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Volume 1, Issue 1

Newsletter Date

Alzheimer’s Disease J

S P E CI A L P O I N TS O F I N T E R E S T :

Symptoms Causes Treatment Statistics Websites

I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E :

Symptoms

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Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Statistics

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Websites

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L e t ’ s n o t f o r g e t t o f i g h t f o r t h o s e w h o c a n ’ t r e m e m b e r

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia. Its account for 70 to 80 percent of all cases of dementia. It is an incurable disease that affects people around the age of 65 years or older. Sadly, it is a disease that worsens over time. There are three stages of Alzheimer's. Around the second stage, the patient will need assistance and will have to have a 24-hour care giver. The

Alzheimer’s Disease is located in the brain

symptoms are memory loss, confusion, difficulty learning new information, difficulty

recognizing that they a problem, difficulty speaking, talking, or walking, mood swings, irregular sleeping patterns, and difficulty recognizing the time of day. The official color of Alzheimer’s disease is purple.


P a g e

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A l z h e i m e r ’ s

Di s e a s e

S y m p t o m s Like many diseases, Alzheimer’s have symptoms. These symptoms can impair one’s ability to function in everyday life. Since Alzheimer’s is a brain disease, the symptoms affect the patient mentally. The symptoms are divided into seven stages, getting severe during time. During stage one, symptoms do not show. During stage two, minor memory loss is common, such as

“It seems that when you have cancer you are a brave battler against the disease, but when you have Alzheimer's you are an old fart. That's how people see you. It makes you feel quite alone.” -Terry Pratchet

locations and memory lapses. In stage three, remembering names of new people and losing valuable objects occur. In stage four, it can be difficult of one to do arithmetic and complete complex task. In stage five one would need help to do daily tasks, such as calling home or remembering addresses. In stage six memory worsens and personality can change; the person will need

help daily. In stage seven the individual cannot function properly. They may need help eating or using the toilet. They fell to respond to the environment or hold a social conversation.

Caption describing picture or graphic.

D i a g n o s i s

There is no single test for Alzheimer’s. just because you have memory loss does not mean you have Alzheimer’s disease. There are several methods to testing for Alzheimer’s. A doctor

can diagnose it through medical history, mental status testing, a physical and neurological exam, and test to rule out any other causes of dementia-like symptoms.

T r e a t m e n t

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. A patient can take drugs and go to therapy for memory loss and behavioral issues. Researchers

are looking for new treatments to alter the course of the disease and improve the quality of life for people with dementia.

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V o l u m e

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I s s u e

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P a g e

S t a t i s t i c s

f o r

A l z h e i m e r ’ s

In America, there are more than five million people living with Alzheimer’s. one in eight older people have Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the only disease that cannot be cured, slowed, or prevented in the top ten. More than 15 million Americans provide unpaid care valued at $210 billion for persons with Alzheimer's and other dementias. The care for patients with Alzheimer is estimated at $20 billion.

W e b s i t e s

http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_facts_and_figures.asp http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=792894&backurl=/shelf/ my# http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=792894&backurl=/shelf/ my# http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=792894&backurl=/shelf/ my#

“I'm in awe of people out there who deal with Alzheimer's, because they have to deal with death 10 times over, year after year.” - Marcia Wallace

Alzheimer ‘s slogans

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JORDAN MALCOM

Alzheimer's jordan_malcom  

2013 ib research health dr. sheilds