

At Education Outside, we're committed to advancing science in public schools, outdoors.

Patty: I want everyone to know about this great program reaching

We transform school gardens into lush, living laboratories where learning comes naturally.

14,000 children in San Francisco’s public schools. I was so impressed after my first visit, I decided that I could help by tapping my network of chefs event -- we called it City Picnic. So I reached out and asked more than a dozen local chefs to contribute a dish to Education Outside’s fundraiswhelmingly positive. We just held our second annual very successful, sold-out

pening in my own backyard, and I never

City Picnic event - which just shows how

knew it.

much interest there is - and plan to do it every year.

BANP: What do you love most about what you do when you volunteer?  Is there a fa-

BANP: When you volunteer, seeing

vorite “something” you like?

time. It’s a powerful moment, and you can almost see their young minds expanding. Education Outside’s program combines these formative experiences with standards-based science lessons that give children lots of opportunities for hands-on learning. It isn’t just sitting in a classroom and listening to a lecture. Seeing kids experience their education with all their senses is very powerful. BANP: Is there a particular moment that stands out for you or a particular joy you get when you volunteer? Patty: A year and a half ago, I first visited an Education Outside school and watched a class harvest, prepare, and then eat this amazing brassica fried rice. These were young kids, picking kale and broccoli, chopping it

14,000 schoolchildren each year.

ing dinner, and the response was over-

hands-on science experiments was hap-

watching a child pick something from the garden and taste it for the first

Our innovative program brings science and nature directly into the hands of more than

and restaurants to support Education Outside with a fun fundraising

children to nature and good food through

Patty: You just can’t beat the experience of

WE BRING SCIENCE TO LIFE IN SCHOOL GARDENS.

what you see and doing what you do, do you often think and hope how others, too, could join in and help make a bigger, more positive difference? Patty: I love how democratic Education Outside is -- they are making these important garden-based learning experiences available to kids at schools all throughout San Francisco. Through our City Picnic events, we’ve introduced hundreds of San Franciscans to Education Outside’s work in San Francisco’s public schools. If we can keep spreading the word, then Education Outside can keep expanding their program so that even more Bay Area kids can have these life-changing experiences.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR WORK: W W W. E D U C AT I O N O U T S I D E . O R G • 4 1 5  3 5 5  6 9 7 9 E X T. 1 5 6 6


SUCCESS STORY

Year Up empowers young adults to go

from poverty to a professional career

IN A YEAR.

WHO ARE WE?

WHO DO WE SERVE?

Since opening its doors in 2008, Year Up Bay Area has served more than 1,100 young adults. We train 320 students at our San Francisco and Silicon Valley campuses each year.

To qualify, students must:

Year Up’s model combines the development of marketable job skills, an educational stipend, an internship, college credits and support to help place young adults on a viable path to economic self-sufficiency.

WHO ARE OUR PARTNERS?*

• Have a high school diploma or GED • Be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or have legal right to work in the U.S.

* partial listing of Year Up Bay Area’s more than 40 Corporate Partners

OUR IMPACT

360 students

100%

SERVED ANNUALLY

INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT

“I feel powerful,”

says Marla Bell, a San Francisco native and recent graduate of Year Up Bay Area. “I’ve accomplished so much in one year. Imagine what I’m going to accomplish in the years to come.” A year ago, Marla was working a dead-end job. Today, she is working full-time at AutoDesk, a software company, as a Training and Organizational Development Assistant. Before Year Up, Marla considered college, but it was not a feasible option due to financial constraints. She was hungry for an opportunity. That’s when she discovered Year Up. Year Up students attend classes for six months in a rigorous academic setting, learning the technical and professional skills necessary to succeed in entry-level technology-based positions. They then put their newlyacquired skills to work at a six-month internship with some of the top companies in the Bay Area.

• Be between the ages of 18 – 24

• Be highly-motivated to learn technical and professional skills for a career in Information Technology (IT)

Visit yearup.org for more student success stories

94%

WORKING OR STUDYING FULL TIME1

$21.00 $7.25 Federal

Year Up Bay Area Graduate

minimum wage

HOURLY WAGE2

GIVE | VOLUNTEER | HOST | HIRE

Help Us Close The Opportunity Divide! PLEASE VISIT YEARUP.ORG FOR MORE INFO

1. Weighted average wage of employed Year Up Bay Area graduates from most recent class; minimum wage: http://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/q-a.htm. 2. Positive Outcomes defined as working or in school full time within 4 months of graduation from program.

Marla majored in Project Management and landed her role at AutoDesk as a Training and Organizational Development Intern where she assisted her team with organization and preparation. “Transitioning from being a Year Up intern to a full-time employee felt like I was taking the training wheels off,” admits Marla. “But I’ve learned that personal growth is endless.” Marla proudly stood on stage as the Master of Ceremonies with her job offer already in hand. She is dedicated to uplifting her Bayview-Hunter’s Point community and plans to pursue higher education in Africana studies and eventually start her own nonprofit.

Underrepresented youth have even more reason to work harder. It’s difficult to work hard if you don’t have the tools and resources, and

that’s where Year Up thankfully steps in.

San Francisco Campus, 80 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 | 415.512.7588 Silicon Valley Campus, 100 West San Fernando Street, Suite 103, San Jose, CA 95113 | 408.513.3004


SUCCESS STORY

Year Up empowers young adults to go

from poverty to a professional career

IN A YEAR.

WHO ARE WE?

WHO DO WE SERVE?

Since opening its doors in 2008, Year Up Bay Area has served more than 1,100 young adults. We train 320 students at our San Francisco and Silicon Valley campuses each year.

To qualify, students must:

Year Up’s model combines the development of marketable job skills, an educational stipend, an internship, college credits and support to help place young adults on a viable path to economic self-sufficiency.

WHO ARE OUR PARTNERS?*

• Have a high school diploma or GED • Be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident or have legal right to work in the U.S.

* partial listing of Year Up Bay Area’s more than 40 Corporate Partners

OUR IMPACT

360 students

100%

SERVED ANNUALLY

INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT

“I feel powerful,”

says Marla Bell, a San Francisco native and recent graduate of Year Up Bay Area. “I’ve accomplished so much in one year. Imagine what I’m going to accomplish in the years to come.” A year ago, Marla was working a dead-end job. Today, she is working full-time at AutoDesk, a software company, as a Training and Organizational Development Assistant. Before Year Up, Marla considered college, but it was not a feasible option due to financial constraints. She was hungry for an opportunity. That’s when she discovered Year Up. Year Up students attend classes for six months in a rigorous academic setting, learning the technical and professional skills necessary to succeed in entry-level technology-based positions. They then put their newlyacquired skills to work at a six-month internship with some of the top companies in the Bay Area.

• Be between the ages of 18 – 24

• Be highly-motivated to learn technical and professional skills for a career in Information Technology (IT)

Visit yearup.org for more student success stories

94%

WORKING OR STUDYING FULL TIME1

$21.00 $7.25 Federal

Year Up Bay Area Graduate

minimum wage

HOURLY WAGE2

GIVE | VOLUNTEER | HOST | HIRE

Help Us Close The Opportunity Divide! PLEASE VISIT YEARUP.ORG FOR MORE INFO

1. Weighted average wage of employed Year Up Bay Area graduates from most recent class; minimum wage: http://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/q-a.htm. 2. Positive Outcomes defined as working or in school full time within 4 months of graduation from program.

Marla majored in Project Management and landed her role at AutoDesk as a Training and Organizational Development Intern where she assisted her team with organization and preparation. “Transitioning from being a Year Up intern to a full-time employee felt like I was taking the training wheels off,” admits Marla. “But I’ve learned that personal growth is endless.” Marla proudly stood on stage as the Master of Ceremonies with her job offer already in hand. She is dedicated to uplifting her Bayview-Hunter’s Point community and plans to pursue higher education in Africana studies and eventually start her own nonprofit.

Underrepresented youth have even more reason to work harder. It’s difficult to work hard if you don’t have the tools and resources, and

that’s where Year Up thankfully steps in.

San Francisco Campus, 80 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 | 415.512.7588 Silicon Valley Campus, 100 West San Fernando Street, Suite 103, San Jose, CA 95113 | 408.513.3004


Love matters. At GLIDE, we express our love by actively working to break the cycles of poverty and marginalization in our community. We feed the hungry, house the homeless, train the jobless, and are deeply committed to creating social justice for all. But our work depends on your generosity. Please, show your love by donating what you can at glide.org. Thank you.

Please donate at glide.org Follow glidesf


Help build affordable homes in the Bay Area. HabitatGSF.org

Habitat for Humanity Greater San Francisco is welcoming volunteers to Habitat Terrace located at 1 Capitol in San Francisco. Every year, over 10,000 volunteers work on Habitat Greater San Francisco construction sites and provide more than 90% of the labor needed to build a Habitat home. Sign up to be a Habitat volunteer today.

www.habitatgsf.org/volunteer


SERGIO ROMO

Jeremy Affeldt

JOE PANIK

MADISON BUMGARNER

Hunter Pence

Pablo Sandoval MATT CAIN

Buster Posey

For the Love of the Game and Their Community THE SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS COMMUNITY FUND AND THE GIANTS COMMUNITY RELATIONS DEPARTMENT

M

ore than the game’s box score is what we call the game of Life. And, also as big as life, you will find the Giants Community Fund and the Giants Community Relations Department. It is a spirit, an energy. They see it as a proud tradition, a way of showing mutual appreciation, and teamwork, that we are truly together – team and community. This is our special team off the field that always goes to bat for our community, our businesses, our organizations, our non-profits and our youth. Throughout the year and in many countless ways, it seems as if every day they are out there always hitting a game winning walk off home run and pitching a perfect game. They are angels for all they do and the difference that they make for so many … Who are these angels? They are Staci Slaughter, Senior Vice President of Communications, Shana Daum, Vice President of Public Affairs and Community Relations and Sue Petersen, Executive Director of the Giants Community Fund, their staffs and all those who are employed by the San Francisco Giants baseball organization. What they are doing off the field, for our community, as well as on, is a story of champions. It is all truly a reflection from the top on down,

complete with heart and devotion. The Giants are enjoying a sell-out every home game in beautiful AT&T Park. Was it really just 15+ years ago, when maybe 5,000-20,000 people would brave the freezing cold and winds of Candlestick Park? Do you believe in miracles, for this was truly one … indeed, how things have miraculously changed. How well do you know, or remember, just how close we were to losing the Giants first to Toronto and then a few years later to Tampa Bay? It was extremely close to happening, but thanks to the dedicated and determined efforts of Larry Baer and Peter Magowan for creating a very real “Dream Team” of ownership partners, the San Francisco Giants were suddenly and very fortunately saved. I


SERGIO ROMO

Jeremy Affeldt

JOE PANIK

MADISON BUMGARNER

Hunter Pence

Pablo Sandoval MATT CAIN

Buster Posey

For the Love of the Game and Their Community THE SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS COMMUNITY FUND AND THE GIANTS COMMUNITY RELATIONS DEPARTMENT

M

ore than the game’s box score is what we call the game of Life. And, also as big as life, you will find the Giants Community Fund and the Giants Community Relations Department. It is a spirit, an energy. They see it as a proud tradition, a way of showing mutual appreciation, and teamwork, that we are truly together – team and community. This is our special team off the field that always goes to bat for our community, our businesses, our organizations, our non-profits and our youth. Throughout the year and in many countless ways, it seems as if every day they are out there always hitting a game winning walk off home run and pitching a perfect game. They are angels for all they do and the difference that they make for so many … Who are these angels? They are Staci Slaughter, Senior Vice President of Communications, Shana Daum, Vice President of Public Affairs and Community Relations and Sue Petersen, Executive Director of the Giants Community Fund, their staffs and all those who are employed by the San Francisco Giants baseball organization. What they are doing off the field, for our community, as well as on, is a story of champions. It is all truly a reflection from the top on down,

complete with heart and devotion. The Giants are enjoying a sell-out every home game in beautiful AT&T Park. Was it really just 15+ years ago, when maybe 5,000-20,000 people would brave the freezing cold and winds of Candlestick Park? Do you believe in miracles, for this was truly one … indeed, how things have miraculously changed. How well do you know, or remember, just how close we were to losing the Giants first to Toronto and then a few years later to Tampa Bay? It was extremely close to happening, but thanks to the dedicated and determined efforts of Larry Baer and Peter Magowan for creating a very real “Dream Team” of ownership partners, the San Francisco Giants were suddenly and very fortunately saved. I


don’t think people realize just how catastrophic that would have been, and the ramifications it would have meant, had the Giants been taken from us. What has come to fruition since: AT&T Park, a most beautiful new ballpark (arguably the best in all of baseball), sellout games, a revitalized SOMA and San Francisco, hundreds of millions of dollars that have gone to benefit local San Francisco and Bay Area community development, non-profits causes and two World Series Championships in three years (when not one in all the years prior since their arrival from New York in 1958); and the outstanding community programs that were born from this. All this from a vision and great fortitude. From the top on down, led by President and CEO Larry Baer, the current ownership group has instilled a culture, a tradition, a legacy, if you will, BRANDON BELT within the San Francisco Giants organization that is indeed rocksolid and part of their own DNA. They believed strongly in their vision, their dedication and their hard work to build AT&T Park. They also believed strongly in expressing the gratitude that the entire Giants organization feels for its community. They believe in their responsibility, to carry on the Giants legacy of giving back to the community and in turn the fans who support them. It is truly a love affair between the Giants and the community they serve – and it shows. It is so very evident. In my conversation with Staci, Shana and Sue, I was enjoying every word they had to say. It was all with such enthusiasm, heart and passion. They love so much what they are doing … and they have each been doing this now for many years. We read in the news all that’s wrong about sports … that’s why I am happy to share this with you, all the GOOD that these Giants do off the field, because we don’t hear this; no, not near enough as we should, if at all. The Giants take their off the field community programs very seriously. As much as they do well on the field, they do it off the field, as well. This is their arm where they can give back to community … and they do … and they have been doing, year in and year out, all these years, an extraordinary job. Indeed, the Giants Community Fund and its

Junior Giants Program won a national award called the Steve Patterson Award for Excellence in Sports Philanthropy …becoming the first Major League Baseball team to have ever won this coveted honor. And the great Giants announcers whose voices we have become so familiar with, and love listening to, are the voice of the Giants on the field, and also for the Giants organization and how it connects with the community off the field. You will hear how they often talk about the team’s community endeavors and the results will beautifully speak for themselves. The Giants sellout all their games … and beyond the three million guests each year who joyfully are coming to the Giants games, there are hundreds of millions more, together with them in spirit, listening on the radio

Lou Seal

and watching on TV. No question, the Giants and the large community have been and are really enjoying this mutual love affair … and are seeing great direct benefits, and results, as well. Are you possibly wondering what kind of participation there is by the Giants team, players, coaches and staff off the field? It is all voluntary and it is 100% - where the entire Giants organization, from the top on down - gladly participates. They make guest appearances, where they will visit and speak to schools, hospitals and non-profits. Indeed, they touch community always in a warm and sincere way. They, too, have and share this very special feeling between the team and community. In addition to the many local causes and nonprofit organizations they help support, they also have been and are involved in helping with great humanitarian causes, such as raising literacy …

and funds to help support the victims of, for example, Katrina, Sandy and the Philippines … and they were the first professional team to help raise funds and build awareness in their support of what has become an annual event: “Until There’s A Cure Day” in the fight against HIV and AIDS. Through its Junior Giants Program, the Community Fund allows more youth to play baseball where it wasn’t possible - building fields, and creating leagues – all free to participate. They find coaches and work closely with the Positive Coaching Alliance, as they help in providing excellent coaching and training. They produce a wonderful handbook each year that is so well thought out and prepared for the parents and their children to read together … and discuss important and meaningful topics like teamwork, character, good health, non-violence and bullying prevention (Strike Out Bullying). Positive role models do have an important place and do help make a big difference. Here, with the Junior Giants, 20,000 kids a year, more than 200,000 in the 20-plus years, have so benefitted. Does it make a difference? For these kids, it surely has and still does. Let’s for a moment talk Junior Giants. What’s it about? How about the 4 Bases of Character Development … 1st Base = Confidence, 2nd Base = Integrity, 3rd Base = Leadership, Home = Teamwork. You can’t score unless you touch All The Bases! “Entering its 21st season, Junior Giants is a free, non-competitive and co-ed baseball program. Over 20,000 youth across California, Nevada and Oregon participate in Junior Giants. Junior Giants offers equipment, uniforms, enrichment programs and coaches Training. Junior Giants wants to help you lead, succeed and have fun! Anyone can play!” Through this amazing handbook, in addition to Character Development, there is also Education – The Giants Community Fund is proud to offer a summer reading program for all Junior Giants players. There is also Health – Be A Healthy Junior Giant: Snack smart with healthy snacks, Exercise 30 minutes of physical activity a day, Enjoy a soda-free summer and Protect yourself by using

sunscreen. Then there is Violence Prevention – Where: I pledge to strike out bullying … Peace starts within you … “I will build peace on the field, at home, at school and in my community each day.” And, then, there’s the Junior Giants Willie Mac Award – This will go to one outstanding Junior Giants player and coach that represents their league, as chosen by their League Commissioner. The Junior Giants encompasses 87 leagues … 210 cities served … 21,558 Girls and Boys and 2,966 coaches. George Kontos GREGOR BLANCO “The Giants Community Fund is a public charity with a tie to the great game of baseball, a sport that convenes people of all ages and from all walks of life. The Giants are honored to have played an active role in the community by providing programs for youth since 1991. They work all year-round to ensure that underserved populations are reached with important initiatives in Education, Health, and Violence Prevention.” I cannot imagine what any of this would have looked like if the Giants were the Toronto Giants or the Tampa Bay Giants … and the San Francisco Giants a thing of the past and none of this - AT&T Park, two World Series Championships, the Giants Community Fund, Community Relations and Junior Giants programs, and the many millions of dollars each year to benefit community and youth programs, making a huge difference for our community day in and day out, all year long, every year - yes, none of this would exist for us today if not for “them” – this, our very special Team. These are angels and our Giants are indeed Giant … indeed Champions on and also most definitely every year off the field. Far beyond the box score, it’s another walk off winning home run and perfect game the Giants perform in the game of life and what they do for community. Thank you for all that you have done, are doing and will do. If not for them, it would be a completely different ballgame. There would be no game. Because of them, we are Champion. From the top on down, it is all by design, dedicated to making such a big difference. It really is an entire Team effort and a mutual love affair with the community … that is indeed very special.


don’t think people realize just how catastrophic that would have been, and the ramifications it would have meant, had the Giants been taken from us. What has come to fruition since: AT&T Park, a most beautiful new ballpark (arguably the best in all of baseball), sellout games, a revitalized SOMA and San Francisco, hundreds of millions of dollars that have gone to benefit local San Francisco and Bay Area community development, non-profits causes and two World Series Championships in three years (when not one in all the years prior since their arrival from New York in 1958); and the outstanding community programs that were born from this. All this from a vision and great fortitude. From the top on down, led by President and CEO Larry Baer, the current ownership group has instilled a culture, a tradition, a legacy, if you will, BRANDON BELT within the San Francisco Giants organization that is indeed rocksolid and part of their own DNA. They believed strongly in their vision, their dedication and their hard work to build AT&T Park. They also believed strongly in expressing the gratitude that the entire Giants organization feels for its community. They believe in their responsibility, to carry on the Giants legacy of giving back to the community and in turn the fans who support them. It is truly a love affair between the Giants and the community they serve – and it shows. It is so very evident. In my conversation with Staci, Shana and Sue, I was enjoying every word they had to say. It was all with such enthusiasm, heart and passion. They love so much what they are doing … and they have each been doing this now for many years. We read in the news all that’s wrong about sports … that’s why I am happy to share this with you, all the GOOD that these Giants do off the field, because we don’t hear this; no, not near enough as we should, if at all. The Giants take their off the field community programs very seriously. As much as they do well on the field, they do it off the field, as well. This is their arm where they can give back to community … and they do … and they have been doing, year in and year out, all these years, an extraordinary job. Indeed, the Giants Community Fund and its

Junior Giants Program won a national award called the Steve Patterson Award for Excellence in Sports Philanthropy …becoming the first Major League Baseball team to have ever won this coveted honor. And the great Giants announcers whose voices we have become so familiar with, and love listening to, are the voice of the Giants on the field, and also for the Giants organization and how it connects with the community off the field. You will hear how they often talk about the team’s community endeavors and the results will beautifully speak for themselves. The Giants sellout all their games … and beyond the three million guests each year who joyfully are coming to the Giants games, there are hundreds of millions more, together with them in spirit, listening on the radio

Lou Seal

and watching on TV. No question, the Giants and the large community have been and are really enjoying this mutual love affair … and are seeing great direct benefits, and results, as well. Are you possibly wondering what kind of participation there is by the Giants team, players, coaches and staff off the field? It is all voluntary and it is 100% - where the entire Giants organization, from the top on down - gladly participates. They make guest appearances, where they will visit and speak to schools, hospitals and non-profits. Indeed, they touch community always in a warm and sincere way. They, too, have and share this very special feeling between the team and community. In addition to the many local causes and nonprofit organizations they help support, they also have been and are involved in helping with great humanitarian causes, such as raising literacy …

and funds to help support the victims of, for example, Katrina, Sandy and the Philippines … and they were the first professional team to help raise funds and build awareness in their support of what has become an annual event: “Until There’s A Cure Day” in the fight against HIV and AIDS. Through its Junior Giants Program, the Community Fund allows more youth to play baseball where it wasn’t possible - building fields, and creating leagues – all free to participate. They find coaches and work closely with the Positive Coaching Alliance, as they help in providing excellent coaching and training. They produce a wonderful handbook each year that is so well thought out and prepared for the parents and their children to read together … and discuss important and meaningful topics like teamwork, character, good health, non-violence and bullying prevention (Strike Out Bullying). Positive role models do have an important place and do help make a big difference. Here, with the Junior Giants, 20,000 kids a year, more than 200,000 in the 20-plus years, have so benefitted. Does it make a difference? For these kids, it surely has and still does. Let’s for a moment talk Junior Giants. What’s it about? How about the 4 Bases of Character Development … 1st Base = Confidence, 2nd Base = Integrity, 3rd Base = Leadership, Home = Teamwork. You can’t score unless you touch All The Bases! “Entering its 21st season, Junior Giants is a free, non-competitive and co-ed baseball program. Over 20,000 youth across California, Nevada and Oregon participate in Junior Giants. Junior Giants offers equipment, uniforms, enrichment programs and coaches Training. Junior Giants wants to help you lead, succeed and have fun! Anyone can play!” Through this amazing handbook, in addition to Character Development, there is also Education – The Giants Community Fund is proud to offer a summer reading program for all Junior Giants players. There is also Health – Be A Healthy Junior Giant: Snack smart with healthy snacks, Exercise 30 minutes of physical activity a day, Enjoy a soda-free summer and Protect yourself by using

sunscreen. Then there is Violence Prevention – Where: I pledge to strike out bullying … Peace starts within you … “I will build peace on the field, at home, at school and in my community each day.” And, then, there’s the Junior Giants Willie Mac Award – This will go to one outstanding Junior Giants player and coach that represents their league, as chosen by their League Commissioner. The Junior Giants encompasses 87 leagues … 210 cities served … 21,558 Girls and Boys and 2,966 coaches. George Kontos GREGOR BLANCO “The Giants Community Fund is a public charity with a tie to the great game of baseball, a sport that convenes people of all ages and from all walks of life. The Giants are honored to have played an active role in the community by providing programs for youth since 1991. They work all year-round to ensure that underserved populations are reached with important initiatives in Education, Health, and Violence Prevention.” I cannot imagine what any of this would have looked like if the Giants were the Toronto Giants or the Tampa Bay Giants … and the San Francisco Giants a thing of the past and none of this - AT&T Park, two World Series Championships, the Giants Community Fund, Community Relations and Junior Giants programs, and the many millions of dollars each year to benefit community and youth programs, making a huge difference for our community day in and day out, all year long, every year - yes, none of this would exist for us today if not for “them” – this, our very special Team. These are angels and our Giants are indeed Giant … indeed Champions on and also most definitely every year off the field. Far beyond the box score, it’s another walk off winning home run and perfect game the Giants perform in the game of life and what they do for community. Thank you for all that you have done, are doing and will do. If not for them, it would be a completely different ballgame. There would be no game. Because of them, we are Champion. From the top on down, it is all by design, dedicated to making such a big difference. It really is an entire Team effort and a mutual love affair with the community … that is indeed very special.


we can see we can see the end of cancer thesee end of cancer we can from here. from he end of here. cancer

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T h e sepe o plearea ne w ge ne rat io n o fblo o d c anc e r pat ie nt s.T h e yliveno rmal live s,so me managing t h e irare c o ndit io n ge wit h o ut lo so o fpills o r t re at nt s s. wit h disc o uraging e f f e c t s, T h e sepe o ple a ne w ne rat io nt f blo o d c anc e r me pat ie nt T h e ylive no rmalside live s, so me t h ank s t ot disc ve rie s io f unde dh in T h eo L uk e mia &s L y mph o ma So c ie t y . Ande t h e se managing h e iro c o ndit n wit o utpart lo t s by o fpills re t re at me nt wit hdisc o uraging side f f e c t s, disc o ve rie s apply t o many dif f e re nt k inds o f c anc e r. Almo st h alf t h e ne w c anc e r t h e rapie s t h ank s rat t o disc o ve rie f unde inie part by T h eL e uk e mia & so L y mph o ma So c ie t y .And t h e se epe o plearea ne w ge ne io n o f blo o ds c anc e rdpat nt s.T h e y live no rmal live s, me appro ve d sby t h eF D A many be t we e nf 2 0 0 0k and 2 0 1 2 we re first appro ve dh f o r blo o dc c anc e pat ie nt s, disc o ve rie apply t o dif e re nt inds o f c anc e r. Almo st h alf e ne w anc e r rt h e rapie s ng t h e ir c o ndit io n wit h o ut lo t s o fpills o r t re at me nt s wit hdisc o uraging side e f f e c t s,t many wit h re se arc h suppo rt e d by L L S. F o rge t so me day . We ’ re mak ing c ure s h appe n t o day . Are appro d by t h e F D Ae be t we e n2 0 0 and 2 0 1 2So we re first appro ve df o r blo o dc anc e r pat ie nt s, t odisc o ve rie s f unde dve in part by T h L e uk e mia &0 L y mph o ma c ie t y .And t h e se y o u aware o f h o w c lo se we are t o many ne w lif e saving bre ak t h ro ugh s? O r h o w y o u c an h e lp? e rie s applyt omany dif f e re nt k inds o fc anc e r. st h alf t h e w c anc e r t h e rapie sing c many wit h re se arc h suppo rt e dAlmo byL L S. F o rge tne so me day . We ’ re mak ure sh appe nt o day .Are F i nd o ut at l l s .o rg/ gba o r c al l 4 0 8.4 9 0 .2 6 6 6 . e d byt h eF D A be t we e n 2 0 0 0 and 2 0 1 2 we re first appro ve d f o r blo o d c anc e r pat ie nt s, y o u awareo fh o wc lo sewearet omanyne w lif e saving bre ak t h ro ugh s? O rh o wy o uc an h e lp?

wit hre se arc hsuppo rt e do by L S. F o rge t so me .We ’ re mak ing6 c ure appe nt o day .Are F i nd utL at l l s .o rg/ gba o rday c al l4 0 8.4 9 0 .2 6 6 . sh Make a donation. Volunteer your time. Be an ambassador for LLS areo fh o wc lo sewearet omanyne w lif e saving bre ak t h ro ugh s? O rh o wy o uc an h e lp? within your community. Help us make someday today. o utatl l s .o rg/ gba o rc al l4 0 8.4 9 0 .2 6 6 6 . Greater Bay Area Chapter San Francisco Office 221 Main Street, Ste. 1650 San Francisco, CA 94105 Silicon Valley & Monterey Bay Office 675 N. First Street, Ste. 1100 San Jose, CA 95112


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Introducing East Bay Non-Profits!

n this day and age, many of us are looking for purpose and asking ourselves how we can help make a difference in our community and our world. If we were to ask ourselves, where would we be without our Non-Profits, that’s a good question - they do a lot! With them, it’s hard enough in our world. Without them, it would be unthinkable. Indeed, we have many Non-Profits doing great works and they are always looking for people, like you, who can and would like to help.

At the same time, there are many people, like you and me, who wonder what specifically more we can do with our money or, especially, just by volunteering – indeed, what a difference that does and will make. The greatest gift of all is in the giving and what a big positive difference it makes in the lives of others. In East Bay Non-Profits, learn about various great people and great organizations doing great things. May it become a growing Resource for you and many others, there’s nothing like teamwork, that can help us all in making a big positive difference for a better community here at Home.


Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area Empower - Inspire - Support EMPOWER - INSPIRE - SUPPORT

Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area Empower - Inspire - Support

Nancy LaBelle, Executive Director BANP: What is the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area about and what do you all do? NL: The Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area has proudly served Bay Area communities since 1998. Our mission is to empower, inspire and support people with Down syndrome, their families and the community, while fostering awareness and acceptance in all areas of life. We pride ourselves on developing programs focused on independence, development and friendship that meet the individual needs of our members. We are dedicated to educating parents, teachers, and medical professionals so that people of all ages with Down syndrome can live their best quality of life while being supported by a strong community. We are diligent about breaking down barriers to inclusion and work hard to make sure those we serve with Down syndrome have access to opportunities afforded to everyone. BANP: What do you love most about the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area and the work you all do? NL: I love that we serve individuals with Down syndrome and all members of their family. We know grandparents, siblings and parents need support in different ways. We set-up children with Down syndrome for educational success by providing school readiness and communication skills; we support school teams by offering mentoring, materials, tools and training. Connecting with new families early on at the DSCBA is a lifeline as we offer hope and a very important sense of community. It is through facilitating personal relationships and real interactions that we gain a deep understanding of our members’ needs. We excitedly share best practices with educators, therapists, doctors and other professionals working with individuals with Down syndrome. The results of this collaboration are often life changing.

BANP: How has the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area make? NL: We are creating opportunities, opening doors, breaking down barriers, offering employment, providing training, innovating programs, and giving opportunities to the greater community to get involved and create meaningful relationships. We provide access to technology, develop resources, offer compassion, provide a voice to those that cannot speak and give hope to many Bay Area families. Our staff, consultants and volunteers are made-up of not only experts in their fields, but many who are parents of a child or adult with Down syndrome. We connect families to others in similar situations through our support groups, peer-topeer mentoring program, educational and social events. Our hope for the future is to continue expanding geographically and offering direct services throughout the Bay Area where we are very much needed. BANP: What is so special about the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area and how can people make a difference? NL: Everyday we touch the lives of individuals with Down syndrome and their families. New parents come to us with fear and uncertainty; we provide support, education and hope. The DSCBA is the only center in Northern California dedicated to serving individuals with Down syndrome. As we expand our support, programs and direct services in communities throughout the Bay Area, everyone can make a difference through direct financial donations. We rely on the community to keep our doors open as we are not government funded. We also have volunteer opportunities and Board Member positions available to those that have a passion for our mission and who want to be part of our continued success. Visit www.dsconnection.org to learn more and to make a donation.

The Down Syndrome Connection is passionate and dedicated to encouraging the unlimited potential in

children and adults with Down syndrome throughout the San Francisco Bay Area since 1998. Our mission is to empower, inspire and support people with Down syndrome, their families and the community that serves them, while fostering awareness and acceptance in all areas of life. We pride ourselves on developing services that are in line with our members’ needs and continuously break down barriers to success by providing resources, technology and education through our direct services. Our Down Syndrome Educational Alliance, Expression Connection and Communication Readiness Programs, as well as Step classes, Medical Outreach Alliance, public policy outreach, education advocacy, new parent outreach, support groups and more reflect the diverse needs of our members.

Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area 101-J Town and Country Drive | Danville, CA 94526 925-362-8660 | www.dsconnection.org


Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area Empower - Inspire - Support EMPOWER - INSPIRE - SUPPORT

Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area Empower - Inspire - Support

Nancy LaBelle, Executive Director BANP: What is the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area about and what do you all do? NL: The Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area has proudly served Bay Area communities since 1998. Our mission is to empower, inspire and support people with Down syndrome, their families and the community, while fostering awareness and acceptance in all areas of life. We pride ourselves on developing programs focused on independence, development and friendship that meet the individual needs of our members. We are dedicated to educating parents, teachers, and medical professionals so that people of all ages with Down syndrome can live their best quality of life while being supported by a strong community. We are diligent about breaking down barriers to inclusion and work hard to make sure those we serve with Down syndrome have access to opportunities afforded to everyone. BANP: What do you love most about the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area and the work you all do? NL: I love that we serve individuals with Down syndrome and all members of their family. We know grandparents, siblings and parents need support in different ways. We set-up children with Down syndrome for educational success by providing school readiness and communication skills; we support school teams by offering mentoring, materials, tools and training. Connecting with new families early on at the DSCBA is a lifeline as we offer hope and a very important sense of community. It is through facilitating personal relationships and real interactions that we gain a deep understanding of our members’ needs. We excitedly share best practices with educators, therapists, doctors and other professionals working with individuals with Down syndrome. The results of this collaboration are often life changing.

BANP: How has the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area make? NL: We are creating opportunities, opening doors, breaking down barriers, offering employment, providing training, innovating programs, and giving opportunities to the greater community to get involved and create meaningful relationships. We provide access to technology, develop resources, offer compassion, provide a voice to those that cannot speak and give hope to many Bay Area families. Our staff, consultants and volunteers are made-up of not only experts in their fields, but many who are parents of a child or adult with Down syndrome. We connect families to others in similar situations through our support groups, peer-topeer mentoring program, educational and social events. Our hope for the future is to continue expanding geographically and offering direct services throughout the Bay Area where we are very much needed. BANP: What is so special about the Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area and how can people make a difference? NL: Everyday we touch the lives of individuals with Down syndrome and their families. New parents come to us with fear and uncertainty; we provide support, education and hope. The DSCBA is the only center in Northern California dedicated to serving individuals with Down syndrome. As we expand our support, programs and direct services in communities throughout the Bay Area, everyone can make a difference through direct financial donations. We rely on the community to keep our doors open as we are not government funded. We also have volunteer opportunities and Board Member positions available to those that have a passion for our mission and who want to be part of our continued success. Visit www.dsconnection.org to learn more and to make a donation.

The Down Syndrome Connection is passionate and dedicated to encouraging the unlimited potential in

children and adults with Down syndrome throughout the San Francisco Bay Area since 1998. Our mission is to empower, inspire and support people with Down syndrome, their families and the community that serves them, while fostering awareness and acceptance in all areas of life. We pride ourselves on developing services that are in line with our members’ needs and continuously break down barriers to success by providing resources, technology and education through our direct services. Our Down Syndrome Educational Alliance, Expression Connection and Communication Readiness Programs, as well as Step classes, Medical Outreach Alliance, public policy outreach, education advocacy, new parent outreach, support groups and more reflect the diverse needs of our members.

Down Syndrome Connection of the Bay Area 101-J Town and Country Drive | Danville, CA 94526 925-362-8660 | www.dsconnection.org


Drivers for Survivors Paul Andrus (Financial Advisor, New York Life)

BANP: What is it about Drivers for Survivors that helped you

bumping his head. The amount of love and care she showed

in choosing to become a volunteer?

for him will always stick in my mind. What a lucky guy! The

PA: In life, we all go through hard times at some point. My

client and I would often talk about economics, biographies,

son, Tio Andrus, has Special Needs and needs back surgery on

technology and his grandchildren’s sport activities on our 25

a regular basis. Shriner’s has been a big support in our lives.

minute drive from Fremont to Santa Clara. The last day of his

I’ve found that I can give back in ways that fit into my life,

treatment, his dear wife teared up when I dropped them to

work and children’s lives. Through Rotary, I became aware of

their home. I was shocked to see this big, burly guy tear up as

Sherry’s organization and have enjoyed

well. I couldn’t help it and got teary my-

being a volunteer for four years now.

self. It makes me feel the same way just writing this now. They are amazing peo-

BANP: What do you do when you volun-

ple and I was lucky to have been driving

teer?

them to their treatments. It was a bless-

PA: I will reach out to the volunteer co-

ing in my life to see that kind of caring

ordinator at Drivers for Survivors and

and love between this couple... honestly

find a patient that I can drive on a reg-

– I was the lucky one to drive them.

ular basis. I can usually handle between one and two drives per week. This way,

BANP: Why would you recommend

it offers some continuity and relation-

Drivers for Survivors to someone who is

ship building time between the driver,

looking to be a volunteer?

myself, and the patient, Drivers for Survi-

PA: Many of us in life find our ‘passions’

vors Client. I frequently drive patients to

and pursue them. Some of us get lost in

their cancer treatments – many of which

the day to day routine of making a dol-

must find rides every day of the week

lar, rushing through traffic to get home

for a 3 – 5 week period of time. This can

and handle the business of our daily

be very difficult on the patient and their

lives. Too many of us don’t realize that

family without the support of organiza-

in one short moment, it all can change.

tions such as Drivers for Survivors.

One moment changes our lives forever as we know it. Because I’ve experienced this, I woke up and realized that what

BANP: Is there a special experience you would like to share?

brings value to my life is not making money. It is sharing and

PA: That’s a hilarious question. I’m not kidding when I say ev-

creating experiences for myself, my family and those I can

ery patient I drive has an amazing and interesting story. But,

care about by doing charitable works like this. The emotional

that said, there is one elderly Filipino couple I was driving last

paycheck is substantial and fills any void – I mean any void.

November/December of 2015. The wife was so incredibly

If you are looking for something to bring you meaning in life

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– here is a choice for you. Make time for what matters in life

open the car door and help the client get seated and get their

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be shocked what you get out of it.

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KAVERI  RANGARAJ

RETIRED REGISTERED NURSE, LIFE ELDERCARE VOLUNTEER AND FUNDRAISER BANP: What is it about LIFE ElderCare that helped you in

BANP: Why would you recommend LIFE ElderCare to some-

choosing to become a volunteer?

one who is looking to be a volunteer?

KR: When I retired, I knew I wasn’t done using my knowl-

KR: Volunteering gives you a chance to get out of the ‘me’

edge and skills. I offered to help out at my former employer,

mindset. We take so many things for granted. I am doing

but then I saw LIFE ElderCare’s ad for volunteers and it just

this out of my belief in service to others and compassion. I

clicked with me! LIFE ElderCare does great work and they’ve

think about how helpful it is from the client’s point of view.

been doing it for a long time so

If you have the privilege to drive

they’ve made a big difference in

now, what have you got to lose? It

our town. I wanted to make a dif-

is so gratifying to see how you can

ference with the elderly, too, and

make a little difference in their life.

I understand the issues they face.

It gives a good perspective and

I really like how LIFE ElderCare is

makes me happy. We are all here

so efficient, and so personally car-

on earth to help each other and

ing at the same time, with me and

you will see what a positive differ-

with the clients. Meals on Wheels

ence it makes in your life!

and volunteer transportation (VIP Rides) and their other programs

BANP: What do you wish other

are just what a lot of people need

people knew about LIFE ElderCare?

right now. I’m really glad to be part

KR: I really look forward to going.

of it. 

It’s very gratifying on both sides. These are people whose minds are

BANP: What do you do when you volunteer?

working well, but their body is not. VIP Rides, and all of LIFE

KR: I am a volunteer with the VIP Rides program so I give

ElderCare’s programs (Meals on Wheels, Friendly Visitors,

rides to elders who have no one else to help them and take

Fall prevention) help with the dignity of living, of staying in

them where they need to go. But I don’t just give a ride to

their own home, and keeping their independence. They ar-

a medical appointment or to the store; I help them shop,

en’t independent in the lonely sense of the word- they can

provide support during a doctor’s visit, make sure they are

keep their own place to live and the lives they are used to,

settled in at home safely, and always also simply lend an ear.

but also can be connected to other people and not be lone-

I think the seniors like to talk to me, as I’m non-judgmental.

ly. It keeps their sanity, also. Many people who move into

They can express their feelings, vent, and have social inter-

assisted living are frustrated that they can’t keep living at

action while they get their important errands done.

home. My experience has been very good with LIFE Eldercare. I love it a lot.


MEALS ON WHEELS, RIDES, COMPANIONSHIP, FALL PREVENTION

PROVIDING FREE, SIMPLE, AND IMPORTANT SERVICES FOR SENIORS WHO PREFER TO REMAIN LIVING AT HOME.

510-574-2090 • www.LifeElderCare.org


PATRICIA OSAGE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LIFE ELDERCARE BANP: What is LIFE ElderCare about and what do you all do? PO: In a nutshell, we serve frail elders – and some disabled non-seniors - who live alone or simply don’t have the help they need to thrive at home. Meals on Wheels is our most well-known service but we also have a nationally award winning volunteer transportation program and we do evidence based, in-home fall prevention work. A recent AARP study showed most people want to age at home where they feel most comfortable. There’s nothing inherently wrong with a skilled nursing facility, but you usually can’t bring your cat or your favorite couch and you definitely can’t bring the wonderful sense of familiarity that comes with years of waking up in your own space. The common phrase is “aging in place”. LIFE ElderCare makes sure they flourish in place, too. BANP: What do you love most about LIFE ElderCare (LIFE) and the work you all do? PO: Free and accessible elder care is part of a strong social justice system. Most of the folks we serve worked hard their whole lives. They shouldn’t have to scrimp on medicine now in order to pay their rent. They shouldn’t have to eat dry cereal because their arthritic hands are too crippled to cook, or skip doctor visits because they have no family left to help them. I feel so honored to be part of a movement that does something about this in such a concrete way. And I love that LIFE ElderCare does it with the power of hundreds of community volunteers. In a way, the volunteer aspect is like another LIFE ElderCare program; they seem to get as many health benefits as the clients by doing this work.

BANP: How has LIFE made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see LIFE ElderCare make? PO: We deliver 105,000 meals a year and give thousands of doctor trips. South and Central Alameda County would be a far less healthy and lonelier place to grow old without LIFE ElderCare. It’s not uncommon for us to hear that a senior had been getting used to “being a little hungry” or hadn’t seen their dentist in years because they were “scared of getting lost” before finding out about LIFE. Science shows lack of social contact leads to early death so even just the frequent human connection that comes by default with our services is saving lives. We also see elders who’d fallen multiple times regain strength and balance from our evidence-based fall prevention program that trains local nursing students to go into the homes, teach exercises and help elders make their homes safer. BANP: What is so special about LIFE and how can people make a difference? PO: LIFE connects people with each other and with basic services that solve complex, expensive problems. And by doing so, prevents enormous numbers of ER and hospital visits and too-early institutionalizations. As the Bay Area ages, the need is growing and our goal is to meet that need fully. By 2030, one in five of us will be age 65+ so we and our sister eldercare nonprofits need all hands on deck. Call your local Meals on Wheels and offer to deliver a couple of times a month. Or volunteer some other way; it makes such a positive difference to your community… and it keeps you young! Write to info@LifeEldercare.org


MEALS ON WHEELS, RIDES, COMPANIONSHIP, FALL PREVENTION

PROVIDING FREE, SIMPLE, AND IMPORTANT SERVICES FOR SENIORS WHO PREFER TO REMAIN LIVING AT HOME.

510-574-2090 • www.LifeElderCare.org


Patricia Gangwer, Volunteer

BANP: What is it about the Read-Aloud Volun- BANP: Is there a special experience you would teer Program that helped you in choosing to be- like to share? come a volunteer? PG: The mother of one of my former reading PG: Reading aloud to a child is one of the most buddies told me that her son George is now rewarding things one can

reading his Read-Aloud

do. Research has shown

program books to his baby

that there is a powerful and

sister and she loves it! I told

lasting impact when a child

the mother how happy that

is read to on a regular basis.

made me feel, to know that

Comprehension,

vocabu-

the joy of reading is being

lary and language skills all

passed on in the family –

increase for the participat-

what a perfect outcome of

ing student, which is won-

the program!

derfully positive, but the

BANP: Why would you rec-

bond of caring and trust

ommend the Read-Aloud

that is established is price-

Volunteer

Program

to

less.

someone who is looking to be a volunteer?

BANP: What do you do when you volunteer?

PG: Reading aloud to someone is such a gift,

PG: I read books to 2 students for 30 minutes and very gratifying. I love children’s literature, so each, once a week. I keep a log of all books read, the pleasure of reading it aloud is as much mine and every other week, each child is given a book as the student’s. For just one hour a day, once of their choice, to keep at home and build a a week, you can truly make a difference in the home library.

lives of children.


THE READ-ALOUD VOLUNTEER PROGRAM is a non-profit organization that recruits and places adult volunteers to read one-on-one with children in Richmond and San Pablo Elementary schools. READ-ALOUD houses a core collection of books at each school and provides a home-library of books for each of the children. Volunteers receive training and an overview of the program. We are funded through donations from individuals, foundations, community service groups, corporate grants and contracts.

GOALS OF THE PROGRAM: • Provide one-on-one reading aloud experiences for children • Improve the child’s reading and comprehension • Build a personal library of quality books for each child to enjoy • Instill the joy of reading and love of books in the children • Encourages children to see themselves as readers and not just reading books • Children know that their ideas and interests are supported by caring adults • Children see themselves as competent and capable, and full of wonderful ideas • Meaningful relationships are at the heart of learning!

READ-ALOUD VOLUNTEER PROGRAM 13831 San Pablo Ave., Building #5 San Pablo, CA 94806 info@read-aloud.org • 510-237-0735

READ-ALOUD.ORG


Executive Director

Ruth Major

BANP: What is Read-Aloud Volunteer Program about and what do you all do? RM: Read-Aloud is a relationship-based volunteer program that places adults into Title 1, Elementary schools, K-2, in Richmond and San Pablo. Adults work with the same child for 24 weeks of the year, reading-aloud to them for 30 minutes each week. Every other week the child choses a new book to take home to build a personal library. The teachers select the children who will participate in the program for multiple reasons. We serve around 300 children each year, depending on the number of readers and the hours they volunteer each week. We have 5 coordinators assisting the volunteers and working with teachers and children at the schools. There is also office support. BANP: What do you love most about Read-Aloud and the work you all do? RM: Read-Aloud is about social justice and equity for children and families. Giving children the opportunity to have their own books, one-on-one adult and child time, space for children to develop at their own pace and the pure joy of reading are what makes the program alive. Children go from beginning readers to seeing themselves as learning to read with books of their own. The friendships the children make with their readers support their growing sense of self. They literally blossom. We don’t test or stress. This is about special time and love of books and storytelling. It is about becoming life-long learners. I love to see the relationships building between the reader and child over the program year. Learning happens in the context of relationships. BANP: How has Read-Aloud made a difference and what

impact do you still wish to see Read-Aloud make? RM: Read-Aloud isn’t about teaching children to read, but sharing the joy of reading and supporting children’s interests. Through modeling, readers help children build literacy skills and confidence. They are capable and competent and our readers have the time to be active listeners and supporters of the students. Children are hearing rich, contextual language and sharing stories with their readers. This makes a huge difference to how they feel about themselves and their capabilities. Many of our young children are dealing with multiple stressors and their reading sessions are special times away from them. I would like to see Read-Aloud expanded and businesses be more involved in volunteering and financially supporting this program in the schools, particularly in West Contra Costa County. There is a great need and it works! BANP: What is so special about Read-Aloud and how can people make a difference? RM: The founder of the program said: “This program is elegantly simple but a potent tool for literacy.” Our volunteers are at the heart of the program and they are committed to the children and schools. Many have been with Read-Aloud for over 15 years. I find this remarkable. I think of many of the qualities the children gain from the program as invisible skills. How do you measure happiness and joy on an evaluation form? Teacher feedback is generally similar: the child who participated is socially and emotionally more grounded, has more focus, enjoys reading and coming to school. Read-Aloud is also about engaging the community to be supporters of families and their schools. It really is a special program.


THE READ-ALOUD VOLUNTEER PROGRAM is a non-profit organization that recruits and places adult volunteers to read one-on-one with children in Richmond and San Pablo Elementary schools. READ-ALOUD houses a core collection of books at each school and provides a home-library of books for each of the children. Volunteers receive training and an overview of the program. We are funded through donations from individuals, foundations, community service groups, corporate grants and contracts.

GOALS OF THE PROGRAM: • Provide one-on-one reading aloud experiences for children • Improve the child’s reading and comprehension • Build a personal library of quality books for each child to enjoy • Instill the joy of reading and love of books in the children • Encourages children to see themselves as readers and not just reading books • Children know that their ideas and interests are supported by caring adults • Children see themselves as competent and capable, and full of wonderful ideas • Meaningful relationships are at the heart of learning!

READ-ALOUD VOLUNTEER PROGRAM 13831 San Pablo Ave., Building #5 San Pablo, CA 94806 info@read-aloud.org • 510-237-0735

READ-ALOUD.ORG


D

O

N

O

R

Kristie Roeth L

a f a y e t

t e ,

C A

BANP: What is it about Agape Villages that helped you in

KR: There are many foster agencies in the Bay Area and

choosing to become a supporter?

I would just like people to know that Agape Village is a very competent and personable foster agency that is ded-

KR: I became a donor to Agape Village because I am im-

icated to the well-being of their clients. They are available

pressed with their personal and supportive care of their cli-

24/7 for their families and children, and their diligence and

ents. They are dedicated to these children and care about

dedication to their families is indicated by their remark-

their futures and how they are being cared for in the pres-

able programs that they offer, such as: a Girls’ Group which

ent. They are on call at all

is a forum for foster girls

times and it brings me joy

that allows them to make

to hear how they are there

friends and share their com-

when needed, to rescue

mon experiences with one

children that are in a crisis

another. There is also an

situation. They develop re-

Enrichment Program that

lationships with these chil-

Apage offers which allows

dren and the foster families

the children to participate

and make sure they are do-

in extracurricular activities

ing well.

that helps to introduce new skills, hobbies and adven-

BANP: What brings you the

tures.

greatest joy? BANP: Why would you KR: I have been a registered

recommend

nurse working in a high

lages to someone who is

risk labor and delivery unit for 30 years and have taken care

Agape

Vil-

looking to be a donor?

of many mothers that are not able to care for their babies. Whether it be drugs, a mental condition or something else,

KR: I would recommend someone to become a donor be-

these mothers do not go home with their babies, for the

cause of the dedication of this agency and the personal one

babies’ safety. What brings me the greatest joy is that many

on one relationships they develop with their clients. Their

of these children are placed in Agape Villages foster family

caring comes from the heart and the employees are very

Agency, and I am so thankful that they are receiving the love,

happy doing what they are doing: saving children from at

comfort and care that they deserve.   My job has made me

risk living situations. Agape Villages provides support and

see the importance of foster care. It is vital for these children

services for their foster parents as well as the children that

that are removed from their own parents, because of abuse

they serve. Their foster parent support meetings are con-

and neglect, are provided with a second chance in life.  And

ducted once a month, which provide, information, resourc-

have the opportunity to be apart of a loving, nurturing family

es, support and a safe place for foster parents to not only

that will be there support system for a lifetime.  

exchange common concerns, and issues, but to share their success stories as well.    

BANP: What do you wish other people knew about Agape Villages?


Shaping Lives for a Lifetime Providing care for children and families for over 40 years.

Agape relies on support from the community - find out about Agape!

Healing Hearts & Building Families 3160 Crow Canyon Place, Suite. 120 •San Ramon • 925.866.3020

www.agapevillages.org


Cheryl Youngblood PROGRAM DIRECTOR

BANP: What is Agape Villages Foster Family Agency about and what do you all do? CY: Agape Villages Foster Family Agency is a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to providing loving homes, resources and emotional support for children 0-21 who have been placed in the foster care system, due to abuse and neglect from their biological loved ones and families. Having been in the field of helping abused children in the Bay Area for over 60 years as Sierra Children’s Home, and believing that children and youth were entitled to a more family life setting, in 1995, Sierra Children’s Home became Agape Villages Foster Family Agency. Agape, meaning unconditional love in Greek may be a fairly small agency in comparison to many other foster family agencies; however, because we’re a smaller outfit, it allows us to make a larger impact on the youth that we serve. Providing one-on-one care to our families and children 24 hours a day, is just one of the several components that we offer that makes Agape a unique program. Throughout the years we have focused on establishing innovative programs that will enhance our children’s and families lives.

children, and watching them cultivate into, resilient, successful, enthusiastic adults, gives meaning to my life’s work, and is by far, the most favorable aspect of my career. BANP: How has Agape Villages made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see Agape make? CY: We have worked diligently to provide stability and improve the lives of our youth, and because of AB12, foster children now have the option to stay in foster care and receive further resources and support until the age of 21. As one of the first agencies to, implement the program and receive the license to house young adults, we feel very fortunate to not only be a part of extended transitional housing, but to be one of the first foster family agencies to pioneer it as well. Our vision is to expand our care for non-minor dependents to transitional settings, while continuing to provide foster homes for young adults. Non minor dependents that qualify could share living responsibilities, with the opportunity to gain more independence while still having the safety net of a foster family agency. BANP: What is so special about Agape Villages and how can people make a difference?

BANP: What do you love most about Agape Villages and the work you all do? CY: As the Director of Agape, I am responsible for implementing progressive programs that will support and shape the lives of children in our care. Even though this is a colossal responsibility, I feel fortunate to have the opportunity to be involved in the process of facilitating resources that will aid in educating, building self-esteem, and providing hope, to at risk youth. Offering our Intensive Treatment Foster Care (ITFC) services, to children with emotional and behavioral challenges is just one of the many, exceptional facets that Agape has to offer. Having the privilege of working with

CY: Agape begins with recruiting stable, nurturing resource parents, as well as continuously striving to implement superlative programs, trainings, and provide the tools to better support our children and families. Additionally, Agape takes pride in employing the best possible staff. We work collaboratively as a team, in order to ensure that our families and children receive optimal care, and attention. Approaching our work with excellence and professionalism helps us to assist disadvantaged youth through these ever changing times. C.A.R.E.S. encompasses the true meaning of what Agape stands for, compassion, amiable, resourceful, empathy and sincere.


Shaping Lives for a Lifetime Providing care for children and families for over 40 years.

Agape relies on support from the community - find out about Agape!

Healing Hearts & Building Families 3160 Crow Canyon Place, Suite. 120 •San Ramon • 925.866.3020

www.agapevillages.org


HERS Breast Cancer Foundation There Just Isn’t Another Place Like It

Nancy Little, Volunteer and Donor BANP: What is it about the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation

cheon. As a breast cancer survivor I sat at a table full of the

that helped you in choosing to become a volunteer?

most amazing people that support this organization. One group makes breast prosthesis and is so passionate to help

Nancy Little: I currently have breast cancer and was look-

women regain their sense of self. The other group at my ta-

ing to find some way to help an organization that deals with

ble was a high tech marketing group that usually engages in

breast cancer patients. Upon first meeting Dr. Vera Packard,

high tech promotion, but has added the HERS Breast Cancer

their director, I could just feel her passion

Foundation to their list of clients because

for helping these patients. I also then be-

they see how wonderful the work they do

came a client and experienced their caring

is as well. There were people who support

way of serving patients first-hand as well.

this local SF Bay Area organization from

There just isn’t another place like it.

Alaska, Georgia and New York to name just a few. Just listening to their enthusiasm I

BANP: What do you do when you volun-

came away feeling like I had just partici-

teer?

pated in something big and really had to become a donor as well.

Nancy Little: I am a former accountant and they were looking for someone to help out

BANP: What do you wish other people knew

with their database at the time, so that put

about the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation?

my skills to work in addition to helping a wonderful organization that serves breast

Nancy Little: I would like more breast can-

cancer patients in a very caring manner. Kind of the perfect

cer patients to know they exist! I was first diagnosed with

match for me! They are very good at matching the skills the

breast cancer in 2001, then was diagnosed with metastasis

volunteers have and what they need help with. They are the

in 2010, and it took me looking for a place to volunteer in

most caring group of people I have ever worked with in all my

2013 for me to even find out about this wonderful organiza-

experiences. They appreciate their volunteers and you feel

tion that serves breast cancer patients! Oncologists, chemo

like you are helping them to help others. I have also helped

infusion rooms, nurse navigators at hospitals, etc. should all

out with other fundraising events and worked with their high

know about them and pass the word. Wigs, Lymphedema

school student volunteers.

garments, bras & breast prosthesis are things that are needed while the patient undergoes treatment as well as long term

BANP: What is it about the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation

follow up care afterwards. It’s tough to go out and research

that helped you in choosing to become a supporter?

where to go during that time. The services provided by the HERS Breast Cancer Foundation just aren’t found all in one

Nancy Little: After I became a volunteer and also a client, I

place anywhere else. This organization has to keep going! I

was invited to their “People With Purpose” fundraising lun-

know they appreciate every dollar.


As a non-profit organization, HERS Breast Cancer Foundation serves all women healing from breast cancer regardless of their financial status. We provide post-operative camisoles, breast forms for partial and full mastectomies, bras designed to support breast forms, compression garments, and wigs.

HERS stands for Hope, Empowerment, Renewal and Support. We are here to provide HOPE to all breast cancer survivors so that they never have to feel embarrassed of their body. We EMPOWER survivors so they feel proud of their “new normal” after the devastating diagnosis of breast cancer. We help in the RENEWAL of their self-image, and SUPPORT them so they can have confidence and thrive.

W E

H A V E

3

P R O G R A M

S T O R E S

L O C A T E D

A T :

FREMONT: Washington Hospital – 2500 Mowry Save, Suite 130 • 510-790-1911 STANFORD – Stanford Cancer Center – 875 Blake Wilbur Dr. Suite CC2102 • 650-497-6046 PLEASANTON – Stanford Health Care Valley Care – 5725 W. Las Positas Blvd. Suite 270 • 925-734-3315


HERS Breast Cancer Foundation

HERS Stands For Hope, Empowerment, Renewal and Support

Dr. Vera Packard, CEO

BANP: What is HERS Breast Cancer Foundation about and

Cancer Foundation make?

what do you all do?

Dr. Packard: Our organization has been in existence since 1998.

Dr. Packard: HERS Breast Cancer Foundation supports all women

Until 2014 we served clients at our Program Store in Fremont lo-

healing from breast cancer by providing post-surgical products

cated at Washington Hospital. Since I joined the organization in

and services, regardless of financial status. We provide appropri-

September of 2008, we have worked on our dream to be in other

ate products (bras, prosthesis, lymphedema

medical facilities so we can help more breast

garments, and wigs) in a safe, comfortable,

cancer survivors. In 2011 the board created

and understanding environment. As one of

a Strategic Plan with the goal of being in 2

our clients said: “The doctors saved my life,

other medical facilities by 2016. In February

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation allowed me

of 2014 we were very happy to open the

to live my life feeling good about myself.”We

doors of our program store at the Stanford

are a Durable Medical Equipment (DME) fa-

Cancer Center and in April of 2015 we ex-

cility accredited by the American Board for

panded our services to Stanford Health Care

Certification in Orthotics, Prosthetics & Pe-

– ValleyCare. We have over 1,700 client visits

dorthics, Inc. Our Breast Care Specialists go

a year, and being in these Stanford facilities

through extensive training of a total of 500

will allow us to reach more clients with our

hours before achieving their credential.

products and services.

BANP: What do you love most about

BANP: What is so special about HERS

HERS Breast Cancer Foundation and the

Breast Cancer Foundation and how can

work you all do?

people make a difference?

Dr. Packard: I love that we are here for a survivor in the begin-

Dr. Packard: We are the only non-profit organization in the San

ning of her journey and continue to support her every year even

Francisco Bay Area to provide these garments and services to ALL

after the treatments are done and gone. The bras, prosthesis,

women, regardless of their ability to pay. There are retail facilities

lymphedema garments, and wigs are just small tools that allow

in the area, but they only assist the insured population. WE ARE

us do what we do best, which is to be good listeners and provide

ONE OF A KIND. Our experience with more than 8,000 clients over

support to every client that walks in our program stores. This is

18 years and the background of the staff has allowed us to have a

why we like to call our program stores “a soft place to fall”. We help

complete understanding of the breast cancer issues. HERS stands

anyone. If they have insurance coverage for the products we will

for Hope, Empowerment, Renewal, and Support. We are here

take care of all the billing process for them, and if they don’t have

to provide HOPE to all breast cancer survivors so that they never

insurance they can receive the same products at NO COST.

have to feel embarrassed of their body. We EMPOWER survivors so they feel proud of their “new normal” after the devastating di-

BANP: How has HERS Breast Cancer Foundation made a dif-

agnosis of breast cancer. We help in the RENEWAL of their self-im-

ference and what impact do you still wish to see HERS Breast

age, and SUPPORT them so they can have confidence and thrive.


As a non-profit organization, HERS Breast Cancer Foundation serves all women healing from breast cancer regardless of their financial status. We provide post-operative camisoles, breast forms for partial and full mastectomies, bras designed to support breast forms, compression garments, and wigs.

HERS stands for Hope, Empowerment, Renewal and Support. We are here to provide HOPE to all breast cancer survivors so that they never have to feel embarrassed of their body. We EMPOWER survivors so they feel proud of their “new normal” after the devastating diagnosis of breast cancer. We help in the RENEWAL of their self-image, and SUPPORT them so they can have confidence and thrive.

W E

H A V E

3

P R O G R A M

S T O R E S

L O C A T E D

A T :

FREMONT: Washington Hospital – 2500 Mowry Save, Suite 130 • 510-790-1911 STANFORD – Stanford Cancer Center – 875 Blake Wilbur Dr. Suite CC2102 • 650-497-6046 PLEASANTON – Stanford Health Care Valley Care – 5725 W. Las Positas Blvd. Suite 270 • 925-734-3315


KRISTIN GOLDTHORPE,

BOLDLY ME DONOR & VOLUNTEER 

Chair of Partnerships at Boldly Me

Program Manager at Stanford University Distinguished Careers Institute BANP: What is it about Boldly Me that helped you in choos-

kids on the right path early in their lives, it will make a big

ing to become a supporter?

difference for them individually later in life, as well as for the

KG: There are many worthwhile organizations in the Bay

community at large. This is a very worthwhile investment.

Area. Deciding which one(s) to invest your time and mon-

I would also like to point out that Boldly Me is a very well

ey can be overwhelming. Having

managed

organization.

Alanna

been born and living with a visible

Powell brings incredible manage-

difference all my life, I immediately

ment skills from her experience in

connected with Boldly Me’s mis-

high tech. She has recruited top-

sion and vision to build self esteem

notch volunteers who enthusiasti-

and public awareness for those

cally donate their expertise. Boldly

who feel different. I love that Bold-

Me has low overhead and keeps

ly Me is an inclusive organization

careful watch on expenses.

- anyone can participate at many BANP: Is there a special experi-

different levels.

ence you would like to share? (or) BANP: What do you wish other

Why would you recommend Boldly

people knew about Boldly Me?

Me  to someone who is looking to

KG: The Boldly Me program has

be a volunteer?

a direct effect on young lives -

KG: When I transitioned from donor

changing their perspectives and

to volunteer, I told Alanna I was in-

attitudes. They learn that they are

terested in doing art with the kids.

not alone, that “everyone struggles,” and most importantly

Immediately she asked me to create a story/activity book to

they learn coping skills. The results are remarkable - sus-

explain the concepts of the “love cup” and “love languages”

pension rates have dropped significantly and youths have

at the first grade level. This assignment came with two art-

abandoned suicide plans after being exposed to the Boldly

ists - recent high school graduates who had been through

Me program.

the Boldly Me program. It has been so much fun collaborating with these young ladies. We even incorporated our last

BANP: Why would you recommend Boldly Me to someone

meeting with a trip to the Cantor art museum to enjoy our

who is looking to be a donor?

mutual love of art.

KG: I highly recommend others to support Boldly Me be-

Working with the Boldly Me community, especially the

cause it a “grass roots” organization making a significant

youth, will make you feel like a kid again.

difference at a critical point in children’s lives. If we can get


Leadership Development • Classes in Self Esteem & Communication Physical Well Being and Financial Stability • Fun Physical Activities Personal, Transitional Consultations • Recreational Events • Retreats Mentorship • Award-winning Service Satisfaction Guarantee

39120 ARGONAUT WAY #545 FREMONT, CA 94538

WWW.BOLDLYME.ORG

Alanna Powell

Executive Director and Founder of Boldly Me


Boldly Me Executive Director

Alanna Powell Executive Director and Founder of Boldly Me BANP: What is Boldly Me about and what do you all do?  and what impact do you still wish to see  Boldly Me Alanna: Boldly Me helps people who struggle with feel- make? ing different by teaching them self compassion, physi- Alanna: Boldly Me has made a difference in comcal wellness, and financial stability. I struggled with Al- munities by unveiling people’s vulnerabilities so that opecia Universalis (total baldness) since I was two years they seek the help they need and learn effective tools to old. I had difficulties of loving and accepting myself as a keep them healthy physically, intellectually, emotionally, bald person for most of my life. My dream was to teach and spiritually. We have made differences in thousands children and their families how to overcome the ineffec- of children and their families lives since 2012 in the San tive thoughts of feeling different, so they could realize Francisco Bay area. My vision and long term wish is to their true power and move forward to make their lives

make Boldly Me a national organization that can help

and this world a better place. Boldly Me is the organiza- our country overcome the high rates of violence and tion I needed when I was a little girl.

self-injury.  We are excited that in January 2016, we have started to build presence in Washington D.C.

BANP: What do you love most about Boldly Me and the

 

work you all do?

BANP: What is so special about Boldly Me and how can

Alanna: I love that Boldly Me is helping children and

people make a difference?

their families  who are silently suffering and releasing Alanna: Boldly Me is comprised of leading professionthem from the feelings of fears, isolation, and unworthi- als within the community who want to fix problems in ness that are hurting them. I’ve had come up to me, or a very manageable, pragmatic way. Some of our volunwrite me letters, saying things like, “You saved my life and

teers and leaders come influential places such as Stan-

I’m happy now. I was planning to commit suicide when I

ford Medicine, Kaiser Permanente Medical Foundation,

met you, and you showed me that I am loved and

Yahoo!, Samuel Merritt University, Hollywood,

worthy of living a full life. I can choose my path.”

GWEN network, Fremont Unified School

We continually see evidence that we’re chang-

District, Discovery Counseling, and Apple

ing lives for the better and that is so rewarding.

Computer. With the wealth of expertise and

And by partnering with school districts, such

array of diversity, we are able to continuous-

as Fremont Unified, we are able

ly invent ways to  deploy  bleed-

to reach out and help so

ing edge  therapeutic tools to

many young people. 

communities in creative, fun

BANP: How has  Boldly

ways.

Me made a difference

Alanna Powell

Founder of Boldly Me


Leadership Development • Classes in Self Esteem & Communication Physical Well Being and Financial Stability • Fun Physical Activities Personal, Transitional Consultations • Recreational Events • Retreats Mentorship • Award-winning Service Satisfaction Guarantee

39120 ARGONAUT WAY #545 FREMONT, CA 94538

WWW.BOLDLYME.ORG

Alanna Powell

Executive Director and Founder of Boldly Me


VANESSA FRANKLIN V O L U N T E E R

BANP: What is it about Beat The Streets that fers a scholarship for those who were previous helped you in choosing to become a volun- school drop outs, and those who want to get teer?

back into school.

Vanessa: The goal that

BANP: Why would you

beat the streets had to

recommend

serve the community is

Streets to someone who

what attracted me to the

is looking to be a volun-

organization. I loved Tra-

teer?

cy’s vision, the founder.

Vanessa: At Beat the

Beat

The

streets Inc., we are a famBANP: What do you do

ily. We all share the same

when you volunteer?

goal, to see our youth

Vanessa: I lead seminars

thrive, and to serve at risk

in educational resources,

community members as

tutor children and also

best as we can. I would

lend a hand in fundraising.

recommend

beat

the

streets for those who truly BANP: Is there a special experience you would like to share?

want to make an impact on the community. I don’t feel that I am just a volunteer at beat the streets inc, I feel that I am

Vanessa: One very special experience of mine truly apart of team. While beat the streets inc. with beat the streets is the 10th anniversary has opened the door for me to give back to my celebration, along with our a bbq that took community, I have also gained so much knowlplace last summer to honor those who had just edge, so many skills and most importantly I graduated high school, and those who have have gained everlasting relationships and famgone back to school. Beat the streets Inc. of- ily members.


BEAT THE STREETS, INC. IS A NONPROFIT RESOURCE CENTER FOUNDED IN 2005 BY A SINGLE MOTHER IN AN EFFORT TO MOTIVATE THE YOUNG ADULTS IN HER NEIGHBORHOOD TO ACHIEVE A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA, SEEK HIGHER EDUCATION, AND GAIN WILLFUL EMPLOYMENT.

• EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES • VOCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES • LIFE SKILLS SERVICES

WWW.BEATTHESTREETSCA.ORG • PHONE: 925-481-2104 2800 SYCAMORE DR. STE. 8 ANTIOCH, CA 94509


TRACY TATE JONES E X E C U T I V E

BANP: What is Beat The Streets about and what do you all do?

D I R E C T O R

BANP: How has Beat The Streets made a difference and what impact do you still wish to see XXXXX make?

TTJ: Our mission is to empower young adults with adequate

TTJ: As best said by one of the clients served name Jeremy Foster,

resources in stimulating self-improvement through the achieve-

“Beat the streets was an important component in my life. I was

ment of educational and employment goals. BTS targets our

lost and confused on the streets doing lord knows what until I

community’s young men and young women by providing an-

met this lady we called her Mrs. Tracy. She took me in like a son

swers to fundamental questions that all,

an helped me beat the streets by help-

if not most of them come across when

ing with resumes, job info, knowledge

transitioning between childhood and

about life etc... I can say because of this

adulthood. We provide those answers

organization I am a full time employee

through our many peer support services,

and a college student. I literally beat the

which include educational support, vo-

streets.” We want to see more stories like

cational support, and life skills services.

Jeremy’s. We’ve mentored and guided

In doing so, we hope to improve the suc-

many youth over the years and want

cess rate among our youth and young

to continue our mission of providing

adults, thus helping to positively impact

young adults with resources that best

our communities. We make such an im-

benefit them. full time employee and a

pact by providing computer access and

college student and I literally beat the

bi-monthly workshops in low-income

streets this organization is truly a bless-

communities to underprivileged, at-risk

ing and I highly recommend it.

youth and training sessions presenting different educational and employment paths, as well as, en-

BANP: What is so special about Beat The Streets and how can

hancing their life skills.

people make a difference?

BANP: What do you love most about Beat The Streets and the

TTJ: Since its inception in 2005, BTS core services has been pro-

work you all do?

viding young adults with resources in education, employment and life skills to promote the foundation of literacy, ethics and

TTJ: What I love most is connecting with the young men and

social responsibilities. BTS seeks to increase the number of high

women of the community and making a positive impact on

school graduates and the number of employed young adults.

their lives. I am like a mom away from home and the youth grav-

The services provided encourage higher learning and prepare

itate toward that. It’s a loving, nurturing environment, where

young adults for successful employment. We are looking to in-

they are taught life skills that many may not learn at home. I love

crease our weekday services to include Tuesday and Thursday,

to mentor youth and young adults as they are at a stage in life

3-6pm to allow for daily computer access and one-to-one peer

where they are impressionable. Teaching them skills to empow-

support. We are confident that with volunteer and financial sup-

er themselves in life is our mission and primary goal.

port, our efforts will be greatly rewarded.


BEAT THE STREETS, INC. IS A NONPROFIT RESOURCE CENTER FOUNDED IN 2005 BY A SINGLE MOTHER IN AN EFFORT TO MOTIVATE THE YOUNG ADULTS IN HER NEIGHBORHOOD TO ACHIEVE A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA, SEEK HIGHER EDUCATION, AND GAIN WILLFUL EMPLOYMENT.

• EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES • VOCATIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES • LIFE SKILLS SERVICES

WWW.BEATTHESTREETSCA.ORG • PHONE: 925-481-2104 2800 SYCAMORE DR. STE. 8 ANTIOCH, CA 94509



Bay Area Nonprofits - Read Aloud