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S ILIC O N VA L L E Y IM PRESSIONS.COM

The Times They Are a Changin’ By

Song title by Bob Dylan, 1964

Marc Kulla

Photo source: History San Jose

“F or all intents and purposes

[people have] built regulatory walls around their communities that prevent even their own children from moving back to the area after college, given the housing costs.” ~ Matt Regan, the Bay Area Council’s senior vice president of public policy and government relations statement to The Mercury News. As everyone who has lived a respectable number of years on this planet knows, things change. Bob Dylan knew this in the 60’s and we all know this today. Sometimes they change for the better, and other times they change for the worse. However, change, in itself, is a positive movement. No person, group, city, state, country, or race of people wants to stagnate. Yet, when voting on local ordinances and regulations related to the construction of large-scale apartment complexes, people often block any change, thinking that it is always bad. S I L I C O N VA L L E Y I M P R E S S I O N S | J u n e 2 0 1 7

Many of the hurdles to getting affordable housing are blocked by regulations that are voted on directly or indirectly by the members of the community. Why would people vote in a manner that would not invoke change, without having a solution to the problem that the change is supposed to be fixing? In short, people do want change. They just don’t want change to occur near them. This NIMBY-esque (not in my backyard) attitude has stopped harmful things such as cell towers from being built near schools, as well as nuclear power plants or oil refineries to be built within a dangerous proximity to our homes. However, the construction of high-density apartment complexes in our communities should never be equated to the construction of a nuclear power plant or a potentially harmful radiation hazard. Affluent people live in luxurious homes. Less fortunate people live in apartments. Affluent people

drive luxury cars. Less fortunate people ride public transportation. These thoughts are integrated into American culture and are especially true throughout the Bay Area. Yet, we all realize that we have a housing shortage, a traffic problem, and a potentially threatening situation to our younger population who, quite frankly, can’t afford to live and work in the Bay Area. Even though we all agree on these problems, people want the problem solved somewhere else. Well, this is one problem that must be solved in our own communities if we want to integrate large companies into our folds. Cupertino boasts Apple. Mountain View boasts Google. Menlo Park boasts Facebook. The list goes on, and all of these companies add so much to the life of so many people in our community as well as the entire world. It’s just a shame that most of their employees cannot afford to live near their work.

Silicon Valley Impressions Magazine summer2017  

SVI summer 2017 edition. Affordable housing issue, include interviews with Ash Kalra and Dave Cortese about Silicon Valley affordable housin...

Silicon Valley Impressions Magazine summer2017  

SVI summer 2017 edition. Affordable housing issue, include interviews with Ash Kalra and Dave Cortese about Silicon Valley affordable housin...