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FEBRUARY 2018 | VOTED MAGAZINE BRAND OF THE YEAR

deliicious. s. FEEL GOOD

+ NEW WAYS WITH STONE FRUIT + CHINESE BANQUET +SUGAR-FREE ICY POLES +SEASONAL RECIPES FROM TASSIE’S AGRARIAN KITCHEN

EASY P

FAST FOOD: Potato, green tapenade & herb spelt pizza

RE

P -A H E A

SPELT BASE

CHRISTINE MANFIELD Puglia feasting

D

PIZZA!

PLUS SUPER SALADS & PREP-AHEAD MEALS

MATT MORAN

JAMIE OLIVER

Wholesome summer baking

Frozen mango and coconut cheesecake


FEBRUARY

CONTENTS

80


REGULARS 6 8 9 12

110

Ed’s letter Talk to us Menus Out & about Join us for a party that’ll Smoke! 25 Insider: news Food trends and restaurant news. 30 Drinks Mike Bennie’s best barbecue picks. 32 Catch of the day Your ultimate guide to swordfish. 34 Masterchef Poke gets a Malaysian makeover. 36 Review Anthony Huckstep applauds a newsworthy Perth newcomer. 38 Meat market Our chef and butcher bring the ‘biff’. 40 I’m loving Matt Preston’s berry excited. 42 Subscribe to delicious. 134 Insider: travel Hot destinations, news and products. 154 Last course Sheree Commerford’s dinner party style picks.

FOLLOW US... @deliciousAUS

SAVOUR 17

46 56 64 72 80 88

96

Hand picked Rodney Dunn brings his Agrarian Kitchen ethos to a seasonal feast. Entertaining This party is all about the Joye. Faster Life’s simple with make-ahead meals. Leanne Kitchen Your Chinese New Year banquet. On trend Fermenting made easy. Balancing act Phoebe Wood’s clean-eating meals. Extract John Gregory-Smith dives deep into Morocco’s myriad flavours. Matt Moran Wholesome bakes the entire family will love.

102 Jamie Oliver Prepare for a tropical taste explosion. 110 Wicked Stone fruit season’s here – and we’ve got your dessert dreams covered. 118 Sugar free Icy poles get a healthier makeover.

ESCAPE

128 Postcard Enjoy a triple-treat of travel inspo. 137 24 hours in Colombo History, culture and fabulous food combine in the Sri Lankan capital. 138 Global flavours Escape the tourist crowds in Italy’s lesser-visited Puglia region. 144 Locavore Darwin’s revitalised food scene is hot, hot, hot!

delicious.com.au

For more delicious. content.

ON THE COVER Potato, green tapenade & herb spelt pizza (recipe p 63) Recipe Charlotte Binns-McDonald Photography Jeremy Simons Styling Kirsten Jenkins Merchandising Emmaly Stewart THE DELICIOUS. TEST KITCHEN USES:

OFFICIAL TEST KITCHEN SUPPLIERS: Our meat is supplied by Vic’s Meat (vicsmeat. com.au). Our equipment is provided by Sheldon & Hammond (sheldonandhammond.com.au)

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SUMMERTIME, AND THE EATING is easy. There’s seafood on the barbecue and a spritz at hand. The days are long and there is never a better time to entertain. Yet it’s also a season when we look to take time out from festive excess. Deprivation has never been our thing at delicious., and everything we do has to taste great. But the most exciting development in recent years is that it’s never been easier to make healthy-ish feel delicious. In fact, eating health-fully has never been so, dare I say it, indulgent. Our line-up of experts prove it’s possible in this issue, from seafood feasts to super-grain salads, friendly fermenting to Asian flavours, and wholesome baking or grilled stone fruits right through to popsicles minus the refined sugar. And while that certainly covers the ‘eating in’ part of our equation, ‘eating out’ has never been more diverse. Australia is, after all, in the midst of a dining boom. Hence a new year also brings new developments for delicious. We have always been at the forefront of translating restaurant trends, so from February 1, we’re proud to launch the most comprehensive, relevant list of restaurant reviews in Australia on delicious.com.au. This new digital destination will have predictive search options whatever your state, easy maps to help you find restaurants, booking functionality, and thousands of national listings powered by trusted and objective critics across the country. We want to make it as easy as possible for all Australians to celebrate our incredible produce and thriving dining scene, and help you decide where to eat out at any time in any city, no matter what cuisine, occasion or budget. Check it out under the Eat Out section on delicious.com.au; leave a review, tell a friend, give us your feedback so we can make this site your number-one go-to every time you want a good feed from a credible source. As for New Year’s resolutions, make sure they include more dining, cooking, entertaining, travelling, laughing and drinking please! (Moderation implied, of course.)

Kerrie McCallum, Editor-in-chief Follow me:

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@kerriemccallum

@kerrie_mccallum

PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

WELCOME

ED’S LETTER.


PLUMM SPRING DECANTER

POUR IT IN PLUMM Touch. Smell. Taste. Plumm takes every glass of wine to the next level. Plumm is designed in Melbourne and made from European crystal. Designed for wine, our wine glasses are beautiful, functional and simple. With over 1,000 of Australia’s best restaurants choosing to pour in Plumm, you know you will be enjoying wine at its best. Available at Myer, selected wine and homewares stores and online at plumm.com.


Made Yotam Ottolenghi’s pistachio and rosewater semolina cake (November 17, p 116). It certainly didn’t disappoint! #makeitdelicious @ingrid.j.p

#MAKEITDELICIOUS

PHOTO OF THE MONTH

LONG DISTANCE: My best friend and I share our love of delicious. through gifted subscriptions. We live on opposite sides of the country, but chat about the recipes we’ve made. Thank you for being more than just a gorgeous food mag and making the tyranny of distance more bearable. Bonnie McBeath DAILY DOSE: Thank you for all the hard work that goes into making delicious. possible. I’ve been subscribing for a number of years now and I’m still impressed with the quality and content of the magazine. Recently, I renewed my subscription and, as a result, received the delicious. daily cookbook. I love it and used it last weekend when cooking dinner for 15 friends. Mark Wongcharoen

THE WINNER IS... Around November I start to get a bit of ‘festive fluster’ because food and entertaining are a huge focus for our Christmas celebrations. Happily, this year (as I write) I’m already well on my way to being ready. Thanks to the jam-packed December/January issue, we can finalise our Christmas and New Year’s menus. Thanks for helping me take a step back and stress less this silly season! I’m looking forward to our ‘delicious’ spread. Jade Blee ED’S NOTE: Congratulations, Jade! You’ve won a Google Home valued at $199. Get answers from Google, enjoy music, manage everyday tasks, and control your smart home all with voice-control. It’s your own Google assistant, always ready to help. Visit: store.google.com Send your emails to delicious@newslifemedia.com.au or write to us at Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015. delicious. reserves the right to edit reader letters, posts and comments.

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kerrie McCallum EDITOR Samantha Jones

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Hayley Incoll

FOOD DIRECTOR Phoebe Wood

EDITORIAL Chief Subeditor Jason Scullin Senior Subeditor Greer Boulting Editorial Coordinator Sophie Kitchen ART Deputy Art Director Josie Smith Style Editor Kirsten Jenkins FOOD Food Editor Charlotte Binns-McDonald Assistant Food Editor Samantha Coutts Food Enquiries askdelicious@news.com.au DIGITAL Digital Editor John Hannan Deputy Digital Editor Sarah Bristow Digital Art Director Morgan Reid Contributing Food Editor, Digital Warren Mendes Digital Producer Mitchell Paul Senior Editor Matt Preston Contributing Editor George Epaminondas Contributors Shannon Bennett, Mike Bennie, Colin Fassnidge, Matt Moran, Silvia Colloca, Anthony Huckstep, Andrew McConnell, Jamie Oliver, Anthony Puharich, Matt Wilkinson, Darren Robertson, Harriet Morgan, Emmaly Stewart, Vivien Walsh, Justine Poole GM, Client Solutions Studio Renee Sycamore Client Solutions Director, Food & Homes Ed Faith Client Solutions Managers, Food Danica Robinson & Donna Hodges Client Solutions Specialists, Food Charmaine Wu & Elizabeth Hamilton (02) 8045 4062 Client Solutions Director, Victoria Vanessa Seidel QLD Commercial Director, Lifestyle Rose Wegner (07) 3666 6903 Classifieds Advertising Rebecca White 1300 139 305 Advertising Creative Director Richard McAuliffe Advertising Creative Manager Eva Chown Advertising Senior Art Director Lisa Klaus Advertising Creative Producers Jenny Hayes and Yasmin Shima Advertising Copy Editor Brooke Lewis Production Director Mark Moes mark.moes@news.com.au Production Manager Neridah Burke neridah.burke@news.com.au Advertising Coordinator Gina Jiang adproduction@news.com.au Finance & Operations Serene Soh Marketing & Commercial Integration Director Rachael Delalande Commercial Integration Manager Kate Clout Marketing Manager – Premium Food Titles Amanda Donald Marketing & Commercial Integration Coordinator Adele Canturi adele.canturi@news.com.au Events Manager Joanne Khawaja (on maternity leave) Events Manager Lucy Simson (maternity leave cover) Chief Executive Officer Nicole Sheffield Director of Food Fiona Nilsson Director of Communications Sharyn Whitten General Manager, Retail and Circulation Brett Willis Subscription Enquiries 1300 656 933; subs@magsonline.com.au

delicious. editorial (02) 8045 4909; delicious@newslifemedia.com.au 2 Holt St, Surry Hills, NSW 2010 Melbourne Office, HWT Tower, Level 5, 40 City Rd, Southbank, Vic 3006, tel: (03) 9292 2000. delicious. is published by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd (ACN 088 923 906), 2 Holt St, Surry Hills, NSW 2010, tel: (02) 9288 3000. NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of News Limited (ACN 007 871 178). Copyright 2018 by NewsLifeMedia Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Colour separations News PreMedia. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, tel: 1300 650 666. No material may be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. PRIVACY NOTICE NewsLifeMedia collects your personal information to assist us in providing the goods or services you have requested, to process your competition entries and to improve our products and services. We or any of our Australian related companies may be in touch by any means (including email or SMS) at any time to let you know about goods, services or promotions that may be of interest to you. We may also share your information with other persons or entities who assist us in providing our services, runningcompetitions or with other companies who provide prizes for our competitions or reader offers. This company is part of a global media and entertainment company. We would like to share your information with these overseas-related companies so that they can contact you with special offers. If you would prefer us not to, please contact our privacy officer at privacy@newslifemedia.com.au or write to Locked Bag 5030, Alexandria, NSW 2015. You can gain access to your personal information by contacting our privacy officer.

ISSN 1448-4455

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INBOX.


FEBRUARY

T R E AT YO U R SEL F

C L E A N E AT S

MENUS L I GH T & FR E SH

Spicy scallop wontons

MIKE BENNIE IS ALSO CO-OWNER OF A SYDNEY-BASED WINE AND LIQUOR RETAIL BUSINESS

Nectarine, strawberry & basil galette

Steamed eggplant with soy and sesame

AFTERNOON TEA

MAXIMUM FLAVOUR

GARDEN LUNCH

Prawn spring rolls with classic sweet & sour sauce, p 67

Steamed eggplant with soy and sesame, p 21

Spicy scallop wontons, p 67

Tim Smith Wines Eden Valley Riesling 2017

Konpira Maru Admiral Semillon 2017

Poke bowl with achar, p 34

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Coconut & chilli poached chicken with mixed rice, p 86

Traditional ginger beer, p 79

Morris of Rutherglen Classic Liqueur Muscat NV

Krinklewood Wild White 2017

Chocolate & raspberry roll, p 21

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Nectarine, strawberry & basil galette, p 114

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~ ~

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Pineapple, lime & pink peppercorn sorbet, p 107

Massolino Moscato d’Asti 2016

Sensi Collezione Moscato d’Asti 2015

Menu match brought to you by

“You can’t go wrong with crisp riesling and prawns. With two very different sweet dishes, balance the weight of the food with the weight of the wine. A delicate and fragrant moscato and a decadently sweet but fresh topaque hit the spot for both.”

“This menu cries out for light and fresh white wines with crisp acidity, so I’m reaching for aromatic varieties like riesling, pinot gris/grigio or sauvignon blanc and blends.”

“These dishes are perfect for a sunny weekend and well worth the effort. Seriously addictive scallop wontons with a fresh and satisfying poke bowl, all washed down with a batch of home-fermented ginger beer. A meal you won’t forget.” Charlotte Binns-McDonald, delicious. Food Editor

Mike Bennie, Drinks Writer

Chris Herringe, Buyer, The Wine Society

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The food delivery app by Uber Across Australia, we partner with local restaurants to deliver the food you want, fast and fresh. Acclaimed Australian photographic artist Matthew Abbott captures an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at some of the busiest kitchens available on UberEATS. They are among more than 8000 of Australia’s favourite restaurants now cooking made-to-order for customers. UberEATS is home-delivery like never before.

KITCHENS OF UBEREATS Almond Bar, Darlinghurst, NSW (Top left) Number 93 in this year’s delicious.100 awards The sisters, Sharon and Carol Salloum, bringing homestyle Syrian cuisine to Sydney with their own twist. Almond Bar instantly makes you feel right at home. This is all part of the culture that sisters household.

ACME, Rushcutters Bay, NSW (Middle left) Number 27 in this year’s delicious.100 awards Mitch Orr (ex Sepia) has created a new taste combining his love of Filipino food with his training in Italian. It’s the non-pasta, pasta restaurant that keeps surprising diners.

The Italian Bowl, Newtown, NSW (Bottom left and top right) Alexi Spyridis says that the restaurant business found him. It’s the perfect fit for the family man who finds so much pleasure in entertaining and watching people enjoy his food.

Kakawa, Darlinghurst, NSW (Middle right) Jin Sun Kim (ex Flying Fish) and partner David Raff (ex Quay) are living their dream, crafting chocolate out of natural ingredients for the most discerning chocoholics.

Butter, Sydney, NSW (Bottom right) It’s fried chicken made fancy from Julian Cincotta (ex Rockpool Bar & Grill and Nomad), creating a new taste in fried chicken that merges Korean and South American flavours into the crumb.


GET DELICIOUS DELIVERED With over 150,000 menu items, UberEATS offers food for every taste and occasion. From pizza to poke, dumplings to donuts, burgers to bento simply open the UberEATS app, search for your favourite restaurant or browse the wide selection of cuisines, and place your order with the tap of a button. With a flat delivery fee, no minimum order, and an average delivery time of 30 minutes - sit back and watch your food come to you by bike, motorbike or car. No matter the time, whatever the moment, get delicious delivered with UberEATS.

How It Works 1 Get the free UberEATS app 2 Browse restaurants or cuisines 3 ‘Place Order’ with the tap of a button 4 Watch your food come to you

or online at WWW.UBEREATS.COM


@chefmattmoran

OUT & ABOUT.

S E I R E S N O C I THE E ICONIC CH

FS

EN , ICONIC V S E H IS D , ICONIC

R AN O M T T A M Y HOSTED B

+

UES

AM P C Y R O C Y MENU B

BELL

E É R I O S R E M M U S T FIRS E K O M S T A WHERE ‘Smoke’, Level 2, 35 Barangaroo Avenue, Sydney

YOU’RE INVITED...

WHEN 6.30pm, Monday, February 5 MENU Roving canapes to showcase Smoke’s exciting new menu

PRICE $99 per person (including wines selected by The Wine Society)

BOOK

smokemattmoran.floktu.com

BOOK NOW!

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@barangaroohouse

PHOTOGRAPHY JASON LOUCAS MENU SUBJECT TO CHANGE

TO AN EXCLUSIVE delicious. event at Smoke – the stunning rooftop cocktail bar crowning Matt Moran and the Solotel Group’s just-opened three-storey Barangaroo House in Sydney’s newest waterfront precinct. Marble, velvet and brass inform Smoke’s luxurious indoor bar space, which opens onto an incredible outdoor deck rich with native flora. You’ll be free to t explore every corner of this next-level venue while enjoyin enjoying generous canapes from Baran Barangaroo House’s head chef, Cory Campbell, Cam designed to showcase Smoke’s Smoke new menu. Food will be mat matched with wines selected by The W Wine Society, and Matt will be on hand as host. Don’t miss out – bo book your spot today!


DELICIOUS.COM.AU/EATOUT

delicious.com.au >

WHERE TO EAT? Got a craving? We’ve got you covered. With thousands of restaurants, cafes and bars in our repertoire, you’re sure to find the perfect place, whatever the occasion.

> SEARCH No matter what your criteria, our search function will find what you need.

VISIT THE

EAT

Best Chinese? Open Mondays? Within a certain price range?

SECTION

Whatever it is, our advanced search and top lists will make choosing the right place a breeze.

LOCATE Want something close to you or your eat-out buddy? No problem! With our user-friendly interactive map, you can plot your journey to dining bliss with ease.

CHEFS TALK BACK Exclusive to delicious.com.au, we give the chefs the right to respond to reviews in a managed forum. Think Darren Robertson’s food needs salt? He might have something to say about that…

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LA UN CH IN G

FE BR UA RY

MAKE EVERY NIGHT OUT DELICIOUS WITH AUSTRALIA’S BEST NEW RESTAURANT REVIEW SITE

GROUP PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY NIGEL LOUGH

THE REVIEW SITE SO GOOD EVEN THE EXPERTS USE IT

THE CRITICS Access all the reviews from our nationally recognised experts, as well as other delicious.com.au members and the general public. Decision-making just got easier!

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THE DINNER PARTY you don’t want to miss Search more than 5500 recipes from your favourite celebrity chefs, 1000s of restaurant reviews,

entertaining ideas to be the ultimate host, hot travel destinations, daily food news and more!

VISIT US AT


MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

HAND PICKED.

HAND PICKED

His Agrarian Kitchen cooking school and eatery in Tasmania is revered the world over for its inventive take on country cooking; now Rodney Dunn brings that ethos to delicious. with a menu full of summer flavours using produce at its farm-fresh peak. WORDS GEORGE EPAMINONDAS PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

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Roasted red capsicum stuffed with brandade. OPPOSITE: sweetcorn soup with basil, garlic & chilli butter (recipes p 21).

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HAND PICKED.


Steamed eggplant with soy and sesame

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HAND PICKED.

STEAMED EGGPLANT WITH SOY AND SESAME SERVES 4-6 AS A SIDE

2 x 500g eggplants, quartered lengthways 1/2 cup (125ml) light soy sauce 1/4 cup (60ml) dark soy sauce 2 tbs brown sugar 1 tbs Chinese rice wine (shaohsing – from Asian food shops) 1 tsp sesame oil 4cm piece (20g) ginger, finely grated 2 spring onions, shredded Toasted white sesame seeds, to serve In 2 batches, place eggplant in a steamer over a saucepan of simmering water and steam for 15 minutes or until tender. Set first batch aside, covered with foil, on a tray and repeat with remaining eggplant. Meanwhile, combine light and dark soy, sugar, rice wine and sesame oil in a small saucepan over high heat and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium and cook for 3 minutes or until reduced slightly. Stir through ginger and set aside. Meanwhile, place shredded spring onion in a bowl of iced water for 5 minutes to curl. Drain and pat dry with paper towel. Transfer eggplant to a serving dish, spoon over some warm soy dressing, and scatter with spring onion and sesame. Serve with remaining soy dressing.

ROASTED RED CAPSICUM STUFFED WITH BRANDADE MAKES 12

Begin this recipe at least 5 hours ahead. You will need 3 metal skewers. 400g skinless firm white fish fillets (we used blue eye), pin-boned 500g unpeeled floury potatoes (such as Kennebec or King Edward), cleaned 6 medium red capsicums 1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to serve 1 cup firmly packed flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped 1 bunch chives, finely chopped Baby parsley, to serve

Place fish in a non-reactive container and sprinkle evenly with 2 tsp salt flakes. Cover and chill for at least 4 hours or overnight. When ready to cook, rinse salt from fish under cold running water. Transfer fish to a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook for 6-8 minutes or until cooked through. Drain, then transfer to a tray lined with paper towel and set aside to cool. Meanwhile, place potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and cook for 45 minutes or until tender. Drain and stand until cool enough to handle. Peel, then press through a potato ricer into a bowl (or mash until smooth). Set aside. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Place capsicums on a baking tray and roast for 30 minutes or until skin is slightly blackened. Transfer capsicum to a heatproof bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside to cool. Using your hands, flake fish into the potato. Add oil, parsley and half the chives, and stir to combine. Season with 1/2 tsp each salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper. Halve roasted capsicum lengthways, and remove and discard skin and seeds. Transfer potato mixture to a piping bag fitted with a 2cm nozzle and pipe along the centre of each capsicum half. Roll capsicum so long edges overlap and enclose filling. Insert a skewer through centre of 2 capsicum tubes to hold closed. Repeat with remaining capsicum tubes. Transfer to a plate and scatter with baby parsley and remaining chives. Drizzle with extra olive oil and sprinkle with cracked pepper and a pinch of salt flakes to serve.

SWEETCORN SOUP WITH BASIL, GARLIC & CHILLI BUTTER SERVES 6 (MAKES 2.25L)

90g unsalted butter, chopped 2 onions, thinly sliced 30g thinly sliced prosciutto, finely chopped 1.1kg (about 4 or 5) corn cobs, husks removed 1.5L (6 cups) chicken stock

BASIL, GARLIC & CHILLI BUTTER

3 long red chillies, stalks trimmed 4 garlic cloves 3 cups firmly packed basil leaves, plus extra to serve 200g unsalted butter, softened For the basil, garlic and chilli butter, place chilli in a small frypan over medium-high heat and cook, turning occasionally, for 10 minutes or until blistered and blackened all over. Transfer to a chopping board and roughly chop. Place remaining ingredients in a small food processor and whiz until smooth. Stir through chopped chilli and set aside. To make the soup, melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and prosciutto, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes or until onion is very soft and beginning to brown. Using a sharp knife, remove corn kernels, add to onion mixture and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until corn is slightly softened. Add stock, increase heat to medium-high and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes or until corn is tender. Transfer 4 cups (1L) soup to a blender and whiz until smooth. Return to pan and stir to combine. Divide soup among bowls and add a dollop of basil, garlic and chilli butter. Scatter with extra basil and a pinch of freshly ground black pepper to serve.

CHOCOLATE & RASPBERRY ROLL SERVES 8

6 eggs, separated 100g caster sugar 30g Dutch cocoa powder, sifted, plus extra to dust 2 tbs plain flour, sifted 80g dark (70%) chocolate, melted, cooled 2 tbs milk 300g creme fraiche 2 tbs pure icing sugar, sifted 250g fresh raspberries Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease a 28cm x 39cm lipped-edge baking pan or Swiss roll


HAND PICKED.

Chocolate & raspberry roll (recipe p 21).


pan and line with baking paper along the longest sides, leaving 2cm overhanging. Place egg yolks and caster sugar in a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment and whisk until thick and pale. Fold through cocoa and flour, then add chocolate and milk, and fold to combine. Clean stand mixer, add eggwhites and whisk to soft peaks. Fold one-quarter eggwhite into chocolate mixture, then carefully fold through remaining eggwhite. Pour cake mixture into prepared pan and smooth to edges. Bake for 12 minutes or until cake springs back when gently pressed. Meanwhile, place a clean tea towel on a work surface with a long edge facing you and, using a fine sieve, dust all over with half extra cocoa. Working quickly, invert hot cake onto prepared towel and remove baking paper. Roll tea towel away from you to form a log and set aside, rolled, until cake is completely cool. Meanwhile, whisk creme fraiche and icing sugar together to firm peaks. Carefully unroll cake (it may crack slightly; this is fine) and spread with creme fraiche mixture. Scatter over half the raspberries, carefully re-roll and dust with remaining extra cocoa. Serve with remaining raspberries.

PHOTOGRAPHY ADAM GIBSON MARKET BASKET SOPHIE KITCHEN

MARKET BASKET

• CAPSICUM belongs to the nightshade family and has antiinflammatory properties. Add them to stir-fries and salads, or use on bruschetta. Stuffed, they make a filling main course. • EGGPLANT is common in Middle Eastern cooking and is a great swap for meat in stews, curries and lasagne. Cut through the sweet fibres with acidic additions such as pomegranate or tomato. • SWEETCORN is gluten free and rich in antioxidants that benefit immune health. Char the cobs on the barbecue, or add the kernels to salsas, soups and salads.

APPLE ISLE MIX-MASTER

At The Agrarian Kitchen cooking school and its sister eatery in Tasmania, Rodney Dunn deftly fuses rustic and refined elements.

“C

ountry cooking with a sophisticated edge” is how Rodney Dunn distils the ethos of The Agrarian Kitchen, his revered cooking school and respected eatery in Tasmania’s Derwent Valley. Along with his wife, Séverine Demanet, Dunn founded the educational facility in 2008, attracting scores of students eager for immersion in its seasonal, sustainable farm-based fare. Even the illustrious American chef Alice Waters once praised it as her “dream cooking school made real”. Only a year old, the associated restaurant is already regarded as a Tassie treasure. As the recipes on these pages reveal, Dunn’s affinity for mixing pastoral and polished notes runs deep. Eggplant is steamed, not grilled or baked, an idea he gleaned from a Hong Kong native who visited the school. “We often get blinkered

with certain vegetables,” Dunn says. Sweet capsicums are filled with salty brandade, a masterful blend of earth and sea. Meanwhile, sweetcorn soup combines comfort-food pleasure with a smidge of inventiveness. “Burning the chilli creates a smoky bitterness that rounds out the flavours without overpowering it,” he says. Dunn blithely admits that relocating from the big smoke of Sydney to a rural town north of Hobart more than a decade ago has hardly simplified his life. He is now a father to two children, Tristan, 10, and four-year-old Chloe, as well as a farmer, educator, restaurateur and recipe developer. Chef Ali CurreyVoumard helms the eatery, where Dunn acts as a consultant and sous chef. He’s even found time to be a new Tasmanian judge for the 2018 delicious. Produce Awards. “Living here mirrors the flow of life,” he says, in reflection. “You cruise through the seasons. It’s idyllic.”

delicious.com.au/food-files

For our seasonal produce guides, ingredient guide and more recipes from top Australian chefs.

@agrariankitchen

delicious.com.au 23


Book out now!


INSIDER.

DEEP DIVE

Shannon Bennett’s new Iki Jime embodies a different kettle of fish. The Melbourne venture, which replaced Bistro Vue on Little Collins Street, is focused on seasonal, sustainable and line-caught seafood. Chefs Justin James and Sam Homan are manning the Josper oven and hibachi grill to produce delicacies such as Moreton Bay bug tarts, blue mackerel with Davidson plum, and abalone-stuffed calamari. Tasmanian provedore Mark Eather is behind the ethical piscatorial offerings, while Projects of the Imagination conceived the moody interior replete with dark accents and graphic pendants.

INSIDER NEWS

Hot tables, lust-have products, the latest news, trends & more. Edited by George Epaminondas @georgeepam

TA B L E TA L K Elevated bar snacks at Smoke, the top-floor bar at Barangaroo House.

TRENDING NOW On Mooloolaba Marina, PIER 33 (above) is a luminous new addition to the Sunshine Coast. Chef Simon Taylor excels at small plates, including crispy fish wings, chargrilled sardines, school prawns with sumac, and even a prawn and seaweed butter to spread on fresh bread. Making waves on the Hobart waterfront is FROGMORE CREEK CITY (above right), a dashing new addition to the MACq 01 building. The lounge offers lunch, dinner, cocktails and Frogmore Creek wines, while at Atmosphere restaurant, guests can dine on a ‘stealth’ tasting menu. The fitout is meticulous. “Nothing has been left to chance,” says Frogmore’s Shelley Temata.

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Sydney’s BARANGAROO HOUSE, the longawaited, multi-level destination from Matt Moran and the Solotel Group, recently opened to much fanfare. Chef Cory Campbell (ex-Noma) is behind the pans at the venue, which combines “fun-dining” Bea restaurant with two bars. Its arresting design, by Collins and Turner, resembles three stacked bowls, or perhaps an intergalactic spaceship…

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ALL-HOURS DINING Fancy eating around the clock? Twenty Pho Seven, a 24-hour eatery serving steaming bowls of pho to night owls, is the latest addition to Melbourne CBD’s nocturnal dining scene. And at Clayton Wells’ forthcoming A1 Canteen in Sydney’s Chippendale, guests can stop by for breakfast, lunch (try the fried eggplant sandwich, right) and dinner.

DELICIOUS.COM.AU Go online for weekly restaurant news and reviews from our team of critics and reviewers.

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INSIDER.

WHAT’S COOKING Pidapipó: Gelato Eight Days A Week (Hardie Grant, RRP $40) is chef Lisa Valmorbida’s ode to Italian iced treats, with 60 recipes for gelato, sorbetto, granita and desserts. French illustrator Jean Jullien has contributed the fanciful imagery.

CHOCOL ATE ROMANCE

In The Modern Kitchen (Quadrille, RRP $40), British columnist Tim Hayward examines 100 impactful objects that have altered the way we cook and informed domestic life.

This Valentine’s Day, a personalised box of gourmet truffles is so much sweeter than ordinary confections. Choose from flavours including dark raspberry and salted caramel, and customise your own love sonnet. goodmeasureco.com.au

PRODUCE-DRIVEN GEM

<<

LIGHTNING IN A BOTTLE

When it comes to creating the menus at luxury lodge Saffire in Tasmania’s Freycinet National Park, chef Todd Adams is spoilt for choice. As well as an established kitchen garden, Adams has his pick of incredible local producers. “The love and attention people put into their produce in Tassie is amazing,” he says. “We change dishes often on a daily basis depending on what we can get. It keeps us on our toes!” saffire-freycinet.com.au

SALT AWAY Maldon, the salt brand beloved by chefs, recently debuted its ‘Perfectly Crushed’ grinders. The adjustable lid on their mills allows you to choose either fine or coarse salt flakes or ground peppercorns. Discover them at independent grocers, including IGA, and gourmet food stores. mayers.com.au

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Melbourne nightlife czarina Tracey Lester, known for the Carlton Club and the revamped Gertrude Hotel among other boîtes, has released a range of organic juices and plant-based foods. Superfluid is a mood-enhancing, energy-boosting line developed with chef Tristan Newman. It’s available at the aforementioned venues and more to come. superfluid.me

OH SO DISHY The quirky characters on these ceramic plates from Puglia are so expressive they may well overshadow your dinner guests. They are the first delightful release from a new lifestyle collection by Alexandra Heard and Heleena Trahanas. alexandtrahanas.com

Colour your life with Tracey Lester’s Superfluid range of juices.


INSIDER.

FUTURE PROOF The new wave of drinking is hangover-free, so get with the program, says Shannon Harley. LE

F TOV E R

carrots

ILLUSTRATION ALICE CLEARY

In the first of a new column devoted to getting the most from ingredients, Monty Koludrovic maximises every bit of carrot. BEING THOUGHTFUL WITH how we feed our families is a small step we can all take to create a better food world. Easy access to food is a great privilege – reducing food waste is about respect for the produce and the farmer. My carrot soup recipe is the perfect way to extract the most nutrients by using the tops, the peel… the whole vegetable. To make, wash carrot tops from 1 bunch baby (Dutch) carrots in iced water. Finely chop 3/4 of the tops (save leftover tops for salad) and mix with 3 tsp extra virgin olive oil, 1/2 clove crushed garlic and finely grated zest of 1 lemon. Place carrot peel in a saucepan with 1 star anise, a pinch of caster sugar, a pinch of salt and 3 cups (750ml) chicken stock. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes. Place chopped carrots in a saucepan with 100g butter and 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes, then add hot stock and peel, discarding star anise. Cook until tender, then blend until smooth. Season. Serve with carrot top gremolata. (Soup can be frozen for up to 3 months.)

delicious.com.au/food-files For more tips on making the most of ingredients.

Search delicious.com.au for ‘kangaroo with roasted carrot, beetroot & walnut’.

MAKE THEM LAST Store in the fridge for up to one month, but not near apples or pears (these produce ethylene gas that will speed up softening). If your carrots have green fronds, cut off the carrot tops to retain moisture in the rest of the carrot. Store carrot tops separately wrapped in damp paper towel in the fridge, and refresh in iced water before using. SERVE THEM WITH

Brown butter, currants, cumin and coriander seeds, feta, goat’s curd, harissa, lemon, tarragon, rosemary, capers, ginger and coconut.

@monty_koludrovic

@misspamplemousse

THERE IS A QUIET revolution brewing in the drinks world and it could spell the end of hangovers. Our vigour to sign up to FebFast et al shows an awareness of the benefits of going boozefree. However, outside of these teetotaling months, there is little impetus to abstain, and that’s down to a lack of compelling options in the glass. We’ve all waved away another sparkling water, wishing there was a grown-up, non-alcoholic drink on the menu. It is exactly this scenario in a London restaurant two years ago that inspired British graphic designer Ben Branson to create Seedlip, the world’s first non-alcoholic spirits, on his family farm in Lincolnshire. “I thought, ‘This is nuts, I’m in an amazing restaurant, but why can’t I get a good drink if I’m not drinking?’.” Ben says while sipping a ‘million dollar smile’ at London’s Dandelyan bar. The cocktail is made with his Seedlip Spice 94, a heady trip to Jamaica with whiskey-esque notes of allspice, citrus zest, acorn and oak shavings. Sydney chef Mike McEnearney is seeing the trend in real time at his restaurant, No. 1 Bent Street, where he says fewer people are drinking alcohol on a daily basis, and the demand for non-alcoholic drinks is surging. “As a restaurateur, it’s not about the sweet and fruity mocktails of the ’80s; it’s about offering something more sophisticated that is on par with the alcoholic drinks we have.” Down the road, Michael Chiem, who owns PS40, Sydney’s first soda factory and bar, is blazing the booze-free trail with handmade sodas made from Australian botanicals that are designed to complement cocktails but also hold their own as a standalone drink – his smoked lemonade is as woody and complex as mezcal, so you can say adiós to the hangover.


INSIDER.

OUT

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1 & 16. Jardan ‘Uashmama Blues’ placemats in blue, $18, jardan.com.au 2. Cultiver linen table napkins in blush, dusk, indigo stripe and indigo (set of 4), $50, cultiver.com.au 3. Ferm Living black towel hanger, $58, designstuff.com.au 4. Utopia Goods pure linen napkin in eucalypt dusk (set of 2), $38, utopiagoods.com 5. Bonnie & Neil ‘Inky Leaf Blue’ napkin (set of 6), $125, bonnieandneil.com.au 6. Walter G ‘Marble Blues’ 150cm x 280cm cotton tablecloth, $150, walter-g.com.au 7. Bonnie & Neil ‘Mosaic Best Pink’ napkin (set of 6), $125, bonnieandneil.com.au 8. Cultiver small linen table cloth, $145, cultiver.com.au 9. Walter G ‘Yoko’ indigo napkin (set of 4), $49.50, walter-g.com.au 10. White bowls and plates, stylist’s own 11. Hay spinning top, $32, hayshop.com.au 12. Lightly ‘Earth’ vase in white, $50, lightly.com.au 13. Aqua Door Designs ‘Blush Ink Splatter’ linen tablecloth, $159, aquadoordesigns.com 14. Bonnie & Neil ‘Curve Pink’ tablecloth, $215-$315, bonnieandneil.com.au 15. Walter G ‘Antibes’ indigo cotton napkin (set of 4), $49.50, walter-g.com.au

From summer denims to mod Australiana prints, set the scene with this stylish new palette of breezy napery and tableware.

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PHOTOGRAPHY NIGEL LOUGH STYLING & MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

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New Series

Bondi Harvest Mondays 7.30pm

Channel 33 Free Food 24/7


FIRED-UP DRINKING With the barbie cranking, Mike Bennie covers every scenario for guaranteed good times and highly satisfied guests. @mikebennie101

@mikebennie101

LA VIOLETTA PATIO PÉT NAT 2017, $32 How could you not invite a wine named ‘Patio’ to your good times barbecue? Irresistible! This is a crisp, lightly fizzy white with a good slug of green apple juice tang and a refreshing belt of zingy citrus character. Be sure to apply liberally, everywhere.

ADELAIDE HILLS DISTILLERY ROSÉ VERMOUTH, $38 Rosé wine spiked with Australian botanicals makes for a very pretty, easy-drinking vermouth that delivers a little cherry-kirsch sweetness and a lovely, gently bitter finish. It’s best served with blood orange wedges on the rocks.

WILLIE SMITH’S TRADITIONAL CIDER: CIDER APPLE BLEND (750ML), $19 Cider and sunshine go hand-in-hand – it’s hard to think of something more thirstcrushing. This cider, from Tasmanian orchards, is full of juicy, apply fruitiness, but finishes pleasingly dry. Serve over ice.

DELINQUENTE PRETTY BOY NERO D’AVOLA ROSATO 2017, $25 Fun! Light and fresh! Strawberry and spice! Ultra-refreshing! Jeez, rosé fits the bill for barbecue good times. It’s perfect with charred meat, a wonderful foil for leafy salads. This one is made with love by a talented young winemaker.

TOTE WINES BAROSSA VALLEY ROSÉ 2017 (1.5L), $30 Rosé is so good at barbies, I’m repeatedly recommending it. Casks might have a certain reputation, but the quality, volume (1.5L), convenience and, here, the stylish packaging, should win you over. It’s a juicy, vibrant, light and fresh-feeling wine.

CORIOLE SANGIOVESE 2016, $27 You’re going to need a solid, win-over-allcomers red to complete a good barbecue, and sangiovese is ideal – medium weight, with fine tannins, bright in red berry fruit character. It’s easy to slosh around, but will also elevate a meal. Coriole makes an outstanding one.

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MY BARBECUES LOOK like the United Nations of Booze. With the diversity of meat and vegetable dishes on offer, you need a breadth of drink. Of course, good barbecue hosts start their guests with a fistful of beer, a vertiginous glass of fizz or the colourful cocktail du jour. For ease of drinking and broad appeal, I tend to stick with refreshing pilsners or lagers in a can, dragged straight from the ice-filled bath. There’s a wealth of small-batch Aussie brewers shifting focus from hopped-up pale ale styles into more sessionable things. Go big on your chosen tinny. Simple bubblies such as prosecco or pétillant naturel (pét nat as it’s often abbreviated) wines also work a treat. Australian prosecco has come on in leaps and bounds. The names Pizzini and Dal Zotto spring to mind, and their proseccos are the perfect foil for light or vegetableoriented barbecue fare. Pét nat is live, fermenting wine sent to bottle to create natural bubbles. They range from creamy and sweet through to tart, tangy and racy. Ultimately, they’re refreshing and great fun. Best examples show pitch-perfect fresh-fruit character with light, sparkly bubbles. Look out for Ravensworth, The Other Right, La Violetta, Sassafras and, a house favourite, Jauma. White wine is a given. I tend to lean to fuller-bodied styles for the grilled chook or seafood, despite the internal sommelier telling me different. Charred and whiteflesh meats tend to match well with whites that have spent a bit of time in oak. Reds, well, they seem to be the drink of choice for most at a barbecued-meatand-salad-fest. Go too heavy and you’ll anaesthetise people; go too light and you’ll have them drinking too fast and doing nudie runs under the sprinkler. I tend to like medium-weight reds, particularly of Italian grape origin – think sangiovese, barbera, nebbiolo – and, best yet, drunk with a light chill.

delicious.com.au/drinks To peruse more of Mike’s favourite drinks.

MIKE BENNIE IS ALSO CO-OWNER OF A SYDNEY-BASED WINE AND LIQUOR RETAIL BUSINESS

DRINKS.


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CATCH OF THE DAY.

“I love eating the belly ceviche, carpaccio or even just raw.” – John Susman

SWORDFISH Fear the swordfish no more. Anthony Huckstep has the lowdown on how to enjoy this sweet, delectable fish at its absolute best.

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Wales”, says John Susman, of seafood consultants Fishtales. “The Australian swordfish fishery is regarded by global managers of pelagic fisheries as one of the best-managed and most sustainable on the planet,” Susman adds. Supreme handling results in the extraordinary eating quality of this fish. “Swordfish is a sweet, dense meat and is so often grilled or barbecued, but I love eating the belly ceviche, carpaccio or even just raw,” says Susman. “A splash of lime juice, some olive oil and a twist of white pepper – it’s insane! I also think that it is one of the great crumbing fish: a light coating of panko, cooked in ghee – its moisture really shines through.” Swordfish are normally between 30kg and 200kg. Susman laughs, remembering the day they got a big one on the line that stopped everyone in their tracks. “On the wharf at Mooloolaba the crane broke and it required 10 of us to unload one 220kg monster – needless to say, it was very Marx Brothers!” @huckstergram

@anthuckstep

delicious.com.au/food-files For more tips on buying and storing fresh seafood.

Search delicious.com.au for ‘vine leaf swordfish with kipflers and haloumi’.

BUYING Because of its huge size,

swordfish is generally sold in loins. Look for ones that are firm and tightly grained, and pearl-white to pink in colour (depending on the season and the fish).

STORING Wrap in muslin or plastic freezer film and place in an airtight plastic container with a layer of ice on the bottom and the fish resting on a drip tray. Seal and place at the bottom of the fridge. COOKING Raw, grilled and barbecued. Because of its high fat content and mild flavour, try marinating it in garlic, lemon and olive oil first. CATCHING METHOD Pelagic

long-line fishing.

SUBSTITUTIONS Warehou. ACCOMPANIMENTS Caramelised

celeriac, carrots and nuts. A tomato, capsicum and olive salad is great, but it also loves ponzu and honey.

ILLUSTRATION ALICE CLEARY

WHAT’S THE PASSWORD? Swordfish. It’s always swordfish. Well, for fans of the Marx Brothers, like yours truly, anyway. The famous scene in their 1932 classic Horse Feathers sees Groucho trying to guess the password to a speakeasy. “I’ll give you a hint,” says Chico. “It’s the name of a fish.” “Is it Mary?” replies Groucho. “Haha, that’s-a no fish!” exclaims Chico. “Really, well she drinks like one.” In true Marx Brothers style, the password is finally revealed as ‘swordfish’. As a mini Huck, swordfish on the barbecue was a true special-occasion food where we’d feast on prawns, salads and, of course, wrap our laughing gear around rich and mildly sweet swordfish flesh. These pelagic billfish descend to great depths during the day, but come to the surface under the cover of darkness to feast on fish, squid, prawns and crabs. Australia’s Walker Seafoods, operating in the Eastern Tuna and Billfish Fishery, are the only Marine Stewardship Council Certified Sustainable Swordfish catchers in the Southern Hemisphere. Fishing mostly occurs off the east coast “from the Coral Sea in the north to southern New South


The world’s finest meals are made fresh to order, shouldn’t your dressing be as well? If you really care about the meals you prepare, you prepare them fresh. We feel the same about our new Moroccan Spiced Yoghurt Dressing. Crafted in small batches and blended with seventeen North African inspired herbs and spices including cumin, coriander, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, cardamom, cassia and mint leaves combined with our own unique creamy yoghurt base. It’s an authentic and delicious way to elevate the favours of any salad or meat dish. EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE IN THE FRESH SALAD SECTION AT WOOLWORTHS STORES

Discover this recipe at birchandwaite.com.au


MASTERCHEF. POKE BOWL WITH ACHAR SERVES 4

delicious.com.au/recipes For more of Diana’s recipes.

BOWLED OVER

Malaysia meets Hawaii as MasterChef winner Diana Chan puts her stamp on a raw tuna poke salad with the addition of sweet and sour pickle. @diana.chan.au

@DianaChanAU

POKE IS A RAW FISH SALAD usually served as an appetiser in Hawaiian cuisine. Traditionally, it includes native limu, a type of seaweed, and roasted ground candlenut. I tried poke for the first time when I visited Hawaii a few years ago. It was served from a food truck and made using the freshest ahi (yellowfin) tuna available. On a warm day, it was exactly what I wanted for lunch – something light and fresh. Since then, poke has exploded in popularity around the world and now comes in many variations. In Hawaii, walk into any supermarket and you’ll see at least half a dozen types – poke with soy sauce, octopus poke with wasabi, salmon poke with fish roe, vegetarian avocado poke, tuna poke with kimchi, and everything in-between. Here’s my take, made using achar, a Malaysian pineapple and cucumber pickle perfect for the warmer weather. The sweet, sour and salty taste from the pickle pairs beautifully with the richness of the tuna, the wonton crisps add some crunch, and the egg ups the protein count. I’ve also gone with red rice instead of sushi rice, but feel free to use quinoa, brown rice, black rice or even barley. This is a chance to be as creative as you like. 34 delicious.com.au

To make the achar, combine cucumber, pineapple, chilli, eschalot and 1 tbs salt flakes in a bowl. Meanwhile, heat sugar, vinegar, 1 cup (250ml) water and 1 tsp salt flakes in a saucepan over high heat, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Set aside to cool completely. Transfer pineapple mixture to a sieve and rinse under cold water. Drain, then stir through vinegar mixture. Stand for 1 hour to pickle slightly, then chill. Meanwhile, place rice and 3 cups (750ml) water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil over high heat, cover, reduce heat to low and cook for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Heat 2cm sunflower oil in a non-stick frypan over medium-high heat. Fry wonton wrappers for 2 minutes or until golden. Remove using tongs and drain. Strain oil into a heatproof bowl. Return pan to heat with 1 tbs strained oil. Add egg, swirling to coat pan, and cook for 3 minutes or until just set. Transfer to a chopping board to cool, then roll up and thinly slice. Toss tuna, soy, sesame oil, mirin and sesame seeds in a bowl. Stand for 5 minutes. Divide rice, cabbage, marinated tuna, achar, omelette and wonton wrappers among bowls. Scatter with spring onion and extra sesame seeds to serve.

PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS COURT STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

2 Lebanese cucumbers, peeled, seeds removed, cut into 1cm pieces 1/2 pineapple, peeled, core removed, cut into 1cm pieces 2 small red chillies, thinly sliced 3 Asian (red) eschalots, finely chopped 1/2 cup (110g) caster sugar 1 cup (250ml) white vinegar 2 cups (360g) red rice, rinsed Sunflower oil, to shallow-fry 12 wonton wrappers, halved into triangles 2 eggs, lightly beaten 400g skinless sashimi-grade tuna fillet, cut into 1cm cubes 1/4 cup (60ml) light soy sauce 1 tbs each sesame oil and mirin 2 tsp each black and white sesame seeds, toasted, plus extra to serve 200g Chinese cabbage, thinly sliced 3 spring onions, white part finely chopped, green part thinly sliced


Beottuegrhtthoanneâ&#x20AC;? ab REVIEWED BY EMMA

These hot cross doughnuts were homemade with love by Brad. Brother and favourite chef of Emma. Find this recipe at csrsugar.com.au/favourite-chef

Be someone's favourite chef


REVIEW.

BOOK A TABLE NOW AT delicious.com.au

Marble, leather and moody lighting give Gazette a salubrious feel; cocktails come with an Italian flavour.

READ ALL ABOUT IT

Next-level service and well-executed Italian make it a good news day for Anthony Huckstep at Perth’s freshly minted Gazette.

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It’s all communal marble-top counters, six-seater booths and standalone tables. A dark, salubrious atmosphere is coloured by neon lights and patrolled by staff who genuinely care, serving with a casual flare void of the fluff of pomp and ceremony. In the kitchen, Giles Bailey is dishing up Roman-inspired food big on simplicity and flavour, and all about a shared feast ideal, though you can go solo if you’re not a sharer. It’s food that suits an evening where you want to sink a few vinos, too. Choose from various small bites to start, then follow up with salads, pastas, pizzas and mains, including slabs of meat cooked in the wood-fired Josper oven. A light crostini is topped with tomato and pepper salsa and two glistening fillets of white anchovy. Then a mound of plump, sweet local Exmouth tiger prawns comes in a moderately spicy ’nduja-based sauce and dollops of salsa verde. Sucking the prawn heads is a complete joy. Ask for a spoon to slurp up a bold shellfish broth enveloping delicate tortellini filled with chunks of West Australian bug. It’s good, but it can do without the tuft of rocket on top. A crisp, refreshing salad of apple, cos, peas and shaved parmesan joins golden crumbed veal cotoletta that shines under a squeeze of lemon. There’s nothing fancy or clever going on here; just well-executed, no-fuss Italian that tastes even sweeter with a side of spot-on service.

GAZETTE CUISINE Italian CHEF Giles Bailey VISIT 125 St Georges Terrace, Perth OPENING HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday Dinner Monday-Saturday BOOKINGS (08) 6282 0000 printhall.com.au PRICE $$$$$ BYO No OTHER FEATURES Bar CHILD FRIENDLY No

@huckstergram

@anthuckstep

delicious.com.au/eat-out For more of our critic’s dining picks.

PHOTOGRAPHY SHOT BY THOM

I’LL ADMIT IT, I initially wasn’t having the best of times at Gazette. Not because of the food, service, lighting or décor. Rather, I was getting my hackles up listening to a pack of well-lubricated wolves bragging about the size of their, erm, portfolios to anyone within howling distance. Sure, I can swear more than a salon full of sailors, but there’s a time and place – the dinner table is neither. Yep, restaurants are full of all walks of life, and it’s hard to blame a venue for rude patrons; unless of course they can’t manage them. But Gazette’s management seemed to take note without fuss, quelling the cacophony of coyotes and focusing on the other guests. Service switched from ‘perfectly fine’ to ‘going the extra mile’ to ensure an excellent experience for everyone. Bad service is the pits. Good service can change your night, and that’s exactly what happened to me at Gazette. The new casual Italian in the monolithic Print Hall complex on St Georges Terrace is a hard space to manage. While it lives in its own designated area, it’s essentially located in a very large bar. With a full house, it’s madder than a bag of bees, but, surprisingly, the cavernous space drowns out the noise to a happy hum. Gone is the separating wall and former fine diner, and in its place trots this Italian stallion that suits the venue much better.


Things take a turn for the Swedish this month, as Colin Fasnidge and Anthony Puharich get creative with rostbiff. Just don’t ask our butcher what rice paper rolls are made of!

THE CHEF AND THE BUTCHER your marinated beef ready to go and your rice paper rolls ready to go. A Nice! C You’ve grilled the beef the night before for your skewers, so the next day we just need to slice it up for the rolls. A Cold roast beef? C Yes, so I can give it to my kids in their lunch boxes! I have to get sliced cucumber and carrots in there for my kids for crunch. And I couldn’t put coriander in there for my girls, but you could for other kids. Same with chilli. Bit of mint. Splash of vinegar or lemon or lime. Then I would roll it up in the rice paper roll. Then a sauce. A Sweet chilli? C There’s nothing wrong with sweet chilli sauce! Why are you being derogatory? A I wasn’t being derogatory! You only said that because it wasn’t your idea. C No it isn’t – I think it works. It’s obvious! I just don’t think sweet chilli will fly for the healthy issue. Maybe I’d do a stock syrup, but at three-quarters water, one-quarter sugar – to cut down on sugar. Then add a tiny bit of sliced chilli, a splash of vinegar, and maybe a coriander root, then I’d blend it into a sauce to add to the rolls. A So we have skewers for dinner and the kids’ lunches, and it’s all healthy-ish? C Exactly. You’ll be singing my praises! A There you go again. Getting carried away as usual.

ROSEMARY BEEF SKEWERS WITH HORSERADISH AND LEMON SERVES 6-8

Begin this recipe 1 day ahead. We used part-picked rosemary stems as skewers, but you can swap for wooden skewers soaked in water.

2 bunches rosemary (with long stems if using stems as skewers) 2 small garlic cloves, chopped 3/4 cup (180ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to brush 1kg rostbiff (centre part of rump – from butchers), trimmed, cut into 3cm pieces Pared zest of 1 lemon, plus 2 extra halved lemons Finely grated fresh horseradish and smoked salt flakes, to serve Pick 1 cup rosemary leaves. Reserve stems for skewers, if using, leaving 4cm of stem with leaves attached at one end. Using a mortar and pestle, pound rosemary leaves, garlic and 1 tsp each salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper into a coarse paste. Stir through oil. Combine beef, pared zest and 1/4 cup (60ml) rosemary paste in a non-reactive bowl. Cover and chill overnight. Reserve remaining rosemary paste to serve. The next day, thread rostbiff onto rosemary skewers, if using, and place on a tray. Set aside for 1 hour to bring to room temperature. Heat a chargrill pan or barbecue to medium-high heat. Grill skewers for 12 minutes, turning every 4 minutes, for medium-rare, or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a heatproof dish and stand, loosely covered, for 5 minutes to rest. Meanwhile, brush cut side of extra halved lemons with extra oil and grill, cut-side down, for 3 minutes or until grill marks appear. Transfer skewers to a serving dish. Sprinkle over horseradish and smoked salt, and serve skewers with reserved rosemary oil and grilled lemon.

INTERVIEW SAMANTHA JONES PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY SHARYN CAIRNS PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

The boys have just polished off a meal at Franklin in Hobart, after a packed day filming for delicious. On Tour, Tasmania. A We’re going to use the rump. C Why is it called rostbiff? A It’s Swedish. C I’ve never in my life heard of rostbiff. A The rump is made up of three different muscles: the cap, the tri-tip and the eye. The heart of the rump is called the rostbiff. It’s the leanest part; high in iron. People have a misconception about rump – they think they don’t like it; they think it’s chewy. C You’re making it up. A You’re an idiot. When you were at Four In Hand you sold 300 of these a week! C Then I am the idiot for paying your prices! A Anyway, the rostbiff is actually the perfect example of a lean, high-protein cut of meat. But people think it’s cheap. C They see it as substandard. A Yeah, lots go for the fillet. But a rump that’s been reared well has great potential. C Alright then, we’ll turn it around. We’ll do skewers. We’ll marinate the beef the day before in a mixture of rosemary, garlic, lemon zest and oil. Then we’ll thread the beef onto skewers and grill them. A Sounds easy! C It is. And the best bit is you can use any leftover beef in rice paper rolls. A What’s rice paper made out of? C Rice, you idiot. A I reckon most people wouldn’t know the rice paper roll is made out of rice. C The name gives it away, mate! Like a bread roll, mate! A Yes, we know that’s made out of bread! So, we’re making the rice paper rolls? C No! We’re buying the rice paper rolls! Nobody has time to make them. You have


MEAT MARKET.

BUTCHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CUT

ROSTBIFF

Think beyond the good old Aussie rump steak; in many countries, rostbiff, the centre Look out for more from Colin in

ON SUNDAY

@cfassnidge

@fassnidge73

@askthebutcher_

part of the rump, is considered to be the best cut of beef for its outstanding flavour. Roast whole, cut across the grain into steaks, or slice into thin strips to use in stir-fries.

delicious.com.auâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;39


I’M LOVING.

I REALLY LOVE RASPBERRIES

In a supermarket stand-off, Matt Preston goes head-to-head with a punnet of proud raspberries. Here’s what it had to say.

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classics like a dark chocolate ganache topped with raspberries to Escoffier’s peach Melba to a sticky slab of almond, pear and raspberry cake sweetened with maple syrup…

GOLDEN ALMOND, PEAR & RASPBERRY CAKE SERVES 8

Warm, this cake is a decadent, you-wouldn’t-know-it’s-gluten-free delight (assuming your baking powder doesn’t contain hidden gluten), but it stays moist for ages, making it equally as tasty cold. 350g drained canned pear halves, cut lengthways into 1cm-thick slices 120g fresh raspberries, plus extra to serve 2 /3 cup (160g) firmly packed brown sugar 100ml olive oil 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 eggs 1 cup (250ml) maple syrup 1 cup (100g) almond meal 2 /3 cup (80g) oat bran (from health food shops) 2 tsp baking powder (gluten-free optional) 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 2 cinnamon quills Creme fraiche, to serve Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease base and sides of a 30 x 12cm loaf pan and line with baking paper, leaving 3cm overhanging the long sides. Line base of prepared pan with 200g pear slices and scatter with half the raspberries. To make batter, finely chop remaining 150g pears and combine in a bowl with sugar, oil, vanilla, eggs and 2 tbs maple syrup. Add almond meal, oat bran, baking powder, cinnamon and 1 tsp salt flakes. Gently pour batter over fruit in prepared pan. Bake for 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack in pan for 15 minutes, then invert onto a serving plate and cool, fruit-side up, for a further 10 minutes. Meanwhile, to make the maple and raspberry syrup, place cinnamon quills and remaining 210ml maple syrup in a saucepan over high heat and bring to the boil. Boil for 4 minutes or until reduced slightly. Add remaining 60g raspberries and stir to combine. Stand for 10 minutes to cool slightly. Pour some syrup over cake and serve, sliced, with creme fraiche, extra raspberries and remaining syrup.

*THE VIEWS OF MY FRIEND THE RASPBERRY DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE EDITORIAL VIEWS OF THIS MAGAZINE. THE STAFF AT DELICIOUS. NEITHER CONDONE NOR DISMISS ANY BERRY’S CLAIM TO CULINARY SUPERIORITY. PHOTOGRAPHY NIGEL LOUGH STYLING VIVIEN WALSH

WHY RASPBERRIES ARE THE KING OF BERRIES We’re engaged in the annual berry wars when, variously, red, black, burgundy and pink fruit clamour for attention. The other day at the supermarket, a punnet of raspberries took me aside, suggesting its contents were the elegant supermodels of the berry world and that strawberries were “as common as muck”. Reprinted here for the first time is the crux of the raspberry’s compelling argument for why it is the king of berries*. RASPBERRIES WANT TO MAKE YOUR LIFE EASIER, STRAWBERRIES COULDN’T GIVE A STUFF You can use raspberries straight from the punnet. Strawberries still have those tedious little leaves to remove. PENTHOUSE OR PAVEMENT? Strawberries grow on the ground in the mud; raspberries grow on canes, making them easier to pick, as well as cleaner. OTHER FRUIT GLISTENS, RASPBERRIES SMOULDER “The strawberry’s skin is as smooth and shiny as the freshly shaved, baby-oiled leg of a catalogue model.” The raspberry then suggested its own dusty-pink colouring was more reminiscent of the blushes of a Jane Austen heroine. SAVOURY BERRIES? It’s not just in sweet dishes that raspberries have strawberries’ measure. With their superior acidity and fragrance, they go well with rabbit, duck and venison, and are delicious with goat’s cheese, crumbed camembert or beetroot. (But between us, neither have the savoury flexibility of pineapples or peaches.) IT’S ALL IN THE NAMES Raspberries have solid dependable names like Heritage, Black Knight, Willamette and Bristol – a testament to their European roots. Strawberry names sound like a baby shower in a US trailer park – Rhapsody, Titan, Jewel, Diamante, Cheyenne, Rybekkah. Okay, maybe the raspberry made up the last two. STRAWBERRY JAM VS RASPBERRY JAM Ask any school fete committee and they’ll tell you raspberry jam outsells strawberry three to one. And raspberry jam always sets without help; strawberry jam is much more capricious. So there! STRAWBERRIES HAVE A ONE-TRACK MIND, RASPBERRIES ARE FAR MORE VERSATILE Strawberries and cream… um… er… well that’s about it when it comes to classic strawberry dishes. But an Aussie strawberry pavlova or English Eton mess wouldn’t be nearly as nice without a tart raspberry coulis to drizzle over or stir through. Raspberries are also at the heart of dozens of radically different desserts, from


@mattscravat

For more from Matt each week, see: Visit delicious.com.au for many more recipes that make raspberries the star.

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SAVOUR

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FROM OURS

JOYE WITH

With careers steeped in style and food, Paula and Saxon Joye know how to entertain well. And with two good reasons to do just that, the couple threw open their Sydney home for a lunch full of their trademark hospitality. RECIPES CHARLOTTE BINNS-MCDONALD & SAMANTHA COUTTS PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS COURT STYLING JUSTINE POOLE

@paulajoye

@PaulaJoye


ENTERTAINING.

Artichoke dip with fennel & rosemary pickled radish (recipe p 50).

Pomegranate & rose prosecco spritzer (recipe p 50).

TOP RIGHT: Tiffany and Alison chat at the top of the table, while the others enjoy the seafood and Italian-themed lunch. RIGHT: simple arrangements of roses, peonies and gardenias decorate the table, and crystal glassware adds elegance. OPPOSITE: Saxon and Paula welcome delicious. to their stylish Dover Heights home.

delicious.com.auâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;47


ENTERTAINING.

delicious.com.au/recipes For more recipes to help make you the host with the most.

WITH A SUCCESSFUL VENTURE – Made By Cow raw milk – and a recent move to fresh digs in Sydney’s Dover Heights, Paula Joye, founder of fashion and lifestyle site thejoye.com, and husband Saxon had double reason to throw a long lunch. Friends joining the couple were Mark Allsopp, CEO of Australia’s Oyster Coast; Social Diary founder Tiffany Farrington; Michael and Karine Johnston, founders of Cold Pressed Foods; and Saxon’s best man Julian Mitton, who works in finance, and his partner Alison O’Brien. The couple’s knack for hospitality shone through. Says Paula: “We love food, love cooking, and always try to make it fun.” That spirit infused the day, with grappalaced cocktails, prosecco spritzers and oysters courtesy of Mark kicking off the celebratory lunch – “any time we get

together it carries on and on,” laughs Tiffany – of Australian seafood and Italian-themed accompaniments that climaxed with a white chocolate torta and Made By Cow raw milk sorbet. Paula and Saxon, who’s been involved in the food industry for two decades, are passionate about the potential of raw milk (milk that’s unpasteurised) in Australia. “I’m an absolute true believer,” says Saxon. He’s clearly not alone; the first batch of Made By Cow sold out in 24 hours and has since proved a huge hit. Adds Paula: “We have big plans – yoghurt, cheese, ice cream. Watch this space… “

SET THE SCENE STYLE “Always our focus is to present,” says Paula. “There’s nothing wrong with doing an invitation, nothing wrong with a dress code. Life is about moments, so when we entertain, we try to create a moment. And then hopefully a memory, but then that’s up to the guests. So we always set a table, and I use my good things.” Says Alison: “It always feels very welcoming, even though you can see there’s a lot of attention paid to detail.”

MENU Oysters played a starring role.“I love getting fabulous oysters, shucking them with friends and just devouring them,” says Saxon. As for the simple seafood platters, Mark says that “Australian seafood speaks for itself”.

PLAYLIST “I’m a music nerd. I make playlists for every function, and always themed,” says Paula. “Today was ‘PJ jazzy’ – Jimi Hendrix, Amy Winehouse, the Stones, mixed in with ’80s and modern tunes. And if you stay late enough, you’ll hear Tiny Dancer on the piano!”

DRINKS “Cocktails set the scene,” says Paula. “They evoke a bygone era – celebrating guests being there, that you’re not leaving. Much nicer than being handed a beer when you arrive.”

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ABOVE: Michael and Mark enjoy a grappa cocktail – or “grappa gimlet” as Paula dubbed it – while Saxon shucks the oysters. BOTTOM (from left): Karine looks on as Paula listens intently; the oysters came from the Clyde River on the NSW south coast. OPPOSITE: Paula describes her style as a “collected aesthetic”, with her biggest influences being Regency, French, Art Deco and “a bit of the Hamptons”.

Lemon, mint & cucumber grappa cocktail (recipe p 50). Oysters with macerated lemon (recipe p 50).


OYSTERS WITH MACERATED LEMON SERVES 8 AS A STARTER

Begin this recipe at least 6 hours ahead. 2 lemons, peeled, remaining pith removed, segmented, finely chopped, plus juice of 1/ 2 a lemon, plus extra lemon wedges to serve 1/ 2 garlic clove, crushed 2 tsp caster sugar 1/ 2 bunch oregano, leaves picked 1/ 3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil 16 freshly shucked oysters Rock salt, to serve To make macerated lemon, combine segmented lemon, garlic, sugar, half the oregano and 1 tbs oil in a bowl. Cover and stand for 6 hours or overnight to macerate. When ready to serve, using a mortar and pestle, pound a pinch of salt flakes and remaining oregano to a paste. Stir through lemon juice and remaining 1/4 cup (60ml) oil. Arrange oysters on a rock-salt-covered platter and drizzle with a little oregano oil and macerated lemon. Serve immediately with remaining macerated lemon, oregano oil and extra lemon wedges.

ARTICHOKE DIP WITH FENNEL & ROSEMARY PICKLED RADISH SERVES 8 AS A STARTER 1/4

cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to serve 3 garlic cloves, chopped 2 eschalots, thinly sliced 280g marinated artichoke hearts, drained 400g can butter beans, rinsed, drained Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon Dried chilli flakes, baby parsley and lavash bread, to serve

PICKLED RADISHES

1 tbs fennel seeds 2 rosemary sprigs 1/ 2 cup (125ml) apple cider vinegar 1 tbs caster sugar 1 bunch radishes, thinly sliced To make the dip, heat oil in a large frypan over medium heat. Add garlic and 50â&#x20AC;&#x201A;delicious.com.au

eschalot, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2-4 minutes or until softened but not coloured. Add artichoke and beans, and cook, tossing regularly, for 3-4 minutes or until slightly golden. Transfer bean mixture to a food processor, add lemon zest and juice, and whiz until smooth. Transfer to a bowl, cover surface directly with plastic wrap and chill until needed (dip can be made up to 2 days in advance). For pickled radishes, toast fennel seeds and rosemary in a frypan over high heat until aromatic. Add vinegar and sugar, and cook, swirling pan regularly, for 1-2 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Bring to a simmer, then pour over radish in a heatproof bowl. Stand for 5 minutes to pickle slightly, then drain (pickling liquid can be used as a dressing in other recipes). Spoon dip onto a serving plate. Drizzle with extra oil, and top with pickled radish, chilli flakes and parsley. Serve with lavash.

POMEGRANATE & ROSE PROSECCO SPRITZER MAKES 4 CUPS (1L)

Begin this recipe at least 3 hours ahead. 1/ 2

cup loosely packed edible fresh (optional) and dried rose petals Juice and seeds of 1 pomegranate 1 tbs rosewater 1 cup (250ml) soda water, chilled 3 cups (750ml) prosecco or sparkling white wine, chilled Place petals in an ice-cube tray, cover with water and freeze for 3 hours or until frozen. Combine pomegranate juice and rosewater in a jug. Top with pomegranate seeds and rose petal ice cubes. Add soda and prosecco, stir and serve immediately.

LEMON, MINT & CUCUMBER GRAPPA COCKTAIL

CUCUMBER & MINT ICE CUBES

Juice of 2 lemons 2 Lebanese cucumbers, chopped 1/ 2 cup picked mint leaves 1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar For the cucumber and mint ice cubes, place lemon juice, cucumber, mint and sugar in a blender and whiz until combined and sugar is dissolved. Divide among ice-cube tray and freeze overnight. When ready to serve, place ice cubes and grappa in a blender and whiz until combined and smooth. Strain into a jug filled with crushed ice. Add soda water and stir to combine. Serve with lemon slices, mint sprigs and cucumber slices.

TOMATO & PROSCIUTTO SALAD SERVES 8 AS A SIDE

2 eschalots, thinly sliced 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 2 tbs red wine vinegar 1/ 2 cup (125ml) extra virgin olive oil 400g sourdough, thinly sliced 600g ox-heart tomatoes, thinly sliced 2 balls buffalo mozzarella, torn 8 slices prosciutto Basil sprigs, to serve To make the eschalot dressing, place eschalot, garlic and 2 tsp salt flakes in a bowl and toss to combine. Set aside for 5 minutes to macerate slightly. Toss through vinegar, 1/4 cup (60ml) oil and 1 tsp ground black pepper, and set aside. Meanwhile, heat a chargrill pan to high heat. Brush bread with remaining 1/4 cup (60ml) oil and grill, turning halfway, for 3 minutes or until grill marks appear. Arrange sourdough, tomato, mozzarella and prosciutto on a platter. Drizzle with eschalot dressing and scatter with basil sprigs to serve.

MAKES 8

Begin this recipe at least 6 hours ahead.

ZESTY BROCCOLINI PASTA SERVES 8 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

300ml grappa (from bottle shops) Crushed ice 2 cups (500ml) soda water Lemon slices, mint sprigs and thinly sliced baby cucumbers (cukes), to serve

300g fusilli pasta 1 cup (250ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to drizzle 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped >>


ENTERTAINING.

Zesty broccolini pasta Tomato & prosciutto salad

TOP RIGHT: Karine and Michael Johnston – the couple met in Japan and Nobu Matsuhisa’s daughter, Yoshiko, is godmother to their daughter. FROM LEFT: Saxon serves up the zesty broccolini pasta; Alison, Julian, Paula and Saxon share a laugh.


Seafood grazing platter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; shellfish (recipe p 54).


ENTERTAINING.

Seafood grazing platter – whiting and snapper (recipe p 54).

delicious.com.au 53


ENTERTAINING.

SEAFOOD GRAZING PLATTERS SERVES 8

4 whole sand whiting, cleaned 3 baby snapper, cleaned 3 bay leaves sprigs, 2 sprigs picked 1/ 3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 long red chillies, halved lengthways 1/ 3 cup (80ml) verjuice 500g mussels, scrubbed, debearded 250g each clams and pipis 10 green prawns, unpeeled PARSLEY & VERJUICE DRESSING

3 long red chillies, finely chopped 2 / 3 cup (165ml) white wine Finely grated zest and juice of 3 lemons 4 bunches broccolini, tops cut into 3cm lengths, remainder finely chopped 1/4 cup (20g) finely grated pecorino 2 / 3 cup (100g) pumpkin seeds (pepitas), toasted Baby sorrel leaves (substitute torn larger sorrel leaves), to serve Cook pasta according to instructions. Refresh under cold water and set aside. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and chilli, and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add wine and lemon zest and

juice, bring to the boil and cook, stirring frequently, for 3 minutes or until reduced slightly. Add broccolini, cover and cook, stirring halfway, for 4 minutes or until broccolini is tender. Stir through cooked pasta and pecorino. Transfer to a serving platter and scatter with pepitas and sorrel. Drizzle with extra oil to serve. 54 delicious.com.au

1 garlic clove, crushed 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked, chopped 1/ 2 cup (125ml) verjuice Finely grated zest of 1 lemon, plus extra lemon wedges to serve 1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil For the dressing, combine all ingredients in a bowl and set aside until needed. Heat a chargrill pan or barbecue to high heat. Score fish at 2cm intervals on each side. Insert picked bay leaves into scores. Rub fish with 2 tbs oil. Grill, covered (use aluminium foil if using a chargrill pan), for 3-4 minutes each side or until just cooked through. Transfer to a tray and drizzle with a little parsley and verjuice dressing (re-insert any bay leaves if necessary). Meanwhile, heat remaining 2 tbs oil in a large frypan over high heat. Add garlic, chilli and verjuice, and bring to the boil. Add bay leaf sprig, shellfish, discarding any that do not close when tapped sharply, and prawns. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes or until shellfish start to open, then toss through remaining dressing. Transfer shellfish and fish to separate serving platters and serve immediately with extra lemon wedges.

WHITE CHOCOLATE TORTA WITH MELON AND RAW MILK SORBET Begin this recipe at least 6 hours ahead. 125g unsalted butter, chopped 1/ 2 cup (110g) raw caster sugar (substitute caster sugar)

200g white chocolate, chopped 5 eggs, separated 1 tsp vanilla extract 22 / 3 cups (270g) almond meal Finely grated zest of 1/ 2 a lemon 1 cup (120g) pure icing sugar, sifted 23/4 tsp raw milk (we used Made By Cow) Thinly sliced peeled rockmelon wedges and baby mint leaves, to serve RAW MILK SORBET

200g caster sugar 200g liquid glucose 3 cups (750ml) raw milk (we used Made By Cow) Finely grated zest of 1/ 2 a lemon For the sorbet, combine sugar, glucose and 2 tbs water in a saucepan over high heat and cook, stirring constantly, for 3 minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat, add milk and zest, and whisk until combined. Transfer to an ice cream machine and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to a 1L (4-cup) loaf pan, cover surface directly with baking paper, then cover with plastic wrap and freeze for 6 hours to overnight or until frozen. Preheat oven to 160°C. Grease base and side of a 22cm springform cake pan and line with baking paper. To make the torta, place butter, caster sugar and chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water (don’t let the bowl touch the water) and stir until melted. Stand for 10 minutes to cool slightly, then whisk in egg yolks and vanilla. In a separate bowl, with a clean whisk, whisk eggwhites to medium peaks. Fold almond meal, zest and eggwhite into chocolate mixture until just combined. Pour chocolate mixture into prepared pan and bake for 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted into centre comes out clean. Set aside to cool completely. Meanwhile, to make raw milk glaze, place icing sugar and milk in a bowl and stir until combined. Transfer torta to a serving plate and drizzle with glaze. Top with rockmelon and scatter over baby mint. Serve immediately with sorbet.


White chocolate torta with melon and raw milk sorbet


FASTER FOOD.

t he nce of e lg u d ver The in nally o fi is n o as to silly se er time al t t e b t ation – w ha organis r u o y flex ius his gen T ? ls il l plan sk ad mea se h a e ma k Binn arlotte e you h C m fro l eas ald wil into McDon y ba c k il m a f r u e. and yo g routin in t a e fe a real-li NS Y SIMO M Y JERE GRAPH NKINS PHOTO TEN JE S IR K G STYLIN

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MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

P R E P


S C H O O L


3 red radishes, thinly sliced, plus extra halved radishes to serve SLOW-BRAISED BRISKET 1/4

cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil 1.5kg beef brisket, trimmed SMOKY CHILLI SAUCE

2 cups (500ml) barbecue sauce 1/ 2 cup (125ml) maple syrup 1 tbs smoked paprika (pimenton) 1 tsp ground chilli Charlotte Binns-McDonald, Food Editor @charliebmcd

SUNDAY BEEF BRISKET BURGERS MAKES 4 BURGERS

Double brisket ingredients if you want to prep for Wednesday’s rendang curry.

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1 cup (280g) Greek yoghurt 4 burger buns, halved crossways 8 thin slices Red Leicester cheese (substitute cheddar) 1 red onion, thinly sliced 2 cups loosely packed watercress sprigs

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Preheat the oven to 200°C. For the slow-braised brisket, heat oil in an ovenproof saucepan over high heat. Add brisket and cook for 2 minutes each side or until browned. Add 2 cups (500ml) water and bring to the boil, cover and transfer to oven. Reduce oven to 160°C and braise, turning brisket halfway, for 4 hours or until very tender. Remove meat from braising liquid (liquid can be chilled or frozen and used as a beef stock) and set aside to cool (if prepping for beef rendang, store half the cooled brisket, chilled in an airtight container, for up to 3 days or, frozen, for up to 3 months).

Meanwhile, for the smoky chilli sauce, combine all ingredients in a saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a simmer. Cook, stirring often, for 2 minutes for flavours to develop. Remove from heat and set aside to cool (sauce can be stored, covered and chilled, for up to 3 weeks). When cool enough to handle, coarsely shred beef using 2 forks and stir through 1 cup (250ml) smoky chilli sauce. To make the chilli yoghurt, fold 2 tbs smoky chilli sauce (reserve a little sauce to serve; remainder can be used as a glaze for barbecued meats) and yoghurt together in a bowl. Set aside. Preheat the oven grill to high heat. Place burger buns, cut-side up, on a baking tray and grill, checking regularly, for 2 minutes or until golden. Divide brisket mixture among bun bases, drizzle with a little reserved smoky chilli sauce and top with 2 slices cheese. Place on a baking tray and grill for 90 seconds or until cheese starts to melt. Place buns on plates and, working quickly, top with onion, watercress, sliced radish and chilli yoghurt. Top with bun lids. Serve immediately with extra halved radish.

“THERE’S A SATISFACTION THAT COMES FROM GETTING YOUR DINNER DUCKS IN A ROW. HERE’S A ROADMAP ON HOW TO DO IT.”


FASTER FOOD.

MEAT-FREE MONDAY PUMPKIN, LEMON THYME & PECORINO PASTA SERVES 4-6

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Place pumpkin on a baking tray and roast for 2 hours or until tender (or roast with brisket for 3 hours or until tender). Halve pumpkin and scoop out flesh, discarding seeds. Whiz flesh to a puree in a food processor (store puree, covered and chilled, for up to 4 days). To make lemon thyme crumb, place sourdough, half lemon thyme and 1/4 cup (60ml) oil in food processor and whiz to fine crumbs. Spread over a baking tray and roast for 15 minutes, stirring halfway, until golden (or roast with pumpkin and brisket for 25 minutes or until golden. Crumb can be stored, in an airtight container at room temperature, for up to 1 week). Cook pasta according to the packet instructions and drain, reserving 1/2 cup (125ml) pasta cooking water. Meanwhile, heat remaining 1/4 cup (60ml) oil in a frypan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and onion, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes or until softened. Add pumpkin puree, 2 cups (500ml) water and remaining lemon thyme, and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until heated through. Increase heat to high and add pasta, reserved pasta water and pecorino. Stir to combine, then stir through lemon zest. Divide pasta and rocket among bowls. Scatter with lemon thyme crumb and extra lemon thyme and pecorino. Drizzle over extra oil to serve.

P

1.7kg whole butternut pumpkin 550g wholemeal seeded sourdough loaf, crusts removed, torn 1 bunch lemon thyme, leaves picked, plus extra leaves to serve 1/ 2 cup (125ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to drizzle 500g rigatoni 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1 onion, finely chopped 3/4 cup (60g) finely grated pecorino, plus extra to serve Finely grated zest of 1/ 2 a lemon 1 bunch baby rocket (substitute wild rocket)

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FASTER FOOD.

TUESDAY SOY-BRAISED CHICKEN AND NOODLES

Combine chicken, ginger, garlic, spring onion and rice wine in a bowl and stand for 10 minutes to marinate. Heat oils in saucepan over high heat. Remove chicken from marinade, reserving marinade. Add chicken to pan and cook for 2 minutes each side or until browned. Add reserved marinade, soy, orange zest, star anise, honey and 1/4 cup (60ml) water, and bring to a simmer. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes or until chicken is cooked through (chicken can be stored, covered and chilled, for up to 3 days or, frozen, for up to 3 months). When ready to serve, combine vinegar and sugar in a bowl, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Add cucumber and stand for 10 minutes to pickle slightly. Meanwhile, cook noodles according to packet instructions. Drain. Divide chicken, braising liquid, noodles and pickled cucumber among bowls. Scatter over shiso to serve. 60 delicious.com.au

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“BRAISE THE CHICKEN AHEAD OF TIME TO IMPROVE THE FLAVOUR OF THIS CLASSIC COMFORT-FOOD DISH.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BEN DEARNLEY

1.5kg chicken ‘lovely’ legs 5cm piece (25g) ginger, thinly sliced 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 spring onions, cut into 5cm pieces 1/4 cup (60ml) Chinese rice wine (shaohsing – from Asian food shops) 1 tbs each sunflower and sesame oil 1/4 cup (60ml) dark soy sauce Pared zest of 1/ 2 an orange 2 star anise 1/4 cup (60ml) runny honey (we used Woolworths Macro) 1/ 2 cup (125ml) rice wine vinegar 2 tbs raw caster sugar 4 baby cucumbers (cukes), thinly sliced 270g soba noodles Baby shiso, to serve

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SERVES 4


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WEDNESDAY HUMP-DAY CURRY NIGHT BEEF RENDANG WITH TURMERIC BROWN RICE SERVES 4 1/ 3

cup (80ml) sunflower oil, plus extra 1 tbs 1/4 cup (20g) desiccated coconut, toasted 1.5kg slow-braised brisket (see burger recipe, p 58) 400ml coconut milk 2 tsp each brown sugar and fish sauce 3 tsp finely grated fresh turmeric 450g cooked brown rice Chopped cucumber, mint leaves and chopped roasted peanuts, to serve

RENDANG PASTE

30g each turmeric, ginger and galangal (from Asian food shops), chopped 2 lemongrass stalks, white part only, chopped 1 red onion, chopped, plus extra thinly sliced red onion to serve 6 long red chillies, chopped 6 garlic cloves, chopped 3 kaffir lime leaves, chopped For the rendang paste, place all ingredients and 2 tbs water in a food processor and whiz to a paste (paste can be stored, covered and chilled, for up to 1 week and, frozen, for up to 3 months). To make the curry, heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add rendang paste and cook, stirring often, for

6 minutes or until darkened slightly. Add coconut and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes or until heated through. Add beef, coconut milk, sugar, fish sauce and 1 cup (250ml) water. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to medium and cook, partially covered and stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes for flavours to develop. Meanwhile, to make turmeric rice, heat extra 1 tbs oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add turmeric and cook, stirring often, for 2 minutes or until turmeric is softened. Add rice and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until heated through. Spread rice across a serving platter and top with coarsely shredded beef rendang. Scatter with cucumber, mint, peanuts and extra thinly sliced red onion to serve.


FASTER FOOD.

SERVES 4

750g whole sweet potato, peeled 1kg skinless snapper fillets, pin-boned, cut into 2cm pieces 3 spring onions, 2 finely chopped, 1 shredded Sunflower oil, to shallow-fry 100g daikon, shredded 1/4 savoy cabbage, shredded 2 small avocados, cut into thick wedges Mint leaves, coriander leaves and pickled ginger, to serve GINGER & SOY DRESSING

2 tbs light soy sauce 2 tbs pickled ginger juice (from jarred pickled ginger) 2 tsp sesame oil

SESAME FURIKAKE

2 nori sheets, crumbled 1/ 2 tsp sesame oil 2 tsp toasted white sesame seeds To make the fish cakes, prick sweet potato all over with a fork and enclose in plastic wrap. Microwave on high, turning halfway, for 12 minutes or until tender. Coarsely mash with a fork, spread onto a tray and freeze for 20 minutes or until completely cooled. Place fish and 1 tsp salt flakes in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add sweet potato and finely chopped spring onion, then pulse to combine. Shape 1/3 cup (85g) sweet potato mixture into 7cm rounds, transfer to a tray and chill until needed (fish cakes can be stored, frozen between sheets of baking paper in an airtight container, for up to 3 months).

For the ginger and soy dressing, whisk ingredients in a bowl until combined (dressing can be stored, chilled in an airtight container, for up to 3 weeks). For the sesame furikake, combine all ingredients in a bowl (sesame furikake can be stored, at room temperature in an airtight container, for up to 1 month). When ready to serve, heat 2cm oil in a frypan over medium-high heat. In batches, cook fish cakes for 3 minutes each side or until cooked through. Remove with a spatula and drain on paper towel for 2 minutes. To make the Japanese-style slaw, toss shredded spring onion, daikon, savoy cabbage, avocado, herbs, ginger and half the sesame furikake in a bowl. Arrange fish cakes on a serving platter with salad and dressing alongside. Sprinkle fish cakes with salt flakes and remaining sesame furikake to serve.

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THURSDAY SWEET POTATO FISH CAKES WITH JAPANESE-STYLE SLAW

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FISH CAKES, DRESSING & FURIKAKE


PIZZA- NIGHT FRIDAY POTATO, GREEN TAPENADE & HERB SPELT PIZZA (COVER RECIPE) SERVES 2-4

3 small potatoes, thinly sliced (we used a mandoline) 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 tsp finely chopped rosemary 21/ 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil 1/ 2 cup (70g) pitted Sicilian olives 150g store-bought salsa verde Goat’s curd, baby parsley leaves, chervil and basil leaves, to serve SPELT PIZZA BASE

7g sachet dried yeast 2 tsp runny honey 23/4 cups (410g) white spelt flour

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PIZZA DOUGH & GREEN TAPENADE

“I MAKE FOUR BATCHES OF DOUGH AND FREEZE IN ONE HIT, SO I HAVE PIZZA NIGHT COVERED FOR A MONTH.”

To make the spelt pizza base, combine yeast, honey and 1 cup (250ml) warm water in a large bowl, cover and set aside in a warm place for 10 minutes or until frothy. Add flour and 2 tsp salt flakes, and stir until combined. Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead for 10 minutes or until soft and elastic. Transfer to an oiled bowl, cover and stand in a warm place for 1 hour or until doubled in size (dough can be stored, rolled into a ball, enclosed in several layers of plastic wrap and frozen, for up to 3 months). Preheat oven to 200°C. Grease a baking tray and line with baking paper. Place potato in a microwave-safe dish and microwave, partially covered, for 3 minutes or until just softened. Roll dough into a 1cm-thick oval. Combine garlic, rosemary and oil in a bowl and rub 2 tbs rosemary mixture over pizza base. Top with potato and drizzle with remaining 2 tsp rosemary mixture. Bake for 20 minutes or until base is golden and potato is tender. Meanwhile, to make the tapenade, combine olives and salsa verde in a bowl and set aside (tapenade can be stored, covered directly with plastic wrap and chilled, for up to 7 days. Stir well before serving). To serve, drizzle tapenade over pizza, then top with goat’s curd and scatter with herbs.

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CHINESE NEW YEAR May you live in prosperous times! To mark the most auspicious day in the Chinese calendar, food writer and chef Leanne Kitchen serves up a banquet of dishes designed to bring wealth and good fortune. PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

“Spring rolls are essential for New Year; it’s believed they resemble gold bars, so by eating them, wealth is assured. The prawns – the icing on the cake – are for bringing happiness and even more good fortune.” (Recipe p 67)

MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

PRAWN SPRING ROLLS WITH CLASSIC SWEET & SOUR SAUCE


LEANNE KITCHEN.

SWEET VINEGARED LOTUS ROOT “In the Cantonese dialect, the word for lotus rhymes with that for ‘always sufficient’, thus lotus root is a favourite on the southern Chinese table at this time of year. Aside from anything else, it’s delicious – especially if you get your hands on fresh roots.” (Recipe p 67)

Schumacher ‘Nanjing’ fabric in smoke (used throughout), Orient House (orienthouse.com.au); small copper spoons, Water Tiger (watertiger.com.au).

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LEANNE KITCHEN.

CHINESE NEW YEAR is the most significant holiday in China, and in places across the world with significant Chinese populations. Although festivities and customs vary from one region of the country to another, one constant is the tradition of each family thoroughly cleaning their house to sweep out any lingering bad vibes from the old year, and make way for coming good fortune. Another is family feasting; families gather on the evening before Chinese New Year for their annual reunion dinner. Highly anticipated, this meal is meticulously planned. Houses are decorated with plenty of red (lanterns, table runners, flowers), as red is thought to scare off Nian, the Beast of Bad Fortune. Dishes associated with the meal heave with symbolism; for example, dumplings (shaped like ingots, they represent wealth), noodles (for longevity) and chicken (for joy, and served complete with head and feet). A whole fish is essential, as fish is said to attract abundance. It’s customary to not eat all the fish because leftovers intensify the idea of prosperity. Fruits associated with wealth are also favoured – tangerines, oranges and pomelos, for example. Then there is a dried moss called f cái in Mandarin and fat choy in Cantonese, giving rise, respectively, to the New Year’s greetings of ‘g ng xi f cái’ and ‘g ng hei fat choy’. Which means ‘congratulations and be prosperous’. @lea_kitch

SPICY SCALLOP WONTONS “Wontons and dumplings are important New Year foods as they signify both plenty and new beginnings for the coming year. Round foods like wontons are also symbolic of coins and, therefore, of money.” Antique Chinese screen (used throughout), Water Tiger (watertiger.com.au).

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PRAWN SPRING ROLLS WITH CLASSIC SWEET & SOUR SAUCE MAKES 14

50g glass noodles (from Asian food shops – substitute sweet potato glass noodles), cooked according to packet instructions, rinsed, drained 2 tbs sunflower oil, plus extra to deep-fry 450g Chinese cabbage (wombok), shredded 100g shiitake mushrooms, finely chopped 2 tsp finely grated ginger 2 garlic cloves, crushed 300g peeled green prawns, finely chopped 1 tbs light soy sauce 1/ 2 cup loosely packed coriander leaves, chopped 14 x 21.5cm frozen spring roll papers (from Asian food shops and selected supermarkets), thawed SWEET & SOUR SAUCE

100ml pineapple juice 2 tsp cornflour 1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar 21/ 2 tbs rice wine vinegar 2 tsp tomato sauce 1 tbs light soy sauce For the sweet and sour sauce, stir 1 tbs pineapple juice and cornflour in a bowl to form a paste. Set aside. Combine sugar, vinegar, tomato sauce, soy sauce and remaining 1/3 cup (80ml) pineapple juice in a saucepan over high heat and bring to a simmer. Whisk cornflour mixture into sugar mixture and cook, whisking constantly, for 1-2 minutes or until thickened. Transfer to a heatproof bowl and set aside. Meanwhile, to make the filling, cut noodles into about 2cm lengths. Heat oil in a wok or large frypan over medium-high heat, add cabbage, mushroom, ginger and garlic, and cook, stirring often, for 7 minutes or until softened. Spread onto a heatproof tray and chill for 30 minutes or until completely cooled. Transfer cabbage mixture to a bowl and stir through noodles, prawn, soy sauce and coriander.

To assemble, place spring roll papers on a tray and cover with a damp tea towel. Place 1 paper on a work surface with a corner facing you and brush edges with a little water. Place 1 heaped tbs of filling 6cm from bottom corner and form into a log. Fold bottom corner over filling and roll away from you once. Fold right side over filling and roll away from you once more. Finally, fold left side over filling and roll away from you to completely seal (don’t roll too tightly; filling will expand when cooked). Repeat with remaining papers. Half-fill a wok or large saucepan with oil and heat to 180°C (a cube of bread will turn golden in 90 seconds when the oil is hot enough). In 4 batches, deep-fry spring rolls, turning halfway, for 4 minutes or until deep golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Serve immediately with sauce.

SWEET VINEGARED LOTUS ROOT SERVES 4 AS PART OF A SHARED MEAL

600g lotus root (order from good grocers and Asian food shops), peeled, cut into 3mm-thick slices 1/ 3 cup (80ml) sunflower oil 1 tsp sesame oil 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 5cm piece (25g) ginger, peeled, finely chopped 5 long dried chillies, torn 1 tbs caster sugar 1/ 3 cup (80ml) rice wine vinegar 3 spring onions, trimmed, thinly sliced Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil. Add lotus root and return to the boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 8 minutes or until lotus is tender but still has some bite. Drain, spread over a tray and pat dry with paper towel. Heat 2 tbs sunflower oil in a large frypan over medium-high heat. Add half the lotus root and cook for 1-2 minutes each side or until golden. Transfer to a bowl and repeat with remaining lotus. Meanwhile, heat sesame oil and remaining 2 tbs sunflower oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic, ginger and chilli, and cook, stirring often, for 2 minutes

or until softened. Add sugar and vinegar, and bring to the boil. Cook, swirling pan, until sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and stir through spring onion. Working quickly, pour vinegar mixture over lotus and toss to coat. Transfer to a plate and serve.

SPICY SCALLOP WONTONS MAKES 46

1 garlic clove, finely chopped 350g scallop meat, finely chopped 150g pork mince 2 tbs finely chopped canned water chestnuts, drained 2 spring onions, white part only, finely chopped 1 tbs light soy sauce 1 tbs Chinese rice wine (shaohsing – from Asian food shops) 46 fresh wonton wrappers (from Asian food shops and selected supermarkets) Cornflour, to dust Toasted white sesame seeds and coriander leaves, to serve SICHUAN PEPPER DRESSING

2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, toasted 1/ 3 cup (80ml) light soy sauce 1/ 3 cup (80ml) chicken stock 2 tbs chilli oil 1 tbs rice wine vinegar 3 tsp caster sugar For the dressing, using a mortar and pestle, pound peppercorns until finely ground. Transfer to a bowl, stir through remaining ingredients and chill until needed. To make the wonton filling, combine garlic, scallop, pork, water chestnut, spring onion, soy and rice wine in a bowl. To make wontons, place 1 tsp filling in the centre of a wonton wrapper, then brush edges lightly with water. Fold wrapper in half to form a rectangle, making sure there are no air pockets. Press edges together to seal. Bring the corners of the long folded edge together and press firmly to seal. Set aside on a baking-paper-lined tray dusted with cornflour. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to the boil over high heat. In batches, cook wontons for 3 minutes or until they float and are cooked through. >>


STEAMED FISH WITH VEGIES “This dish represents a double whammy of good luck. The word for ‘fish’ (yú) has the same pronunciation as the word meaning ‘surplus’ and, by association, signifies ‘leftover money’, or an increase in prosperity. Mixed vegetables are said to inspire family harmony for the coming year.” (Recipe p 70)

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LEANNE KITCHEN.

RAW SALMON SALAD (YUSHENG) “A popular Lunar New Year dish in Malaysia and Singapore. The Mandarin translation means ‘prosperity toss’. Ingredients are tossed at the table using chopsticks to shouts of ‘auspicious wishes’ from diners. The higher the toss, the better.” (Recipe p 70)


Drain well, transfer to a plate and repeat with remaining wontons. Divide wontons among warmed bowls and drizzle over dressing. Scatter with sesame seeds and coriander to serve.

RAW SALMON SALAD (YUSHENG) SERVES 4

Use a julienne peeler to shred carrot, daikon, cucumber and jicama, if using. 1/ 3

cup (50g) white sesame seeds, toasted 3/4 tsp Chinese five-spice powder Sunflower oil, to shallow-fry 10 wonton wrappers (from Asian food shops and selected supermarkets) 11/ 2 tbs very finely shredded ginger 3 spring onions, shredded 2 carrots, peeled, shredded 200g daikon, peeled, shredded 2 Lebanese cucumbers, shredded 1/4 jicama (yam bean – optional, substitute extra daikon), peeled, shredded 1 pomelo, peeled, cut into segments 400g skinless sashimi-grade salmon, thinly sliced 150g roasted unsalted peanuts, roughly chopped 1/ 2 bunch coriander, sprigs picked

stirring occasionally, for 1-2 minutes or until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Meanwhile, place spring onion in a bowl of iced water and stand for 10 minutes to curl. Drain. To serve, place all ingredients except wontons, plum sauce and ginger in separate piles on a platter. Scatter with fried ginger and a little sesame seed mixture. Serve with wontons, plum sauce and remaining sesame seed mixture.

For the plum sauce dressing, combine plum sauce and honey in a small saucepan over medium-high heat and cook, stirring often, for 4 minutes or until reduced slightly. Remove from heat, stir in lime juice and sesame oil, and set aside to cool. Using a mortar and pestle, pound sesame seeds and five-spice powder until coarsely ground. Heat 3cm oil in a frypan over mediumhigh heat. When hot, in batches, shallowfry wonton wrappers, turning halfway, for 1-2 minutes or until golden and crisp. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Add ginger and shallow-fry,

SERVES 4

2kg whole duck 11/ 2 tbs Sichuan peppercorns, toasted 3/4 cup (40g) lung ching tea leaves (from tea shops and Asian food shops – substitute lapsang souchong or jasmine tea) 1/4 cup (60g) firmly packed brown sugar Sesame oil, to brush SOY & CHILLI SAUCE

STEAMED FISH WITH VEGIES SERVES 2-4

2 tbs light soy sauce 2 tbs rice wine vinegar 1 tbs oyster sauce 1 tsp caster sugar 2 x 1kg plate-sized whole snapper (substitute barramundi or other firm white fish), cleaned 4cm piece (20g) ginger, thinly sliced 4 spring onions, cut into 10cm lengths 2 celery stalks, shredded, leaves reserved 1 leek, white part only, trimmed, shredded 1/ 3 cup (80ml) sunflower oil 1 cup (140g) frozen podded edamame, blanched, refreshed, drained

PLUM SAUCE DRESSING

350ml plum sauce 21/ 2 tbs runny honey Juice of 4 limes 11/ 2 tbs sesame oil

TEA-SMOKED DUCK

Combine soy, rice wine, oyster sauce, sugar and 2 tbs water in a small bowl and stir to combine. Using a sharp knife, make 3 deep diagonal scores in both sides of each fish (take care not to cut through to the bones). Divide half the ginger and spring onion among fish cavities. Divide remaining ginger and spring onion between 2 heatproof plates big enough to hold fish. Add fish and transfer plates to steamer baskets set over 2 saucepans of simmering water. Top fish with celery and leek, then pour over soy mixture. Cover and steam for 12-15 minutes or until fish is just cooked. Transfer fish and cooking juices to serving plates. Heat oil in a small saucepan over high heat until hot, then pour over fish. Scatter fish with edamame and reserved celery leaves to serve.

2 tbs each light soy sauce and Chinese black vinegar (chinkiang – from Asian food shops) 1 tsp sesame oil 1 small red chilli, seeds removed, finely chopped Using kitchen paper, pat dry outside of duck and inside cavity. Using a mortar and pestle, pound peppercorns until coarsely ground. Add 1 tbs salt flakes, then rub half peppercorn mixture all over duck, including cavity. Set remaining peppercorn mixture aside. Place duck, breast-side up, on a heatproof plate and place in a large steamer set over a large saucepan of simmering water. Cover and steam for 1 hour 15 minutes or until juices of the duck run clear when the thickest part of a thigh is pierced with a skewer. Line the base of a wok with 2 layers of foil. Scatter tea and sugar over foil. Place a greased heatproof rack over sugar mixture, then place duck, breast-side down, on rack. Heat wok over medium heat until tea mixture starts to smoke, then cover with a tight-fitting lid or seal with foil. Smoke for 10 minutes, then carefully turn duck, re-cover and smoke for a further 10 minutes. Remove from heat and stand, covered, for 10 minutes to rest. Meanwhile, for the sauce, combine all ingredients in a bowl and set aside. Transfer duck to a chopping board and lightly brush all over with sesame oil. With a cleaver, cut duck through the bone into bite-sized pieces. Scatter with some of the remaining peppercorn mixture. Serve warm with soy and chilli sauce.


LEANNE KITCHEN.

TEA-SMOKED DUCK “In Chinese New Year symbolism, duck (y ròu) is said to symbolise fertility. This way of preparing it is delicious and surprisingly easy; steam ahead of time and then smoke just before you serve it.”

delicious.com.au/recipes For more recipes to help you celebrate Chinese New Year.

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ON TREND.

F R I E N D LY

Kimchi glazed chicken wings. OPPOSITE: buckwheat pancakes with sauerkraut and fried egg (recipes p 76).


MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

FERMENT

Join the home-pickling revolution with these fermentationmade-easy recipes from Charlotte Binns-McDonald and Jaimee Edwards, of Sydney’s Cornersmith Cafe and Picklery. Their jars of natural goodness, packed with healthy bacteria and yeasts, are guaranteed to put some pep in your step. PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS

STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

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@fermentingprojects

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“This is a good-size batch of sauerkraut with classic Eastern European flavours of juniper and caraway. You could use red cabbage or white, or both, for a vibrant pink colour!”

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS COURT

FERMENTING IS ONE of the oldest methods of food preservation, and it’s having quite the revival due to a growing interest in the probiotic benefits. Put simply, fermentation is the work of friendly yeasts and bacteria converting the sugars in fruits and vegetables into lactic acid, CO2, acidic acid or alcohol. The process gives us many of our favourite foods, such as yoghurt, sourdough bread, miso paste, and, of course, wine and beer. All of these are rich in the bacteria and yeasts that are so good for digestive health. While there are an increasing number of fermented foods in the shops, making them yourself is surprisingly easy and deeply satisfying. There’s a lot of fun to be had in joining the growing numbers of enthusiasts whose kitchens are filled with crocks, jars and bottles containing the alchemy of fermentation. For newcomers, the best place to start is with lacto-fermentation, where lactic acid bacteria are harnessed in an airtight vessel to preserve your vegetables, increase nutrition and develop rich flavours. Try these simple and economic recipes for sauerkraut and ginger beer (see page 79). They require a little bit of looking after, but the rewards are immense. Fermented foods and beverages are nutritious, dense in probiotics and full of flavour. These are foods that truly love you back!


ON TREND.

Green flatbreads with kefir dressing (recipe p 76).


BUCKWHEAT PANCAKES WITH SAUERKRAUT AND FRIED EGG SERVES 6

6 eggs, separated, plus extra fried eggs to serve 11/ 2 cups (375ml) milk kefir (from good grocers and health food shops – substitute buttermilk) 130g buckwheat flour, sifted 125g white spelt flour, sifted 11/ 2 tbs raw caster sugar 3 tsp baking powder, sifted 1/ 2 cup (80g) poppy seeds Cooking oil spray, to grease 1 cup (175g) red cabbage sauerkraut (see recipe, page 79, or substitute good-quality store-bought sauerkraut) 1/ 2 bunch dill, sprigs picked, plus extra to serve 250g sour cream 2 tbs finely grated fresh horseradish (optional) Finely grated zest of 1 lemon Preheat the oven to 100°C. To make the pancake batter, whisk egg yolks, kefir, flours, sugar, baking powder and 1/ 2 tsp salt flakes in a bowl until combined. In a separate bowl with a clean whisk, whisk eggwhites to medium peaks. Fold whisked eggwhite and poppy seeds through egg yolk mixture.

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Place a greased non-stick frypan over medium-high heat. Add 1/3 cup (80ml) batter to pan and cook for 2 minutes or until bubbles form. Flip and cook for a further 1-2 minutes or until cooked through. Transfer to a baking tray and place in oven to keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter, greasing pan as needed. Meanwhile, combine sauerkraut and dill in a bowl. Combine sour cream and horseradish, if using, in a second bowl. Divide pancakes among serving plates and top with a fried egg and sauerkraut mixture. Scatter with zest and extra dill sprigs, and serve with sour cream.

GREEN FLATBREADS WITH KEFIR DRESSING SERVES 4

500g Greek yoghurt 2 bunches broccolini, 1 chopped 1 cup firmly packed baby spinach 11/3 cups (135g) almond meal 4 eggs 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil 1 each red and golden baby beetroots, shaved (we used a mandoline) Baby mint leaves, to serve KEFIR & CARAWAY DRESSING 1/2

KIMCHI GLAZED CHICKEN WINGS SERVES 4

1.5kg chicken wings, tips removed 2 /3 cup (165ml) kimchi liquid (from a large jar of kimchi) 1/3 cup (80ml) maple syrup Finely chopped salted roasted peanuts, baby coriander and kimchi, to serve Preheat the oven to 220°C. Grease a baking tray and line with baking paper. Toss chicken, kimchi liquid and maple syrup in a bowl until combined. Remove chicken from kimchi mixture and spread over prepared tray. Set aside. Place kimchi mixture in a saucepan over high heat and bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3-5 minutes or until reduced slightly. Remove from heat. Brush chicken with a little kimchi mixture and roast, basting regularly with kimchi mixture, for 55 minutes or until cooked through and sticky. Transfer chicken to a serving platter, scatter with peanuts and baby coriander, and serve with kimchi.

cup (125ml) milk kefir (from good grocers and health food shops – substitute buttermilk) 2 tsp Dijon mustard 1/2 tsp toasted caraway seeds To make the labneh, line a fine sieve with a large square of muslin or a clean Chux cloth. Set over a bowl and add yoghurt. Fold up edges to cover yoghurt and chill for 4 hours or until firm. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Grease a baking tray and line with baking paper. Place chopped broccolini and spinach in a food processor and whiz until finely chopped. Add almond meal, eggs and 1/2 tsp salt flakes. Pulse until just combined. Spread broccolini mixture evenly over prepared tray to create a layer about 4mm thick. Bake for 25 minutes or until firm. Remove from oven and stand until completely cooled. Heat a chargrill pan to high heat. Toss whole broccolini and oil in a bowl, then grill for 3 minutes on one side. Turn and grill for a further 2 minutes or until grill marks appear. Transfer to a plate and set aside to cool slightly. Meanwhile, for the kefir dressing, combine all ingredients in a bowl. To serve, transfer flatbread spread with labneh to a platter and top with beetroot and grilled broccolini. Drizzle with kefir dressing and scatter over baby mint.


ON TREND.

“THERE’S A LOT OF FUN IN JOINING THE GROWING NUMBER OF ENTHUSIASTS WHOSE KITCHENS CONTAIN THE ALCHEMY OF FERMENTATION.” – JAIMEE EDWARDS Grilled pineapple & tofu with kombucha (recipe p 79).


ON TREND.

PHOTOGRAPHY BEN DEARNLEY

“This is a traditional ginger beer made using a ginger bug. Think of the bug as a ‘starter’ – it provides the yeasts. The colour of your beer may vary, depending on ginger and honey used, and cooking temperature.”

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“THESE RECIPES FOR SAUERKRAUT AND GINGER BEER REQUIRE A BIT OF LOOKING AFTER, BUT THE REWARDS ARE IMMENSE.” – JAIMEE EDWARDS GRILLED PINEAPPLE & TOFU WITH KOMBUCHA DRESSING SERVES 4

1 medium pineapple, peeled, thinly sliced into rounds 1/2 cup (125ml) maple syrup 1 tbs sunflower oil 1/4 cup (90g) gochujang (Korean fermented chilli paste) 500g firm tofu, thinly sliced 1 red onion, thinly sliced 1 small red chilli, finely chopped 1/4 cup (35g) roasted salted cashews, chopped Mint leaves, to serve KOMBUCHA DRESSING 1/ 2

cup (125ml) kombucha (hibiscus or regular) Juice of 2 limes 2 tbs maple syrup

For kombucha dressing, whisk all ingredients and a pinch of salt flakes in a jug until well combined. Set aside. Heat a chargrill pan or barbecue to high heat. Toss pineapple and half the maple syrup in a bowl until combined. Grill for 2 minutes each side or until grill marks appear. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Line chargrill pan or barbecue with baking paper. Combine oil, gochujang paste and remaining 1/4 cup (60ml) maple syrup in a bowl. Brush tofu with gochujang mixture, then grill for 3 minutes each side or until grill marks appear. Arrange pineapple, tofu and onion on a platter. Scatter with chilli, nuts and mint, and drizzle with a little dressing. Serve with remaining dressing.

RED CABBAGE SAUERKRAUT MAKES 9 CUPS (1.6KG)

You will need 2 x 4-cup (1L) clean glass jars with screw-top lids. Begin this recipe at least 2 days ahead.

2kg red cabbage, shredded (we used a mandoline) 1 tbs salt flakes 2 tsp caraway seeds 2 tsp juniper berries Place all ingredients in a bowl. Using a wooden pounder, the flat head of a meat hammer or your hands, pound or squeeze the cabbage to release its water content. Keep pounding or squeezing until water runs out when you squeeze a fistful of cabbage (this will take up to 10 minutes). Tightly pack cabbage mixture into jars, pressing down so liquid rises above the cabbage and any air bubbles are released. Pack the jars until filled to 3cm from top of jar and liquid covers cabbage by about 1cm (top up jars with filtered water if necessary). Wipe clean jar rims and seal. Place jars on a tray in a cool, dry place for at least 2 days to ferment. During this time, the sauerkraut will bubble and some juices will escape. Simply wipe jars clean. After 2 days, carefully open jars over a sink (in case juices bubble over) and taste the sauerkraut. If you are happy with the level of sourness, reseal and chill. If you would like the sauerkraut to be more sour, reseal, place on tray and stand for another 24 hours. Sauerkraut can be eaten immediately, but will improve with time (we suggest a week). Store, covered and chilled, for up to 6 months.

TRADITIONAL GINGER BEER MAKES 8 CUPS (2L)

You will need a clean 2-cup (500ml) glass jar and 2 clean 4-cup (1L) glass jars or bottles, both with screw-top lids. Begin this recipe at least 11 days ahead. Note: this ginger beer will be mildly alcoholic.

8 cups (2L) filtered water cup (60ml) runny honey

1/4

GINGER BUG

About 300g ginger About 260g caster sugar About 280ml filtered water For the ginger bug, fill the 2-cup jar with 2 tbs thinly sliced unpeeled ginger, 2 tbs caster sugar and 2 tbs filtered water. Seal and shake vigorously. Remove lid and cover the mouth of the jar with cheese cloth or a clean Chux cloth, securing with an elastic band or kitchen string. Each day for the next 3-7 days, depending on room temperature (the process is faster in warmer months), add another 2 tbs each ginger, sugar and filtered water. Stir with a clean spoon, then re-cover with cloth. Once foam forms on the surface of ginger bug and it is perpetually bubbling, the ginger bug is ready. If, after 7 days, this does not occur, discard and start again. To make the ginger beer, place ginger, lemon juice and water in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to a very gentle simmer. Simmer, very gently, for 18 minutes to infuse. Remove from heat, stir through honey and stand until cooled to room temperature. Strain honey mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl. Strain ginger bug, discarding solids, through sieve into the honey mixture and stir to combine. Divide between 4-cup jars or bottles, seal and stand at room temperature for 7-10 days, depending on room temperature, to ferment (fermentation is faster in warmer months). Chill for 1-2 days before drinking. Open carefully over the sink and drink within 3 weeks.

delicious.com.au/recipes 400g unpeeled ginger, thinly sliced Juice of 4 lemons

For more pickling and fermenting ideas.


HIGH IN IRON & FIBRE

SUPREME Phoebe Wood gets your new year off to a nutritious start with recipes that make the most of clean and lean whole grains. Whether starring barley, spelt, freekeh, rye or rice, these fibrefilled, flavour-packed dinners will be on the table in a flash. PHOTOGRAPHY CHRIS COURT

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STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS


BALANCING ACT.

MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

RICH IN PROTEIN

Coconut & chilli poached chicken with mixed rice. Basix napkins in rosa and sable, Hale Mercantile Co. (halemercantileco.com); Tiro dinner plate (set of 4) and Eli rectangular platter, Country Road (countryroad. com.au); Wash&Wear paint in clay court (used throughout), Dulux (dulux.com.au). OPPOSITE: harissa beef and carrot with barley & tomato salad (recipes p 86). Tiro salad servers, Country Road; Sagres Antique Portuguese tiles (used throughout), Jatana Interiors (jatanainteriors.com.au).


HIGH IN FIBRE, LOW GI


BALANCING ACT. Eggplant, fennel & burrata rye bruschetta. Basix napkins in rosa, sable, porta and ceb, Hale Mercantile Co. (halemercantileco.com); Tiro platter, Country Road (countryroad.com.au). OPPOSITE: Freekeh with paprika and honey-glazed salmon (recipes p 84).

VEGETARIAN

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EGGPLANT, FENNEL & BURRATA RYE BRUSCHETTA SERVES 6

1 large eggplant, cut into wedges 2 /3 cup (165ml) extra virgin olive oil 250g cherry tomatoes on the vine 2 tsp toasted fennel seeds, coarsely ground 1 garlic clove, crushed 1/4 cup (60ml) red wine vinegar 6 slices rye sourdough, toasted 2 tbs finely grated parmesan 1/2 fennel, thinly shaved (we used a mandoline) Burrata and basil leaves, to serve

“WITH THE INDULGENCE OF CHRISTMAS OVER, IT’S THE TIME OF YEAR WHEN I COMMIT TO MORE NOURISHING FOODS. AND THAT MEANS WHOLE GRAINS, WHICH ARE PACKED WITH NUTRIENTS. I USE THEM TO BULK OUT FRESH, SEASONAL SALADS OR SUMMER-NIGHT DINNERS FOR A CLEAN, HEALTHY START TO 2018.” @phoeberosewood

delicious.com.au/recipes For more healthy recipes full of wholesome ingredients.

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Preheat oven to 200°C. Grease a baking tray and line with baking paper. Arrange eggplant on prepared tray in a single layer, drizzle with 1/3 cup (80ml) oil and season. Roast for 30 minutes or until tender and cooked through. Add tomatoes in last 10 minutes of cooking time or until starting to blister. Meanwhile, whisk fennel seeds, garlic, vinegar and remaining 1/3 cup (80ml) oil in a bowl. Season well. Divide toasted sourdough among serving plates and scatter with parmesan. Press eggplant onto the toast and top with tomato, shaved fennel, burrata and basil. Drizzle with dressing to serve.

Place rocket, parsley, garlic, pine nuts and parmesan in a food processor and whiz until finely chopped. With the motor running, add remaining 1/3 cup (80ml) oil, whizzing until combined. Squeeze juice and pulp from lemon through a sieve into rocket mixture, discarding pips. Add 1 tsp salt flakes and whiz to combine. Set aside. Cook pasta according to packet instructions, reserving 1/3 cup (80ml) cooking water. Toss cooked pasta with pesto and reserved cooking water. Divide among serving bowls and scatter with extra pine nuts and parmesan to serve.

FREEKEH WITH PAPRIKA & HONEY-GLAZED SALMON SERVES 4

2 cups (330g) freekeh 1/3 cup (80ml) runny honey 1 tbs smoked paprika (pimenton) 1/3 cup (80ml) extra virgin olive oil 600g whole skinless salmon fillet, pin-boned 1 medium zucchini, thinly sliced (we used a mandoline) 1 cup fresh or frozen peas, blanched, refreshed 1/3 cup (80ml) sunflower oil 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced Dill sprigs, to serve LIME & SOUR CREAM DRESSING

SPELT SPAGHETTI WITH ROASTED LEMON ROCKET PESTO SERVES 4

1 lemon, halved 1/2 cup (125ml) extra virgin olive oil 1 bunch rocket, leaves picked 1/2 bunch flat-leaf parsley 1 garlic clove, crushed 1/4 cup (40g) toasted pine nuts, plus extra to serve 1/3 cup (25g) finely grated parmesan, plus extra to serve 400g spelt spaghetti Preheat oven to 200°C. Place lemon on a baking tray and drizzle with 2 tbs oil. Roast for 25 minutes or until very soft. Remove and set aside to cool completely.

2 tbs sour cream Juice of 1 lime 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil Place freekeh in a saucepan and cover with 6 cups (1.5L) cold water. Place over medium heat and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 25 minutes or until liquid is completely absorbed. Set aside to cool, covered. Preheat oven to 200°C. Combine honey, paprika and olive oil in a bowl. Line a baking tray with baking paper and add salmon. Rub paprika mixture over salmon to coat. Season with salt. Bake for 15 minutes for medium. Set aside, loosely covered with foil, to rest for 5 minutes. Combine freekeh, zucchini and peas in a bowl and toss to combine. Set aside.


BALANCING ACT.

Spelt spaghetti with roasted lemon rocket pesto. Baxta large tray, Country Road (countryroad.com.au).

RICH IN VITAMIN B3 & PROTEIN


BALANCING ACT.

“THESE EASY WEEKNIGHT MEALS ARE THE PERFECT WAY TO BRING BALANCE BACK INTO YOUR DIET.”

Heat sunflower oil in a frypan over medium heat. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes or until crisp and golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on paper towel. For lime and sour cream dressing, whisk all ingredients together in a bowl with 2 tbs cold water. Season well. Toss salad with dressing and scatter with garlic chips and dill. Transfer to a serving dish with roasted salmon.

COCONUT & CHILLI POACHED CHICKEN WITH MIXED RICE SERVES 4

400ml coconut milk 4 cups (1L) chicken stock 2 tbs hot chilli condiment or chilli bean paste (from Asian food shops) 1 lemongrass stalk, bruised 5cm piece (25g) ginger, thinly sliced 1/2 bunch coriander, leaves picked, roots trimmed and washed 2 x 200g skinless chicken breast fillets 1 tbs fish sauce Juice of 1 lime 2 tbs maple syrup 11/2 cups (300g) brown rice 1/3 cup (60g) black wild rice 200g green beans, blanched, refreshed Thai basil and mint leaves, to serve Place coconut milk, chicken stock, chilli condiment, lemongrass, ginger and coriander root in a large saucepan over medium heat. Bring to the boil, stirring to combine. Reduce heat to low. Add chicken, cover and simmer for 5 minutes, then remove from heat. Set aside, covered, for 25 minutes (the chicken will cook through in the hot stock). Remove cooked chicken from stock and set aside. Stir fish sauce, lime juice and maple syrup through stock. Set aside. Cook rices according to packet instructions. Divide among serving bowls and ladle over some stock (remaining

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stock can be stored, frozen in an airtight container, for another use.) Using two forks, shred chicken and divide among bowls. Top with beans, Thai basil, mint and coriander leaves to serve.

HARISSA BEEF AND CARROT WITH BARLEY & TOMATO SALAD SERVES 4

1 bunch baby (Dutch) carrots, blanched, refreshed 1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil 11/2 cups (300g) hulled barley (substitute pearl barley) 1 tbs harissa paste 1 tbs brown sugar 700g skirt steak, trimmed Baby mint leaves, to serve ALMOND, TOMATO & GARLIC SALAD

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, roughly chopped 1/2 cup (80g) roasted almonds, chopped Juice of 1 lemon 1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil 250g cherry tomatoes, halved Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper and arrange carrots in a single layer. Drizzle with 1 tbs oil and roast on top shelf of oven for 25 minutes or until light golden. Cook barley according to packet instructions. Drain and set aside. Combine harissa, sugar and remaining 2 tbs oil in a bowl. Add skirt steak and toss to coat. Season with salt. Heat a barbecue or chargrill pan to high heat. Grill steak for 5-6 minutes each side for medium-rare. Transfer to a plate and rest, loosely covered with foil, for 10 minutes. Combine salad ingredients in a bowl, toss through barley and season well. Arrange on a serving plate with thinly sliced steak. Scatter with baby mint and serve with roasted carrots.


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EXTRACT.

Pulled lamb méchoui (recipe p 92).

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S O U K

IT UP

From its city markets and majestic mountains to its fertile coast and desert interior, Morocco’s culinary traditions come to life through food and travel writer John GregorySmith’s rich collection of sweet and savoury recipes. FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY MARTIN POOLE STYLING ROSIE REYNOLDS


E, THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AN ABU N I L ND ST A AN O C CE N E O LD

SH RE FF FOOD SEA

ALO NG TH EG O

Fried prawns with preserved lemon and oregano. OPPOSITE: Fez kefta sandwich.


EXTRACT.

MOROCCO IS NOT AN ending, but a beginning – a gateway to the East, and a world that’s so amazing I can’t fully describe it. It’s the source of a culinary obsession that has lasted many years and will no doubt last many more. Today’s Moroccan food is a cultural clash of Berber and Arabic, with other influences – Moorish, Ottoman, French, Spanish – peppered in. Orange Blossom & Honey is a window into that wonderful world. From the Sahara to the sea and the mountains to the medinas, I hope these recipes will bring a little Moroccan magic to your kitchen. This is an edited extract from Orange Blossom & Honey by John Gregory-Smith (Simon & Schuster, RRP $39.99). Available in stores now. @johngs

FRIED PRAWNS WITH PRESERVED LEMON AND OREGANO SERVES 4 AS A LIGHT MEAL

“These simple fried prawns are a typical dish cooked along Morocco’s Atlantic coast, where the seafood is just incredible. The juicy prawns cook quickly, taking on all the flavour of the garlic, preserved lemons and herbs. When I ate this dish in the quiet beach town of Oualidia, just south of Casablanca, it was prepared with the wild oregano that grows in abundance there. You can make this using dried oregano, which has a similarly strong flavour.” 2 /3

cup (165ml) extra virgin olive oil 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1/ 3 cup (70g) finely chopped preserved lemon rind

600g green peeled prawns 2 tsp sweet paprika (pimenton) 1 tsp ground cumin 1/4 tsp each ground turmeric and dried chilli flakes 1 tsp dried oregano 1/ 2 bunch each coriander and flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked, finely chopped Juice of 1/ 2 a lemon Wild rocket and crusty bread, to serve

Add spices, dried oregano and 1/ 2 tsp each salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 1-2 minutes or until prawns are cooked through. Stir through coriander, parsley and lemon juice, and transfer to a serving plate. Scatter with wild rocket and serve with crusty bread.

FEZ KEFTA SANDWICH SERVES 2

Heat oil in a large frypan over mediumhigh heat. Add garlic and preserved lemon, and cook, stirring constantly, for 10 seconds or until fragrant. Add prawns and cook, stirring regularly, for 2 minutes or until just turning pink.

“Fez has some of the best street food in Morocco, and as you weave your way through the narrow roads and winding alleyways, you discover more and more delicious snacks. This sandwich is a classic – minced meat cooked on a hot plate with

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EXTRACT.

onions, herbs and spices, and served with masses of chilli sauce in a soft white roll. You can choose from lamb, beef or merguez sausage, or even mix all three. It’s the ultimate speedy snack.” 2 tbs olive oil 1/ 2 red onion, finely chopped 250g beef mince 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 tomato, finely chopped 1 tbs tomato paste 1 tbs chilli sauce, plus extra to serve 1 tsp baharat (Middle Eastern spice blend – from good grocers or Middle Eastern food shops) 55g pitted black olives, chopped 1/ 2 bunch flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked, finely chopped 4 round Turkish rolls or crusty bread rolls of your choice, cut in half vertically, sliced open, warmed Shredded iceberg lettuce and lemon wedges, to serve Heat oil in a large frypan over high heat. Add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes or until softened slightly. Add beef and cook, breaking up with a wooden spoon, for 3 minutes or until browned all over. Add garlic and cook, stirring constantly, for 10 seconds or until fragrant, then add tomato and cook for 2 minutes or until softened slightly. Add tomato paste, chilli sauce, baharat, 1/4 cup (60ml) water and a pinch of salt flakes, and cook, stirring often, for 2-3 minutes or until thickened slightly. Stir through olives and parsley. Stuff the halved rolls with lettuce and a generous helping of beef mixture. Top with more chilli sauce if you’re an addict, like me, and serve immediately with lemon wedges.

PULLED LAMB MÉCHOUI SERVES 4

“Méchoui is a very traditional Berber lamb barbecue dish. To learn about it, I travelled deep into the High Atlas Mountains with my friend Lachen. A huge fire pit was prepared, made of mud in a cone shape. We tied the lamb carcass to a wooden 92 delicious.com.au

cross and rubbed smen (fermented butter) all over it. Then we lowered the cross into the pit so the lamb was suspended over the fire, before sealing the top of the makeshift oven with more mud. Then we waited, enjoying the stunning scenery and eating boulfaf (lamb liver skewers). When the lamb was ready, we broke the seal and lifted it out. The meat was served on a bed of wild herbs, with bread and spices to season. We ate with our fingers, ripping off pieces of meat. To do this at home would be quite full on, I admit, but a slow-roasted shoulder of lamb works just as well. And to lighten up the rich flavours, a final showering of fresh herbs, salty feta and pomegranate seeds adds an incredible finish.” Begin this recipe 1 day ahead.

ORANGE & HONEY BLOSSOM CAKE

3 garlic cloves 30g salted butter, softened 2 tsp ras el hanout (Moroccan spice blend – from good grocers and Middle Eastern food shops) 1 tsp each ground cumin and ground coriander 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil 1.5kg lamb shoulder (bone-in) 1/ 2 cup (100g) feta, crumbled Seeds of 1 pomegranate 1/ 2 bunch each mint and flat-leaf parsley, leaves picked, finely chopped Toasted flatbreads, to serve

1 orange 21/ 2 cups (375g) self-raising flour 240g almond meal 11/ 2 tsp baking powder 250g unsalted butter, softened 300g caster sugar 2 tbs orange blossom water 6 eggs 1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil 60g fresh honeycomb (from good grocers) 20g flaked almonds Edible dried rose petals (optional), to serve

Using a mortar and pestle, pound garlic and a pinch of salt flakes to a paste. Add butter, spices and oil, and stir until smooth. Prick the lamb all over with the tip of a sharp knife and place in a large non-reactive bowl. Rub the spice paste all over the lamb. Cover and chill overnight. The next day, preheat oven to 220°C. Bring lamb to room temperature. Place in a roasting tray and pour 100ml of water around the sides. Cover with foil and place in the oven. Reduce oven to 200°C and roast lamb for 3 hours or until meat is very tender. Remove from oven, cover and stand for 20 minutes to rest. Using two forks, coarsely shred lamb. Transfer to a large serving platter, scatter with feta, pomegranate seeds and herbs, and serve with flatbread.

FILLING

SERVES 10

“From sugary mint teas to flaky pastries and crunchy biscuits, Moroccans have a real sweet tooth and love to indulge in wonderful cakes. A simple orange and almond cake is a staple dessert that is made in homes up and down the country. I have used the classic base to make a show-stopping naked layer cake, with three layers of moist almond and orange cake, a soft and scented ricotta filling, and honeycomb, candied orange, rose petals and flaked almonds scattered over the top. It’s heavenly and best enjoyed with plenty of fresh mint tea.” Begin this recipe at least 2 hours ahead.

21/ 2 cups (600g) firm ricotta 300g Greek yoghurt 100g pure icing sugar, sifted 1 tbs orange blossom water CANDIED ORANGES

200g caster sugar 2 oranges, cut into 4mm-thick slices For the candied oranges, line a baking tray with baking paper. Place sugar and 2 cups (500ml) water in a large non-stick frypan over high heat. Bring to the boil and cook, swirling the pan occasionally, for 5 minutes or until sugar is dissolved and liquid is reduced slightly. Add orange slices in a single layer, reduce heat to medium and cook, turning halfway, for


“STANDING BETWEEN THE MIGHTY SAHARA DESERT AND THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA, MOROCCO WAS PERFECTLY POSITIONED AS AN OUTPOST OF DIFFERENT CIVILISATIONS.” Orange & honey blossom cake


EXTRACT.

15 minutes or until slightly translucent. Remove from heat and, using tongs, transfer slices to prepared tray to cool. Reserve syrup. Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease the base and sides of three 22cm round cake pans and line with baking paper. To make the cake, place the orange in a saucepan of boiling water over high heat. Cover and boil for 20 minutes or until soft. Drain and quarter, removing any large pips. Transfer to a blender and whiz for 3 minutes or until a smooth puree. Transfer puree to a bowl and set aside. Sift flour, almond meal and baking powder into a large bowl and set aside. Add butter, sugar and orange blossom water to the blender and whiz, stirring every 2 minutes, for 5-6 minutes or until combined and smooth. Add eggs, 1 at a time, whizzing between each addition, until combined and smooth. With the motor running, add the oil in a steady stream until all added and well combined. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, whizzing after each addition,

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until smooth. Add orange puree and whiz until combined. Divide cake batter among prepared pans and bake, swapping the top and bottom pans halfway, for 35-40 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean (if only 2 cakes fit in your oven at one time, it’s fine to set one of the uncooked cakes aside and cook separately). Remove cakes from oven and leave in pans for 30 minutes to cool slightly. Prick tops of cakes with a skewer. Warm reserved candied orange syrup over medium heat (add water, 1 tbs at a time, to loosen if necessary), then pour evenly over each cake. Stand for 20 minutes to soak. Remove cakes from tins and place on wire racks to cool completely. Meanwhile, for the filling, place all ingredients in a food processor and whiz until smooth. Cover and chill for 1 hour to firm up. To assemble, place 1 cake on a serving platter and spoon over one-third filling, using a palette knife to smooth to edges. Repeat layering process, finishing with a

layer of filling. Top cake with candied orange slices, fresh honeycomb, almonds and rose petals, if using, before serving.

POMEGRANATE & ROSEWATER MILLE-FEUILLE SERVES 6

“During the day, as you wander the maze of little streets that make up the Marrakesh medina, you will wind up in Jemaa El Fna square, and when you do, you’ll need a coffee and a pastry. Head around the back of Café de France to Al Jawda, on Rue de la Liberté. It’s a sophisticated patisserie, filled with a fabulous array of sweet treats: coconut cookies, macaroons, date-filled makroots and stunning mille-feuille. Moroccans love millie-feuille, the classic French custard slice. It’s one of the many hangovers from the French Protectorate in Morocco. Today, cafe culture is rife and families enjoy tucking into tea and mille-feuille for afternoon gossip on the weekend. My version is slightly more modern, flavoured with pomegranate and rosewater, and


made with a mascarpone cream instead of custard. This really is a stunning centrepiece for afternoon tea or a swanky dinner party.” 375g frozen butter puff pastry (we used Careme brand), thawed 165g pure icing sugar, sifted Seeds of 1/ 2 a pomegranate 600ml thickened cream 200g mascarpone 2 tsp rosewater Dried rose petals (optional), to serve Preheat oven to 200°C. Grease a baking tray and line with baking paper. Roll out pastry on a lightly floured surface to a 30cm x 35cm rectangle. Place on prepared tray and prick all over with a fork. Cover pastry with another piece of baking paper and top with another baking tray. Bake for 45-50 minutes or until golden. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. Divide 100g icing sugar between 2 bowls. Add 2 tsp water to 1 bowl and stir to a thick white paste. Using the end of a

rolling pin, muddle 2 tbs pomegranate seeds in a clean bowl and reserve the juice. Stir 21/ 2 tsp pomegranate juice into second bowl of icing sugar to form a slightly thinner pink icing. Set bowls aside. Cut pastry into 3 even rectangles. When ready to serve, place cream in a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment and whisk to soft peaks. Add mascarpone, rosewater and remaining 65g icing sugar, and whisk to stiff peaks. Place 1 piece of pastry on a serving board and spread half the cream mixture over the top, levelling with a knife. Top with another piece of pastry and spread remaining cream mixture on top. Spread white icing over remaining piece of pastry and place, icing-side up, on the mille-feuille. Using a teaspoon, drizzle the pink icing over the top. Run a skewer through the icing to combine slightly and let drip down sides. Scatter over the rose petals, if using, and the remaining pomegranate seeds, then serve immediately.

“THE FRENCH, WHO HAD A PROTECTORATE OVER MOROCCO FROM 1912 AND OCCUPIED THE COUNTRY FOR 40 YEARS, LEFT THEIR CAFE CULTURE AND AN APPETITE FOR SOPHISTICATED PASTRIES.”

delicious.com.au/recipes For more savoury and sweet ideas from around the globe.


Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wholesome treats the kids will love, or fresh and light desserts perfect for summer entertaining, fresh from The Great Australian Bake Off, Matt Moran has packed his must-make recipes chock-full of nutritious ingredients. PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

OH MY GOODNESS


MATT MORAN. Chewy oat & raisin cookies. OPPOSITE: pineapple upside-down cake (recipes p 99).

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I LOVE TO BAKE as much as I can at home. In winter, it’ll be fruit tarts or even a good old sticky date pudding, but now that summer’s come round, I’ll make something a bit lighter, like lemon chia cake, or lemon, orange or mandarin curd cake. My favourite, though, is pineapple upside-down cake – it’s that little bit cleaner and fresher for warmer weather. I think it’s important to keep a bit of balance with nutritious, wholesome ingredients. My family enjoy cakes and treats, but they don’t like things too sugary – no one wants to finish a dessert that’s really sickly-sweet. That’s another reason I like pineapple upside-down cake, because it’s got that bit of acidity. It’s not too rich and it’s not going to weigh you down. And the banana muffins and chewy cookies are great for kids. Again, they’re full of good, wholesome ingredients – and things that they think are sweet, but they’re not! @chefmattmoran

Lemon chia cake

@chefmattmoran


MATT MORAN.

LEMON CHIA CAKE SERVES 8

2 tbs black chia seeds 1/ 3 cup (80ml) milk 21/ 2 cups (400g) wholemeal plain flour 3 tsp baking powder 1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda 125g unsalted butter, softened 200g light muscavado sugar 2 eggs Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon 250g Greek yoghurt YOGHURT & LEMON ICING

2 tbs icing sugar, sifted 1/ 2 cup (140g) Greek yoghurt Finely grated zest and juice of 1/2 a lemon Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease base and sides of a 22cm ring mould cake pan and line with baking paper. Combine chia seeds and milk in a bowl and set aside for 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile, combine flour, baking powder, bicarb and 1/4 tsp salt flakes in a bowl. In a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, beat butter and sugar until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating between each addition. Stir through lemon zest and juice and chia mixture. In 2 batches, add flour mixture and yoghurt, stirring until combined. Spoon batter into prepared pan and bake for 40 minutes or until a skewer inserted into cake comes out clean. Cool in pan. For the icing, combine all ingredients except lemon zest in a bowl. Spoon over cooled cake and sprinkle with zest to serve.

Preheat oven to 160°C. Grease base and side of a 23cm springform cake pan and line with baking paper. Place pineapple, maple syrup and vanilla bean in a large non-stick frypan over medium-high heat and cook, swirling pan occasionally, for 12 minutes or until maple syrup is reduced by half and pineapple is golden. Transfer pineapple to prepared pan and chill until needed. Set syrup aside. Combine flour, coconut, baking powder and 1/ 2 tsp salt flakes in a bowl. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter, sugar and vanilla seeds until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating between each addition. Fold in flour mixture and sour cream. Carefully pour batter over pineapple in prepared pan and place on a baking tray. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Stand for 15 minutes to cool slightly. Place serving plate over pan, invert cake and remove pan. Warm reserved syrup mixture over medium heat and drizzle over cake.

CHEWY OAT & RAISIN COOKIES MAKES 18 COOKIES

300g raisins 315g rolled oats 250g white spelt flour, sifted 1 tsp baking powder 11/ 2 tsp ground cinnamon 250g unsalted butter, softened 2 tbs rapadura or raw sugar 2 eggs 2 tsp vanilla extract 100g dark (90%) chocolate, finely chopped

PINEAPPLE UPSIDE-DOWN CAKE SERVES 10

400g peeled, thinly sliced pineapple 1 cup (250ml) maple syrup 1 vanilla pod, split, seeds scraped 225g white spelt flour 150g desiccated coconut 2 tsp baking powder 220g unsalted butter, softened 220g demerera or raw sugar 4 eggs, at room temperature 200g sour cream

Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease 3 baking trays and line with baking paper. Combine raisins and 2 cups (500ml) boiling water in a heatproof bowl and stand for 30 minutes to soften. Drain, transfer to a food processor and whiz until smooth. Set aside to cool completely. In the cleaned food processor, whiz one-third oats until finely ground. Place ground oats in a bowl with flour, baking powder, cinnamon, 1/ 2 tsp salt flakes and remaining oats, and stir until combined.

In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter, sugar and raisin puree until pale and combined. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating between each addition. Add vanilla, then, on low speed, beat in dry ingredients and chocolate until combined. Roll 2 tbs raisin mixture into a ball, place on prepared trays and flatten with the palm of your hand, leaving 3cm between each cookie. Bake, swapping top and bottom trays halfway, for 12 minutes or until a cookie moves on the tray when gently pushed. Cool cookies on trays, then serve.

BANANA, WALNUT & MAPLE MUFFINS MAKES 15 MUFFINS

100g sultanas 100g coconut oil, melted 1 cup (250ml) maple syrup 2 eggs 6 ripe bananas, 4 mashed, 2 finely chopped 1/ 2 cup (125ml) milk 265g white spelt flour 21/ 2 tsp baking powder 1 vanilla pod, split, seeds scraped 1/ 2 tsp ground allspice 150g walnuts, finely chopped Preheat oven to 180°C. Line 15 holes of two 12-hole 80ml (1/ 3 -cup) muffin pans with muffin cases. Place sultanas and 2 cups (500ml) boiling water in a heatproof bowl for 5 minutes to soften. Drain and rinse under cold water. In a separate bowl, whisk oil, 2 / 3 cup (165ml) maple syrup, eggs, mashed banana, milk and sultanas until combined. In a separate bowl, combine flour, baking powder, vanilla seeds, allspice and 1/ 2 tsp salt flakes. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and stir to combine. Divide batter between prepared pans. Sprinkle with walnut and chopped banana. Bake for 25 minutes or until a skewer inserted into a muffin comes out clean. Meanwhile, place remaining 1/3 -cup (80ml) maple syrup in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to the boil. Drizzle over muffins as they come out of oven. Set aside to cool before serving.

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Banana, walnut & maple muffins (recipe p 99).

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MATT MORAN.

SPICED PUMPKIN & HONEY BREAD

HONEY-RIBBONED LABNEH

SERVES 8

Begin this recipe 1 day ahead.

500g Greek yoghurt 1/4 cup (60ml) runny honey

400g peeled butternut pumpkin, cut into 3cm pieces 2 eggs 2 tbs runny honey 1/ 3 cup (80ml) sunflower oil 1/ 2 cup (125ml) buttermilk 150g pumpkin seeds (pepitas) 250g white spelt flour 1 tsp baking powder 1/ 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda 2 tsp ground ginger 1 tsp mixed spice

For the honey labneh, line a fine sieve with muslin or a clean Chux cloth. Set over a bowl and add yoghurt. Fold up edges to cover yoghurt, weigh down with a plate and chill overnight to drain. The next day, fold through honey and chill until needed. Preheat the oven to 160°C. Grease a baking tray and line with baking paper. Grease a 20cm x 10cm loaf pan and line with baking paper, allowing 3cm to overhang the long edges.

Spread pumpkin across prepared tray. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until very tender. Set aside to cool, then transfer to a food processor and whiz until smooth. Add eggs, honey, oil, buttermilk and half the pepitas, and whiz to combine. Add dry ingredients and pulse to combine. Pour batter into prepared pan and sprinkle with remaining 75g pepitas. Bake for 1 hour or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Cool in pan. Remove from pan, slice and serve with labneh. For more of Matt Moranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recipes, see:

ON SUNDAY


JAMIE OLIVER. Passionfruit semifreddo sandwiches (recipe p 104). OPPOSITE: Aperol & grapefruit citrus jellies (recipe p 108).

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Jamie Oliver brings a totally tropical vibe to your table, with tangy and refreshing fruit desserts bursting with the sun-drenched flavours of mango, melon and pineapple. PHOTOGRAPHY SIMON BAJADA RECIPES MADDIE RIX


PASSIONFRUIT SEMIFREDDO SANDWICHES SERVES 10

Begin this recipe 1 day ahead. Pulp of 7 passionfruit 400ml thickened cream 4 eggs, separated 45g caster sugar PASSIONFRUIT SAUCE

3 titanium-strength gelatine leaves 1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar Pulp of 18 passionfruit HAZELNUT SPONGE

“WITH SUMMER IN FULL SWING IT’S THE PERFECT TIME TO WHIP UP A SEASONAL DESSERT. I’M TALKING JUICY WATERMELON – THE PERFECT REFRESHER – DELICIOUS, COCKTAILINSPIRED ICY POLES, AND CITRUS JELLIES, WHICH ARE SO VERSATILE, YOU CAN SWAP INGREDIENTS FOR YOUR OWN ZESTY COMBO. YUM.” @jamieoliver

@jamieoliver

100g hazelnuts 5 eggs 100g caster sugar 100g unsalted butter, melted, cooled 100g self-raising flour, sifted Grease a 3cm-deep, 30cm x 35cm baking tray and line with baking paper. To make semifreddo, strain passionfruit pulp through a sieve set over a measuring jug. You should have 70ml passionfruit puree (top up with water if necessary). In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk cream to soft peaks. Add passionfruit puree and whisk until combined. Transfer to a bowl. Wipe clean stand mixer and whisk yolks and sugar for 5 minutes or until thick and pale. Transfer to a second bowl. Wipe clean stand mixer and whisk eggwhites and a pinch of salt flakes to firm peaks. Fold passionfruit mixture into egg yolk mixture, then fold through whisked eggwhite. Spread semifreddo mixture evenly across prepared tray. Top with a sheet of baking paper and freeze for 6 hours or until frozen. Preheat oven to 160°C. Grease two 30cm x 35cm baking trays and line with baking paper. For the hazelnut sponge, place hazelnuts in a food processor and whiz until finely ground. In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk eggs, sugar and a pinch of salt flakes for 5 minutes or until thick. With the motor running, add butter in a thin, steady stream, until combined. Fold through ground hazelnut and flour.

Divide mixture between prepared trays and bake for 12 minutes or until firm to the touch. Set aside to cool completely. For the passionfruit sauce, soak gelatine in cold water for 5 minutes to soften. Combine sugar and pulp from 15 passionfruit in a bowl. Strain passionfruit mixture through a sieve set over a second bowl. You should have 150ml passionfruit liquid (top up with water if necessary). Stir through pulp of 3 remaining passionfruit. Squeeze excess water from gelatine, then transfer leaves to a small saucepan over medium heat and stir until melted. Add passionfruit mixture, stir to combine and set aside to cool to room temperature. Remove top layer of baking paper from semifreddo. Turn out 1 hazelnut sponge directly onto semifreddo, then carefully invert onto a chopping board (the semifreddo will now be on top). Reserve 2 tbs passionfruit sauce and spoon remaining sauce over semifreddo. Turn out second hazelnut sponge onto passionfruit-topped semifreddo to make a sandwich. Cover with baking paper and freeze for at least 30 minutes or until firm. When ready to serve, heat reserved passionfruit sauce in a saucepan over medium heat until warm. Stand semifreddo sandwich at room temperature for 5-10 minutes or until softened slightly. Slice into rectangles and drizzle with warm passionfruit sauce to serve (individual semifreddo sandwiches can be stored, wrapped in baking paper and plastic wrap, in the freezer).

TROPICAL FRUIT CARPACCIO SERVES 6

2 lemongrass stalks, white part only, bruised 1 long red chilli, halved lengthways 2cm piece (10g) ginger, bruised 2 tbs caster sugar 1/2 bunch basil 1 pineapple, peeled Pulp of 3 passionfruit Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime 2 ripe mangoes, thinly sliced 1 ripe papaya, thinly sliced


JAMIE OLIVER.

Tropical fruit carpaccio

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JAMIE OLIVER.

CO

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S U M

Pina colada icy poles. OPPOSITE: rumsoaked watermelon with watermelon granita.


100g fresh coconut flesh, shaved Edible flowers (optional), to serve To make the syrup, place lemongrass, chilli, ginger, sugar, 2 sprigs basil and 100ml cold water in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and stand for 1 hour to infuse. Heat a chargrill pan or barbecue to high heat. Grill pineapple, turning every 2 minutes, until charred. Set aside to cool. Once cool enough to handle, core, then thinly slice. Remove chilli from syrup and discard. Transfer syrup to a food processor. Whiz until smooth, then strain through a fine sieve placed over a bowl. Stir through passionfruit pulp and lime zest and juice. Arrange pineapple, mango and papaya on a platter. Drizzle over dressing and scatter with coconut, edible flowers, if using, and remaining basil leaves to serve.

RUM-SOAKED WATERMELON WITH WATERMELON GRANITA SERVES 8

Begin this recipe at least 7 hours ahead. 4 limes, cut into wedges, plus extra finely grated lime zest to serve 1/3 cup (75g) caster sugar 1 bunch mint, leaves picked 100ml white rum 1 x 6kg seedless watermelon, halved Place lime, sugar and three-quarters mint in a large bowl or jug and muddle with the end of a rolling pin. Stir through rum and stand for 1-2 hours to infuse. Strain mixture through a sieve set over a bowl, pressing with the back of a spoon to extract juice. Remove rind from 1 watermelon half and coarsely chop flesh. Spread on a freezer-proof tray and pour over half rum mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and freeze for 6 hours or until frozen. Cut remaining watermelon half into wedges, place on a tray and drizzle with remaining rum mixture. Chill until needed. Place frozen watermelon mixture in a food processor and pulse, stirring occasionally, until a snowy consistency.

Transfer to a platter. Working quickly, top with watermelon wedges, extra zest and remaining mint leaves. Serve immediately.

PINA COLADA ICY POLES MAKES 8

Begin this recipe 1 day ahead. You will need 8 x 125ml (1/2-cup) icy pole moulds and 8 paddle-pop sticks 11/2 tbs caster sugar Finely grated zest and juice of 3 limes 1/2 pineapple, peeled, core removed, chopped 100ml pineapple juice 1 tsp maple syrup 400g coconut yoghurt 1/4 cup (60ml) white rum To make the lime layer, combine sugar and cup (165ml) water in a saucepan over low heat and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Transfer to a heatproof bowl and stir through lime zest and juice. Divide lime mixture among moulds and freeze for at least 45 minutes or until partially frozen. 2 /3

To make the pineapple layer, when lime layer is partially frozen, place pineapple, pineapple juice and maple syrup in a blender and whiz until smooth. Spoon 2 tbs pineapple mixture into each icy pole mould and return to freezer for at least 90 minutes or until partially frozen. To make yoghurt layer, whisk yoghurt and rum in a bowl until combined. Divide yoghurt mixture among moulds. Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole through centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick. Freeze overnight or until frozen. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.

PINEAPPLE, LIME & PINK PEPPERCORN SORBET SERVES 6

Begin this recipe at least 6 hours ahead. 11/2 tbs pink peppercorns 200g caster sugar Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1 ripe pineapple, core removed, chopped 200ml pineapple juice


FROZEN MANGO RIPPLE & COCONUT CHEESECAKE SERVES 8-10

Begin this recipe at least 7 hours ahead. 80g coconut oil, plus extra to grease 90g desiccated coconut 200g digestive biscuits FILLING

8 cardamom pods 3 mangoes, peeled, chopped 1 tbs runny honey 300ml thickened cream 500g cream cheese, softened 180g caster sugar 270ml can coconut cream

To make lime syrup, using a mortar and pestle, pound peppercorns until coarsely ground. Transfer to a small saucepan with sugar and 100ml water. Cook, stirring, over medium heat for 2 minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat, stir through lime zest and juice, and set aside until completely cool. Place pineapple and pineapple juice in a blender and whiz until smooth. Strain lime syrup into pineapple mixture, reserving peppercorn and lime zest from sieve, and pulse to combine. Transfer pineapple mixture to an ice cream machine and churn according to manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s instructions. Transfer to a loaf pan, cover and freeze for 6 hours until firm. To serve, stand sorbet at room temperature for 10-20 minutes or until softened slightly. Scoop into bowls and scatter over reserved peppercorn mixture.

APEROL & GRAPEFRUIT CITRUS JELLIES MAKES 6

Begin this recipe at least 3 hours ahead. 4 titanium-strength gelatine leaves 4 grapefruit

Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon and 1 orange 1/3 cup (80ml) Aperol 1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar 100ml thickened cream 1 tsp icing sugar, sifted Soak gelatine in cold water for 5 minutes to soften. Finely grate zest of 1 grapefruit and place in a bowl with lemon and orange zest. Cover and chill until needed. Combine lemon and orange juice, Aperol, caster sugar, 100ml water and juice from zested grapefruit in a saucepan. Squeeze excess water from gelatine and add to pan. Place over medium heat, stirring constantly, until gelatine and sugar are dissolved. Set aside to cool. Peel and segment the remaining 3 grapefruits and divide among six 250ml (1-cup) serving glasses. Divide Aperol jelly among glasses. Cover and chill for 3 hours or until set. Place cream, icing sugar and threequarters reserved zest mixture in a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment and whisk to medium peaks. Divide cream mixture among glasses and scatter with remaining zest mixture to serve.

Grease a deep 23cm springform cake pan. Add 2 tbs desiccated coconut and shake to coat base and sides. Shake out excess. Place biscuits, coconut oil and remaining 50g desiccated coconut in a food processor and whiz to fine crumbs. Firmly press biscuit mixture into base of prepared pan and chill until needed. Meanwhile, for the filling, in a mortar and pestle pound cardamom pods, discarding husks, until finely ground. Place mango, honey and crushed cardamom in a food processor and whiz until smooth, then transfer to a bowl. In a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk cream to stiff peaks, then transfer to a second bowl. Place cream cheese and sugar in stand mixer and whisk until smooth. Fold through whipped cream and coconut cream. Transfer 11/2 cups (375ml) coconut cream mixture to a clean bowl and set aside. Stir two-thirds mango puree through remaining coconut cream mixture and pour into prepared pan. Spread reserved coconut cream mixture over cheesecake and drizzle with remaining one-third mango puree. Using a skewer, make a swirl pattern in topping. Freeze for 6 hours or until firm. To serve, stand cheesecake at room temperature for 1-2 hours or until soft. Carefully remove from pan and slice with a hot knife.


JAMIE OLIVER.

Frozen mango ripple & coconut cheesecake. OPPOSITE: pineapple, lime & pink peppercorn sorbet (recipe p 107).

delicious.com.au/recipes For more sweet dessert ideas from Jamie Oliver.

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Is there a more wonderful time of year than stone fruit season? These beautiful desserts from Phoebe Wood have us convinced. PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS

Three-milk cake with peach & lemon thyme jam (recipe p 114). Ink Splatters linen tablecloth, Aqua Door Designs (aquadoordesigns.com).

STYLING VIVIEN WALSH


WICKED.

Nectarine, strawberry & basil galette (recipe p 114). Sarah Ellison ‘Leopard Pink’ wallpaper, Emily Ziz (emilyziz. com); Madeline Weinrib ‘Silk Ikat’ fabric, Tigger Hall (tiggerhall.com); Mosaic Best tea towel in pink, Bonnie and Neil (bonnieandneil.com.au).

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Plum baked custard. Cayenne Tangerine sheer fabric, Emily Ziz (emilyziz. com); Aila round platter in pink, Country Road (countryroad.com.au). OPPOSITE: cherry & star anise pie (recipes p 116). Big Waves tea towel in orange, Bonnie and Neil (bonnieandneil.com.au).


WICKED.

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Phoebe Wood, Food Director @phoeberosewood

PEACH, CARROT & WALNUT CAKE WITH CREAM CHEESE ICING

sugar until pale and fluffy. Add cream cheese and vanilla, and beat until smooth. Using a serrated knife, trim tops of cakes to level. Top 1 cake with half the icing, then top with second cake. Using a palette knife, spread a little of the remaining icing around side of cake, scraping the edges to create a ‘naked’ effect. Top cake with remaining icing. Arrange extra peaches on top, then scatter with extra walnuts and freeze-dried raspberries to serve.

THREE-MILK CAKE WITH PEACH & LEMON THYME JAM

remaining milk mixture. Chill for 3 hours or overnight until cold. Meanwhile, for the jam, place all ingredients in a saucepan over mediumlow heat and stir to combine. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 45 minutes or until a thick, jammy consistency. Cool completely. Whisk mascarpone, cream and icing sugar until combined. Place cake on a serving plate, release from pan and spread top with mascarpone mixture. Drizzle over lemon thyme jam just before serving.

SERVES 10

NECTARINE, STRAWBERRY & BASIL GALETTE

SERVES 8

Begin this recipe at least 5 hours ahead.

SERVES 8

500g ripe yellow peaches, chopped, plus extra thinly sliced peaches to serve 270g coarsely grated carrot 1 cup (220g) caster sugar 2 tsp vanilla bean paste 50g finely chopped walnuts, plus extra chopped toasted walnuts to serve 1/4 tsp ground cardamom 2 tsp ground ginger 2 tsp ground cinnamon 4 eggs, lightly beaten 1 cup (250ml) sunflower oil 125g sour cream 31/3 cups (500g) self-raising flour, sifted Freeze-dried raspberries, to serve

200g unsalted butter, softened 11/3 cups (295g) caster sugar 2 tsp vanilla bean paste Finely grated zest of 1 lemon 6 eggs 3 cups (450g) self-raising flour, sifted 600ml buttermilk 375ml can evaporated milk 21/2 cups (625ml) milk 500g mascarpone 1 cup (250ml) thickened cream 1/2 cup (60g) pure icing sugar, sifted

Begin this recipe at least 4 hours ahead.

CREAM CHEESE ICING

125g unsalted butter, softened 2 cups (240g) pure icing sugar 500g cream cheese, softened 1 tsp vanilla extract Preheat oven to 160°C. Grease 2 x 20cm round cake pans. Line with baking paper. Whiz peach in a food processor to a coarse puree. Transfer to a bowl with carrot, sugar, vanilla, walnut, spices, egg, oil and sour cream, stirring to combine. Add flour and fold to combine. Divide batter evenly between prepared pans and smooth tops. Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes or until a skewer inserted into centre comes out clean. Stand for 30 minutes, then turn onto a wire rack to cool completely. For the icing, in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter and

4 nectarines, halved 500g strawberries, larger ones halved 1 cup (220g) caster sugar 2 tsp vanilla extract 1/2 cup (50g) milk powder 1/2 cup (75g) plain flour Small basil leaves and cream, to serve PASTRY

2 /3

22 /3 cups (400g) plain flour 1/4 cup (55g) caster sugar 250g cold unsalted butter, chopped 2 tbs apple cider vinegar 1 egg, lightly beaten with 1 tbs water 1 tbs demerara sugar

Preheat the oven to 160°C. Grease a 22cm springform cake pan and line with baking paper. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter and caster sugar until pale. Add vanilla and zest, and beat to combine. Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. In 2 batches, fold in flour and 350ml buttermilk, then spoon batter into prepared pan and smooth top. Bake for 1 hour 15 minutes or until a skewer inserted into centre comes out clean. Stand for 20 minutes, then prick top all over with a skewer. Combine evaporated milk, milk and remaining 250ml buttermilk in a jug, then pour half over cake. Stand to soak for 15 minutes, then pour over

For the pastry, combine flour, caster sugar and 1/2 tsp fine sea salt in a bowl. Add butter and toss to coat. Rub butter into flour until it resembles very coarse crumbs. Combine vinegar, 1/4 cup (60ml) chilled water and 4 ice cubes in a jug. Make a well in centre of flour mixture, add vinegar water and combine to form a rough dough. Enclose in plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours or up to 2 days. To make the filling, place nectarine, strawberry, sugar and vanilla in a bowl and toss well to combine. Roll out pastry on a lightly floured work surface to form a 3mm-thick, 35cm round. Transfer to a baking tray lined with baking paper. Scatter milk powder and flour over pastry, leaving a 12cm border. Spoon fruit mixture over milk powder mixture, then

LEMON THYME JAM 1/2

bunch lemon thyme, leaves picked cup (150g) caster sugar 4 yellow peaches, roughly chopped 1/2 cup (125ml) elderflower cordial


WICKED.

Peach, carrot & walnut cake with cream cheese icing. Edit ‘Watercolour’ fabric, Tigger Hall (tiggerhall.com).

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fold over edges to enclose. Brush pastry edges with eggwash and sprinkle with demerara sugar. Chill for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 200°C. Bake tart for 25 minutes or until pastry starts to colour, then reduce oven to 180°C and bake for a further 35 minutes or until pastry is dark golden. Rest for 20 minutes, then scatter with basil leaves and serve with cream.

PLUM BAKED CUSTARD SERVES 6

2 cups (500ml) pure (thin) cream 200ml milk (we used Woolworths Macro) 2 tsp vanilla bean paste Finely grated zest of 1 orange 11/2 tsp finely grated ginger 1/4 cup (45g) fine semolina 4 egg yolks 100g caster sugar 700g plums, thinly sliced Preheat oven to 160°C. Combine cream, milk, vanilla, zest and ginger in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to just below the boil. Meanwhile, whisk semolina, egg yolks and sugar in a bowl until pale. Whisking constantly, slowly pour hot cream mixture into egg mixture until combined. Return mixture to a clean saucepan over medium heat and cook, whisking constantly, for 4 minutes or until thickened. Pour custard into a 1.2L ceramic baking dish and set aside to cool slightly, then chill for 30 minutes to firm slightly. Arrange plums upright in custard. Place dish in a larger deep-sided baking dish and add boiling water to halfway up sides of smaller dish. Bake for 50 minutes or until just cooked with a gentle wobble in the centre. Cool to room temperature or chill to serve.

CHERRY & STAR ANISE PIE SERVES 8-10

Begin this recipe at least 4 hours ahead. 1.5kg pitted cherries 1 cup (220g) caster sugar 11/2 tsp ground star anise Finely grated zest of 1 orange 1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped 1/4 cup (35g) cornflour

2 Granny Smith apples, coarsely grated 1/2 cup (50g) milk powder Vanilla ice cream, to serve HAZELNUT PASTRY

100g hazelnut meal 42 /3 cups (700g) plain flour 1/2 cup (110g) caster sugar 360g cold unsalted butter, chopped 2 tbs apple cider vinegar 1 egg, lightly beaten with 1 tbs water 1 tbs demerara sugar For hazelnut pastry, combine hazelnut meal, flour, caster sugar and 1/2 tsp fine sea salt in a bowl. Add butter and toss to coat. Turn out onto a clean work surface, then, using a pastry cutter, cut butter into flour until it resembles very coarse crumbs. Combine vinegar, 100ml chilled water and 4 ice cubes in a jug. Make a well in centre of flour mixture, add vinegar water (add a little extra water if needed) and combine to form a rough dough. Halve pastry and enclose in plastic wrap. Chill for at least 2 hours or up to 2 days. Meanwhile, to make the filling, place cherries, sugar, star anise, zest, vanilla pod and seeds, and 1 cup (250ml) water in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes until cherries are softened. Remove 1/2 cup (125ml) liquid and combine in a bowl with cornflour. Return cornflour mixture to cherry mixture and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4 minutes or until thick. Cool completely, then stir through apple. Roll out 1 portion of pastry on a lightly floured work surface to 3mm thick and use to line a 20cm x 15cm x 4cm baking dish. Chill for 30 minutes. Roll out remaining pastry to 3mm thick and cut into twenty 1cm-wide strips. Place on a baking tray lined with baking paper and chill for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 200°C. Scatter base of pastry case with milk powder, then pour in cherry filling. Brush pastry edges with eggwash, then make a lattice pie topping with pastry strips. Fold pastry edges over lattice strips to seal. Brush with eggwash, then scatter with demerara sugar. Place pie on a baking tray and bake for

20 minutes or until pastry starts to colour. Reduce oven to 180°C and bake for a further 30 minutes or until pie is dark golden and bubbling. Rest for 30 minutes, then serve with ice cream.

NECTARINE ETON MESS SERVES 6

Begin this recipe at least 6 hours ahead. 6 yellow nectarines, halved 1 tbs orange blossom water 1 cup (220g) caster sugar 125g blueberries 600ml thickened cream 1/2 cup (60g) pure icing sugar, sifted 300g creme fraiche Crushed roasted shortbread, to serve MERINGUE

3 eggwhites 3/4 cup (165g) caster sugar 1/2 tsp cream of tartar Preheat oven to 150°C and line a large baking tray with baking paper. For the meringue, in a stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, whisk eggwhites, sugar and cream of tartar for 15 minutes or until sugar is dissolved and mixture is thick and glossy. Spoon meringue onto prepared tray. Place in oven and reduce heat to 100°C. Bake for 1 hour 10 minutes or until outside is crisp and dry. Turn off oven and leave in oven to cool completely. Place nectarines, cut-side up, in a baking dish. Drizzle with orange blossom water, scatter with 2/3 cup (150g) caster sugar and add 1/2 cup (125ml) water. Cover dish with baking paper, then foil. Bake for 30 minutes or until tender. Cool completely. Meanwhile, place blueberries, 2 tbs water and remaining 1/3 cup (75g) sugar in a saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until syrupy. Cool completely. Break meringues into shards and divide among bowls. Whisk cream and icing sugar to soft peaks, then whisk in creme fraiche until thick and combined. Spoon over meringue. Spoon over nectarines, cooking juices and blueberry mixture. Scatter over shortbread and serve immediately.


WICKED.

“THIS AUSSIE VERSION OF A CLASSIC ENGLISH DESSERT IS THE PERFECT EASY ENTERTAINING RECIPE.” Nectarine Eton mess. Nine Muses ‘Drawlines’ fabric in pink and Madeline Weinrib ‘Mu’ fabric in sunburst, both Tigger Hall (tiggerhall.com).

delicious.com.au/recipes For more showstopping desserts starring stone fruit.

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POP Tropical pops (left and far right) and ombre-style fruit icy poles (recipes p 122).

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TILL YOU


SUGAR-FREE.

DRO ROP Fabulously fruity, delightfully delicious. Samantha Coutts packs her icy poles full of fresh summer produce – think peaches, berries, kiwis, mangoes, cherries, watermelon and more – to create cool-as frozen treats minus any refined sugars. PHOTOGRAPHY BRETT STEVENS

STYLING VIVIEN WALSH


SUGAR-FREE.

Citrus & cucumber icy poles. OPPOSITE: Iced VoVo icy poles (recipes p 122).


“PRE-SOAK YOUR PADDLE-POP STICKS. THIS S WILL W L HELP H P STOP S THEM ‘FLOATING’ WHEN YOU INSERT T THEM T M INTO I O THE T MOULDS. EVEN N ONE O HOUR R WILL W L MAKE M EA DIFFERENCE.” ”

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and serve immediately sprinkled with shredded coconut.

PEACHES & CREAM ICY POLES MAKES 8

2 peaches, quartered, stones removed, thinly sliced 250g creme fraiche 3/4 cup (180ml) milk Finely grated zest of 1 lemon 1 tsp vanilla essence 1/ 3 cup (80ml) runny honey 100g gingernut biscuits, finely chopped 25g unsalted butter, melted Samantha Coutts, Assistant Food Editor @s.coutts

Begin these recipes 1 day ahead. You will need 8 x 80ml ( 1/3 -cup) icy pole moulds and 8 paddle-pop sticks for each recipe.

ICED VOVO ICY POLES MAKES 8

250g Greek yoghurt 125g raspberries 2 tbs rice malt syrup 300ml coconut cream Shredded coconut, to serve

Divide sliced peach among icy pole moulds, using a knife to press slices against the side of the moulds. Whisk creme fraiche, milk, lemon zest, vanilla and honey in a bowl until combined, then divide among moulds, stopping 1cm from top of each mould. Insert paddle-pop sticks into centre of moulds (the peach slices will hold them in place) and freeze for 2 hours or until partially frozen. Combine biscuit and butter in a bowl and use to top moulds, pushing down with a spoon to create an even finish. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.

Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole through centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.

OMBRE-STYLE FRUIT ICY POLES MAKES 8

100g raspberries 350g peeled watermelon, chopped Juice of 1/ 2 a lemon 400ml pineapple juice Place raspberries, watermelon, lemon juice and 1/2 tsp salt flakes in a food processor and whiz until smooth. Strain through a fine sieve into a bowl, then use to half fill icy pole moulds. Freeze for 2 hours or until partially frozen. Top up moulds with pineapple juice. Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole through centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick, pushing down a little into raspberry layer. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.

TROPICAL POPS MAKES 8

Line a fine sieve with a large square of muslin or a clean Chux cloth. Set over a bowl and add yoghurt. Fold over cloth to cover and weigh down with a plate. Set aside for 1 hour to drain. Meanwhile, using the back of a spoon, push raspberries through a fine sieve into a bowl to create a puree. Discard seeds. Combine puree and rice malt syrup, and chill until needed. Combine drained yoghurt and coconut cream in a separate bowl. Spoon 1 tbs yoghurt mixture into each icy pole mould. Add 1/2 tsp raspberry mixture to each mould. Repeat layering process, alternating between yoghurt and raspberry mixtures, until moulds are full. Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole through centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds 122â&#x20AC;&#x201A;delicious.com.au

CITRUS & CUCUMBER ICY POLES MAKES 8

2 each lemons and limes, peeled, white pith removed 1/ 3 cup (80ml) rice malt syrup 3 eggwhites 1 cup (250ml) sparkling water 200g baby cucumbers (cukes), thinly sliced 1/ 2 bunch mint, sprigs picked Place lemon, lime, rice malt syrup, eggwhites and 1/2 tsp salt flakes in a blender and whiz until well combined. Strain through a fine sieve into a jug and stir through sparkling water. Divide among icy pole moulds, stopping 3cm from top of each mould. Fill moulds with sliced cucumber and mint, pushing down with a knife to press up against sides of moulds.

1 mango cheek, halved, thinly sliced 1/ 2 dragon fruit, thinly sliced 1/4 red papaya, thinly sliced 1 star fruit, thinly sliced 50g blueberries 1 tbs rosewater 1 cup (250ml) boiled water, cooled to room temperature (this results in a clearer icy pole) Place fruit in a bowl and toss to combine. Divide among icy pole moulds. Combine rosewater and cooled boiled water in a jug and pour into moulds to fill. Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole through centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.


SUGAR-FREE.

Peaches & cream icy poles. Baxta large tray, Country Road (countryroad.com.au).

“USING SUMME UMMER FRU RUITS MEANS YOU CAN HAVE BERRIES ES, PEACHES ES AND MANGOE OES IN N APR APRIL.. THESE T ICY POLE LES WILL LAST T IN IN THE T FREEZER R FOR F UP TO O EIGHT E WEEKS.”


SUGAR-FREE.

CHERRY COLA ICY POLES MAKES 8

125g blueberries 100g frozen cherries 300ml coconut water (substitute water) Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lime 1/4 tsp each ground cinnamon and ground coriander 1/ 2 star anise, finely grated 2 tbs maple syrup Place all ingredients and 1 tsp salt flakes in a blender and whiz until smooth. Strain through a fine sieve into a bowl, then divide among icy pole moulds. Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole

through the centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.

SUMMER KIWI ICY POLES MAKES 8

200g (about 2) kiwi fruit, peeled, chopped 3/4 cup (180ml) apple juice 250g strawberries, hulled 1/ 2 cup (125ml) coconut cream 1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped Place the kiwi fruit, 1/ 2 cup (125ml) apple juice and 1/ 2 tsp salt flakes in a food processor and whiz until smooth. Use to fill each mould to one-third full.

Wipe clean food processor. Add strawberries and remaining 1/4 cup (60ml) apple juice, and whiz until smooth. Divide strawberry mixture among moulds, stopping 1cm from the top of each mould, and freeze until needed. Combine coconut cream and vanilla seeds in a bowl and divide among moulds. Cover mould tops with foil. Using a small, sharp knife, cut a small hole through centre of foil over each mould and insert a paddle-pop stick. Freeze overnight. Remove icy poles from moulds and serve immediately.

delicious.com.au/recipes For more fruit-packed sweet treats perfect for summer eating.

Summer kiwi icy poles (top, middle and bottom) and cherry cola icy poles.

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ISLAND PARADISE

From fresh, local fare and a thriving arts scene to 19th century architecture, Vancouver Island is filled with secrets and surprises.

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CULTURE CAPITAL Victoria,

on Vancouver Island, is the capital of British Columbia and home to historic buildings, modern cuisine and exhilarating vistas of mountains and ocean in every direction. Visitors are struck by the beauty of the picturesque harbour and footpaths lined with flower baskets spilling over with colour.

With its inner harbour framed by the regal Fairmont Empress hotel and the neo-baroque structures of the stately British Columbia Parliament Buildings, you’d be forgiven for surmising that Victoria is all pomp and grandeur. Dig a little deeper and you’ll find an eclectic community shaped by students attending the University of Victoria, a vibrant arts and music scene, and dining options showcasing the diverse regional bounty from land and sea.

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GO BEYOND Cruise the scenic roads through the Cowichan Valley. Arguably the richest food region on the island, this gourmet haven is nestled between mountains and the Salish Sea. Stop off at Merridale Ciderworks; a farm, cidery, distillery, bistro, bakery, deli and pub all in one; and don’t miss Hilary’s Cheese Company with its large selection of fine regional artisan cheeses and wines. Hilary and Patty Abbott are the only cheese makers in the Cowichan Valley. In the eclectic township of Duncan, start with Zanatta Vineyards, Vancouver Island’s first estate winery. For flavour of a different kind, Westholme Tea Company is the first estate-grown tea farm in Canada. Its tasting bar offers a vast and considered tea and dessert pairing menu.

SEE IT ALL

Explore the whole of Vancouver Island on a 12-day self-drive tour that includes a jaw-dropping wildlife experience at a remote bear lodge. Visit: canada-alaska.com.au/specials/vancouver-island-self-drive-bear-lodge-adventure

2FLAVOUR TRAILS

There’s no doubt about it, this small, walkable city packs some culinary punch. A guided food tour with A Taste of Victoria is possibly the best way to eat your way through the city and uncover gastronomic gems. And did you know Victoria is the craft beer capital of British Columbia? It all began with Spinnakers, Canada’s oldest brewpub. Pop in for a pint at this renowned pioneer of the burgeoning local industry. Follow your tastebuds to the Victoria Public Market in the original Hudson Bay building, where talented buskers create a buzzing atmosphere as you taste delicacies such as truffle goat’s cheese and native mushroom pies. Victoria’s diverse food scene reflects Vancouver Island’s rich farming regions. With more than 26,00 farms and 3340 kilometres of coastline, access to fresh fare and seafood is endless. Hire a car and make your first stop the Butchart Gardens, just outside of Victoria. This National Historic Site of Canada is 55 acres of spectacular floral displays that has to be seen to be believed.

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PRIME PRODUCE

Vancouver Island’s remarkable taste trails will have you craving more with diverse wineries, farms and arty gifts. It’s easy to see why the island’s impressive variety of produce now supplies many of British Columbia’s top restaurants.


POSTCARD SPECIAL: HIGH SEAS CRUISING; A NEW GOLD COAST STAR; SICILY’S LUXE SIDE 128 YOUR BEST DAY ON A PLATE IN COLOMBO 137 >> CHRISTINE MANFIELD’S GASTRONOMIC TOUR OF PUGLIA 138 DISCOVER DARWIN’S RED-HOT REINVENTION AS A FOODIES’ PARADISE 144

ESCAPE

CRYSTAL CRUISE PHOTOGRAPHY SIMON KELLY

CLOCKWISE: The Star Gold Coast’s new pool area; seek sanctuary in Verdura Resort’s Villa Peonia; poolside onboard the Crystal Symphony.


For more luxurious trips to exotic destinations, head to crystalcruises. com

LIFE AT SEA

Phoebe Wood finds herself aboard an ocean-going gem as she joins the Crystal Symphony for a luxury cruise of the Malay Archipelago, full of exploration, adventure and famous-name food.

STEAMY, LOUD AND SCENTED with char kway teow sizzling in smoking woks, the Malaysian city of Kota Kinabalu is an intoxicating hub. Tourists flock to this melting pot (at 90 per cent humidity, this is literally the case) on the island of Borneo for its bustling markets and old-world charms, but I’m here to board the Crystal Symphony. We’ll be cruising the Malay Archipelago, the sprawling island chain between Indochina and Australia, and retreating into a Zen calm. Crystal Cruises is one of the industry’s most awarded luxury cruise companies. It takes just a few moments to discover why. My private butler, Paolo, immediately pours me a glass of Billecart-Salmon brut (my favourite – how did he know?) as I explore my tastefully decorated penthouse suite. A queen-size bed is made up with Egyptian linens, a marble bathroom with Jacuzzi, and verandah with sweeping views; it’s the perfect place to watch the sun sink into the turquoise ocean. Testing my sea legs, I set off to explore the ship. Among its many charms, the impressive vessel boasts an exquisite sun deck, a medi-spa offering acupuncture and other treatments, and even a tennis court. And, of course, plenty of varied dining

“IT’S IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO BE SEDUCED BY HIGH GLAMOUR ON THE HIGH SEAS.” options. In the Palm Court bar, furnished with a nod to Philippe Starck, guests listen to a violinist while enjoying pre-dinner drinks. At the Italian-themed Prego, tangles of pasta are tossed in spiced tomato sauce with thin ribbons of squid and prawns, and bright-pink pockets of beetroot ravioli are stuffed with creamy goat’s cheese. An eclectic approach to dining is encouraged on a cruise ship of this stature. At Umi Uma, a satellite eatery from Michelin-starred Nobu Matsuhisa, sashimi and handmade rolls are cut to order. Tuxedoed guests lap it up. After dinner, I can’t resist the Elton John tribute show, followed by some spirited karaoke in the speakeasy. A Spanish-speaking reveller in cigarillo-slim pants belts out ‘La Bamba’ by the Gipsy Kings and I find myself singing along to the chorus; it’s a Love Boat moment. The next day brings an exhilarating shore adventure in the small kingdom of Brunei. I’m mesmerised by palatial colonial-style houses painted in pinks, lime-greens and blues, and by the ornate, gold-capped mosques surrounded by banana trees and tropical palms. Then it’s off to board a speedboat, clutch our cheap straw hats and race past a water village through to the mangroves. Our ebullient guide, Min, instructs us to look out for “vegetarian” crocodiles and proboscis, the “best-looking monkey in Asia”. At a fish market in Bangar, we feast on flaky samosa, crispy fried banana and pork curry steamed in banana leaves, and refreshing wedges of mangosteen. Back onboard the Symphony, I refresh with a dip in the rooftop pool, but I need an escape from the sultry heat. Unwinding in my air-conditioned bubble, I find that Paolo has thoughtfully replenished my bottle of bubbles and left me a plate of canapes. It’s impossible not to be seduced by the doctrine of high glamour on the high seas as I settle in for the crossing to Singapore. 128 delicious.com.au

@phoeberosewood

NOBU-INSPIRED SASHIMI PLATE WITH JALAPENO DRESSING SERVES 6

Sunflower oil, to shallow-fry 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced lengthways 2 jalapenos, finely chopped 1/3 cup (80ml) rice wine vinegar 2 tsp brown sugar 1 tsp white miso paste 1 tbs light soy sauce 1/2 tsp sesame oil 300g each sashimi-grade salmon and sashimi-grade kingfish, thinly sliced 1 cup (100g) podded edamame, blanched, refreshed 2 baby cucumbers (cukes) or 1 Lebanese cucumber, thinly sliced Baby purple shiso and toasted white sesame seeds, to serve Heat 1cm oil in a frypan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and cook for 1-2 minutes, stirring occasionally, until garlic is golden and crisp. Remove using a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on paper towel. Place jalapeno, vinegar, sugar, miso, soy and sesame oil in a bowl and stir to combine. Arrange the salmon and kingfish on a serving plate. Top with edamame and sliced cucumber. Drizzle with a little dressing and scatter with shiso, toasted sesame seeds and crispy garlic chips. Serve with the remaining dressing.

STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

CRUISE ALONG

PHOTOGRAPHY SIMON KELLY FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY MARK ROPER

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POSTCARD.

CLOCKWISE: enjoy chilled Champagne on your balcony; a penthouse suite on the Crystal Symphony; shaded comfort by the pool; Nobu-inspired sashimi plate with jalapeno dressing; soaring towers in Singapore.


Vegemite & red miso lamb with eggplant puree

CLOCKWISE (from top): the Garden Kitchen & Bar; Cucina Vivo restaurant; Ocean Terrace suites are bright and full of light with (inset) Art Deco styling touches; The Star Gold Coastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lobby.


2 GOLD STAR

To book at the recently revamped The Star Gold Coast, go to star.com.au/ goldcoast

POSTCARD.

STAR TURN Reborn as The Star Gold Coast, the former Jupiters Casino has a fresh look, new food options and an outdoor focus. Kerrie McCallum explores.

THE GOLD COAST: traditional home of Meter Maids, Cocktails & Dreams nightclub, the Coolangatta Gold and, for 2018, The Logies (though many would argue the Gold Coast should always have been its spiritual home). It’s long been a sparkling sort of place. However, a reinvigorating change is in the salty air, courtesy of the Commonwealth Games, coming to the GC in April. Broadbeach, the more stylish cousin to Surfer’s Paradise, has benefited as the hub of extensive development. Central to its transformation is The Star Gold Coast (formerly known as Jupiters Casino) and its neighbour, Pacific Fair. Neither is recognisable from my holidays as a youth. My memories of Pacific Fair include a tired hodgepodge of faded pavers traversed by a rickety train and senior citizens drained by the pokies. Now, it’s a world-class shopper’s paradise, with open-air seating, pools and tropical chill zones. Directly across the road, a remarkable transformation (boasting investment worth $850 million) also suits The Star, owned by The Star Entertainment Group of Sydney’s The Star Casino. When we visited, a new luxury six-star hotel at the front of the property was still under construction, but the refurbishment of 596 hotel rooms and six food and beverage offerings was almost complete, with the casino floor yet to finish. Where Jupiters was all maroon and gold ’80s carpets,

RECIPE CHASE KOJIMA FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY BEN DEARNLEY STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

“ASIDE FROM ONE REMAINING CASINO BUFFET, THE FOCUS HAS MOVED OUTSIDE.” dark faded glamour and dressing-room lights, The Star is all about the great outdoors. Oh, and gambling. The difference with The Star is that it’s easy to forget there is a 24-hour gaming den on the ground floor. Aside from one remaining casino buffet, dubiously called Food Fantasy, the focus has moved outside to celebrate the famous GC weather. Pools have been updated, complete with cabanas and private spas. A dining option, the indoor/outdoor Garden Kitchen & Bar, is all high ceilings, open windows and elegant Palm Beach style; it’s bright, light and thriving. The terrace leads to a large lawn, filled with white picnic furniture and a Yoder Smoker cranking out a smoked barbecue menu on the weekends. Service was excellent throughout, with only the pool bar requiring some sorting out. Inside, rooms are spacious and light, and there’s familyfriendly Asian and Italian fare at Mei Wei Dumplings and Cucina Vivo (where kids can make their own pizzas). Chase Kojima, of Sokyo at The Star Sydney, headlines the complex’s Kiyomi (named after a rare Japanese citrus). His restaurant is the best fine-dining option and it’s good, attracting regular clientele beyond the transient nature of guests. Its izakayastyle menu centres on “umami flavour”, according to Kojima, along with a wide variety of Japanese beers, sake and whiskies. “It needed to be cool and exciting, and have food to match the level of Sokyo in Sydney, but with more of a relaxed feel,” he says. It’s simple yet creative, tapping into Kojima’s youthful energy (he ran a half-marathon the day before we met), and the sashimi dishes are the standout. The Star has style and substance. With more food offerings and bars to come, it will be worth checking out on completion, when it is likely to be celestial indeed.

@kerrie_mccallum @kerriemccallum

VEGEMITE & RED MISO LAMB WITH EGGPLANT PUREE SERVES 4

Sunflower oil, to shallow-fry 1/ 2 bunch basil, leaves picked 600g Japanese eggplant 60g unsalted butter, chopped 1 tbs maple syrup 1 lemongrass stalk, white part, chopped 8cm piece (40g) ginger, thinly sliced 1/4 cup (60ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus 2 tbs extra 400ml umeshu (Japanese plum wine) 1/4 cup firmly packed (60g) brown sugar 1/4 cup (80g) red miso paste 2 tbs Vegemite 12 lamb cutlets, trimmed To make crispy basil, heat 3cm sunflower oil in a saucepan or wok over high. Pat basil with paper towel and, in batches, carefully add to pan, standing back as it spits. Cook for 5 seconds or until crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. To make eggplant puree, heat a chargrill pan to high heat. Grill eggplant for 7-8 minutes each side or until tender. Transfer to a heatproof bowl, cover and stand for 20 minutes to cool. Trim tops, transfer eggplant and juices to a blender with butter and maple syrup, and whiz until smooth. Cover and set aside until needed. Meanwhile, to make Vegemite and miso sauce, combine lemongrass, ginger, olive oil and plum wine in a saucepan over high heat and bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes or until reduced by three-quarters. Add sugar, miso and Vegemite, increase heat to high and cook, stirring, until boiling. Strain into a heatproof bowl. Cover and set aside. Reheat chargrill pan to high heat. Rub lamb in extra olive oil. Grill for 3 minutes each side, or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate and rest for 5 minutes. Spread puree onto serving plates, add lamb, and drizzle with Vegemite and miso sauce. Scatter with crispy basil to serve.

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WILD AT HEART After immersing herself in Sicily’s savagely historic culture, Shannon Harley unwinds with a restorative stay at the peak-luxury Verdura Resort.

THE RUGGED TERRAIN of southwest Sicily is like a sun-drenched moonscape. Inland, Greek and Roman ruins tumble down rocky mountain faces like discarded marbles, while towards the coast, the peaks flatten out into vast plains peppered with wild olive trees and baglio, the island’s iconic stone-walled country estates. It is a world apart from the pastoral postcard of the country’s north and the candy-coloured contours of the Amalfi coast, but Sicily’s appeal lies in its savage beauty. The island’s skin has been scarred by a succession of conquests by the Romans, Greeks, Arabs, Moors, Spanish and French in the form of olive, almond, pistachio and orange trees, grape vines, couscous, cassata and cannoli, and iconic architecture and pottery that marry Roman opulence with the geometric appeal of Moorish design. Nowhere is this mash-up of history better on show than at Verdura Resort. Perched on a private two-kilometre stretch of coastline between the medieval town of Sciacca to the north with its beautiful churches, castles and piazzas, and Agrigento to the south – a UNESCO World Heritage Site with some of the best-preserved Greek buildings outside of Greece – this impeccably understated golf resort (there are three Kyle Phillipsdesigned courses) offers a taste of Sicily’s cuisine, culture and landscape with an uninterrupted view of the Med.

“HOWEVER YOU INDULGE YOURSELF, THE FEEL-GOOD VIBE IS HARD TO SHAKE.” Any traveller to Italy is in search of the three Ps – pizza, pasta and prosecco (make it five if you throw in Pucci and Pavarotti) – and UK-based Italian hotel magnate Sir Rocco Forte delivers all of this and more at Verdura. The luxe brand of wellness that has come to define the hotel group is designed to complement the relaxed Italian hospitality so many come in search of. Forte’s daughter Irene, who curates the brand’s wellness offering, says that while Verdura is far from a health resort, the growing demand for healthconscious travel is behind its impressive, award-winning spa complex. “We wanted to cater for the growing number of health-conscious travellers. Certain guests look for clean, natural and nutritious food; others, the latest fitness facilities and equipment; others, organic products with spa treatments that achieve results,” she says. To some, holiday wellness may well mean a post-beach strawberry gazpacho with flaxseed croutons at Michelin-starred chef Pietro Leemann’s vegan restaurant; to others, it will translate to a thalassotherapy spa, or a facial using organic skincare products made from ingredients grown on the property, followed by a mod-Med lunch of prawn spaghetti and caponata at poolside Zagara – one of the resort’s eight dining options; while to others, it will be a loop of the property’s eight-kilometre hiking track at sunset followed by Aperol spritz and seafood platters at shoreside Amare restaurant. However you choose to indulge yourself at Verdura, that feel-good vibe is hard to shake as you watch another breathtaking sunset from your villa balcony, or from a lounger by the pool sipping on a ‘Sicilian mojito’, or from your golf buggy at the 18th hole, or from a perch high above the property at the trekking viewpoint love seat.

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@misspamplemousse

STRAWBERRY GAZPACHO WITH FLAXSEED CRACKERS SERVES 4-6 AS A STARTER (MAKES 1.2L)

18cm piece (90g) ginger 2 /3 cup (165ml) extra virgin olive oil 800g strawberries, hulled 200g tomatoes Dill sprigs, to serve FLAXSEED CRACKERS

160g brown flaxseed meal 1 carrot, chopped 1 celery stalk, trimmed, chopped 2 small zucchini, chopped 2 tsp coriander seeds 1 strip pared lemon zest 1 bunch oregano, leaves picked 2 tsp sweet paprika (pimenton) 2 tsp black sesame seeds, plus extra to serve Grate 12cm (60g) ginger into a fine sieve set over a bowl and press out juice. Stir through half the oil and set aside. Preheat oven to 100°C. Grease 2 large baking trays and line with baking paper. For the flaxseed crackers, whiz all ingredients except sesame with 1 tsp salt flakes and 1 tbs water in a food processor for 2 minutes or until very finely chopped. Divide flaxseed mixture between the prepared trays and, using a palette knife, spread evenly across trays, about 1-2mm thick. Scatter with sesame seeds and gently press into flaxseed mixture. Bake, swapping trays halfway, for 80-90 minutes or until crisp. Stand to cool, then break into shards. To make the gazpacho, whiz strawberry, tomatoes, 1 tsp salt flakes, and remaining 1/3 cup (80ml) oil and 6cm (30g) ginger in a blender until smooth. Transfer to a jug and chill until cold. Divide gazpacho among serving bowls. Drizzle with ginger oil, scatter with dill and extra sesame, and serve with crackers.

FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY NIGEL LOUGH STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

RICH HISTORY

To book, go to roccoforte hotels.com/ hotels-andresorts/ verduraresort

RECIPE PIETRO LEEMANN

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POSTCARD.

CLOCKWISE: the terrace at Verduraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Villa Peonia; glimpses of Sicily at the entrance to the spa; the resort sits discreetly in the islandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terrain; strawberry gazpacho with flaxseed crackers; the magnificent resort pool.

delicious.com.au/recipes For more recipes inspired by fabulous travel experiences.


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TRAVEL NEWS

Hot destinations, cool stays, travel essentials & everything in transit.

BIJOU BREAKFAST Audrey Hepburn fans swooned when Tiffany & Co., the venerable jeweller, unveiled a tony new cafe at its Manhattan flagship recently. Finally, they could have ‘breakfast at Tiffany’s’ like their heroine. At the Blue Box Cafe, the brand’s signature colour, robin’s-egg blue, is splashed on everything from the chairs to the plates. As for the menu, wannabe Holly Golightlys can dine on finger sandwiches, truffled eggs and poached salmon. There’s a breakfast, lunch and tea service, but bookings are essential.

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Founded by a former royal ballet dancer, HOTEL SANDERS (left) in Copenhagen is a graceful leap forward in lodging design. It’s a haven of mid-century furnishings, colonial touches and hygge (cosy) flourishes, including abundant greenery, soaking tubs and wood-burning fireplaces. The 54-room inn is situated in a vibrant cultural neighbourhood, and is the perfect lair from which to explore the Danish capital’s cutting-edge restaurants. hotelsanders.com Expect enhanced levels of barefoot relaxation on CASTAWAY ISLAND (above), Outrigger’s intimate Fijian resort. After a major revamp in the wake of Cyclone Winston, the private island’s upgraded bures (Fijian bungalows) take full advantage of their beach, ocean or garden views, while a warm and stylish indigenous theme informs the decor. Bathrooms now come with rain showers and twin vanities. The resort’s four dining options, among them award-winning 1808 restaurant, have also been refreshed. castawayfiji.com

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LUST RESORT

The island nation of Mauritius is known for its orchidaceous resorts, and Lux Grand Gaube is the latest temptation. The hotel has 193 sea-facing, eclectically appointed rooms, six restaurants, three pools, two beaches and a seaplane to ferry guests. With watersports galore and a polished spa, it’s a getaway to immerse yourself in.

FEELING MISTY>>

Fliers will appreciate Verso’s Anti Pollution, a sensual, hydrating mist that purports to shield the complexion from pollutants that trigger premature prem ageing. A spritz in a pressurised airliner cabin certainly feels rejuvenating. mecca.com.au 134 delicious.com.au

PAMPERED GUESTS at London’s Lanesborough can access the hotel’s sumptuous club and spa (above). The gleaming new facility comes with ‘spa butlers’, mintinfused showers and myriad trainers. Or, just dine at the restaurant offering health-oriented items such as zucchini spaghetti. Edited by George Epaminondas

@georgeepam

DELICIOUS.COM.AU/TRAVEL Go online for more travel news from Australia and around the world.


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LIFE’S H A BEAC

PHOTOGRAPHY NIGEL LOUGH STYLING & MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

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INSIDER.

HOURS IN...

COLOMBO

The Sri Lankan capital’s rich history and beguiling mix of cultural influences make it a fascinating destination. Travel writer Joanna Bates delivers your best day on a plate.

8am FUEL YOUR FORAY Buffet breakfasts are a fine tradition in Asia, and the spread at Hilton Colombo (hilton. com) – with its array of Sri Lankan, Asian and European dishes – definitely hits the mark. Keep it local to get a taste for king coconut, curd and treacle, and egg hoppers.

2pm BUY UP BIG AT BAREFOOT

Devotees of the late architect Geoffrey Bawa, known as the father of ‘tropical modernism’, can tour his private Colombo villa, Number 11 (geoffreybawa.com) by appointment. Part of the home is also devoted to boutique accommodation.

An easy walk from the Gallery Café, you’ll find Barefoot Ceylon (barefootceylon.com) for art, books, spa products and gorgeous gifts. Established by the artist, author and former journalist Barbara Sansoni, who worked on the fit-out of many of Bawa’s hotels, the shop is spread over several levels. After blitzing its tempting wares, enjoy a refreshing king coconut or beer at the lovely outdoor cafe.

12.30pm EAT AMONG ART

4pm TUK TUK IN

To round out your Bawa experience, visit his former office, now one of the best casual eating spots in town. The art-filled Gallery Café (paradiseroad.lk) has indoor

Aussies Mick Morehead and Tim Graham have packed a whole lot of food adventure into three wheels. They’ve scoured the city for the best street eats, converted a fleet of

10am HOME VISIT

PHOTOGRAPHY GETTY IMAGES

and courtyard dining. At the entry pavilion, there’s the Paradise Road shop where you can pick up stylish, locally made designs.

@jo.inkmedia

tuk tuks (you can take down the top, plug in your iPod and chill your tipple) and hired a team of ace drivers. From the best hoppers to the bustling back streets of Pettah Market, Tuk Tuk Safari (tuktuksafarisrilanka. com) offers one heck of a ride – a must to get a sense of what Colombo has to offer.

9pm STAR-POWERED ATTRACTION The legendary Galle Face Hotel (gallefacehotel.com) on the Indian Ocean has played host to Vivien Leigh, Sir Laurence Olivier, Mahatma Gandhi and Che Guevara. The former Dutch villa opened its doors as a hotel in 1864 and has become Colombo’s most prestigious address – it’s the place to sip a cocktail by the water’s edge.

delicious.com.au/travel For more international city travel guides.

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GLOBAL FLAVOURS.

CLOCKWISE: Santa Chiara church in Lecce; spring salad of fennel and puntarelle, a type of chicory; (inset) a typical Puglian breakfast of grapes, cheese, yoghurt, bread and olives; the whitewashed walls and flagstone streets surrounding Ostuni Cathedral; a restaurant owner in Ostuni shows off puntarelle. OPPOSITE: the pool at Masseria Moroseta, a country house hotel outside Ostuni.

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THE ROAD LES S

TR AVELLED Our love affair with Italy knows no bounds. Now chef Christine Manfield is deepening the bond with a food safari to beautiful Puglia, home to vast olive groves, artisan producers, a glorious natural bounty and that spectacular Mediterranean coastline. Amore Italia! RECIPES CHRISTINE MANFIELD TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY JAIME KOWAL FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS

@christinemanfieldchef


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GLOBAL FLAVOURS.

here is so much to love about Puglia, the less-travelled region on the heel of Italy with sun-drenched coastlines facing the Adriatic and Ionian seas. Daily life moves slowly – the ideal rhythm to recharge, reflect and reinvigorate, being mindfully in the present and taking time to breathe, to take it all in. Amid dramatic landscapes is imposing architecture – from the conical-shaped trulli houses to the majestic restored masseria (farmhouses) – reflecting its ancient ties to Greece and Byzantium. There’s a real diversity to the region, whether it’s the beautiful Baroque city of Lecce; the stunning coastal towns of Polignano al Mare, Otranto and Santa Maria di Leuca; the charm of Alberobello and Noci; or the iconic whitewashed hilltop town of Ostuni. The people couldn’t be more genuinely friendly or welcoming; their passion for their culture is palpable and infectious. It captured my heart from the moment I arrived. The cuisine is an intrinsic part of the Puglia experience; it’s a food-lover’s paradise. Rich in agriculture, you’ll see olive trees by the million. As every local will remind you, the region is Italy’s largest producer of olive oil. There’s also a time-honoured fishing tradition, where the catch will include prized red prawns, as well as sea urchin, mussels, lobster and a dazzling array of fish. The fish market at Gallipoli on the Ionian coast is one of the best and most well-known markets in the region. It’s set by the water in the rampart of the old town under the shadow of its fort castle. Vegetables are abundant – eggplant, tomatoes, broccoli rabe, broad beans, chicory, chillies and sweet peppers, to

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name a few – and are at the core of Puglian cuisine. Orchards reach from one coast to the other and the fruit trees drip with cherries, figs, plums, almonds and, of course, olives. In summer, watermelon is the thirstquencher de rigueur, often sold off the back of farm trucks. Carnivores are rewarded with a bounty of cured and grilled meats, a specialty in the butchercum-restaurants in the pretty hilltop towns of Cisternino and Martina Franca. Burrata, a darling of the cheese world, is one of the region’s most famous products and a standard feature on menus. Along with fior di latte, ricotta and mozzarella, it is produced in small farms across the Salento Peninsula. Wherever I eat on this trip, I feel I have immersed myself in the very idea of the healthy Mediterranean diet; the produce is so fresh, the flavours jump off the plate. Local dishes are made in the timehonoured slow-food tradition – simply prepared, locally sourced and seasonal. Puglia is home to cucina povera – literally ‘poor cooking’ – using whatever is at hand and making the most of humble ingredients. These are dishes that have stood the test of time; that are etched into the collective memory and shared from one generation to the next. This is also ancient grain territory, where pastas and breads are handmade from locally grown durum wheat. Puglia is home to the ear-shaped orecchiette pasta traditionally served with cime di rapa or broccoli rabe. While staying in the seaside town of Otranto on the southeast coast, I make a private pilgrimage to the century-old Benedetto Cavalieri pasta factory in the mediaeval town of Maglie to witness experts making genuine Italian durum wheat pasta from scratch in myriad shapes. Driving west, I travel with local foodie friend Giuseppe past fields of wheat that stretch as far as the eye can

see, speeding towards Altamura, whose hat-shaped bread is the first European bread to achieve DOP certification; the early morning mission made urgent so we get to taste the tomato focaccia as it comes straight from the stone floor of a massive 500-year-old oven. On arrival, the whole town is bathed in its aroma. It’s worth every second of the drive, and I don’t just stop at one piece! Giuseppe punctuates our daily drives with visits to dolci shops, espresso and gelato bars, ancient olive groves for oil tastings, and boutique wineries to discover Puglian grape varieties. A leisurely lunch at Masseria Le Stanzie, a working farm in the centre of the peninsula, is a revelation, the epitome of the principles of paddock to plate. Puglia completely seduces the senses; I can’t wait to get back to taste the sunshine. Christine is hosting Mare e Montagne, a food safari to Puglia and the Dolomites in June 2018 for an intimate group of 12 guests. Travelling with Christine on this exclusive culinary safari will awaken your palate, sharpen your senses and deepen your appreciation of Italy’s many gastronomic delights. For details and enquiries, visit christinemanfield.com or classicsafaricompany.com.au.

delicious.com.au/travel Head online for Shannon Harley’s ‘24 hours in Puglia’ story.


Sardine gratin

SARDINE GRATIN SERVES 4 AS A LIGHT MEAL

90g sourdough breadcrumbs 2 garlic cloves, crushed Finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon 100g pine nuts 2 small red chillies, seeds removed, finely chopped 1 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, finely chopped, plus extra to serve 1/ 2 cup mint leaves, finely chopped 1/ 2 small fennel bulb, shaved, fronds reserved 1/ 2 cup (125ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to drizzle 16 butterflied sardine fillets (skin-on), halved into single fillets Preheat the oven to 200°C. Grease a 22cm 1L (4-cup) round baking dish. Combine breadcrumbs, garlic, lemon zest and juice, pine nuts, chilli, parsley, mint, shaved fennel, oil, 1 tsp salt flakes and 1/2 tsp ground black pepper in a bowl. Lay half the sardines in a single layer in prepared dish. Sprinkle with half the breadcrumb mixture. Add remaining sardines and top with remaining breadcrumb mixture. Roast in the centre of the oven for 12 minutes or until sardines are just cooked through. Heat oven grill to high and grill gratin at the top of the oven, checking regularly, for 2 minutes or until golden. Drizzle with extra oil and scatter with reserved fennel fronds and extra parsley to serve.

CLOCKWISE: breakfast on the terrace at Masseria Moroseta; views of the Adriatic from the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rooftop deck; step inside its whitewashed walls to immerse yourself in the Puglian landscape.


LECCESE PANNA COTTA AND ESPRESSO CARAMEL SERVES 6

Begin this recipe at least 4 hours ahead. 2 titanium-strength gelatine leaves 2 cups (500ml) pure (thin) cream 1 cup (250ml) milk 70g caster sugar 11/2 tsp almond essence 2 tsp amaretto (from bottle shops) 1/3 cup (55g) roasted almonds, chopped 2 tbs maple syrup ESPRESSO CARAMEL

200g caster sugar 100ml strong espresso coffee (substitute 100ml boiling water and 1 tbs instant coffee granules) 200ml pure (thin) cream

CLOCKWISE: the seaside resort of Torre dell’Orso; architectural detail in Ostuni; traditional dishes at Osteria del Capitolo in Ostuni; a bicycle parked near Lecce’s Piazza Sant’Oronzo; street detail in Ostuni; a bookseller in Piazza Sant’Oronzo; meals are served on handmade ceramic plates at Masseria Moroseta.

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To make the panna cotta, soak gelatine in cold water for 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile, combine cream, milk, sugar and almond essence in saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a simmer. Squeeze excess water from gelatine, remove cream mixture from heat, and add gelatine and amaretto, stirring until gelatine is dissolved. Divide cream mixture among 6 x 125ml (1/2-cup) serving glasses and chill for 4 hours or until set. Meanwhile, For the espresso caramel, combine sugar and 2 tbs water in a saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, for 4 minutes or until sugar is dissolved. Bring to the boil and cook, swirling the pan occasionally, for 6 minutes or until light caramel. Carefully add espresso to caramel, swirling to combine, and cook for 2 minutes or until slightly thickened. Remove from heat and stir in cream until smooth. Transfer to a bowl and chill for 2 hours or until cooled. Combine almonds and maple syrup in a bowl and set aside. When ready to serve, pour a layer of cooled caramel over top of panna cottas and scatter with almond mixture.


GLOBAL FLAVOURS.

Leccese panna cotta and espresso caramel

“THE CUISINE IS AN INTRINSIC PART OF THE PUGLIA EXPERIENCE; IT’S A FOOD-LOVER’S PARADISE.”

CLOCKWISE (from top right): Ostuni’s Piazza della Libertà Ostuni; lavender fields dot the Puglian landscape; (inset) pistachio gelato; Ostuni – the ‘White City’ – in all its glory from Masseria Moroseta’s rooftop.


Forget croc and barra; when it comes to the NT capital’s food scene, there’s a theory of evolution in the air. In fact, this tropical city’s newest dining spots are red-hot, as George Epaminondas discovers.

>>DARWIN PHOTOGRAPHY HELEN ORR

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LOCAVORE.

CLOCKWISE: Darwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cityscape; the city has a thriving street art scene; palm trees signal the tropics; the industrial-chic interior at PM Eat & Drink; (inset) the restaurant has a seafood focus.


@georgeepam

1

CHANGE OF FACE

By day, Little Miss Korea (Austin Lane; littlemisskorea.com) is a casual venture serving bibimbap bowls and vegetarian pancakes. By night, it morphs into a lively Korean barbecue joint with diners grilling thinly sliced meats, seafood and vegetables. Chef Chung Jae Lee is a former judo champion who throws himself into creating adventurous dishes with equal gusto; look to his jeyuk-gui, a moreish pork dish seasoned with red pepper paste and cooked on a grill. Sam Lee, his partner, is a vivacious host. “This was an old loading bay, so we get truckies saying, ‘I used to drive my truck in here!’,” she volunteers. Located on ‘Graffiti Laneway’, the restaurant continues the arty theme with an electric-hued mural and industrial fit-out.

2

FUN OF THE FAIR

If you’ve ever considered running away with the carnival, you’ll adore Lola’s Pergola (48 Marina Blvd, Larrakeyah; lolas. net.au). And even if you haven’t, you’ll still be enchanted by this quirky and quixotic bar on the water at Cullen Bay. Decked out with carousel ponies, arcade machines and sideshow flourishes, the al fresco spot has a floating-funfair air. Families gather here by day, ordering from its extensive burger list, and merrymakers arrive for the twilight session to soak up the exuberant energy with endless craft beers. Look down and you’ll even see fish darting through the illuminated water below.

3

MARKET SHARE

Darwin’s heady markets are animated by a cornucopia of globe-trotting food. During the dry season, Mindil Beach Sunset Market operates on Thursdays and Sundays, offering Sri Lankan, Indonesian, Brazilian and Russian delicacies. My preference, though, was for the focused selection at Parap Village Markets on Saturdays (open year-round). Here, people line up for luminous laksa from Mary’s or Yati’s, Cambodian savoury pancakes, buckwheat crepes and mango lassies. Rapid Creek Markets on weekends is the prime produce source and where many chefs shop. Pick up a quenching cane sugar beverage and launch yourself down the long, narrow space crammed with Asian vegetables, exotic herbs and fragrant spices. We glimpsed green jackfruit, bitter melon, Chinese plums and pea eggplants (ideal for curry) among the dizzying array.

4

TRIPLE TREAT

Aboriginal Bush Traders (74 The Esplanade; aboriginalbushtraders.com) is a retail store, cultural repository and outdoor cafe in one. The compelling venture carries the vibrant wares of Indigenous artists and artisans, which have been ethically sourced from community art centres. It’s a diverse collection of paintings, carvings, weavings, homewares and native food. At the cafe, explore takes on bush tucker, such as damper with wild rosella and lilly pilly jams, granola with native cranberries and Kakadu plum dust, and quandong lamingtons.

SWEET BREW CAFE PHOTOGRAPHY DANIEL GUNSTON

D

arwin is renowned for its technicolour sunsets, but it was dawn, not dusk, that captivated me. Specifically, the dawn of the NT capital’s fledgling dining scene. In the past two years, this former frontier outpost has shrugged off its provincialism with a cluster of urbane eateries. “Eating out here is no longer just about crocodile and barramundi,” says Alana Matthews of PM Eat & Drink, the slick, seafood-focused venue that’s leading the way. Darwin’s polyglot markets have long been the source of the city’s most electrifying food. Now, there are notable alternatives. “There’s lots of newness,” says Pina Sommerville of Wharf One. “Diners are more educated, too.” Sommerville is excited by the fresh produce sprouting in this remote city on the Timor Sea. “Pumpkins, tomatoes, herbs and chillies,” she says. Meanwhile, Indigenous chefs like Zach Green are showcasing native ingredients in a novel way. “I like to tell a story within the food,” says Green, who will soon open Elijah’s. Local pioneers include Hanuman, with a 25-year legacy of serving authentic Thai and Indian food, and Pee Wees at the Point, the romantic beachfront restaurant offering its ‘Modern Territorian’ dishes for almost two decades. Joining them is a flock of nascent restaurants, cafes and bars. There are even two local micro-breweries: Six Tanks Brew Co and One Mile Brewing Company. Darwin’s dry season (May-October) is the perfect time to visit this tropical, topical city.


LOCAVORE.

5

HIP BREW

Cynics viewed the 2016 arrival of hipster magnet Sweet Brew & Co (45 Stuart Hwy, Stuart Park; facebook.com/ sweetbrewandco) as the beginning of the end – for the Top End. But there is ample room for a venture this good. Sweet Brew combines inventive fare such as pork buns, duck crumpets and brekkie ramen, coffee from Single Origin and Campos, and delectable house-made pastries. Owners Joseph Stock and Brigid Beilby worked in Sydney, and run two other popular spots in town. This is their best one, though, complete with dapper interiors: one wall of the cafe is adorned with a fetching wallpaper of palms and toucans.

ABOVE: carnival scenes at Lola’s Pergola. CLOCKWISE: Mindil Beach Sunset Markets; jackfruit at Rapid Creek Markets; Aboriginal Bush Traders; (inset) Sweet Brew & Co; Mindil Beach; Little Miss Korea’s large, open dining room; (inset) LMK’s dish of NT barramundi.

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LOCAVORE.

7

LEADER OF THE PACK

When it comes to serving exquisite seafood, PM Eat & Drink (cnr of Knuckey St & Austin Ln; pmeatdrink.com) casts a wide net. Rock cod, red emperor, Spanish mackerel and jewfish are among the local species on its ever-changing menu. Painted on a wall of the airy space is an enormous octopus, hinting at the kitchen’s global tentacles. Lunch began with a numus of pickled jewfish, a heavenly blend of citrus and raw fish. Grilled calamari with pico de gallo and chilli oil evoked both the Mediterranean and Mexico, while a whole snapper with ponzu and togaroshi delivered Japanese drama. Chef Jacob Preece, whose CV includes a stint at Bistro Moncur in Sydney, is adept at infusing pristine produce with exotic flavours. PM is worth anyone’s vote.

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8

WINE O’CLOCK

Darwin remained bereft of a sophisticated wine bar until Rebecca Bullen uncorked Stone House Wine Bar (33 Cavenagh St; stonehousedarwin.com.au) nearly two years ago. The lair, which occupies an historic stone cottage, is equipped with an impressive wall of wine that entices patrons as they enter. Staff are well-versed in the inventory of small-batch drops from Australia, France, Spain and beyond. There are plenty of options available by the glass, as well as craft beers and aperitivo snacks. Meanwhile, in the leafy garden, chatty revellers imbibe jugs of flavoured sangria. The whole scene is refreshingly convivial.

9

SMOOTH SAILING

It would be easy for Wharf One Food & Wine (3/19 Kitchener Dr; wharfone.com.au), with its vast deck and spectacular waterfront views, to coast by on location alone. But the restaurant delivers a few gastronomic surprises, including roast suckling pig carved at the table, deftly cured barramundi with citrus and chilli dressing, and slow-braised Brahman hump – the toothsome meat tastes similar to beef cheeks. An industrious kitchen makes its own bread and pasta, grills endless types of protein, and offers lighter fare, such as a zesty watermelon, fennel and orange salad. Owner Pina Sommerville is the consummate host.

PHOTOGRAPHY GEORGE FRAGOPOULOS, FIONA MORRISON

6

ART MOVEMENT

Gallery-hopping around Darwin, an epicentre of Indigenous art, is essential. Start at Nomad Art (1/3 Vickers St, Parap; nomadart.com.au), a font of limited-edition prints, small sculptures and textiles. Then head to Outstation Gallery (8 Parap Pl, Parap; outstation.com.au) for its inspired selection of established and emerging artists. Its director, Matt Ward, is a knowledgeable, agreeable guide.


CLOCKWISE: Saffrron’s colourful fare; the relaxed scene at Foreshore; aquatic art at PM Eat & Drink; (inset) Outstation Gallery; colourful street art; (inset) Stone House Wine Bar; Lucky Bat’s Danny and Jack Crichton.

10

11

CURRY FAVOUR

LUCKY YOU

Lucky Bat Cafe (3/7 Pavonia Pl, Nightcliff; luckybat.space) fills up fast on Sundays, when the neighbouring Nightcliff Markets unfold. But it’s worth visiting any day of the week. The cafe menu features tasty Middle Eastern-influenced dishes, including chilli scrambled eggs, charred eggplant and herb salad on toast, and cardamom and orange chia pudding. On weekend evenings, they offer a pizza menu with wonderfully charred versions. Or you could fuse the two menus, as I did, and order a flatbread topped with Baghdad eggs, crumbed ricotta and fresh parsley. It was so fragrant and flavourful, I still think about it.

Darwin is blessed with stellar Indian restaurants, but Saffrron (14/34 Parap Rd, Parap; saffrron.com) is the most appealing. Diners gather at this suburban eatery for zestful, artful spins on staples including lamb korma, chicken tikka and eggplant masala. The city’s best barramundi dish may well be their Chennai curry, which immerses the omnipresent fish in an aromatic broth of tomato, coconut milk, chilli, tamarind and fenugreek seeds. Chef Selvam Kandasamy is dedicated to using only local seafood, fresh market produce and biodegradable bamboo tableware. He is also an accomplished colourist – his dishes appear as vividly enticing as they taste. Saffrron Express is their takeaway outlet in Alawa.

12

A SWELL TIME

The Foreshore Restaurant & Cafe (255 Casuarina Dr, Nightcliff; foreshorecafe.com.au) makes the most of its picturesque location on the water. Glass doors open up to the breeze, the main dining room is suffused with light, and there are outdoor seating options. It’s especially inviting at breakfast, when the menu spans hearty options such as banana pancakes and acai bowls. It draws an upbeat crowd of families, fitness obsessives and retirees. At dinner, chef Jake Stanley turns out more audacious fare like coffee-braised beef.

delicious.com.au/travel Head online for more of Darwin’s foodie highlights.


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INDEX.

FEBRUARY 2018

RECIPE INDEX 2017 ANNUAL RECIPE INDEX TO DOWNLOAD OUR ANNUAL RECIPE INDEX, VISIT DELICIOUS.COM.AU AND SEARCH ‘INDEX’

STARTERS, SIDES & LIGHT MEALS Artichoke dip with fennel & rosemary pickled radish (v) ....................................50 Eggplant, fennel & burrata rye bruschetta (v)....................................84 Fried prawns with preserved lemon and oregano ...............................91 Green flatbreads with kefir dressing (v) .....................................76 Grilled pineapple & tofu with kombucha dressing (v) ...........................79 Kimchi glazed chicken wings .....................76 Nobu-inspired sashimi plate with jalapeno dressing .........................128 Oysters with macerated lemon..................50 Prawn spring rolls with classic sweet & sour sauce ................................67 Raw salmon salad (yusheng) ......................70 Roasted red capsicum stuffed with brandade ........................................21 Rosemary beef skewers with horseradish and lemon ..........................38 Sardine gratin...........................................141 Spicy scallop wontons................................67 Steamed eggplant with soy and sesame (v)........................................21 Strawberry gazpacho with flaxseed crackers (v) .............................132 Sweet potato fish cakes with Japanese-style slaw................................62 Sweet vinegared lotus root (v) ...................67 Tomato & prosciutto salad.........................50

MAINS Beef brisket burgers...................................58 Beef rendang with turmeric brown rice .....61 Buckwheat pancakes with sauerkraut and fried egg .........................................76 Coconut & chilli poached chicken with mixed rice.......................................86 Fez kefta sandwich.....................................91 Freekeh with paprika & honey-glazed salmon.............................84 Harissa beef and carrot with barley & tomato salad.......................................86 Poke bowl with achar .................................34 Potato, green tapenade & herb spelt pizza (cover recipe) (v) ...................63 Pulled lamb méchoui .................................92 Pumpkin, lemon thyme & pecorino pasta (v)...................................59 Seafood grazing platters............................54 Soy-braised chicken and noodles..............60 Spelt spaghetti with roasted lemon rocket pesto (v).......................................84 Steamed fish with vegies ...........................70 Sweetcorn soup with basil, garlic & chilli butter ................................21 Tea-smoked duck .......................................70 Vegemite & red miso lamb with eggplant puree.............................131 Zesty broccolini pasta (v)............................50 SWEET THINGS Aperol & grapefruit citrus jellies ..............108 Banana, walnut & maple muffins ...............99 Cherry & star anise pie.............................116 Cherry cola icy poles................................124 Chewy oat & raisin cookies........................99 Chocolate & raspberry roll.........................21 Citrus & cucumber icy poles ....................122

Frozen mango ripple & coconut cheesecake.............................108 Golden almond, pear & raspberry cake ....40 Iced VoVo icy poles..................................122 Leccese panna cotta and espresso caramel .................................142 Lemon chia cake ........................................99 Nectarine Eton mess................................116 Nectarine, strawberry & basil galette ......114 Ombre-style fruit icy poles.......................122 Orange & honey blossom cake .................92 Passionfruit semifreddo sandwiches........104 Peach, carrot & walnut cake with cream cheese icing.......................114 Peaches & cream icy poles ......................122 Pina colada icy poles................................107 Pineapple upside-down cake ....................99 Pineapple, lime & pink peppercorn sorbet ...............................107 Plum baked custard .................................116 Pomegranate & rosewater mille-feuille .....94 Rum-soaked watermelon with watermelon granita..............................107 Spiced pumpkin & honey bread..............101 Summer kiwi icy poles..............................124 Three-milk cake with peach & lemon thyme jam.............................................114 Tropical fruit carpaccio.............................104 Tropical pops............................................122 White chocolate torta with melon and raw milk sorbet................................54 DRINKS & EXTRAS Lemon, mint & cucumber grappa cocktail. 50 Pomegranate & rose prosecco spritzer .....50 Red cabbage sauerkraut (v) .......................79 Traditional ginger beer ..............................79 (v) denotes vegetarian recipe

OFFICIAL TEST KITCHEN SUPPLIERS: Our meat is supplied by Vic’s Meat (vicsmeat.com.au). Our equipment is provided by Sheldon & Hammond (sheldonandhammond.com.au)

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THE PERFECT FINISH Eclectic, rustic and polished elements blend in an appealing mix at the post-dinner table of Sheree Commerford, creative force behind lifestyle blog Captain And The Gypsy Kid. @captainandthegypsykid

SWEET THING It’s always a homemade cake at our place – my grandmother’s caramel tart. Mum is now custodian of the recipe. HIP SIPS My favourite cocktail is a Soho Mule from Soho House in London, with vodka, lime juice and ginger syrup. I also pour Miraval Rosé in summer. 154 delicious.com.au

HEART OF GLASS I worked with Royal Doulton recently and I’m obsessed with their crystal tumblers for wine. FASHION PLATES I love handmade ceramics, French antique earthenware and precious dinnerware from Astier de Villatte. But for everyday use, we use classic enamel plates from Falcon. They’re great with kids and travel. SILVER LINING I lost some antique silverware from Christofle, unfortunately, but I still have linen napkins and silver napkin rings collected from various French flea markets. NON-NEGOTIABLES Butter and freshly made baguette, a side of truffled mash and a cup of Prana Chai tea.

PERSONAL STYLE This answer could be more like an essay. I do like my vintage pinafores, though, and hair wrapped up in a scarf. I finish with a coat of YSL mascara and a spritz of Aesop’s Marrakech Intense for an exotic vibe. GAME ON We never get sick of Celebrity, the name game. I’m open to anything that is hilarious and, after a few drinks, makes you look ridiculous. Falcon enamel dinner plate, Scout House (scouthouse.com.au); ‘Highclere’ crystal tumbler, Royal Doulton (royaldoulton.com.au); Marrakech Intense Eau de Toilette, Aesop (aesop.com); Miraval Côtes de Provence Rosé, Dan Murphy’s (danmurphys.com.au); Astier de Villatte Marguerite dessert plate, ABC Carpet & Home (abchome.com).

INTERVIEW GEORGE EPAMINONDAS PHOTOGRAPHY JEREMY SIMONS STYLING KIRSTEN JENKINS MERCHANDISING EMMALY STEWART

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On board Scenic’s ships in Bordeaux and the South of France, take your love of gastronomy one step further and indulge in a Scenic Culinaire cooking class. Learn an array of expert tips and enjoy the opportunity to visit traditional local markets with your on board chef to gather ingredients. Of course, the best bit will be the tastings at the conclusion of each class. We look forward to welcoming you on board.

138 128 SCENIC.COM.AU

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