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We Support Diversity and Gender Equality – An Issue Greater Than Just “Equal Pay in the Workplace” The story behind Atlanta Metro Women Magazine and Website has always been to empower, inspire and support women in our local communities and the workplace. We believe in diversity and gender equality, equal pay for equal work and believe that no woman should have to be in fear of harassment or assault in her community or workplace. Women have made unquestionable advances — from American boardrooms and courts of law, to political and sports arenas — but inequality remains,  especially in poor or rural areas. By simply being inclusive of an equitable number of women in an organization, it has availed itself of a larger talent pool, increased its attractiveness to potential talent, increased its ability to retain talent and has brought an insightful eye to market to potential users and clients of the organization’s products or services. While outcomes of equality in the workplace should be achievable equally among genders, these outcomes may not necessarily be the same for all. Still, it’s essential to advance the trend of acceptance and advancement in gender equality to ensure that access and enjoyment of the same rewards, resources and opportunities are available to all. This includes freedom from gender discrimination and its stereotypes, pregnancy and parenting, freedom from discrimination in fields of employment where women have traditionally been excluded or discouraged and the systemic undervaluing of work traditionally performed by women. Workplaces need to provide equal opportunities and pay for equal work; there is no justifiable reason based on gender not to do so. There should never be limits to the equal participation of women in the workforce. All should have access to all positions and industries; including leadership roles regardless of gender. Women represent nearly half of the U.S. workforce and the number of women in politics is increasing rapidly. At some point in their career, one in four women has been subjected to harassment at work. Management has a responsibility to ensure they act early to both identify and stop harassment, but unfortunately, in many companies, occurrences are often ignored. If there are signs of harassment taking place within the workplace– no matter how big or small – it should be rectified immediately, and preventative processes reevaluated to avert such occurrences from happening again. Organizations have a responsibility to maintain an environment that is free of sexual harassment. Today we are asking that our communities’ most prominent workplaces and community organizations take a step to join Atlanta Metro Women Magazine and its website to advocate for respectful, fair and dignified treatment of women. Thank You Rich Borell Founder & Publisher


We Support Diversity and Gender Equality – An Issue Greater Than Just “Equal Pay in the Workplace” The story behind Atlanta Metro Women Magazine and Website has always been to empower, inspire and support women in our local communities and the workplace. We believe in diversity and gender equality, equal pay for equal work and believe that no woman should have to be in fear of harassment or assault in her community or workplace. Women have made unquestionable advances — from American boardrooms and courts of law, to political and sports arenas — but inequality remains,  especially in poor or rural areas. By simply being inclusive of an equitable number of women in an organization, it has availed itself of a larger talent pool, increased its attractiveness to potential talent, increased its ability to retain talent and has brought an insightful eye to market to potential users and clients of the organization’s products or services. While outcomes of equality in the workplace should be achievable equally among genders, these outcomes may not necessarily be the same for all. Still, it’s essential to advance the trend of acceptance and advancement in gender equality to ensure that access and enjoyment of the same rewards, resources and opportunities are available to all. This includes freedom from gender discrimination and its stereotypes, pregnancy and parenting, freedom from discrimination in fields of employment where women have traditionally been excluded or discouraged and the systemic undervaluing of work traditionally performed by women. Workplaces need to provide equal opportunities and pay for equal work; there is no justifiable reason based on gender not to do so. There should never be limits to the equal participation of women in the workforce. All should have access to all positions and industries; including leadership roles regardless of gender. Women represent nearly half of the U.S. workforce and the number of women in politics is increasing rapidly. At some point in their career, one in four women has been subjected to harassment at work. Management has a responsibility to ensure they act early to both identify and stop harassment, but unfortunately, in many companies, occurrences are often ignored. If there are signs of harassment taking place within the workplace– no matter how big or small – it should be rectified immediately, and preventative processes reevaluated to avert such occurrences from happening again. Organizations have a responsibility to maintain an environment that is free of sexual harassment. Today we are asking that our communities’ most prominent workplaces and community organizations take a step to join Atlanta Metro Women Magazine and its website to advocate for respectful, fair and dignified treatment of women. Thank You Rich Borell Founder & Publisher


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Khatera Ballard

Chief Marketing Officer

Honeysuckle Gelato

Ponce City Market


Infoblox - a global leader in delivering Actionable Network Intelligence to enterprise, government, and service provider customers around the world - has launched a global initiative entitled the“Women’s Internal Network”(WIN) to increase the representation of women at the company. The purpose of WIN is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. A global initiative of this magnitude can only be successful with active support at the highest level.

Bay Area Women Magazine caught up with the Executive Board for the WIN group … • Jesper Andersen, CEO • Sonya Andreae, Vice President of Global Customer Advocacy • Norma Lane, Executive Vice President of People & Places Read on to see what each has to say . . .


Infoblox - a global leader in delivering Actionable Network Intelligence to enterprise, government, and service provider customers around the world - has launched a global initiative entitled the“Women’s Internal Network”(WIN) to increase the representation of women at the company. The purpose of WIN is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. A global initiative of this magnitude can only be successful with active support at the highest level.

Bay Area Women Magazine caught up with the Executive Board for the WIN group … • Jesper Andersen, CEO • Sonya Andreae, Vice President of Global Customer Advocacy • Norma Lane, Executive Vice President of People & Places Read on to see what each has to say . . .


Q&A with Infoblox’s WIN Executive Team “Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.” JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What is the purpose of Infoblox’s “Women’s Internal Network” and what need will it serve? JA: Our purpose is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

Q: As a company, what made you stop and say … “we need to create a WIN program?” JA: We value diversity at all levels and in all job categories throughout the organization. We’re fortunate to have a diverse workforce, in general. However, we lack broad representation of Women in senior leadership and technical roles. We decided to create an internal network for women to learn together and from each other. Additionally, we want to support external efforts that inspire young women to pursue engineering and technology careers. This will help fill the pipeline with qualified candidates in the future. Collectively, we think we can make a difference. The result will be a more engaged and productive workforce, and ultimately a more successful organization. Q: What goals do you hope to achieve and what is your time frame? JA: We haven’t established a timeframe or specific quotas to achieve. Instead we’re taking direct action to achieve our goals in everything we do. From recruitment, to employee development, outreach activities and mentoring efforts. Additionally, we’re participating in a variety of community initiatives that align with our goal. Q: How will you monitor the progress of WIN? JA: We’ll measure our effectiveness in engagement levels of women employees through our mid-year and annual employee engagement survey. Additionally, we’ll measure our percent of women representation in leadership and technology positions.

JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership? SA: A primary concern is the lack of women entering the Engineering/technical profession resulting in fewer women available to assume leadership position in the high-tech industry. There are a variety of social and economic reasons that have resulted in an imbalance of women in leadership and technology. Many women don’t have mentors at home to help shape their career aspirations. Others were preoccupied with fulfilling traditional roles of being a mother and/or caretaker, placing their career goals on the back burner. Additionally, there are still deep-seated biases that have existed for many generations. During the last few decades I’ve seen a positive shift in this mindset. As a result, women are achieving parity in the workplace. Although we’re seeing positive change in the workplace, it will require sustainable change in institutional mindset to correct these biases over time. Male presence still dominates the boardroom and C-Suite positions.

Q: Why is tech the fastest-growing industry in the U.S. which is predicted to provide more job opportunities than all other professional sectors, still failing to attract and retain women in your opinion? SA: I wouldn’t say the high-tech industry is failing at attracting and retaining women in the workplace. Quite the opposite. I think we’re making significant progress. More than ever, employers are sponsoring mentorships for women in technology and proactively pursuing opportunities to expand their representation of women, particularly in technical positions. Additionally, there are now many Corporate-backed outreach programs designed to attract and inspire women to enter high-tech careers. STEM and Code.org come to mind as two well-funded programs sponsored by employers in the high-tech industry. However, as noted earlier, it takes time to change mindset and practice resulting from generations of gender bias. Infoblox is one of many employers who are embracing this change in mindset by promoting women leadership in the workplace and sponsoring programs aligned with our beliefs.


Q&A with Infoblox’s WIN Executive Team “Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.” JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What is the purpose of Infoblox’s “Women’s Internal Network” and what need will it serve? JA: Our purpose is to build an internal support system to attract, retain and promote women in the workplace. Our primary focus is to expand the presence of women in leadership, enterprise direct sales, and engineering roles.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

Q: As a company, what made you stop and say … “we need to create a WIN program?” JA: We value diversity at all levels and in all job categories throughout the organization. We’re fortunate to have a diverse workforce, in general. However, we lack broad representation of Women in senior leadership and technical roles. We decided to create an internal network for women to learn together and from each other. Additionally, we want to support external efforts that inspire young women to pursue engineering and technology careers. This will help fill the pipeline with qualified candidates in the future. Collectively, we think we can make a difference. The result will be a more engaged and productive workforce, and ultimately a more successful organization. Q: What goals do you hope to achieve and what is your time frame? JA: We haven’t established a timeframe or specific quotas to achieve. Instead we’re taking direct action to achieve our goals in everything we do. From recruitment, to employee development, outreach activities and mentoring efforts. Additionally, we’re participating in a variety of community initiatives that align with our goal. Q: How will you monitor the progress of WIN? JA: We’ll measure our effectiveness in engagement levels of women employees through our mid-year and annual employee engagement survey. Additionally, we’ll measure our percent of women representation in leadership and technology positions.

JESPER ANDERSEN - INFOBLOX CEO

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership? SA: A primary concern is the lack of women entering the Engineering/technical profession resulting in fewer women available to assume leadership position in the high-tech industry. There are a variety of social and economic reasons that have resulted in an imbalance of women in leadership and technology. Many women don’t have mentors at home to help shape their career aspirations. Others were preoccupied with fulfilling traditional roles of being a mother and/or caretaker, placing their career goals on the back burner. Additionally, there are still deep-seated biases that have existed for many generations. During the last few decades I’ve seen a positive shift in this mindset. As a result, women are achieving parity in the workplace. Although we’re seeing positive change in the workplace, it will require sustainable change in institutional mindset to correct these biases over time. Male presence still dominates the boardroom and C-Suite positions.

Q: Why is tech the fastest-growing industry in the U.S. which is predicted to provide more job opportunities than all other professional sectors, still failing to attract and retain women in your opinion? SA: I wouldn’t say the high-tech industry is failing at attracting and retaining women in the workplace. Quite the opposite. I think we’re making significant progress. More than ever, employers are sponsoring mentorships for women in technology and proactively pursuing opportunities to expand their representation of women, particularly in technical positions. Additionally, there are now many Corporate-backed outreach programs designed to attract and inspire women to enter high-tech careers. STEM and Code.org come to mind as two well-funded programs sponsored by employers in the high-tech industry. However, as noted earlier, it takes time to change mindset and practice resulting from generations of gender bias. Infoblox is one of many employers who are embracing this change in mindset by promoting women leadership in the workplace and sponsoring programs aligned with our beliefs.


NORMA LANE - CHRO AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES NORMA

“We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. ” NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: Focusing on diversity in the workplace is an essential step in building a great culture. How has Infoblox responded to this challenge as a company thus far? NL: Fortunately, we’ve built a great culture and a cool work environment which focuses on collaboration, respecting others, and having fun. (“We believe that a fun, caring, collaborative, and learning work environment will stimulate creativity and innovation that results in customer satisfaction and business success,” said Jesper Andersen, CEO of Infoblox) We also maintain a diverse work environment and fully embrace diversity in all areas of the company. Our challenge is finding qualified candidates in our senior management, direct enterprise sales, and Engineering environment. We’re taking steps to sponsor programs (like Hour of Code) that promote women in technology through STEM and various professional associations (such as Watermark) who are also aligned with our purpose. This will help build a strong pipeline of female candidates for future consideration. Additionally, we’re sponsoring a variety of programs to develop and promote women currently employed at Infoblox. Q: There is currently lack of women in tech … does Infoblox have a goal of how many Women they would like to employ in the company? NL: We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. Q: A diverse workplace is proven to get better results, more accurately reflects your customer/client base, and ensures a wider range of experience. Do you feel WIN project will help Infoblox meet its goals? NL: Absolutely! A diverse work environment offers diverse opinions on broad business issues. Ultimately, business decisions are well thought out and result in sustainable solutions because we’ve considered a variety of creative ideas and in-depth insight.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: What woman inspires you and why? NL: Personally, I relate to women who are successful because of their resilience and grit. They’ve been through their share of life experiences that may have been challenging. However, they remained focused and determined, despite the obstacles. These women were not born with a silver spoon. They didn’t come from privileged families who paved the way for their success. Instead, these women envisioned their dreams and seized opportunities to pursue them; Overcoming many speed bumps along the way. Even after achieving success they remained humble and gave back to their community so that others can also prosper. Oprah Winfrey comes to mind. My Grandma is another.


NORMA LANE - CHRO AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES NORMA

“We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. ” NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: Focusing on diversity in the workplace is an essential step in building a great culture. How has Infoblox responded to this challenge as a company thus far? NL: Fortunately, we’ve built a great culture and a cool work environment which focuses on collaboration, respecting others, and having fun. (“We believe that a fun, caring, collaborative, and learning work environment will stimulate creativity and innovation that results in customer satisfaction and business success,” said Jesper Andersen, CEO of Infoblox) We also maintain a diverse work environment and fully embrace diversity in all areas of the company. Our challenge is finding qualified candidates in our senior management, direct enterprise sales, and Engineering environment. We’re taking steps to sponsor programs (like Hour of Code) that promote women in technology through STEM and various professional associations (such as Watermark) who are also aligned with our purpose. This will help build a strong pipeline of female candidates for future consideration. Additionally, we’re sponsoring a variety of programs to develop and promote women currently employed at Infoblox. Q: There is currently lack of women in tech … does Infoblox have a goal of how many Women they would like to employ in the company? NL: We would like to see a significant increase of women represented in our management and technical positions. We are committed to creating and maintaining a work environment that reflects gender diversity, which in turn, will result in higher employee morale, superior performance, and ultimately profitability. Q: A diverse workplace is proven to get better results, more accurately reflects your customer/client base, and ensures a wider range of experience. Do you feel WIN project will help Infoblox meet its goals? NL: Absolutely! A diverse work environment offers diverse opinions on broad business issues. Ultimately, business decisions are well thought out and result in sustainable solutions because we’ve considered a variety of creative ideas and in-depth insight.

SONYA ANDREAE - GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE & SUPPORT EXECUTIVE

NORMA LANE - EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF PEOPLE & PLACES

Q: What woman inspires you and why? NL: Personally, I relate to women who are successful because of their resilience and grit. They’ve been through their share of life experiences that may have been challenging. However, they remained focused and determined, despite the obstacles. These women were not born with a silver spoon. They didn’t come from privileged families who paved the way for their success. Instead, these women envisioned their dreams and seized opportunities to pursue them; Overcoming many speed bumps along the way. Even after achieving success they remained humble and gave back to their community so that others can also prosper. Oprah Winfrey comes to mind. My Grandma is another.


Marina Gavric

Marina Gavric Health & Fitness Training www.marinagavric.com

Age is Nothing But a Number Y

ou don’t spend 20 years in the fitness industry without learning a few things about numbers. A valuable term I learned early on, and attest to, is the age old adage that “Age is nothing but a number”. Each of us has a calendar age and a biological age. We’ve all seen this … Often I will see a 30 or 40 year-old who may look and feel considerably older than his or her actual age … or a 60 or 70 year-old who may look and feel considerably younger. How and why is that? Good health and well-being, so much of it is in our mind. Also our diet and exercise. It includes an attitude, our habits, our way of life. Healthy and vibrant, the good news is we don’t have to be stuck, where we might not be happy. The choice is ours and there are things we can do to improve. We should control our health rather our health control us. Health, fitness and wellness, no matter what our age, is a great recipe that works … and is everyone’s best reward. When and how did those years get stuck within layers of unhealthy fat, lining our frames? Can you pinpoint the time you became older than you really are? Think back. Was it when you were 12 trying to get out of gym class? Maybe in college when all your time was spent studying and socializing over noodles

and cocktails? Perhaps your fitness years were lost when the children began ruling your world or work sucked you in to the career abyss? Is it possible you just haven’t found your way out. Resolving when you began losing those years is key to getting them back. No matter what your current age or fitness level, taking action in changing your fitness age, to grow younger as you age, to become a fitter and wiser you, begins with some simple, clean life choices we can all make. Ask yourself: How old am I? How old do I feel? What is my fitness age? If I have lost years of vibrant life, when did I lose them? How can I get them back? And when do I begin taking action in the fight to take them back? Don’t let your “real” age rule or get the better of you. You can do it ... let your fitness age take the spotlight! … Stay Hydrated, Stay Focused, Stay Fit!


ANN GATTI CHEF/OWNER

DOUGHNUT DOLLIES MARIETTA WEST MIDTOWN


Representing the Citizens of District 10 as an Established Community Leader, Meet Atlanta City Councilmember,

Andrea L. Boone Atlanta native Andrea L. Boone is serving her first term as a member of the Atlanta City Council representing the citizens of District 10. She is the daughter of the late civil rights leader Rev. Joseph E. Boone and longtime Atlanta Public Schools educator Alethea W. Boone.   As the young daughter of activists, Councilmember Boone found herself immersed in the fight for social justice. She quickly acclimated to her assigned role in the Civil Rights Movement as she courageously marched alongside her father during multiple protests.   The idea of service is not new to her. As Chief of Staff to the former Dean of the Atlanta City Council, C.T. Martin, she spearheaded his efforts to increase affordable housing, improve public safety and empower youth throughout District 10. She also served for over seven years as the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Constituent Services where she worked alongside and in partnership with churches, senior centers, neighborhood associations, businesses and other stakeholders to ensure elected officials never lost focus on the needs and issues faced by the citizens of Atlanta.   These years of experience have given her an in-depth knowledge, expertise and first-hand understanding of the inner workings of large municipal budgets, as well as tax and fiscal policies. As a councilmember, she has assisted the Atlanta City Council and Mayor’s Office in reaching its goal of hiring 2,000 police officers and successfully balancing the city’s last two budgets without increasing taxes.

Councilmember Boone is a proven advocate who has worked to keep the Atlanta Public School Board, Atlanta City Council, and various mayoral administrations focused on prioritizing the needs of residents and neighborhoods in her district. A graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and Tuskegee University, Andrea is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Committed to her father’s legacy, she is a lifelong member of Rush Memorial Congregational Church. Q: What advice do you have for young women who want to pursue a career in politics? AB: Get involved. Make your voice heard. Whether it is at a neighborhood meeting, a zoning board hearing, a school board meeting, volunteering for a candidate or organization that is advocating for an issue you care about, join in. You will meet people who inspire you and from whom you can learn. You will gain knowledge and experience. And don’t ever compromise your integrity. Q: What is one skill you believe that women should have to facilitate a successful career in politics? AB: It’s more a group of skills that one needs. Chief among them is the ability to genuinely listen to and respect others. And then the ability to bring disparate sides of an issue together to hammer out, to work through, a solution. Crafting public policy is the art of compromise. That doesn’t mean you leave your passions and beliefs at the door. It means you go in with an open mind. Sometimes the negotiation fails because you may be asked to compromise your values or your integrity. That’s a deal-breaker.

Councilmember Boone is joined by community members attending the Financial Empowerment and Homeownership Workshop. She hosted the event in partnership with the Urban League of Greater Atlanta and BB&T Bank. The workshop was free to the public and provided city residents with much needed information regarding down-payment assistance programs, closing costs, home inspections, credit readiness, and various financing options.

Q: When will women in politics become the norm? AB: We still have a very long way to go. But progress is being made. Of the fifteen members with whom I serve on the Atlanta City Council, seven are women. As well, our Council President and Mayor are women. And although numbers remain low in the Georgia General Assembly where 30 percent currently serving are women, that is up from 20 percent in 2008. In Congress, the highest number of women in our history - 127 – are seated. But that is only 24 percent of the entire Congress. The change is slow, but it is steady, growing, and inevitable. Q: Why do you think women remain underrepresented in business and politics? AB: I think women are less likely to be encouraged or recruited as a potential candidate when a position opens. That is often because men dominate the political field and pull from their own ranks when looking for candidates. As women in politics – both in front of and behind the scenes – grow in numbers and influence, you will see this continue to change. Certainly, the gains made in Congress have shown that women are viable and winning candidates.

Q: What has been your greatest achievement as a council member so far? AB: I began my first term in January 2018, and immediately sought to address pay equity in our public safety departments. We had seen pay stagnate terribly for our public safety employees. To the point where they were working two and sometimes three jobs to make ends meet. The physical and emotional toll that the jobs have on police officers and firefighters is enormous. Their life expectancy is shorter than the U.S. population at large. Working closely with our Mayor and my Council colleagues we were able to pass equitable pay and raises for the City’s police and fire employees. The passage of which has brought a marked increase in morale and, frankly, has created a safer city. Q: If there’s one wish you could be granted to change the way congress works ... what would that be? AB: The ability for both parties to work across divides. The beauty of a legislative body is that cooperation and compromise are the markers of success. Passing legislation is a negotiation that requires give and take on both sides. Congress must retreat from its debilitating partisanship and work together.


Representing the Citizens of District 10 as an Established Community Leader, Meet Atlanta City Councilmember,

Andrea L. Boone Atlanta native Andrea L. Boone is serving her first term as a member of the Atlanta City Council representing the citizens of District 10. She is the daughter of the late civil rights leader Rev. Joseph E. Boone and longtime Atlanta Public Schools educator Alethea W. Boone.   As the young daughter of activists, Councilmember Boone found herself immersed in the fight for social justice. She quickly acclimated to her assigned role in the Civil Rights Movement as she courageously marched alongside her father during multiple protests.   The idea of service is not new to her. As Chief of Staff to the former Dean of the Atlanta City Council, C.T. Martin, she spearheaded his efforts to increase affordable housing, improve public safety and empower youth throughout District 10. She also served for over seven years as the Commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Constituent Services where she worked alongside and in partnership with churches, senior centers, neighborhood associations, businesses and other stakeholders to ensure elected officials never lost focus on the needs and issues faced by the citizens of Atlanta.   These years of experience have given her an in-depth knowledge, expertise and first-hand understanding of the inner workings of large municipal budgets, as well as tax and fiscal policies. As a councilmember, she has assisted the Atlanta City Council and Mayor’s Office in reaching its goal of hiring 2,000 police officers and successfully balancing the city’s last two budgets without increasing taxes.

Councilmember Boone is a proven advocate who has worked to keep the Atlanta Public School Board, Atlanta City Council, and various mayoral administrations focused on prioritizing the needs of residents and neighborhoods in her district. A graduate of Frederick Douglass High School and Tuskegee University, Andrea is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Committed to her father’s legacy, she is a lifelong member of Rush Memorial Congregational Church. Q: What advice do you have for young women who want to pursue a career in politics? AB: Get involved. Make your voice heard. Whether it is at a neighborhood meeting, a zoning board hearing, a school board meeting, volunteering for a candidate or organization that is advocating for an issue you care about, join in. You will meet people who inspire you and from whom you can learn. You will gain knowledge and experience. And don’t ever compromise your integrity. Q: What is one skill you believe that women should have to facilitate a successful career in politics? AB: It’s more a group of skills that one needs. Chief among them is the ability to genuinely listen to and respect others. And then the ability to bring disparate sides of an issue together to hammer out, to work through, a solution. Crafting public policy is the art of compromise. That doesn’t mean you leave your passions and beliefs at the door. It means you go in with an open mind. Sometimes the negotiation fails because you may be asked to compromise your values or your integrity. That’s a deal-breaker.

Councilmember Boone is joined by community members attending the Financial Empowerment and Homeownership Workshop. She hosted the event in partnership with the Urban League of Greater Atlanta and BB&T Bank. The workshop was free to the public and provided city residents with much needed information regarding down-payment assistance programs, closing costs, home inspections, credit readiness, and various financing options.

Q: When will women in politics become the norm? AB: We still have a very long way to go. But progress is being made. Of the fifteen members with whom I serve on the Atlanta City Council, seven are women. As well, our Council President and Mayor are women. And although numbers remain low in the Georgia General Assembly where 30 percent currently serving are women, that is up from 20 percent in 2008. In Congress, the highest number of women in our history - 127 – are seated. But that is only 24 percent of the entire Congress. The change is slow, but it is steady, growing, and inevitable. Q: Why do you think women remain underrepresented in business and politics? AB: I think women are less likely to be encouraged or recruited as a potential candidate when a position opens. That is often because men dominate the political field and pull from their own ranks when looking for candidates. As women in politics – both in front of and behind the scenes – grow in numbers and influence, you will see this continue to change. Certainly, the gains made in Congress have shown that women are viable and winning candidates.

Q: What has been your greatest achievement as a council member so far? AB: I began my first term in January 2018, and immediately sought to address pay equity in our public safety departments. We had seen pay stagnate terribly for our public safety employees. To the point where they were working two and sometimes three jobs to make ends meet. The physical and emotional toll that the jobs have on police officers and firefighters is enormous. Their life expectancy is shorter than the U.S. population at large. Working closely with our Mayor and my Council colleagues we were able to pass equitable pay and raises for the City’s police and fire employees. The passage of which has brought a marked increase in morale and, frankly, has created a safer city. Q: If there’s one wish you could be granted to change the way congress works ... what would that be? AB: The ability for both parties to work across divides. The beauty of a legislative body is that cooperation and compromise are the markers of success. Passing legislation is a negotiation that requires give and take on both sides. Congress must retreat from its debilitating partisanship and work together.


Councilmember Boone rolls up her sleeves and helps bag litter during one of the many community clean-ups she hosts every year. Combating blight and its effects on Atlanta neighborhoods is a paramount priority for her. In addition, Councilmember Boone, in partnership with Atlanta’s City Solicitor’s Office and the Atlanta Police Department’s Code Enforcement Section, regularly hosts symposiums to educate residents on how to fight blight. As well, Councilmember Boone holds an annual scrap tire drive. This year over 500 illegally dumped tires were collected and transported to recycling facilities.

Councilmember Boone joins volunteers as they build raised bed vegetable gardens in Atlanta’s historic Westside neighborhood. The effort was part of a day of service sponsored by Young Generation Movement and the Lions Club.

Sunny View’s Annual Benefit Dinner, Lynn North, Chair of the Foundation

Councilmember Andrea Boone greets an Atlanta Public School parent during her annual Back 2 School Bash. Hundreds of parents struggle every year to provide the necessary school supplies for their children. To help meet this need, Councilmember Boone hosts an annual event to ensure children start the school year ready for success. In previous years, backpacks and school supplies for over 700 students have been provided.

Q: If you had the power, what one Government policy would you reverse? AB: Recently, we have seen a host of good environmental policies (e.g. the ban on dumping waste from mining into streams, tighter automotive fuel efficiency standards, regulation of ozone standards, and limits on fracking) reversed. I would like to see many of these policies brought back. I would want to reverse these reversals! Q: Can you tell our audience one of your most memorable moments your career? AB: Before I ran for office, I served as the City of Atlanta’s Commissioner of Constituent Services. In that role, my staff and I solved myriad problems and challenges facing City residents. One instance, in particular, has stayed with me. The landlord of a large apartment complex made the decision to shutter and sell his property. In the process he evicted some 100 tenants all of whom were very low-income, and most of whom were elderly people with medical

issues and single mothers with small children. They were all being put on the street. My staff and I worked around the clock – literally – finding housing, healthcare, food, and other forms of assistance for the residents. We helped moms enroll their children in their new school districts and made sure refrigerators were stocked and utilities were turned on. We did not stop until every single person was re-housed and safe. It was a remarkable effort that required coordination among many different government agencies. A bureaucratic nightmare that required patience, persistence, compassion, tenacity, and creativity to solve very complicated problems. I am still in touch with many of them today. Q: What’s one lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? AB: The importance of communication. Getting elected is the first step in your political career. In order to get things done for those who have entrusted you to represent them, you must build trust with your constituents, colleagues,

other elected officials, department heads, etc. Be reliable, responsive, and transparent. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? AB: The late Fulton County Commissioner Emma Darnell. She was a warrior, a fierce and compassionate woman who fought for the elderly, the poor, the disenfranchised. She was an advocate for people who had no voice. Sometimes she spoke by herself, but she knew she was not speaking alone. Commissioner Darnell was one of the strongest, smartest, toughest people I have ever known. She entered office when women – especially African American women – were not seen. She was a trailblazer for all who came after her. I am here because I stand on her shoulders. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? AB: Women still face a choice between family and

career. Women are the caretakers in families – whether for their children, grandchildren, or aging parents. As such, they often must put their careers and ambitions on hold. Men do not face these same constraints, putting women at a disadvantage for promotion/advancement. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace? AB: Finding a mentor is extremely valuable. I have been mentored, and I have mentored many women in my professional career. Through mentoring, women support each other in many ways. You will need encouragement and support, but you also need someone who will be honest with you and push you to grow. Q: What’s your advice for women in male-dominated fields? AB: Never ever believe you are less than any man in your field. Fight for your place at the table.


Councilmember Boone joins volunteers as they build raised bed vegetable gardens in Atlanta’s historic Westside neighborhood. The effort was part of a day of service sponsored by Young Generation Movement and the Lions Club.

Councilmember Boone rolls up her sleeves and helps bag litter during one of the many community clean-ups she hosts every year. Combating blight and its effects on Atlanta neighborhoods is a paramount priority for her. In addition, Councilmember Boone, in partnership with Atlanta’s City Solicitor’s Office and the Atlanta Police Department’s Code Enforcement Section, regularly hosts symposiums to educate residents on how to fight blight. As well, Councilmember Boone holds an annual scrap tire drive. This year over 500 illegally dumped tires were collected and transported to recycling facilities.

Councilmember Andrea Boone greets an Atlanta Public School parent during her annual Back 2 School Bash. Hundreds of parents struggle every year to provide the necessary school supplies for their children. To help meet this need, Councilmember Boone hosts an annual event to ensure children start the school year ready for success. In previous years, backpacks and school supplies for over 700 students have been provided.

Q: If you had the power, what one Government policy would you reverse? AB: Recently, we have seen a host of good environmental policies (e.g. the ban on dumping waste from mining into streams, tighter automotive fuel efficiency standards, regulation of ozone standards, and limits on fracking) reversed. I would like to see many of these policies brought back. I would want to reverse these reversals! Q: Can you tell our audience one of your most memorable moments your career? AB: Before I ran for office, I served as the City of Atlanta’s Commissioner of Constituent Services. In that role, my staff and I solved myriad problems and challenges facing City residents. One instance, in particular, has stayed with me. The landlord of a large apartment complex made the decision to shutter and sell his property. In the process he evicted some 100 tenants all of whom were very low-income, and most of whom were elderly people with medical

issues and single mothers with small children. They were all being put on the street. My staff and I worked around the clock – literally – finding housing, healthcare, food, and other forms of assistance for the residents. We helped moms enroll their children in their new school districts and made sure refrigerators were stocked and utilities were turned on. We did not stop until every single person was re-housed and safe. It was a remarkable effort that required coordination among many different government agencies. A bureaucratic nightmare that required patience, persistence, compassion, tenacity, and creativity to solve very complicated problems. I am still in touch with many of them today. Q: What’s one lesson you’ve learned in your career that you can share with our audience? AB: The importance of communication. Getting elected is the first step in your political career. In order to get things done for those who have entrusted you to represent them, you must build trust with your constituents, colleagues,

other elected officials, department heads, etc. Be reliable, responsive, and transparent. Q: Which woman inspires you and why? AB: The late Fulton County Commissioner Emma Darnell. She was a warrior, a fierce and compassionate woman who fought for the elderly, the poor, the disenfranchised. She was an advocate for people who had no voice. Sometimes she spoke by herself, but she knew she was not speaking alone. Commissioner Darnell was one of the strongest, smartest, toughest people I have ever known. She entered office when women – especially African American women – were not seen. She was a trailblazer for all who came after her. I am here because I stand on her shoulders. Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? AB: Women still face a choice between family and

career. Women are the caretakers in families – whether for their children, grandchildren, or aging parents. As such, they often must put their careers and ambitions on hold. Men do not face these same constraints, putting women at a disadvantage for promotion/advancement. Q: What advice would you give to young women who want to succeed in the workplace? AB: Finding a mentor is extremely valuable. I have been mentored, and I have mentored many women in my professional career. Through mentoring, women support each other in many ways. You will need encouragement and support, but you also need someone who will be honest with you and push you to grow. Q: What’s your advice for women in male-dominated fields? AB: Never ever believe you are less than any man in your field. Fight for your place at the table.


Law, Justice & Results, Building on a Tradition of Success Meet Atlanta Attorney, Lyle Griffin Warshauer www.warlawgroup.com | (404) 620-6304

Q: How old were you when you knew you wanted to pursue a career in the legal field? LGW: 18 years old, when I was a freshman in college. I thought I wanted to be a doctor and was in the pre-med program; but I took a Constitutional Law class as an elective on a whim and I instantly fell in love with the law. I changed my major to political science, with a minor in history – the quintessential pre-law scenario! By the time I graduated I was pretty sure that law school was in my future, but knowing what a commitment that would be, both in terms of time and money, I decided to test the waters as a paralegal first. I worked for a great litigation firm for several years before starting law school, which was a perfect precursor for me. When I entered law school, I was very focused and intentional about preparing to be a trial lawyer. Q: What expectations did you have after graduating and receiving your law degree? LGW: I had a pretty good understanding of what I was getting into. Not only did I know that I wanted to do civil litigation, I knew I wanted to handle medical cases on behalf of patients and their families. I was fortunate to get a job with a firm that did catastrophic injury work, and it was essentially baptism by fire. I was exposed to very complex cases right from the start and was able to participate in trials and appeals at an unusually early stage in my career. In fact, one of my first trials was a very high profile, threeweek long wrongful death trial in Florida that was covered by Court TV. I guess you could say my best expectations were realized pretty early on. Q: How long have you practiced law? LGW: I have been a lawyer for almost 27 years … 24 of those years I have had my own firm. Q: What type of cases do you generally handle? LGW: All of the cases that I handle as lead attorney involve medical malpractice. However, as one of the principals in our firm, I have some involvement in many of the cases that our firm takes on. I am also the lead brief writer, so I am often involved in the complex motions practice of the firm, and I handle most of the appeals.

Q: I see you have Bar Admissions in Alabama and Tennessee, as well as Georgia. Can you share with our audience, what it means for an Attorney to have multiple admissions? LGW: Our firm has a national practice, so we handle cases in venues throughout the country. While the majority of my medical cases are in Georgia, we often have matters in other southeastern states and it helps to know the applicable laws in the different jurisdictions, particularly when in claim can be asserted and the types of damages that are recoverable. Being licensed in multiple states not only gives me that knowledge, but I am permitted to appear in the courts of those states without special admission, so it is just more efficient. Q: What are some of the most popular topics your asked to lecture on? LGW: I am most often asked to talk about one of two things. Because of my experience handling medical cases, I frequently lecture on medical malpractice law and strategy. In addition, I have become fairly well known as an authority on the admissibility of expert testimony, so I talk a lot about the rules of evidence applicable to expert witnesses and have probably written about expert testimony more than any other area of the law. Q: Who is your typical client? LGW: I always tell people, “you don’t ever want to be my client,” because the people that I represent have either experienced a very serious injury themselves, or a family member of theirs has been gravely injured or killed. In recent years, I have taken on a number of birth injury claims, so my clients are the parents of children with significant deficits, such as cerebral palsy or other consequences of brain injury. I care about all of my clients, but I really appreciate the opportunity to help children, who have their entire lives ahead of them, because I know that what we do can be the difference between a full life and one that cannot withstand the challenges. The responsibility can be daunting; but when things work out the emotional reward is beyond measure. https://warlawgroup.com/


Law, Justice & Results, Building on a Tradition of Success Meet Atlanta Attorney, Lyle Griffin Warshauer www.warlawgroup.com | (404) 620-6304

Q: How old were you when you knew you wanted to pursue a career in the legal field? LGW: 18 years old, when I was a freshman in college. I thought I wanted to be a doctor and was in the pre-med program; but I took a Constitutional Law class as an elective on a whim and I instantly fell in love with the law. I changed my major to political science, with a minor in history – the quintessential pre-law scenario! By the time I graduated I was pretty sure that law school was in my future, but knowing what a commitment that would be, both in terms of time and money, I decided to test the waters as a paralegal first. I worked for a great litigation firm for several years before starting law school, which was a perfect precursor for me. When I entered law school, I was very focused and intentional about preparing to be a trial lawyer. Q: What expectations did you have after graduating and receiving your law degree? LGW: I had a pretty good understanding of what I was getting into. Not only did I know that I wanted to do civil litigation, I knew I wanted to handle medical cases on behalf of patients and their families. I was fortunate to get a job with a firm that did catastrophic injury work, and it was essentially baptism by fire. I was exposed to very complex cases right from the start and was able to participate in trials and appeals at an unusually early stage in my career. In fact, one of my first trials was a very high profile, threeweek long wrongful death trial in Florida that was covered by Court TV. I guess you could say my best expectations were realized pretty early on. Q: How long have you practiced law? LGW: I have been a lawyer for almost 27 years … 24 of those years I have had my own firm. Q: What type of cases do you generally handle? LGW: All of the cases that I handle as lead attorney involve medical malpractice. However, as one of the principals in our firm, I have some involvement in many of the cases that our firm takes on. I am also the lead brief writer, so I am often involved in the complex motions practice of the firm, and I handle most of the appeals.

Q: I see you have Bar Admissions in Alabama and Tennessee, as well as Georgia. Can you share with our audience, what it means for an Attorney to have multiple admissions? LGW: Our firm has a national practice, so we handle cases in venues throughout the country. While the majority of my medical cases are in Georgia, we often have matters in other southeastern states and it helps to know the applicable laws in the different jurisdictions, particularly when a claim can be asserted and the types of damages that are recoverable. Being licensed in multiple states not only gives me that knowledge, but I am permitted to appear in the courts of those states without special admission, so it is just more efficient. Q: What are some of the most popular topics your asked to lecture on? LGW: I am most often asked to talk about one of two things. Because of my experience handling medical cases, I frequently lecture on medical malpractice law and strategy. In addition, I have become fairly well known as an authority on the admissibility of expert testimony, so I talk a lot about the rules of evidence applicable to expert witnesses and have probably written about expert testimony more than any other area of the law. Q: Who is your typical client? LGW: I always tell people, “you don’t ever want to be my client,” because the people that I represent have either experienced a very serious injury themselves, or a family member of theirs has been gravely injured or killed. In recent years, I have taken on a number of birth injury claims, so my clients are the parents of children with significant deficits, such as cerebral palsy or other consequences of brain injury. I care about all of my clients, but I really appreciate the opportunity to help children, who have their entire lives ahead of them, because I know that what we do can be the difference between a full life and one that cannot withstand the challenges. The responsibility can be daunting; but when things work out the emotional reward is beyond measure.


Marina Gavric

Marina Gavric Health & Fitness Training www.marinagavric.com

Commit to Balance, to Your Fitness Success and to Yourself S

taying committed to an exercise and health plan is not always the simplest task. Breaking bad habits is never easy. “I have tried and tried!” … Yes, I know, I hear this, everyone’s story, all the time! Regardless of what age you may be or at what point you are in your life, men and women, boys and girls … a corporate executive, a student, an employee, a stay-at-home parent … we’re all busy all the time. Please recognize that health & wellness, as well as fitness & nutrition, are interrelated. It’s all a good thing and it’s a choice we make in our busy lives. Once you have resolved a priority to yourself of “health & fitness” in your life … make “finding balance” a key component. You can stay genuinely dedicated, enjoying your commitment, while not falling victim to excuses. What a positive difference in our lives and how we feel (the energy alone, perhaps meaning better sleep) we all seem to know it would make. It’s a matter of doing. For example, Jane is a busy executive and, although Jane is a fictitious character, she represents a good number of men and women. She is up at 5am, by 5:15am has her coffee in hand and for the next hour, before she rounds up the kids for school, she reviews her yesterday and prepares for today. In no time, she then packs up her home team, briefcase in hand and is out the door. Finally, she’s at the office and sits with another cup of coffee, with breakfast in hand … whatever pastries there may be. The sodas come later. Day in and day out, Jane reflects on making life changes to improve her well-being and feel good about herself, inside and out. Yet, day after

day, Jane’s willpower gives in and she seems to repeat the same old routine, a cycle, she wishes she could break. When? She feels too busy. She feels not up to it”. She believes there is no other way. She speaks for many, many people. No matter the phase of the health cycle one is in, we all struggle with this … to get in that workout in or say no to an extra helping of our favorite foods. The first step is to find your balance … and to commit to change. It starts with that commitment … even if one step at a time to begin with and to win. Regularly reflect on all your priorities … then decide on the commitments you can realistically make and stick with them. Whether this week it’s a 30 minutes for 3 days-a-week commitment or next week a 40 minutes 6 days-a-week commitment. A key is to write your commitments down. As you would keep your word to your boss or loved ones, keep your word to yourself. Stay Hydrated, Stay Focused, Stay Fit


Ourgoali st oI ns pi r e,Empower&Suppor tWomeni nt heAt l ant aMet r oAr ea


A SPECIAL CONVERSATION

WITH PAT WADORS, Senior Vice President of Global Talent Organization at LinkedIn

ful and fastest growing companies in Silicon Valley and the world. Pat joined LinkedIn in January 2013 “to lead its world-class talent (HR) team. In addition to hiring, retaining and inspiring top talent, Pat is also responsible for all employee related HR programs at LinkedIn, including compensation and benefits and performance management”. Since her arrival, the company has nearly tripled in size. All this, and more, is why she is one of the most respected voices in business. In this brief conversation, enjoy what is some of her vision and philosophies, as we indeed have … Q: How do you see HR evolving – from what it was to where it is and your vision of where you see it heading? PW: HR is evolving from a function that is often viewed as process oriented to more of an innovative role. Typically, HR folks are not the first to deviate from the norm, but successful companies will have HR teams that are not only subject matter experts but they innovate at the same time. They are the ones in the industry that are making Human Resources hip and progressive. This is what we aspire to at LinkedIn. For instance, I am always looking to move the needle and to

yond their own boarders and think of talent issues that affect the world. They become game changers. SVL: Regarding talent – What are some of the key elements looked for – How important are data analytics and PW: When it comes to talent I hire for humility and intellectual curiosity. The candidate needs to have a decent amount of the skills required for the role, but as long as they have humility and curiosity, then the rest can almost always be learned. I am also a strong believer in treating people beautiful-

The HR Organization of the Future … What Does It Mean?” nization at LinkedIn. LinkedIn is one of the most success-

ny culture. Typically, these are individuals who think be-

what can aspiring employees learn to improve?

“How LinkedIn Is Creating

Pat Wadors is Senior Vice President of Global Talent Orga-

have the ability to inspire leaders and influence compa-

ly. At LinkedIn we are in hyper growth and in order to maintain our wonderful culture we need to continue to hire people who believe in this sentiment. We also need gain a fresh perspective. What better way to do this, and tap into the collective brainpower, than by bringing together the best and the brightest interns from around the Bay Area? We did just that this past summer when we hosted our first ever HR Hackathon event. Teams comprised of technical and non-technical interns competed against each other to come up with the coolest, most creative, out-of-the box solutions to today’s toughest HR problems. Over 150 interns from companies across the Bay Area participated, and the energy level and breadth of ideas generated from each team was inspiring. The future of HR is not about avoiding policies and processes, it is more about innovation and knowing what should be global vs. local, and creating unique experiences that differentiate your company. These leaders help evolve/create an amazing talent brand for their organizations and influence HR practices in their community. They are willing to experiment and compete for talent in new ways. I meet with my peers and other HR and Talent Acquisition leaders every single week. What I am discovering, are more leaders are in that third bucket or are leaders who aspire to be in that space. It means taking more intelligent risks. They

to constantly reinforce our culture through our behaviors and decisions we make every

Pat Wadors and participants of LinkedIn’s inaugural HR Hackathon. Photo credit: Tony Chung

to work for. Connect with those employees and see how they navigate the company. Remember – a company’s best hire is a referral from someone else at the company. If you really want to work somewhere try to find alumni from your alma mater that already works there, grab coffee with a current employee, follow the company, etc. Leverage your network to help you get your next job.

day. Pulsing our employees twice

SVL: HR is the catalyst - What

a year on an employee voice sur-

makes a good employee, man-

vey is one way in which we gauge

ager, leader desirable and great

our culture and engagement.

for the company and also for the

To help drive talent strategies

employee, himself/herself?

that truly enable our businesses success – we need data. Talent Analytics is the new oil. At LinkedIn we have built a talent analytics team to help us find, engage, hire and retain the right people. The data helps us understand things like where the candidates are, what skillsets they have, and who our competition is. This data also helps me keep an eye on our organizational health. What is our hiring pattern? Where do we have the most effective leaders? What do they do different that we can leverage in other teams? What are the key drivers to engagement? Data helps us solve problems and improve as a company. Regarding aspiring employees they need to learn to build out their network; connect with people who they went to school with, or worked with. Add your friends and family. Then learn about the companies and cultures you aspire

PW: I believe that a good employee is always learning, has a strong work ethic and is a brand ambassador for their organization. Managers and leaders need to lead the way. They create the vision that others aspire to achieve. They need to be authentic and treat people beautifully. They should ensure their teams are working on a good mix of projects that both stretches them in their skills and contributes to the success of the company. They encourage the team to come to the table with solutions, not problems. They realize that mistakes are just part of the necessary learning curve and should not be hidden. They believe in transparency to build trust. They strive to be both empowering while holding themselves and their teams accountable.


A SPECIAL CONVERSATION

WITH PAT WADORS, Senior Vice President of Global Talent Organization at LinkedIn

ful and fastest growing companies in Silicon Valley and the world. Pat joined LinkedIn in January 2013 “to lead its world-class talent (HR) team. In addition to hiring, retaining and inspiring top talent, Pat is also responsible for all employee related HR programs at LinkedIn, including compensation and benefits and performance management”. Since her arrival, the company has nearly tripled in size. All this, and more, is why she is one of the most respected voices in business. In this brief conversation, enjoy what is some of her vision and philosophies, as we indeed have … SVL: How do you see HR evolving – from what it was to where it is and your vision of where you see it heading? PW: HR is evolving from a function that is often viewed as process oriented to more of an innovative role. Typically, HR folks are not the first to deviate from the norm, but successful companies will have HR teams that are not only subject matter experts but they innovate at the same time. They are the ones in the industry that are making Human Resources hip and progressive. This is what we aspire to at LinkedIn. For instance, I am always looking to move the needle and to

yond their own boarders and think of talent issues that affect the world. They become game changers. Q: Regarding talent – What are some of the key elements looked for – How important are data analytics and PW: When it comes to talent I hire for humility and intellectual curiosity. The candidate needs to have a decent amount of the skills required for the role, but as long as they have humility and curiosity, then the rest can almost

The HR Organization of the Future … What Does It Mean?” nization at LinkedIn. LinkedIn is one of the most success-

ny culture. Typically, these are individuals who think be-

what can aspiring employees learn to improve?

“How LinkedIn Is Creating

Pat Wadors is Senior Vice President of Global Talent Orga-

have the ability to inspire leaders and influence compa-

gain a fresh perspective. What better way to do this, and tap into the collective brainpower, than by bringing together the best and the brightest interns from around the Bay Area? We did just that this past summer when we hosted our first ever HR Hackathon event. Teams comprised of technical and non-technical interns competed against each other to come up with the coolest, most creative, out-of-the box solutions to today’s toughest HR problems. Over 150 interns from companies across the Bay Area participated, and the energy level and breadth of ideas generated from each team was inspiring. The future of HR is not about avoiding policies and processes, it is more about innovation and knowing what should be global vs. local, and creating unique experiences that differentiate your company. These leaders help evolve/create an amazing talent brand for their organizations and influence HR practices in their community. They are willing to experiment and compete for talent in new ways. I meet with my peers and other HR and Talent Acquisition leaders every single week. What I am discovering, are more leaders are in that third bucket or are leaders who aspire to be in that space. It means taking more intelligent risks. They

Pat Wadors and participants of LinkedIn’s inaugural HR Hackathon. Photo credit: Tony Chung

always be learned.

to work for. Connect with those employees and see how

I am also a strong believer in treating people beautiful-

they navigate the company. Remember – a company’s

ly. At LinkedIn we are in hyper growth and in order to

best hire is a referral from someone else at the company.

maintain our wonderful culture we need to continue to

If you really want to work somewhere try to find alum-

hire people who believe in this sentiment. We also need

ni from your alma mater that already works there, grab

to constantly reinforce our culture through our behav-

coffee with a current employee, follow the company, etc.

iors and decisions we make every

Leverage your network to help you get your next job.

day. Pulsing our employees twice a year on an employee voice sur-

Q: HR is the catalyst - What

vey is one way in which we gauge

makes a good employee, man-

our culture and engagement.

ager, leader desirable and great

To help drive talent strategies

for the company and also for the

that truly enable our businesses

employee, himself/herself?

success – we need data. Talent Analytics is the new oil.

PW: I believe that a good em-

At LinkedIn we have built a talent analytics team to help

ployee is always learning, has a strong work ethic and is a

us find, engage, hire and retain the right people. The data

brand ambassador for their organization.

helps us understand things like where the candidates

Managers and leaders need to lead the way. They cre-

are, what skillsets they have, and who our competition is.

ate the vision that others aspire to achieve. They need to

This data also helps me keep an eye on our organization-

be authentic and treat people beautifully. They should

al health. What is our hiring pattern? Where do we have

ensure their teams are working on a good mix of proj-

the most effective leaders? What do they do different

ects that both stretches them in their skills and contrib-

that we can leverage in other teams? What are the key

utes to the success of the company. They encourage the

drivers to engagement? Data helps us solve problems

team to come to the table with solutions, not problems.

and improve as a company.

They realize that mistakes are just part of the necessary

Regarding aspiring employees they need to learn to build

learning curve and should not be hidden. They believe

out their network; connect with people who they went to

in transparency to build trust. They strive to be both em-

school with, or worked with. Add your friends and family.

powering while holding themselves and their teams ac-

Then learn about the companies and cultures you aspire

countable.


Female Ground Breakers in Professional Sports

Michele Roberts: National Basketball Association

Michele Roberts was ranked Numero Uno by a panel of sports insiders for the top spot on a list of “The 25 Most Powerful Women in Sports,” and for good reason. As the current executive director of the NBA Players Association, Roberts represents the interests of over 300 of the best basketball players in the world. Michele is the first woman to ever hold the position and is first woman to head a major professional sports union in the United States. A graduate of UC Berkeley Law and former trial attorney, Roberts success is an inspiration to women everywhere.

Sarah Thomas: National Football League

NFL Down Judge Sarah Thomas has made making history a habit. In 2007 she was the first ever female official to work in a major college football game. Since then Sara was the first ever female official to work a college football bowl game, the first ever full-time female official to work in the National Football League and in January of 2019 Sarah became the first ever female official to participate in an NFL playoff game. Aside from making football history, Sarah lettered five times playing high-school softball and received a basketball scholarship to the University of Mobile where she was an academic all-American.

Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird: Women’s National Basketball Association/Team USA

Legends in the making and double trouble for opposing teams, point guards Diana Taurasi of the Phoenix Mercury and Sue Bird of the Seattle Storm account for a combined eight Olympic and seven FIBA World Cup gold medals and will again team up for the 2020 Olympics. Taurasi was the first WNBA player to score 8,000 points and is the league’s all-time leader in field goals. One of the highest paid female athletes in the world, at 38 years old Sue Bird is still a backcourt phenom with ball-handling skills that rival those of any basketball player, male or female, at any level. Unless one of them breaks a leg, the 2020 gold medal should be a lock for Team USA.

Alex Morgan: Women’s Professional Soccer

Women in sports have come a long way since the inception of Title IX in 1965. In an industry that had for so long been dominated by men, women have assumed their rightful place as being able to hold their own both on the field and in the front office, even obliterating the glass ceiling in some instances. Here are just a few cases in point:

Very few players can start out at the top and stay there, but Alex Morgan has made it look easy. Soccer fans will never forget Alex Morgan’s game-winning shot in overtime that beat Canada and sent the USA Women to the gold medal match vs Japan in the 2012 London Olympic Games. Since her juggernaut debut, Alex has played professionally at home and abroad, including a stint with the French Olympique Lyonnais, where she helped the team win a French Cup and UEFA title. Most recently, in July of 2019, Morgan once again help the U.S. team win the FIFA Women’s World Cup and was awarded the Silver Boot.

Serena Williams: Professional Tennis

Ranked as Number One in the world eight different times, Serena Williams has won more combined Grand Slam tennis titles then any active player, with 39 major victories. Serena is the most recent female player to hold all four of the singles Grand Slam titles at once, is only the third player in professional tennis history to do it more than once and is also the most recent player to win a championship on hard court, grass and clay in one year. With over $28 million in earnings in 2016 and again in 2017, Williams was the only woman to make Forbes’ list of the 100 highest paid athletes. At 37 years old in 2019, Williams is ranked 8th in the world and will arguably go down in history as one of the greatest female athletes of all time.


Female Ground Breakers in Professional Sports

Michele Roberts: National Basketball Association

Michele Roberts was ranked Numero Uno by a panel of sports insiders for the top spot on a list of “The 25 Most Powerful Women in Sports,” and for good reason. As the current executive director of the NBA Players Association, Roberts represents the interests of over 300 of the best basketball players in the world. Michele is the first woman to ever hold the position and is first woman to head a major professional sports union in the United States. A graduate of UC Berkeley Law and former trial attorney, Roberts success is an inspiration to women everywhere.

Sarah Thomas: National Football League

NFL Down Judge Sarah Thomas has made making history a habit. In 2007 she was the first ever female official to work in a major college football game. Since then Sara was the first ever female official to work a college football bowl game, the first ever full-time female official to work in the National Football League and in January of 2019 Sarah became the first ever female official to participate in an NFL playoff game. Aside from making football history, Sarah lettered five times playing high-school softball and received a basketball scholarship to the University of Mobile where she was an academic all-American.

Diana Taurasi and Sue Bird: Women’s National Basketball Association/Team USA

Legends in the making and double trouble for opposing teams, point guards Diana Taurasi of the Phoenix Mercury and Sue Bird of the Seattle Storm account for a combined eight Olympic and seven FIBA World Cup gold medals and will again team up for the 2020 Olympics. Taurasi was the first WNBA player to score 8,000 points and is the league’s all-time leader in field goals. One of the highest paid female athletes in the world, at 38 years old Sue Bird is still a backcourt phenom with ball-handling skills that rival those of any basketball player, male or female, at any level. Unless one of them breaks a leg, the 2020 gold medal should be a lock for Team USA.

Alex Morgan: Women’s Professional Soccer

Women in sports have come a long way since the inception of Title IX in 1965. In an industry that had for so long been dominated by men, women have assumed their rightful place as being able to hold their own both on the field and in the front office, even obliterating the glass ceiling in some instances. Here are just a few cases in point:

Very few players can start out at the top and stay there, but Alex Morgan has made it look easy. Soccer fans will never forget Alex Morgan’s game-winning shot in overtime that beat Canada and sent the USA Women to the gold medal match vs Japan in the 2012 London Olympic Games. Since her juggernaut debut, Alex has played professionally at home and abroad, including a stint with the French Olympique Lyonnais, where she helped the team win a French Cup and UEFA title. Most recently, in July of 2019, Morgan once again help the U.S. team win the FIFA Women’s World Cup and was awarded the Silver Boot.

Serena Williams: Professional Tennis

Ranked as Number One in the world eight different times, Serena Williams has won more combined Grand Slam tennis titles then any active player, with 39 major victories. Serena is the most recent female player to hold all four of the singles Grand Slam titles at once, is only the third player in professional tennis history to do it more than once and is also the most recent player to win a championship on hard court, grass and clay in one year. With over $28 million in earnings in 2016 and again in 2017, Williams was the only woman to make Forbes’ list of the 100 highest paid athletes. At 37 years old in 2019, Williams is ranked 8th in the world and will arguably go down in history as one of the greatest female athletes of all time.


Meet Denise Bevers

Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy

Co-Founder & COO of KindredBio Q: Why/how did you get into the animal health industry? DB: For over 20 years I worked in the human drug development and medical communications industries, managing dozens of products and development programs from Phase I though Phase IV. While I enjoyed what I was doing, I wanted to do something that also paired with my love for animals and degree in zoology. I was fortunate to be able to leverage my years of experience in drug development and investor relations to co-found KindredBio, a company dedicated to developing cutting-edge therapeutics for cats, dogs, and horses. As the parent of frogs, hermit crabs, mice, rats, bunnies, hamsters, and a dog as a child (not all at the same time), my mother is not surprised by my success or that of KindredBio! Q: Who has been a career inspiration to you? DB: I met my co-founder and KindredBio CEO, Dr. Richard Chin, when we worked together at Elan Pharmaceuticals. Right away, I felt connected to him and his business philosophies. As a Harvard-trained physician and former Rhodes Scholar, with a track record of almost a dozen drug approvals, I knew I could learn from him and that my clinical operations expertise and management skills would benefit him as well. When we left Elan, we kept in touch and I always knew we would work together again. Then, in 2012, we began to talk about how we could pair our decades of experience and love of animals to start a veterinary biopharmaceutical company. That’s when we started KindredBio and never looked back. I feel very fortunate to be in partnership with Richard because our diverse skill set and management styles that really complement one another. Q: People think of pets as part of their family, how does that fit in with what you do? DB: Our fury companions have truly become members of the family proven by Americans spending $700 million each year on Valentine’s Day gifts for our beloved pets. The evolution of the pet as a family member has been relatively short. In my lifetime, I have seen dogs move from the yard, to the dog house, to a sequestered room behind a gate, and now, 40% of pets sleep in bed with their pet parents! In 2016, pet owners in the U.S. spent over $66 billion on their pets, and increase of over 10% from the year before. There is a critical need, and

willingness to pay, for innovative medicines for our pets. We found that there are few companies dedicated to developing such therapies for companion animals, with a market in dire need, which is why we founded KindredBio. Q: What’s KindredBio’s mission? DB: Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy. Our core strategy is to leverage the billions of dollars that have been invested in human drug development by modifying, improving, and repurposing pre-existing drugs and pursuing biological targets that have already proven to be safe and effective in humans. We have developed a team of veterinarians, scientists, and operational experts who love animals and want to develop therapeutics that have been appropriately studied and, eventually, approved by FDA for use in pets. The passion that we have for pet wellness is infectious throughout the organization. Q: Why did you decide to headquarter the company in Silicon Valley? DB: We love the energy that comes with working in an innovative hub of technology like Silicon Valley. The bay area is an epicenter of biotechnology and Richard, who spent years as the head of Clinical Research for biotherapeutics at Genentech, has recruited a world-class team of scientists and protein engineers to develop our cutting-edge biologics for cats, dogs, and horses. Because of the talent in the area, we have put together an incredible team that is innovating in lockstep with human breakthroughs, such as those in immunotherapy. Importantly, the energy of the valley, along with the great weather and access to outdoor pursuits, is what allows us to attract top talent to our organization. Q: What were some of the challenges you faced as a woman raising money on Wall Street? DB: I grew up in biotech and pharma in California, and was fortunate that I did not feel limited by a glass ceiling in my career trajectory. It was quite apparent to me as we began our testing-the-waters meetings and eventual IPO roadshow that there were many fewer female decision-makers on Wall Street. There were entire days on the roadshow when I would not see a single woman at the table. I have always felt that, regardless of gender, it is critical to know your business and industry better than any-

one else in the room. Because we had a very strong business plan that I knew inside-and-out, I did not feel a need to alter my pitch because of my gender. The fact that my passion for animals and KindredBio shines through my pitch, perhaps more because of my delivery as a woman, is only an asset. I am happy to say that, in the nearly four years as a publicly-held company, I do meet more and more female investors at the table who are decision-makers.

and competitors to the product and the customer. Do your homework. Combine your passion and knowledge with drive and persistence, and you are well on your way.

SVL: Tell me about the drugs you have in development and how they help animals? DB: We are currently anticipating FDA approval and launch of Zimeta™ (dipyrone injection), a novel, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory for the control of fever in horses, and Mirataz™ (mirtazapine 2% topical ointment) for the management of weight loss in cats. It says so much about our team that we have two drugs under review by FDA in less than 5 years of founding the company. In addition to those products, we have approximately 20 products in development for a variety of diseases for cats, dogs, and horses. In the future, we will be helping animals with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders, to name a few.

SVL: What is the best advice you’ve ever received? DB: While my Mom didn’t verbalize advice as much as she led by example, she taught me to follow my passion, regardless of where society pushed me (or even where she thought I should be heading). She raised two girls as a single parent and worked two jobs at once, as a special education teacher and a waitress. She also got her Master’s degree before I graduated high school and found time to attend the Academy of Dramatic Arts to fulfill her creative needs. As a child of the 70’s and 80’s, she was a phenomenal role model, who taught me that a woman could be anything she set out to be. She supported my every whim as a child, as long as it was something I was passionate about. I saw the way she loved teaching and nurturing children with learning challenges, and the fulfillment she received in return, which showed me how to have a

SVL: What is your advice for companies who are fundraising for their businesses? DB: Tout your brain and your heart. Telling your story and conveying your vision is a huge part of connecting with a potential investor. Your heart will show how much you believe in what you are doing. Investors will see that. It’s equally important to show your knowledge of what you are selling. Investors want to see that you know what you are talking about – from the industry

rewarding career, driven by passion. SVL: What hobbies or interests do you enjoy when you aren’t working? DB: My husband, Lon, and I enjoy traveling, music, and theater in our spare time. We have had the opportunity to support theatrical productions on and off Broadway. In additional to adventure travel, we find the dozens of concerts we attend each year to be a great way to be in the moment and relax. We have recently become horse enthusiasts and owners of a grand prix show jumper, Wasco, as well as parent to a border collie, Betty, and two cats, Gladys and Glover.


Meet Denise Bevers

Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy

Co-Founder & COO of KindredBio SVL: Why/how did you get into the animal health industry? DB: For over 20 years I worked in the human drug development and medical communications industries, managing dozens of products and development programs from Phase I though Phase IV. While I enjoyed what I was doing, I wanted to do something that also paired with my love for animals and degree in zoology. I was fortunate to be able to leverage my years of experience in drug development and investor relations to co-found KindredBio, a company dedicated to developing cutting-edge therapeutics for cats, dogs, and horses. As the parent of frogs, hermit crabs, mice, rats, bunnies, hamsters, and a dog as a child (not all at the same time), my mother is not surprised by my success or that of KindredBio! SVL: Who has been a career inspiration to you? DB: I met my co-founder and KindredBio CEO, Dr. Richard Chin, when we worked together at Elan Pharmaceuticals. Right away, I felt connected to him and his business philosophies. As a Harvard-trained physician and former Rhodes Scholar, with a track record of almost a dozen drug approvals, I knew I could learn from him and that my clinical operations expertise and management skills would benefit him as well. When we left Elan, we kept in touch and I always knew we would work together again. Then, in 2012, we began to talk about how we could pair our decades of experience and love of animals to start a veterinary biopharmaceutical company. That’s when we started KindredBio and never looked back. I feel very fortunate to be in partnership with Richard because our diverse skill set and management styles that really complement one another. SVL: People think of pets as part of their family, how does that fit in with what you do? DB: Our fury companions have truly become members of the family proven by Americans spending $700 million each year on Valentine’s Day gifts for our beloved pets. The evolution of the pet as a family member has been relatively short. In my lifetime, I have seen dogs move from the yard, to the dog house, to a sequestered room behind a gate, and now, 40% of pets sleep in bed with their pet parents! In 2016, pet owners in the U.S. spent over $66 billion on their pets, and increase of over 10% from the year before. There is a critical need, and

willingness to pay, for innovative medicines for our pets. We found that there are few companies dedicated to developing such therapies for companion animals, with a market in dire need, which is why we founded KindredBio. SVL: What’s KindredBio’s mission? DB: Our mission is to bring our pets the same kinds of innovative, safe, and effective medicines that our human family members enjoy. Our core strategy is to leverage the billions of dollars that have been invested in human drug development by modifying, improving, and repurposing pre-existing drugs and pursuing biological targets that have already proven to be safe and effective in humans. We have developed a team of veterinarians, scientists, and operational experts who love animals and want to develop therapeutics that have been appropriately studied and, eventually, approved by FDA for use in pets. The passion that we have for pet wellness is infectious throughout the organization. SVL: Why did you decide to headquarter the company in Silicon Valley? DB: We love the energy that comes with working in an innovative hub of technology like Silicon Valley. The bay area is an epicenter of biotechnology and Richard, who spent years as the head of Clinical Research for biotherapeutics at Genentech, has recruited a world-class team of scientists and protein engineers to develop our cutting-edge biologics for cats, dogs, and horses. Because of the talent in the area, we have put together an incredible team that is innovating in lockstep with human breakthroughs, such as those in immunotherapy. Importantly, the energy of the valley, along with the great weather and access to outdoor pursuits, is what allows us to attract top talent to our organization. SVL: What were some of the challenges you faced as a woman raising money on Wall Street? DB: I grew up in biotech and pharma in California, and was fortunate that I did not feel limited by a glass ceiling in my career trajectory. It was quite apparent to me as we began our testing-the-waters meetings and eventual IPO roadshow that there were many fewer female decision-makers on Wall Street. There were entire days on the roadshow when I would not see a single woman at the table. I have always felt that, regardless of gender, it is critical to know your business and industry better than any-

one else in the room. Because we had a very strong business plan that I knew inside-and-out, I did not feel a need to alter my pitch because of my gender. The fact that my passion for animals and KindredBio shines through my pitch, perhaps more because of my delivery as a woman, is only an asset. I am happy to say that, in the nearly four years as a publicly-held company, I do meet more and more female investors at the table who are decision-makers.

and competitors to the product and the customer. Do your homework. Combine your passion and knowledge with drive and persistence, and you are well on your way.

Q: Tell me about the drugs you have in development and how they help animals? DB: We are currently anticipating FDA approval and launch of Zimeta™ (dipyrone injection), a novel, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory for the control of fever in horses, and Mirataz™ (mirtazapine 2% topical ointment) for the management of weight loss in cats. It says so much about our team that we have two drugs under review by FDA in less than 5 years of founding the company. In addition to those products, we have approximately 20 products in development for a variety of diseases for cats, dogs, and horses. In the future, we will be helping animals with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders, to name a few.

Q: What is the best advice you’ve ever received? DB: While my Mom didn’t verbalize advice as much as she led by example, she taught me to follow my passion, regardless of where society pushed me (or even where she thought I should be heading). She raised two girls as a single parent and worked two jobs at once, as a special education teacher and a waitress. She also got her Master’s degree before I graduated high school and found time to attend the Academy of Dramatic Arts to fulfill her creative needs. As a child of the 70’s and 80’s, she was a phenomenal role model, who taught me that a woman could be anything she set out to be. She supported my every whim as a child, as long as it was something I was passionate about. I saw the way she loved teaching and nurturing children with learning challenges, and the fulfillment she received in return, which showed me how to have a

Q: What is your advice for companies who are fundraising for their businesses? DB: Tout your brain and your heart. Telling your story and conveying your vision is a huge part of connecting with a potential investor. Your heart will show how much you believe in what you are doing. Investors will see that. It’s equally important to show your knowledge of what you are selling. Investors want to see that you know what you are talking about – from the industry

rewarding career, driven by passion. Q: What hobbies or interests do you enjoy when you aren’t working? DB: My husband, Lon, and I enjoy traveling, music, and theater in our spare time. We have had the opportunity to support theatrical productions on and off Broadway. In additional to adventure travel, we find the dozens of concerts we attend each year to be a great way to be in the moment and relax. We have recently become horse enthusiasts and owners of a grand prix show jumper, Wasco, as well as parent to a border collie, Betty, and two cats, Gladys and Glover.


They often say that the future is female, and they’re not wrong at all. Women are beginning to truly take the world by storm. They’re covering many different sectors, too. Women are starting to become bigger forces in everything from athletics to business. If you look around, you’ll probably notice that there are more small businesses owned by women than ever before. Things are changing in rapid and meaningful ways all over the United States and globe. It doesn’t look like things are going back ever again, either.

Small Businesses and

Female Owners

Women in sports have come a long way since the inception of Title IX in 1965. In an industry that had for so long been dominated by men, women have assumed their rightful place as being able to hold their own both on the field and in the front office, even obliterating the glass ceiling in some instances. Here are just a few cases in point:

Women of past decades and centuries were often kept down by societal standards. They in many cases felt as though they had no option but to lead certain types of lives. It wasn’t uncommon for women to believe that they had no option but to remain at home. The situation is totally different now, however, and without a doubt for the better. Women are rapidly discovering that they have more options than ever. It doesn’t matter if a woman wants to pursue a life as a small business owner. It doesn’t matter if she wants to go after a rewarding career as a staff member for a massive corporation, either. Women are gaining major traction in all sorts of career divisions. They’re setting fantastic examples for young girls that are part of newer generations, too.


They often say that the future is female, and they’re not wrong at all. Women are beginning to truly take the world by storm. They’re covering many different sectors, too. Women are starting to become bigger forces in everything from athletics to business. If you look around, you’ll probably notice that there are more small businesses owned by women than ever before. Things are changing in rapid and meaningful ways all over the United States and globe. It doesn’t look like things are going back ever again, either.

Small Businesses and

Female Owners

Women in sports have come a long way since the inception of Title IX in 1965. In an industry that had for so long been dominated by men, women have assumed their rightful place as being able to hold their own both on the field and in the front office, even obliterating the glass ceiling in some instances. Here are just a few cases in point:

Women of past decades and centuries were often kept down by societal standards. They in many cases felt as though they had no option but to lead certain types of lives. It wasn’t uncommon for women to believe that they had no option but to remain at home. The situation is totally different now, however, and without a doubt for the better. Women are rapidly discovering that they have more options than ever. It doesn’t matter if a woman wants to pursue a life as a small business owner. It doesn’t matter if she wants to go after a rewarding career as a staff member for a massive corporation, either. Women are gaining major traction in all sorts of career divisions. They’re setting fantastic examples for young girls that are part of newer generations, too.


longer taking others telling them that they cannot accomplish certain objectives. Women are not sitting back and settling for things. They’re standing up for themselves. They’re speaking up about the things on the planet that make them feel the most passionate. It’s happening in women across many different walks of life. It’s happening in women of many different age categorizations as well.

Women and Small Businesses of All Kinds Little girls are growing up with so many positive female role models around them. It isn’t hard to come across female small business owners in this day and age. If you visit a bakery or general dining establishment in your community, there’s a strong chance that it’s owned and operated by a hard-working woman. Women are quickly learning about all of the ins and outs that are associated with keeping businesses running smoothly. They’re figuring out the fundamentals of getting their hands-on business loans of all kinds. They’re figuring out the logistics that are part of recruiting staff members. They’re figuring out how to train their team mem-

bers. These things are only the beginning. There are many women nowadays who have bosses and who appreciate their careers. There are also many women who are having serious epiphanies. They’re realizing that they can opt to be their own bosses if they wish. They’re realizing that there are choices that go beyond being part of a company’s staff. They can make pertinent choices that relate to staffing. They can make meaningful choices that relate to getting their hands-on supplies and tools. What makes things so different for women who are keen on the concept of entrepreneurship as of late? Women are no

Women are becoming more supportive of their fellow female entrepreneurs, too. It’s not atypical to see women giving their full support to other businesses that are owned and managed by female aficionados. Sisterhood is more than alive in the United States. It’s more than alive all around the planet, too. Young girls in elementary schools are learning that sisterhood is a wonderful thing. They’re starting to make it a huge priority in their existences. Women have a lot of potential. The future may revolve around women and all their possibilities. They’re making enormous waves in all sorts of fields and industries. They’re thriving in science. They’re thriving in politics. They’re thriving in many sectors that go beyond those as well. It’s going to be fascinating to see where women will go next. Small businesses that are run by women are going to become even more ubiquitous.


longer taking others telling them that they cannot accomplish certain objectives. Women are not sitting back and settling for things. They’re standing up for themselves. They’re speaking up about the things on the planet that make them feel the most passionate. It’s happening in women across many different walks of life. It’s happening in women of many different age categorizations as well.

Women and Small Businesses of All Kinds Little girls are growing up with so many positive female role models around them. It isn’t hard to come across female small business owners in this day and age. If you visit a bakery or general dining establishment in your community, there’s a strong chance that it’s owned and operated by a hard-working woman. Women are quickly learning about all of the ins and outs that are associated with keeping businesses running smoothly. They’re figuring out the fundamentals of getting their hands-on business loans of all kinds. They’re figuring out the logistics that are part of recruiting staff members. They’re figuring out how to train their team mem-

bers. These things are only the beginning. There are many women nowadays who have bosses and who appreciate their careers. There are also many women who are having serious epiphanies. They’re realizing that they can opt to be their own bosses if they wish. They’re realizing that there are choices that go beyond being part of a company’s staff. They can make pertinent choices that relate to staffing. They can make meaningful choices that relate to getting their hands-on supplies and tools. What makes things so different for women who are keen on the concept of entrepreneurship as of late? Women are no

Women are becoming more supportive of their fellow female entrepreneurs, too. It’s not atypical to see women giving their full support to other businesses that are owned and managed by female aficionados. Sisterhood is more than alive in the United States. It’s more than alive all around the planet, too. Young girls in elementary schools are learning that sisterhood is a wonderful thing. They’re starting to make it a huge priority in their existences. Women have a lot of potential. The future may revolve around women and all their possibilities. They’re making enormous waves in all sorts of fields and industries. They’re thriving in science. They’re thriving in politics. They’re thriving in many sectors that go beyond those as well. It’s going to be fascinating to see where women will go next. Small businesses that are run by women are going to become even more ubiquitous.


Want to Advance your Career?

Find a Mentor! By Dr. Frumi Rachel Barr

Lux was a top performer. In the 20 years before I met her she was always considered a high potential employee. In her two decades in the IT department of a large financial institution she progressed slowly but steadily through the ranks. If there were a complex problem to resolve –Lux would get it done. And then she got stuck. She couldn’t understand why she was overlooked time and again to achieve a top position. The reason was simple – she never asked. Sometime being good at what you do can be what prevents you from getting ahead. Why would anyone advance Lux further when she was doing such an excellent job just where she was? And for her part, she never let anyone know that she had her eye on a very senior position. The game changer for her was the suggestion to find a Mentor. She chose the CFO of the organization who was both flattered and interested in being her guide. Within a very short time, after expressing her interest in moving up the ladder, and following her mentor’s suggested roadmap to success, she achieved her objective of being a senior V.P. And now it’s your turn. A Mentor is a wise and trusted counselor and guide. In “traditional” corporations an executive or senior person is assigned a “high potential” to assist in his or her development. A Mentor has a body of knowledge that a Mentee would like to learn. For example, in an accounting firm, information regarding technical matters and professional development are often transferred from Mentor to Mentee. There are many reasons why having a Mentor can acceler-

ate your career. Here are three for you to consider: • Guidance regarding how to navigate corporate politics. For women, it sometimes helps to have a Mentor who is also female. Your role as a Mentee is to be open to the feedback, suggestions, and critiques that are offered to you. This will maximize the effect of the support you receive. • Assistance finding connections, the “whos” who can help you get where you’d like to be more quickly. The question to ask is “who do you know who….” • And thirdly, guidance in how to improve your skills. Within the context of a mentoring relationship the Mentor assists an individual fill a particular knowledge gap by learning how to do things more effectively. In your search for a Mentor, it’s a good idea to choose someone working in the same functional area as you are, as well as someone who shares your values. Professional organizations in your field, whether they offer formal mentoring programs or not, can be excellent sources of Mentors. Test the waters by asking for advice first. Be open to sharing your concerns and fears. Mentors are most likely to invest themselves in those in whom they see a little of themselves. Don’t think that you, as a Mentee, get all the benefits from the relationship. In my experience mentoring is a rich and rewarding experience and I’ve learned more about technologies from my Mentees than I would ever have learned on my own! Having a well chosen Mentor to guide you can be a game changer in accelerating your career. Do it now! DrFrumi@Scaling4growth.com www.Scaling4Growth.com


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Meet

Keynote speakers Randi Zuckerberg and NASA’s Dr. Natalia Batalha, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, playwright Lauren Gunderson, and speaker Ann Bowers at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

Jenny

Dearborn,

Senior Vice Present, Chief Learning Officer, SAP

Speaking on The Art of Learning, Developing & Inspiring Leadership When you talk about Leadership, Management, Human Relations, Sales, and Excellence and someone who is one of the most inspiring, leading positive role models in Silicon Valley - Jenny Dearborn’s name will come up. 

J

at Hewlett-Packard, Sun Microsystems (acquired by Oracle), Suc-

peers are awesome and my manager is visionary and just

cessFactors and SAP. I’ve been a Chief Learning Officer at four

an all-around great guy. I love the type of work that I do,

different companies.

it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do – leading the function at my company, helping

SVL: Who and what inspired you along your path to be where you

customers solve complex business challenges, writing arti-

are?

cles and speaking at conferences on topics that are import-

JD: I am severely Dyslexic, have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hy-

ant to me like data analytics, business strategy, the future

peractivity Disorder) and mild OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Dis-

of workplace and diversity & inclusion.

order) and was undiagnosed until age 18. The most formative part of my early life was

enny is Senior Vice President and Chief Learning Officer

and a Teaching Credential in 1993, and San Jose State University

growing up knowing that I was very smart

of SAP, the world’s largest business-to-business software

with a MBA in Organizational Development in 2003.

and capable, but placed in the lower tracked and Special Education classes at school. I felt

company, and is accountable for the learning and devel-

I love the type of work that I do, it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do

SVL: You have learned so much about the special dynamics of Leadership … First, what is your definition of Leadership? JD: Great leaders inspire a common purpose, collaboratively create a shared vision and

opment of the 75,000 SAP employees worldwide. She has won

Q: Where do you work? What do you do? What has been your

that my early education years were wasted.

many top industry awards, including recognition as one of the 50

path leading you to today?

I felt great resentment towards the teach-

Most Powerful Women in Technology by the National Diversity

JD: I work at SAP, the world’s largest business software company.

ers and school system and vowed to make

Council in 2014 and 2015.

As the Chief Learning Officer, I’m accountable for the training, ed-

a difference in the education system so no

Her invaluable experience...plus interviews with more than 100

ucation, development and readiness of SAP’s 75,000 employees

student would ever experience the frustra-

global leaders,...has led to her best seller: Data Driven - How Per-

world-wide. I am in Human Resources and report to the Chief Hu-

tion and humiliation that I went through in

formance Analytics Delivers Extraordinary Sales Results.

man Resources Officer who reports to the CEO. I started as a high

my K-12 years. I felt great passion to drive

In the high tech universe, Jenny serves as a highly regarded advo-

school English, Public Speaking and Drama teacher at Woodside

change in our education system. This fire

cate and inspiration for many. Please enjoy this delightful conver-

High School. After two years I transitioned to corporate education

got me started in education, then after 2 years as a high school

their greatest potential. “Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to

sation with Jenny Dearborn...

as an instructor at Hewlett-Packard teaching the personal devel-

teacher I transitioned to the corporate education world for the

high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher stan-

opment, management and leadership courses. I worked my way

opportunity to apply exciting and growing new learning tech-

dard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.”

Q: Where were you born and raised? Where did you go to

up through all the various roles in corporate learning and educa-

nology to impact learners on a mass scale.

—Peter Drucker

school and what did you study?

tion including carrying a quota in Sales selling learning services

JD: I was born in Marin, California and raised K-12 in Davis, Califor-

to external corporate customers and partners. I’ve worked at a

SVL: What do you like most about what you do?

ple, they instinctively redirect all credit to the team when praise

nia. I graduated from Davis High School in 1987, American River

small learning technology start-up that went public (Docent, now

JD: There are so many things I like, that I can’t say what I

comes and absorb all blame when criticism comes. They are slow

College with an AA in Social Science in 1989, UC Berkeley with a

Sum Total Systems), and had a succession of executive roles with

like the most. I love my team, they are hands down the

to punish and swift to reward. Leadership is about the courage to

BA in English in 1991, Stanford University with a MA in Education

increasing responsibility in Human Resources, Sales & Services

best professionals I’ve ever worked with in my career. My

stand alone and the integrity of intent. “Leadership and learning

translate that vision into reality. Leadership is about action and driving results for the greatest good, great leaders see solutions where others only see challenges and obstacles. Great leaders know that people want to “make a dent in the universe” as Steve Jobs famously said, and make the world a better place. This comes through empowering others to achieve

Great leaders have the humility to be a servant leader to their peo-


Meet

Keynote speakers Randi Zuckerberg and NASA’s Dr. Natalia Batalha, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, playwright Lauren Gunderson, and speaker Ann Bowers at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

Jenny

Dearborn,

Senior Vice Present, Chief Learning Officer, SAP

Speaking on The Art of Learning, Developing & Inspiring Leadership When you talk about Leadership, Management, Human Relations, Sales, and Excellence and someone who is one of the most inspiring, leading positive role models in Silicon Valley - Jenny Dearborn’s name will come up. 

J

at Hewlett-Packard, Sun Microsystems (acquired by Oracle), Suc-

peers are awesome and my manager is visionary and just

cessFactors and SAP. I’ve been a Chief Learning Officer at four

an all-around great guy. I love the type of work that I do,

different companies.

it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do – leading the function at my company, helping

Q: Who and what inspired you along your path to be where you

customers solve complex business challenges, writing arti-

are?

cles and speaking at conferences on topics that are import-

JD: I am severely Dyslexic, have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hy-

ant to me like data analytics, business strategy, the future

peractivity Disorder) and mild OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Dis-

of workplace and diversity & inclusion.

order) and was undiagnosed until age 18. The most formative part of my early life was

enny is Senior Vice President and Chief Learning Officer

and a Teaching Credential in 1993, and San Jose State University

growing up knowing that I was very smart

of SAP, the world’s largest business-to-business software

with a MBA in Organizational Development in 2003.

and capable, but placed in the lower tracked and Special Education classes at school. I felt

company, and is accountable for the learning and devel-

I love the type of work that I do, it’s challenging and rewarding. I love the variety in the work I do

Q: You have learned so much about the special dynamics of Leadership … First, what is your definition of Leadership? JD: Great leaders inspire a common purpose, collaboratively create a shared vision and translate that vision into reality. Leadership is

opment of the 75,000 SAP employees worldwide. She has won

SVL: Where do you work? What do you do? What has been your

that my early education years were wasted.

many top industry awards, including recognition as one of the 50

path leading you to today?

I felt great resentment towards the teach-

Most Powerful Women in Technology by the National Diversity

JD: I work at SAP, the world’s largest business software company.

ers and school system and vowed to make

Council in 2014 and 2015.

As the Chief Learning Officer, I’m accountable for the training, ed-

a difference in the education system so no

Her invaluable experience...plus interviews with more than 100

ucation, development and readiness of SAP’s 75,000 employees

student would ever experience the frustra-

global leaders,...has led to her best seller: Data Driven - How Per-

world-wide. I am in Human Resources and report to the Chief Hu-

tion and humiliation that I went through in

formance Analytics Delivers Extraordinary Sales Results.

man Resources Officer who reports to the CEO. I started as a high

my K-12 years. I felt great passion to drive

In the high tech universe, Jenny serves as a highly regarded advo-

school English, Public Speaking and Drama teacher at Woodside

change in our education system. This fire

cate and inspiration for many. Please enjoy this delightful conver-

High School. After two years I transitioned to corporate education

got me started in education, then after 2 years as a high school

their greatest potential. “Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to

sation with Jenny Dearborn...

as an instructor at Hewlett-Packard teaching the personal devel-

teacher I transitioned to the corporate education world for the

high sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher stan-

opment, management and leadership courses. I worked my way

opportunity to apply exciting and growing new learning tech-

dard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.”

SVL: Where were you born and raised? Where did you go to

up through all the various roles in corporate learning and educa-

nology to impact learners on a mass scale.

—Peter Drucker

school and what did you study?

tion including carrying a quota in Sales selling learning services

JD: I was born in Marin, California and raised K-12 in Davis, Califor-

to external corporate customers and partners. I’ve worked at a

Q: What do you like most about what you do?

ple, they instinctively redirect all credit to the team when praise

nia. I graduated from Davis High School in 1987, American River

small learning technology start-up that went public (Docent, now

JD: There are so many things I like, that I can’t say what I

comes and absorb all blame when criticism comes. They are slow

College with an AA in Social Science in 1989, UC Berkeley with a

Sum Total Systems), and had a succession of executive roles with

like the most. I love my team, they are hands down the

to punish and swift to reward. Leadership is about the courage to

BA in English in 1991, Stanford University with a MA in Education

increasing responsibility in Human Resources, Sales & Services

best professionals I’ve ever worked with in my career. My

stand alone and the integrity of intent. “Leadership and learning

about action and driving results for the greatest good, great leaders see solutions where others only see challenges and obstacles. Great leaders know that people want to “make a dent in the universe” as Steve Jobs famously said, and make the world a better place. This comes through empowering others to achieve

Great leaders have the humility to be a servant leader to their peo-


are indispensable to each other.” —John F. Kennedy Q: What is the best course of action for management when it comes to Leadership? What is the best course of action for the employee when it comes to Leadership? JD: I believe in leadership at every level, leadership is about person power not position power. Everyone, regardless if they are people managers or individual contributors, can and should be a leader.

Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency.

Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

Q: How do you see the workplace evolving and improving?

Keynote speakers Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo, New York Times best-selling author Lalita Tademy, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and Emmy Award-winning writer and producer Margaret Nagle at TheatreWorks Silicon Valley’s Leading Ladies event celebrating passion in arts and innovation, held in 2015, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography TheatreWorks Artistic Director Robert Kelley, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and TheatreWorks Managing Director Phil Santora at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

JD: The overarching theme for the workplace of the future is transparency.

the help you need.

business trip to align with a school break or just pull them from school

• Transparency in how we work: Your mobile device will become your office.

• Let it go – Your house does not have to be spotless. When you have a full

for a week here or there. John (or a grandparent or nanny) and the kids

• Transparency in where we work: We’ll work from everywhere - Workers will be

work and family life, the children have to learn to be independent. With

visit the local sites while I’m at the office working. We’ve done work/

spread across many time zones and countries in numerous satellite offices for

clear and consistent communication, every child can do their own laun-

family trips to: Mexico, Germany, China, Dubai, Singapore, Japan, Pan-

worker interaction, but not necessarily as daily destinations. Always-on video will

dry, clean their own rooms, clean the kitchen and bathrooms, make their

ama, Canada, England, France, Amsterdam, Australia, Belgium, Italy,

facilitate collaboration with colleagues in other locations.

own breakfast and lunch. Learning to be responsible and capable early on

to name a few….

• Transparency of our competence and value: Everyone will have a rating score,

is good for everyone.

I throw myself fully into what my children love as a way to spend time

based on his/her reputation capital, which is the sum total of your personal brand,

• Focus and prioritize – Do the high value work that only you can do and

together doing what interests them. Currently my 12 year old is ab-

the quality of your results, your expertise, depth and breadth of experience and

outsource the rest. You can outsource the laundry but your child only

solutely obsessed with Giants baseball, so he and I watch the games

social networks. The new workplace will be a results only work environment.

wants you there to see her win an award at school. Knowing how to fo-

together. It’s our special thing to do.

• Transparency in who we work for: Every manager will also have a rating score

cus on your highest priorities makes a big career and a big family possible.

I love to be creative. I write and publish articles in business magazines

based on similar criteria plus people management and functional leadership.

SVL: What do you see are some of the major issues facing us in today’s

and my first book Data Driven: How Performance Analytics Delivers

Employees will be hired into a company and then choose which manager they

work environment?

Extraordinary Sales Results was published in March 2015 – it debuted

want to work for based on the rating score of that manager.

JD: The globalization of work and changing demographics of the

at #1 in the new business releases on Amazon. I like to paint large

• Transparency of skill gaps: Big data, predictive analytics and artificial intelli-

workforce; multiple generations in the workplace

scale acrylic on canvas pictures, primarily pop art versions of comic

gence are enabling a workplace of the future that magnifies the global talent

• Contingent labor force

book superheroes.

shortage and makes more sparse highly skilled workers. Thus making lifelong

• Big data and analytics

learning a business requirement.

• Adaptation of mobile and social networks

SVL: Who are some of your favorite authors and what are some of your favorite books? Different topics? Are there books you like to rec-

Q: What do you recommend as tips and strategies for work-life balance?

SVL: If you could wave a magic wand, what would you like to see for

ommend?

JD: Well, I don’t think there is such a thing as work-life balance, but work-life inte-

progress in the workplace?

JD: I try to read what my kids are reading for pleasure or in school to

gration is very do-able. I was recently quoted in the Fortune Magazine article on

JD: I’d like to see a true meritocracy in the workplace. A workplace

make our dinner table conversation richer with the themes they are

this topic - Women with big jobs and big families: Balancing really isn’t that hard.

where people are paid equally for equal work regardless of their gen-

exploring and how to connect with broader issues in the world. So

Here are the tips and strategies mentioned in that article and others that I use.

der or race, and the diversity in the workplace at all levels of an organi-

if it’s a popular young adult series, I’ve probably read it. I go through

• Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re

zation mirroring the diversity in the population at large.

phases with the books I read. Right now I’m doing a research project on the knowledge and skills first time managers need and I’m reading

managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency. I use a shared on-line calendar and each kid is color coded, they all have an

SVL: Who are some of the people who inspire you most and why?

stacks and stacks of books and white papers on the topic. For fun I

iPhone and can see where they need to be at any given time.

JD: My children and husband. I follow the research of a few social

listen to audio books and love Doris Kearns Goodwin who is such a

• Prioritize self care – Put your own oxygen mask on first. Managing your life takes

scientists, like Amy Cuddy of Harvard and Kelly McGonigal of Stanford,

great story teller.

energy, so never skimp on sleep, nutrition or exercise.

I find their work fascinating. SVL: What are some of your favorite movies, music, theater?

• Build your support team at work – Invest in the development of your staff to be accountable and independent. Seek sponsors and allies that understand and

SVL: You have many interests … please share with us what some of

JD: For movies – I love all horror / thriller / suspense films. I wrote my se-

support you.

these are?

nior thesis at UC Berkeley on the evolving role of women in horror films

• Build your support team at home – Enlist a village to help you and don’t be afraid

JD: I love to travel, I’m always up for going to a country that I’ve nev-

from Nosferatu in 1922 to Silence of the Lambs in 1991. The central idea

to ask for support (it’s a sign of strength not weakness). Live near family if possible.

er been to before. I’ve just passed 60 countries. I’m very fortunate

is that the female character in horror films is the manifestation of how

Invest in things that make your life easier. Not at the same time, but in the last 20

professionally to have worked for companies with operations around

our culture views women in society and as societies views of feminism

years I have employed all of the following: a part-time nanny, a full-time live-in au

the globe and have the opportunity to travel extensively for work. I

evolve, so does the female protagonist.

pair, home cook, meal delivery service, housekeeper, and a personal accountant.

also love to share with my family the cultures of the world and I’ve

For music – I love classic rap, hip hop and alternative punk from the 80s.

Depending on what the big challenge is at a given phase in life, reach out to get

brought them along on many of my business trips. I typically plan a

For theatre – I love any production that my kids are in.


are indispensable to each other.” —John F. Kennedy SVL: What is the best course of action for management when it comes to Leadership? What is the best course of action for the employee when it comes to Leadership? JD: I believe in leadership at every level, leadership is about person power not position power. Everyone, regardless if they are people managers or individual contributors, can and should be a leader.

Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency.

Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

SVL: How do you see the workplace evolving and improving?

Keynote speakers Congresswoman Anna G. Eshoo, New York Times best-selling author Lalita Tademy, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and Emmy Award-winning writer and producer Margaret Nagle at TheatreWorks Silicon Valley’s Leading Ladies event celebrating passion in arts and innovation, held in 2015, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography TheatreWorks Artistic Director Robert Kelley, Event Chair Jenny Dearborn, and TheatreWorks Managing Director Phil Santora at TheatreWorks’ Leading Ladies, held in 2014, at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts. Photo credit: Drew Altizer Photography

JD: The overarching theme for the workplace of the future is transparency.

the help you need.

business trip to align with a school break or just pull them from school

• Transparency in how we work: Your mobile device will become your office.

• Let it go – Your house does not have to be spotless. When you have a

for a week here or there. John (or a grandparent or nanny) and the kids

• Transparency in where we work: We’ll work from everywhere - Workers will be

full work and family life, the children have to learn to be independent.

visit the local sites while I’m at the office working. We’ve done work/

spread across many time zones and countries in numerous satellite offices for

With clear and consistent communication, every child can do their own

family trips to: Mexico, Germany, China, Dubai, Singapore, Japan, Pan-

worker interaction, but not necessarily as daily destinations. Always-on video will

laun-dry, clean their own rooms, clean the kitchen and bathrooms, make

ama, Canada, England, France, Amsterdam, Australia, Belgium, Italy,

facilitate collaboration with colleagues in other locations.

their own breakfast and lunch. Learning to be responsible and capable

to name a few….

• Transparency of our competence and value: Everyone will have a rating score,

early on is good for everyone.

I throw myself fully into what my children love as a way to spend time

based on his/her reputation capital, which is the sum total of your personal brand,

• Focus and prioritize – Do the high value work that only you can do and

together doing what interests them. Currently my 12 year old is ab-

the quality of your results, your expertise, depth and breadth of experience and

outsource the rest. You can outsource the laundry but your child only

solutely obsessed with Giants baseball, so he and I watch the games

social networks. The new workplace will be a results only work environment.

wants you there to see her win an award at school. Knowing how to fo-

together. It’s our special thing to do.

• Transparency in who we work for: Every manager will also have a rating score

cus on your highest priorities makes a big career and a big family possible.

I love to be creative. I write and publish articles in business magazines

based on similar criteria plus people management and functional leadership.

Q: What do you see are some of the major issues facing us in today’s

and my first book Data Driven: How Performance Analytics Delivers

Employees will be hired into a company and then choose which manager they

work environment?

Extraordinary Sales Results was published in March 2015 – it debuted

want to work for based on the rating score of that manager.

JD: The globalization of work and changing demographics of the

at #1 in the new business releases on Amazon. I like to paint large

• Transparency of skill gaps: Big data, predictive analytics and artificial intelli-

workforce; multiple generations in the workplace

scale acrylic on canvas pictures, primarily pop art versions of comic

gence are enabling a workplace of the future that magnifies the global talent

• Contingent labor force

book superheroes.

shortage and makes more sparse highly skilled workers. Thus making lifelong

• Big data and analytics

learning a business requirement.

• Adaptation of mobile and social networks

Q: Who are some of your favorite authors and what are some of your favorite books? Different topics? Are there books you like to rec-

SVL: What do you recommend as tips and strategies for work-life balance?

Q: If you could wave a magic wand, what would you like to see for

ommend?

JD: Well, I don’t think there is such a thing as work-life balance, but work-life inte-

progress in the workplace?

JD: I try to read what my kids are reading for pleasure or in school to

gration is very do-able. I was recently quoted in the Fortune Magazine article on

JD: I’d like to see a true meritocracy in the workplace. A workplace

make our dinner table conversation richer with the themes they are

this topic - Women with big jobs and big families: Balancing really isn’t that hard.

where people are paid equally for equal work regardless of their gen-

exploring and how to connect with broader issues in the world. So

Here are the tips and strategies mentioned in that article and others that I use.

der or race, and the diversity in the workplace at all levels of an organi-

if it’s a popular young adult series, I’ve probably read it. I go through

• Hone your management skills – When managing your work and family, you’re

zation mirroring the diversity in the population at large.

phases with the books I read. Right now I’m doing a research project on the knowledge and skills first time managers need and I’m reading

managing a complex organization. Do activities as a family, to maximize efficiency. I use a shared on-line calendar and each kid is color coded, they all have an

Q: Who are some of the people who inspire you most and why?

stacks and stacks of books and white papers on the topic. For fun I

iPhone and can see where they need to be at any given time.

JD: My children and husband. I follow the research of a few

listen to audio books and love Doris Kearns Goodwin who is such a

• Prioritize self care – Put your own oxygen mask on first. Managing your life takes

social scientists, like Amy Cuddy of Harvard and Kelly McGonigal of

great story teller.

energy, so never skimp on sleep, nutrition or exercise.

Stanford, I find their work fascinating. Q: What are some of your favorite movies, music, theater?

• Build your support team at work – Invest in the development of your staff to be accountable and independent. Seek sponsors and allies that understand and

Q: You have many interests … please share with us what some of

JD: For movies – I love all horror / thriller / suspense films. I wrote my se-

support you.

these are?

nior thesis at UC Berkeley on the evolving role of women in horror films

• Build your support team at home – Enlist a village to help you and don’t be afraid

JD: I love to travel, I’m always up for going to a country that I’ve nev-

from Nosferatu in 1922 to Silence of the Lambs in 1991. The central idea

to ask for support (it’s a sign of strength not weakness). Live near family if possible.

er been to before. I’ve just passed 60 countries. I’m very fortunate

is that the female character in horror films is the manifestation of how

Invest in things that make your life easier. Not at the same time, but in the last 20

professionally to have worked for companies with operations around

our culture views women in society and as societies views of feminism

years I have employed all of the following: a part-time nanny, a full-time live-in au

the globe and have the opportunity to travel extensively for work. I

evolve, so does the female protagonist.

pair, home cook, meal delivery service, housekeeper, and a personal accountant.

also love to share with my family the cultures of the world and I’ve

For music – I love classic rap, hip hop and alternative punk from the 80s.

Depending on what the big challenge is at a given phase in life, reach out to get

brought them along on many of my business trips. I typically plan a

For theatre – I love any production that my kids are in.


FERTILITY PRESERVATION 5 Things You Should Know By Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh

Your fertility isn’t skin deep. It’s as simple as that. Just because you look like you’re 28 when you’re 42, doesn’t mean your ovaries are the same. Unlike men who don’t run out of sperm, it is totally normal and expected for every woman to run out of eggs by a certain age. The average age of menopause is 51 and it’s very difficult to get pregnant during the 10 years leading up to that age. Some of us are born with more eggs or run out at a slower rate but at the end of the day most women are not fertile in their 40’s. It’s unfair for women to be made to feel like there’s something wrong with them when they’re told they’re not fertile at the age of 40. Not many women are fertile in their 40’s. Empower yourself with knowledge about your fertility so you can learn more about your options. Running out of eggs doesn’t mean you also run out of options. Women in their 40’s often turn to more creative ways to grow their family: donor eggs, donor embryos and adoption just to name a few. I find that most of my patients who see me over the age of 40 say they wish they had frozen their eggs when they could have. Women today sadly learn that they’re running out of eggs at the same time that they decide to start a family. Egg freezing technology has changed dramatically over the past 5 years or so. Women don’t have to say that they wish they froze their eggs 10 years ago…..a time when egg freezing success rates weren’t as good as they are today. The time is now to ask your doctor whether egg freezing is for you. Here’s what you should know: 1. There are tests you can do to find

Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh Photos by Jennifer Crandall

out more about your fertility. Your doctor can order an Anti Mullerian Hormone level (AMH) as a guide regarding how much battery you have in your biological clock. Cycle day 3 FSH and estradiol levels and an antral follicle count (ultrasound looking at your ovaries often done by a reproductive endocrinologist) can also be used clinically as a guide. 2. If your Mom or other female family members had fertility issues related to conditions like endometriosis or early menopause, you should strongly consider preserving your fertility and seeing a doctor


to talk more about your options. 3. There are some medical conditions that require drug treatments that can be what we call “gonadotoxic” ie result in damage to eggs or sperm. Patients who are diagnosed with conditions like Lupus, blood disorders, and cancer are often put on chemotherapeutic Dr. Eyvazzadeh has been hosting “Egg Freezing Parties” designed to raise awareness of fertility issues since 2014. drugs. Freezing eggs/sperm Harvard Medical School, she completed a can give these patients a chance for pregnancy in the future fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility at University of Michigan. She after their treatment is over if they run out also completed a Masters in Public Health in of eggs earlier because of the treatments. Health Management and Policy at University 4. Freezing eggs for future use is best in of Michigan. She has a private practice in younger women because our eggs have a the SF Bay Area. higher chance of being viable the younger Each day she hears story after story we are. If you’re considering freezing your from women struggling to conceive. In her eggs in your late 30’s, you could still have a attempt to alleviate some of this heartbreak, good chance for pregnancy. Speaking with she has gone on a mission of “fertility a fertility specialist would be helpful before awareness”. Her hope is to empower you decide to freeze your eggs. women at an early age, making them more 5. Egg freezing involves a surgical aware of their own personal fertility levels procedure. Women have to take selfadministered shots in the skin of their lower and allowing them to be better educated about their options. Never again does she abdomen for about 10 days prior to the egg want to hear “If I had known 10 years ago extraction procedure. To hear more about the process of IVF or that my egg reserves were running low, I would have done things differently”. egg freezing, please read Dr. Aimee’s next In 2014, she launched her message with article. “Egg Freezing Parties”. These hosted parties Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh is a native of offer women a chance to learn more about the Bay Area. She is a graduate of UCLA egg freezing and ask their questions in a School of Medicine. After completing her comfortable, safe environment with likeresidency in Obstetrics & Gynecology at minded women. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and


A Conversations with

Katie Jacobs Stanton,

CMO of Color & Former Vice President of Global Media at Twitter Q: Can you share with us your experience working at the White House and State Department?

nities. I’m thrilled that the Gates Foundation has committed $170 million towards improving economic

KJS: Working in the Obama Administration was the honor of a lifetime. At the White House, I served

leverage for women worldwide. According to Melinda Gates, “when money flows into the hands of

as the Director of Citizen Participation, trying to make it easier for citizens to engage with the govern-

women who have the authority to use it, everything changes.”

ment using digital platforms like Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram. At the State Department, I worked in the Office of Innovation, helping the government use 21st century tools to address 21st century challenges. For example, we organized Town Halls for the President in China where participants could Tweet and text questions (even when these tools were blocked in China).

Q: What are some strategies that can help women achieve a more prominent role in their organizations? KJS: 1. Build your own personal Board of Directors. Cultivate relationships with people you admire, seek

Q: Of the 8 countries you’ve lived in, which was your favorite and why?

out their advice and collaborate with them on projects you’re passionate about. For example, I’m a

KJS: I’ve greatly appreciated all the countries I’ve been fortunate to spend time in, but

founding partner of #Angels, which I started with five of my friends from Twitter. We share access to

I’ve always felt a strong personal connection with France. I like the way Thomas Jeffer-

deals, networks and opportunities. I also lean on entrepreneurs and execs including Tina Sharkey, Dan

son put it; “a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty and the point of life.”

Rosensweig, Dick Costolo and Elad Gil for career and industry advice.

Q: What was your experience like working as Vice President of Global Media at Twitter? KJS: Twitter was one of the highlights of my career. When I joined, we didn’t have any employees, offices, revenues or partnerships outside of the U.S. My role was to help build our teams globally and then lead the Media team which was responsible for partnerships across government, news, sports, music, and TV. We brought the best content from each of our markets to the platform and tried to help build the most vibrant and safest digital town square. I worked with exceptional people at Twitter and I’m proud of how much we were able to achieve. Q: You were an Angel Investor for Color Genomics … what made you decide to step in as Chief Marketing Officer? KJS: There are 4 core values that help me decide on new roles:

2. Pay it forward - help women at all levels. I’m pretty sure I’m going to work for the women on my team at Color one day and am really excited about that! 3. Make sure women’s voices are heard and presences are felt. Work to ensure that they’re seated at the table and included in the conversation. 4. Have conviction in your beliefs and share them. Don’t be afraid to bring new ideas forward. 5. Be passionate about what you’re doing. Life is short. 6. Choose wisely. Look for a manager and team that help you be your best self. 7. Don’t worry about the job title - do your best work and the title and prominence will follow. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? KJS: My media team at Twitter had a great motto: Dream big, do big, act big. Follow these principles as a leader and you can’t go wrong.

1. Are the people smart and ethical? 2. Is this a product I would use?

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

3. Is this an opportunity I would be proud of?

KJS: There is still plenty of gender bias in our society and structural barriers that make it difficult for

4. Can I make an impact?

women to rise to the top: lack of access to paid leave, affordable childcare, and equal pay. We’re making progress, but not fast enough. We need to keep pushing and make it easier for women to stay in

Color checked all of these boxes. Othman Laraki, our CEO and co-founder, is one of the smartest and most ethical people I’ve ever known. Cancer has hit my family, as it has so many others, and I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to join a movement to help beat cancer and other hereditary conditions. Q: Can you share with us some of the advancements and discoveries Color Genomics has made? KJS: When you buy a car, a home or a phone, you get an owner’s manual. Unfortunately, that’s not the case with our bodies! Color is making it easier to unlock the DNA inside of us to make it easier to stay healthy. Specifically, Color has made access to medically actionable genetic testing easier and more affordable. We’re empowering people to learn their risk of hereditary conditions and use that early knowledge to take control of their healthcare and develop personalized plans to prevent illness or detect it early.

the workplace, advance quickly, and get paid fairly. Q: Can you offer advice to parents with daughters graduating from high school? KJS: Not yet! My older daughter graduates this year. Please send me advice on Twitter: @katies! Q: Tell us about your hobbies outside of work? KJS: I love Zumba with Ula Ghosheh. She’s the best instructor. I’m the worst in the class. Q: Is there an interesting fact that most people wouldn’t know about you? KJS: I wanted to be a pilot and was briefly in Air Force ROTC in college. Maybe one day I’ll finish getting my pilot’s license!

Q: What would you like to see Color Genomics accomplish in the next 5 years?

Q: How do you achieve work-life balance?

KJS: I would love to look back in 2023 to see that Color helped eliminate all hereditary conditions,

KJS: There’s no such thing as a balance - it’s more of a mashup. I try to prioritize the most important

including breast and ovarian cancers, caused by genetic mutations.

things and be present wherever I am.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? KJS: My daughters, Ellie and Kiki. They’re passionate, fearless, strong, curious, and funny. Most importantly, they are focused on making a positive difference in the world! Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? KJS: One of the biggest challenges for women is economic power. It’s also one of our biggest opportu-

Q: What would you say is your greatest professional accomplishment thus far? KJS: I can Tweet reasonably well. :) Q: What do you enjoy most about living in the Bay Area? KJS: The Bay Area is a magical place filled with smart, optimistic people who want to make the world a better place and have the skillset to have massive positive impact at scale.


A Conversations with

Katie Jacobs Stanton,

CMO of Color & Former Vice President of Global Media at Twitter Q: Can you share with us your experience working at the White House and State Department?

nities. I’m thrilled that the Gates Foundation has committed $170 million towards improving economic

KJS: Working in the Obama Administration was the honor of a lifetime. At the White House, I served

leverage for women worldwide. According to Melinda Gates “when money flows into the hands of

as the Director of Citizen Participation, trying to make it easier for citizens to engage with the govern-

women who have the authority to use it, everything changes.”

ment using digital platforms like Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram. At the State Department, I worked in the Office of Innovation, helping the government use 21st century tools to address 21st century challenges. For example, we organized Town Halls for the President in China where participants could Tweet and text questions (even when these tools were blocked in China).

Q: What are some strategies that can help women achieve a more prominent role in their organizations? KJS: 1. Build your own personal Board of Directors. Cultivate relationships with people you admire, seek

Q: Of the 8 countries you’ve lived in, which was your favorite and why?

out their advice and collaborate with them on projects you’re passionate about. For example, I’m a

KJS: I’ve greatly appreciated all the countries I’ve been fortunate to spend time in, but

founding partner of #Angels, which I started with 5 of my friends from Twitter. We share access to

I’ve always felt a strong personal connection with France. I like the way Thomas Jeffer-

deals, networks and opportunities. I also lean on entrepreneurs and execs including Tina Sharkey, Dan

son put it; “a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty and the point of life.”

Rosensweig, Dick Costolo and Elad Gil for career and industry advice.

Q: What was your experience like working as Vice President of Global Media at Twitter? KJS: Twitter was one of the highlights of my career. When I joined, we didn’t have any employees, offices, revenues or partnerships outside of the U.S. My role was to help build our teams globally and then lead the Media team which was responsible for partnerships across government, news, sports, music, and TV. We brought the best content from each of our markets to the platform and tried to help build the most vibrant and safest digital town square. I worked with exceptional people at Twitter and I’m proud of how much we were able to achieve. Q: You were an Angel Investor for Color Genomics … what made you decide to step in as Chief Marketing Officer? KJS: There are 4 core values that help me decide on new roles:

3. Pay it forward - help women at all levels. I’m pretty sure I’m going to work for the women on my team at Color one day and am really excited about that! 4. Make sure women’s voices are heard and presences are felt. Work to ensure that they’re seated at the table and included in the conversation. 5. Have conviction in your beliefs and share them. Don’t be afraid to bring new ideas forward. 6. Be passionate about what you’re doing. Life is short. 7. Choose wisely. Look for a manager and team that help you be your best self. 8. Don’t worry about the job title - do your best work and the title and prominence will follow. Q: What’s one leadership lesson you’ve learned in your career? KJS: My media team at Twitter had a great motto: Dream big, do big, act big. Follow these principles as a leader and you can’t go wrong.

1. Are the people smart and ethical? 2. Is this a product I would use?

Q: What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership?

3. Is this an opportunity I would be proud of?

KJS: There is still plenty of gender bias in our society and structural barriers that make it difficult for

4. Can I make an impact?

women to rise to the top: lack of access to paid leave, affordable childcare, and equal pay. We’re making progress, but not fast enough. We need to keep pushing and make it easier for women to stay in

Color checked all of these boxes. Othman Laraki, our CEO and co-founder, is one of the smartest and most ethical people I’ve ever known. Cancer has hit my family, as it has so many others, and I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to join a movement to help beat cancer and other hereditary conditions. Q: Can you share with us some of the advancements and discoveries Color Genomics has made? KJS: When you buy a car, a home or a phone, you get an owner’s manual. Unfortunately, that’s not the case with our bodies! Color is making it easier to unlock the DNA inside of us to make it easier to stay healthy. Specifically, Color has made access to medically actionable genetic testing easier and more affordable. We’re empowering people to learn their risk of hereditary conditions and use that early knowledge to take control of their healthcare and develop personalized plans to prevent illness or detect it early.

the workplace, advance quickly, and get paid fairly. Q: Can you offer advice to parents with daughters graduating from high school? KJS: Not yet! My older daughter graduates this year. Please send me advice on Twitter: @katies! Q: Tell us about your hobbies outside of work? KJS: I love Zumba with Ula Ghosheh. She’s the best instructor. I’m the worst in the class. Q: Is there an interesting fact that most people wouldn’t know about you? KJS: I wanted to be a pilot and was briefly in Air Force ROTC in college. Maybe one day I’ll finish getting my pilot’s license!

Q: What would you like to see Color Genomics accomplish in the next 5 years?

Q: How do you achieve work-life balance?

KJS: I would love to look back in 2023 to see that Color helped eliminate all hereditary conditions,

KJS: There’s no such thing as a balance - it’s more of a mashup. I try to prioritize the most important

including breast and ovarian cancers, caused by genetic mutations.

things and be present wherever I am.

Q: Which woman inspires you and why? KJS: My daughters, Ellie and Kiki. They’re passionate, fearless, strong, curious, and funny. Most importantly, they are focused on making a positive difference in the world! Q: What are some of the challenges you feel women face today? KJS: One of the biggest challenges for women is economic power. It’s also one of our biggest opportu-

Q: What would you say is your greatest professional accomplishment thus far? KJS: I can Tweet reasonably well. :) Q: What do you enjoy most about living in the Bay Area? KJS: The Bay Area is a magical place filled with smart, optimistic people who want to make the world a better place and have the skillset to have massive positive impact at scale.


GRATITUDE:

A POWERFUL ANTIDOTE TO ENTITLEMENT By Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed. Director, Wellness and Health Promotion Services at Stanford University I was meeting up with friends in the latest hot restaurant in Palo Alto. As I walked towards my group, a very cool looking guy wearing a classy expensive black T-shirt leaned back in his chair and almost crashed into me as I squeezed between tables. He glared at me. And there, nestled just below his sculpted pecks, was the message, in bold Elephant Font: “You don’t get my respect. You have to earn it.” There may be many interpretations. What might you think? Would you be attracted to his swagger? Turned off by the implied entitlement? Be curious about how this attitude plays out in his life? Wonder how this message impacts those around him? I don’t know what goes through this guy’s mind when he awakens at 3 in the morning. But I know too many people of all ages who brand themselves with some display of entitlement, even arrogance. The attitude is fueled by media that offers top billing to those who display their entitlement and arrogance as strengths of character, even virtues. What is the impact on you, me, our kids looking for successful role models?

The truth is that on the surface, these people appear to be dominant, accomplished, on top of things. But trust me, it’s an illusion. Because deep down, they often experience isolation, emptiness and frustration. “Superiority” masks vulnerability. Recent studies indicate that this loss of empathy and connection to self and others is a growing concern among all ages. Is there a way out of this trend towards displaying arrogance or entitlement as valor? Consider the power of gratitude as an antidote to this deep well of discontent. Gratitude isn’t just a soft filmy blur of appreciation. It takes gumption and courage to live with gratitude in a culture that rewards snarky digs and hostile irony. It takes grit to choose to live with thankfulness for what we have, rather than focusing on endless lists of what is missing. Gratefulness is a gold standard of deep happiness, positive emotion and good health. Dr. Robert Emmons, UC Davis, leading researcher and author of “Thanks”, reminds us, “Gratitude can be as easy as a beautiful sunset, an exquisite bite of chocolate, a child, or the brilliance of autumn leaves. No matter what shape

or form gratitude takes, it fills us with a warmth and a reminder that life is good; this moment is special. Gratitude provides lessons to make us stronger. It is more than appreciation- it is a gift.” Research suggests why the experience of gratitude is transformative and offers tremendous health benefits. Thankfulness awakens our brain’s pleasure centers, and our bodies produce bio-chemicals that activate a strong and powerful sense of our potential, well-being and connection. Our bodies respond with vitality and a stronger immune system. We may be inspired to serve others, to contribute to the greater good. Power up your gratitude muscle with a few simple actions. Do these with your family. Do these with your friends. Do them alone. Mix it up. If you practice just three times a week, you’ll begin noticing a stronger sense of ease, fun, and lightness. Best of all, these practices will spark new connections among your friends and family in fun heart-warming ways. - Gratitext: Everyone takes out their cell phone or notepad. Each person imagines a particular person to whom you are grateful, maybe someone who helped you get where you are today. Send them a “gratitext” or a note, expressing your thoughts and feelings of gratitude to them for adding some benefit- or sparkle- to your life. Notice the good feelings that arise when you send this note- and how you feel when they respond. - Reach Out: Notice the many people who earn minimum wage performing a service that adds value to your day. Reach out, and thank them. Experience the gentle exchange of appreciation. - 3 Good Things:. Begin a “gratitude” journal and several times a week, write down 3 good things that happened. Even if you aren’t feeling particularly grateful, no problem. Just take a deep breath, and give thanks for the simple things. Hot and cold running water. A daily meal. The people who contribute to your comfort, whether or not you personally know them. Gratitude is a powerful antidote to entitlement, indifference, the “blahs”, and discontentment. - -

- Just Like Me. Find a good place to “people watch”. Relax and just be aware of others, take a deep breath and bring to mind the following thought: “Just like me this person has faced struggles, suffering and disappointments, and just like me, this person wants to be content and happy.” Observe what gets stirred up in you or how this guided attention changes your emotional state. Do you feel more empathy or perhaps appreciation for our shared humanity? Share your experience with each other. - Soak in this awesome 5 minute video with your family and friends: Just watch and notice your thoughts and feelings. www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj2ofrX7jAk - Gratitude. Simple. Powerful. Transformative. It is an act of courage to express your thankfulness. Do stuff that opens your heart. Tell your friends and family how they contribute to your life. When you savor and appreciate the goodness in your life, the little things and the million dollar moments, no one will ever need to earn your respect. Gratitude itself is an act of deepest respect, freely given, for life itself.


GRATITUDE:

A POWERFUL ANTIDOTE TO ENTITLEMENT By Carole Pertofsky, M.Ed. Director, Wellness and Health Promotion Services at Stanford University I was meeting up with friends in the latest hot restaurant in Palo Alto. As I walked towards my group, a very cool looking guy wearing a classy expensive black T-shirt leaned back in his chair and almost crashed into me as I squeezed between tables. He glared at me. And there, nestled just below his sculpted pecks, was the message, in bold Elephant Font: “You don’t get my respect. You have to earn it.” There may be many interpretations. What might you think? Would you be attracted to his swagger? Turned off by the implied entitlement? Be curious about how this attitude plays out in his life? Wonder how this message impacts those around him? I don’t know what goes through this guy’s mind when he awakens at 3 in the morning. But I know too many people of all ages who brand themselves with some display of entitlement, even arrogance. The attitude is fueled by media that offers top billing to those who display their entitlement and arrogance as strengths of character, even virtues. What is the impact on you, me, our kids looking for successful role models?

The truth is that on the surface, these people appear to be dominant, accomplished, on top of things. But trust me, it’s an illusion. Because deep down, they often experience isolation, emptiness and frustration. “Superiority” masks vulnerability. Recent studies indicate that this loss of empathy and connection to self and others is a growing concern among all ages. Is there a way out of this trend towards displaying arrogance or entitlement as valor? Consider the power of gratitude as an antidote to this deep well of discontent. Gratitude isn’t just a soft filmy blur of appreciation. It takes gumption and courage to live with gratitude in a culture that rewards snarky digs and hostile irony. It takes grit to choose to live with thankfulness for what we have, rather than focusing on endless lists of what is missing. Gratefulness is a gold standard of deep happiness, positive emotion and good health. Dr. Robert Emmons, UC Davis, leading researcher and author of “Thanks”, reminds us, “Gratitude can be as easy as a beautiful sunset, an exquisite bite of chocolate, a child, or the brilliance of autumn leaves. No matter what shape

or form gratitude takes, it fills us with a warmth and a reminder that life is good; this moment is special. Gratitude provides lessons to make us stronger. It is more than appreciation- it is a gift.” Research suggests why the experience of gratitude is transformative and offers tremendous health benefits. Thankfulness awakens our brain’s pleasure centers, and our bodies produce bio-chemicals that activate a strong and powerful sense of our potential, well-being and connection. Our bodies respond with vitality and a stronger immune system. We may be inspired to serve others, to contribute to the greater good. Power up your gratitude muscle with a few simple actions. Do these with your family. Do these with your friends. Do them alone. Mix it up. If you practice just three times a week, you’ll begin noticing a stronger sense of ease, fun, and lightness. Best of all, these practices will spark new connections among your friends and family in fun heart-warming ways. - Gratitext: Everyone takes out their cell phone or notepad. Each person imagines a particular person to whom you are grateful, maybe someone who helped you get where you are today. Send them a “gratitext” or a note, expressing your thoughts and feelings of gratitude to them for adding some benefit- or sparkle- to your life. Notice the good feelings that arise when you send this note- and how you feel when they respond. - Reach Out: Notice the many people who earn minimum wage performing a service that adds value to your day. Reach out, and thank them. Experience the gentle exchange of appreciation. - 3 Good Things:. Begin a “gratitude” journal and several times a week, write down 3 good things that happened. Even if you aren’t feeling particularly grateful, no problem. Just take a deep breath, and give thanks for the simple things. Hot and cold running water. A daily meal. The people who contribute to your comfort, whether or not you personally know them. Gratitude is a powerful antidote to entitlement, indifference, the “blahs”, and discontentment. - -

- Just Like Me. Find a good place to “people watch”. Relax and just be aware of others, take a deep breath and bring to mind the following thought: “Just like me this person has faced struggles, suffering and disappointments, and just like me, this person wants to be content and happy.” Observe what gets stirred up in you or how this guided attention changes your emotional state. Do you feel more empathy or perhaps appreciation for our shared humanity? Share your experience with each other. - Soak in this awesome 5 minute video with your family and friends: Just watch and notice your thoughts and feelings. www.youtube.com/watch?v=nj2ofrX7jAk - Gratitude. Simple. Powerful. Transformative. It is an act of courage to express your thankfulness. Do stuff that opens your heart. Tell your friends and family how they contribute to your life. When you savor and appreciate the goodness in your life, the little things and the million dollar moments, no one will ever need to earn your respect. Gratitude itself is an act of deepest respect, freely given, for life itself.


The founder of this movement is Tarana Burke, who started spreading awareness in the early 2000s. According to Burke, the phrase has a deeper meaning. First, it is a bold statement by the victim of sexual harassment. He or she is not ashamed of what has happened. That’s why they dare to speak out. Second, it acts as a solidarity mechanism for all victims of sexual harassment. They are united and will support each other through tough times.

How the Me Too Movement is Helping Women?

This is Why the Me Too Movement is So Important The best way to find a solution to a social problem is to create awareness. Social media has helped in spreading the message across. An example of a life-changing movement created on social media is the ‘Me Too’ campaign. What is the Me Too Movement? It is a platform that encourages victims of sexual harassment to share their experiences with the rest of the world. The phrase gained popularity in 2017 after Alyssa Milano encouraged people to share their stories about sexual harassment and discrimination on Twitter using the words ‘Me Too’. However, Alyssa borrowed these words from some else.

The attitudes of people towards women are changing. Thanks to the ‘Me Too’ movement, women are more respected. If a guy or another woman inappropriately talks to you, you have every right to speak up or report that person to the authorities or superiors. It is not normal for a person to talk about your body just because you are a woman. It has created a forum where women share experiences and empathize with one another. This support system has allowed most women to regain their confidence and self-esteem. As a result, there are more empowered women in society. Women feel like they belong thanks to the ‘Me Too’ movement. They no longer feel isolated and alone because of their negative experiences. These women know that they are not alone,

and they can get justice for negative treatment. Women can hold perpetrators responsible for inappropriate behavior. They can say what they have experienced, and people won’t judge them. Everyone has a right to be heard. Women feel safer in the workplace. The office is notorious for inappropriate behavior. Since the majority of workers in an organization are mostly men, women are afraid of pointing out inappropriate behavior. The good news is that things are changing. Organizations are taking sexual harassment cases more seriously. They are changing the way workers conduct themselves to protect women from inappropriate behavior. Women have the support of their families and friends thanks to the ‘Me Too’ movement. Since women are speaking out and making their family members aware of how they feel about certain situations, there is a sense of unity. For example, parents are feeling more responsible for their daughters. The ‘Me Too” movement has helped modern society progress as far as values are concerned. There is nothing too embarrassing not to talk about. As long as it affects you, it can affect the other person. Speaking out prevents the vice from spreading. It’s time to make our voices heard!


The founder of this movement is Tarana Burke, who started spreading awareness in the early 2000s. According to Burke, the phrase has a deeper meaning. First, it is a bold statement by the victim of sexual harassment. He or she is not ashamed of what has happened. That’s why they dare to speak out. Second, it acts as a solidarity mechanism for all victims of sexual harassment. They are united and will support each other through tough times.

How the Me Too Movement is Helping Women?

This is Why the Me Too Movement is So Important The best way to find a solution to a social problem is to create awareness. Social media has helped in spreading the message across. An example of a life-changing movement created on social media is the ‘Me Too’ campaign. What is the Me Too Movement? It is a platform that encourages victims of sexual harassment to share their experiences with the rest of the world. The phrase gained popularity in 2017 after Alyssa Milano encouraged people to share their stories about sexual harassment and discrimination on Twitter using the words ‘Me Too’. However, Alyssa borrowed these words from some else.

The attitudes of people towards women are changing. Thanks to the ‘Me Too’ movement, women are more respected. If a guy or another woman inappropriately talks to you, you have every right to speak up or report that person to the authorities or superiors. It is not normal for a person to talk about your body just because you are a woman. It has created a forum where women share experiences and empathize with one another. This support system has allowed most women to regain their confidence and self-esteem. As a result, there are more empowered women in society. Women feel like they belong thanks to the ‘Me Too’ movement. They no longer feel isolated and alone because of their negative experiences. These women know that they are not alone,

and they can get justice for negative treatment. Women can hold perpetrators responsible for inappropriate behavior. They can say what they have experienced, and people won’t judge them. Everyone has a right to be heard. Women feel safer in the workplace. The office is notorious for inappropriate behavior. Since the majority of workers in an organization are mostly men, women are afraid of pointing out inappropriate behavior. The good news is that things are changing. Organizations are taking sexual harassment cases more seriously. They are changing the way workers conduct themselves to protect women from inappropriate behavior. Women have the support of their families and friends thanks to the ‘Me Too’ movement. Since women are speaking out and making their family members aware of how they feel about certain situations, there is a sense of unity. For example, parents are feeling more responsible for their daughters. The ‘Me Too” movement has helped modern society progress as far as values are concerned. There is nothing too embarrassing not to talk about. As long as it affects you, it can affect the other person. Speaking out prevents the vice from spreading. It’s time to make our voices heard!


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Profile for Rich Borell

Atlanta Metro Women Magazine - Andrea L. Boone  

Atlanta Metro Women Magazine - Andrea L. Boone