Page 1

SVETLANA MIRCHEVA

SPACE DOGS


SVETLANA MIRCHEVA

SPACE DOGS This catalogue presents the works of Svetlana Mircheva from her 4 solo exhibitions in the period 2011 - 2014, new works from 2014 - 2016, screen works and drawings. Printed in Sofia, 2017. Texts by Olivier Boissiere Marco Antonini Vladyia Mihaylova Cover Space Dogs, 2016 Š 2017 Svetlana Mircheva svetlanamircheva.com


SVETLANA MIRCHEVA

SPACE DOGS


SVETLANA MIRCHEVA

SPACE DOGS SPACE DOGS

LOVE&PEACE PUZZLE

p. 9 p. 15

SOUNDSCAPES p. 21 IMAGES OF THE WORD

p. 31

103 MISTAKES

p. 81

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS

p. 103

RANDOM SHOW

p. 121

SCREEN WORKS

p. 139

DRAWINGS p. 159 RESUME p. 169


8


9

SPACE DOGS

The #Untaggblexhibition National Academy of Art, Sofia 2016


10

SPACE DOGS part of Space dogs, series in progress laser cut color plexiglass 90 cm x 55 cm 2016 Tribute to Laika, Pchyolka, Mushka and other moon dogs heroes of the first Sputnik age. Little stories to discover follow the constellations dog shapes, about feminine canines-cosmonauts, brave galaxy adventurers, and think about mankind, progress, universe, space.


11


12

SPACE DOGS


13


14


15

LOVE&PEACE PUZZLE

Toyphilia Toy Phobia exhibition Institute of Contemporary Art-Sofia 2016


16

LOVE&PEACE PUZZLE 3d puzzle, toy object laser cut color plexiglass 3 parts, 27 cm x 12 cm each part 2016 Fragile. No instructions. Let’s play.


17


18

LOVE&PEACE PUZZLE


19


20


21

SOUNDSCAPES

Space Audience exhibition Sofia Arsenal-Museum for Contemporary Art 2016


22

SOUNDSCAPE installation drawing, collage 33 x 58 cm 2016


23


24

SOUNDSCAPE installation, mirrors, color, sound sound: Angel Simitchiev 140 cm x 480 cm x 60 cm 2016 Reflections upon sounds turned into image-object suspended in space. 2 copies of words spoken and recorded, turned into 2 parallel imageobjects in space. A cinetic view, a soundscape. For the viewer passing trough is magical, reflections and sound lead him into another reality.


25


26

SOUNDSCAPE


27


28

SOUND GREEN collage on paper 30 x 40 cm 2016

SOUND PINK collage on paper 30 x 40 cm 2016


29


30


31

IMAGES OF THE WORD

Solo exhibition Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia 2014


32


33

RANDOM, CHANCE, BLIND DATE, SERENDIPITY

“langage=jeu galant”. Marcel Duchamp

Once upon a time, there was a flâneur. Baudelaire followed him strolling the city leisurely both distracted and attentive to the new world (it would become brave later), looking for modernity. A viewer/voyeur, he would note the remarkable in the environment of his contemporaries, the spread of commercial activities as a consequence of the industrial revolution and the raise of consumerism. The flâneur attitude marked a significant shift in the points of views upon the world. Shop-windows became familiar scenes where artists would dig for inspiration. The cubist collage and Duchamp’s ready-made replaced the representation of the object by the object itself incorporated into assemblages exposed to language that would become the rule at mid-century. Walter Benjamin haunted the Paris “passages”, the Surrealists the flea market of Saint-Ouen looking for bizarre objects of undetermined functions and forms, craving for close encounters of the third kind, expecting surprise ( “soup-rice” as the Marx brothers had put it ).

“One does not do poetry with ideas, one does poetry with words”1. Mallarmé said. He must have foreseen that poetry could become image by means of “a throw of the dice”. Freeing words from one another, dispersing them on the page opens new interpretations as well as a disconcerting design. Are they pure coincidence or an effect of the Zeitgeist? Mallarme’s poem might look as a prelude to the re-introduction of the word in visuals arts. From Picasso’s first cubic collages to Schwitters’ Merzbau, to Saul Steinberg’s rebus and Rauschenberg’s, then “Conceptual’ and Art language, Kossuth, Lawrence Wiener, then Bruuuuuuuce Nauman, Ed Ruscha et al, words, sentences, aphorisms did invade the art field. An art work could both express and enounce?


34

The computer age has generated a new version of the flâneur, the “geek” zooming and zapping on the freeways of information. Exit the street and the city. The world has turned global and the Net its cosmic echo. An all-over set of information both text and imagery has become available at fingertip distance. The somewhat naive first fans of cybernetics in the late 60s prophesized then the advent of some new Leonardo, Picasso or other artist genius who would take up the new medium and generate new masterworks. This has not happened (yet). But the amazing field of the Web providing for all kind of opportunities of criss-cross and short cuts is currently being explored. Wait and see…

Horace Walpole coined the name “serendipity”2 from an indo-arabian old legend where the three princes of Serendip described a lost camel that they had never seen through the traces and indexes which they had noticed on the road. Serendipity was defined as discovering by chance something that one was not looking for, or the art to take notice to the surprising and give it a pertinent interpretation. It was thus chance + sagacity. The word had a discreet carrier at first until it reached the scientific domain with the discovery of the penicillin (a fortuitous accident, according to Fleming) or Albert Hoffmann’s one of LSD. Even Isaac Newton and his apple were called in. It became an argument for free versus applied research. In the art field, it sounds like a fact, No usefulness is expected. Free imagination, innovation and fantasy are supposed to be the rules of the game. Serendipity is supposed to pop up without notice. “The stupid call these strikings of the thought “chance” without thinking that chance never occurs to the dunces.”3

Svetlana Mircheva is the heiress of all the above. She walks the city, collects abandoned objects, bits and pieces, sheets of left over papers, fragments of newspapers (preferably old) photographs of loves forgotten, rags of faded materials evocative of lives unknown, memories anonymous. The artist reinserts them in comic strips, little tales to be deciphered, telescoping images and words (image as text, text as image) in poetic collages in the form of rebus, those “compositions that operate this great marriage of letter and drawing which has always haunted the baroque artists.”4 Mircheva’s attention to shop windows might be triggered by petty trivial domains. Exploring pet shops she has spotted a variety of dog food, biscuits wearing unexpected words suggesting pet loves … She has used them to design candid canine calligrams, nursery rimes whistling little tunes, pretty constellations, as many tributes to Laika, Pschyolka, Mushka and other moon dogs heroes of the first Sputnik age. Ironic compassion? Love thy dog as thyself?


35

The interactive aspect of the computer can take (at least) two forms: communication with brothers/sisters internauts or direct dialog with the Machine, as it offers help/services to user/client. Mircheva contacted once by curiosity programs which given a name of your firm + keyword to your activity would deliver the right slogan for your advertising. The tests Mircheva did rapidly proved deceptive, either irrelevant or conventional. But a little twist on a sentence could make them funny on the verge of the absurd. So… Coincidently Mircheva landed on the glagolitic site. Cyril and Method had elaborated an alphabet before the Cyrillic. In their devotion, they had followed up with three sentences using each letter as a key to a word all to the glory of God. A sublime early use of sacred advertising! Following up with her “mistakes” Mircheva has bumped into new intriguing incidents. A A4 found in a paper basket had all the visual seductions of the “conceptual” art of the 60s. The content, an exploration of the keyword “make” proved most serious and hilarious. A further research led (with the help of New York curator friend Eriola Pira) to a million words thesaurus accumulated by a very serious university department in Providence, RI, on the possibilities of computers in the field of language in the early 60s. With “Make” the viewer is invited to pursue with the game. Infinitely. “Language is a virus from the outer space.”5

Certainly serendipitous Svetlana Mircheva is not fooled by the process. She is well aware that the haphazard character of serendipity cannot ever constitute a method, only a state of mind. Told about the story of the three princes of Serendip, Mircheva had but a brief comment: “there is no normal camel” she said. Think of it.

Olivier Boissiere Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia

1 Stephane Mallarmé “Un coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hasard” in Cosmopolis Paris. 1897 2 Sylvie Catellin “Serendipité, du conte au concept” Seuil Paris. 2014 3 Balzac “Theorie de la démarche” L’Europe litteraire 1833, La Pleiade 1981. tome XXII 4 Roland Barthes about Saul Steinberg in “All except you”. Repères. Galerie Maeght. 1983 See also Rosalind Krauss “Rauschenberg and the Materialized Image” in “The originality of the Avant Garde and other modernist myths” The MIT Press Cambridge Mass. 1985 5 William Burroughs


36

ADS FOR HAPPY DAYS twisted slogans, compositions in Latin and Glagolitic You’ve got questions, We’ve got mountain. laser cut plexiglass 81 x 176 cm 2014


37


38

ADS FOR HAPPY DAYS twisted slogans, compositions in Latin and Glagolitic How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Sun? laser cut plexiglass diameter 92 cm 2014 Started with the use of curiosity programs which would deliver the right slogan for your advertising. The first tests did rapidly proved deceptive, either irrelevant or conventional. But a little twist on a sentence could make them funny on the verge of the absurd.


39


40

ADS FOR HAPPY DAYS twisted slogans, compositions in Latin and Glagolitic Speak the word strongly Glagolitic sentence laser cut plexiglass 85 x 46 cm 2014 Cyril and Method had elaborated an alphabet before the Cyrillic. In their devotion, they had followed up with three sentences using each letter as a key to a word all to the glory of God. A sublime early use of sacred advertising!


41


42

ADS FOR HAPPY DAYS twisted slogans, compositions in Latin and Glagolitic Me, knowing the letters, I speak Glagolitic sentence laser cut plexiglass 134 x 34 cm 2014


43


44

ADS FOR HAPPY DAYS exhibition view


45


46

MAKE BELIEVE poetic “to make” composition print on laser cut plexiglass 117 x 128 cm 2014 A coincidentally found A4 paper with linguistic studies from the 90s in Sofia led to a deep look at American language in the early 60s. With “Make” the viewer is invited to pursue with the game. Infinitely. “Language is a virus from the outer space.”5


47


48

MAKE BELIEVE


49


50

MAKE PAGE 1-15, PAGE 10 thesaurus for the word “make” color print on Torchon paper 85 x 60 cm 2014 “MAKE PAGE, 1-15”, from a found A4 to a million words thesaurus, an exploration of the keyword “make”, both serious and hilarious.


51


52

MAKE PAGE 1-15, PAGE 11 thesaurus for the word “make” color print on Torchon paper 85 x 60 cm 2014


53


54

MAKE PAGE 1-15, PAGE 3 thesaurus for the word “make” color print on Torchon paper 85 x 60 cm 2014


55


56

MAKE PAGE 1-15


57


58

FOR LAIKA WITH LOVE poetic constellations, dog food series

Dog food biscuits wearing unexpected words

9 calligrams x 16 polymer clay biscuites

designed in poetic constellations of calligrams,

1 calligram size around 70 x 60 cm

whistling rimes.

2014


59

Love words combined with clear action commands;

both visually and in collaboration with musicians

they can be seen, read, sung, played, danced,

and performers who would interpret the score of

rapped or performed. This work may be presented

words.


60

FOR LAIKA WITH LOVE poetic constellation, dog food series calligram, detail bones 5.5x3x1.5cm, hearts 4x4x1cm 2014


61


62

LOOK FOCUS SPEAK COME WALK WITH ME SLEEP STAND RING FETCH BACK HIDE SPIN HERE STAY CALM

FOR LAIKA WITH LOVE poetic constellation, dog food series 16 polymer clay biscuites calligram size around 70 x 60 cm 2014


63


64

FOR LAIKA WITH LOVE


65


66

SPIN SING JUMP SMILE HAVE FUN BOW BACK HIDE LIFT STAY FETCH RUN GIVE PAW SHAKE STAND

FOR LAIKA WITH LOVE poetic constellation, dog food series 16 polymer clay biscuites calligram size around 70 x 60 cm 2014


67


68

SIT STAY SPEAK COME HUG ME KISS ME I LOVE U BE MINE FETCH LEAVE IT HEEL DOWN

FOR LAIKA WITH LOVE poetic constellation, dog food series 12 polymer clay biscuites calligram size around 140 x 30 cm 2014


69


70

REBUS COLLAGES collages on canvas with found papers Menuetto in G major

39 x 159 cm

Cry me a river

2014


71

Made with collected from the streets papers, reinserted in comic strips, little tales to be deciphered.


72

REBUS COLLAGES collages on canvas with found papers At 11 o’clock put everything in the blue pot

39 x 159 cm

Fly me to the moon

2014


73


74

OBJECT, BOOK The body of the language 3D print in paper 16.5 x 22.5 x 4.5 cm 2015 A non-existing book, combining 4 texts on the 4 levels of reading; science astronomy text, love story in a forest, “a man enters a bar� story and a recipe about something delicious. From the space to the body, from the stars to your stomach, the universe of the language in the body of a book.


75


76

GOOD MORNING 1 collage on paper hot coffee maker on a pink napkin 30 x 40 cm 2016

GOOD MORNING 2 collage on paper hot coffee maker on a pink napkin 30 x 40 cm 2016


77


78

UNTITLED, MOOSE color print on Torchon paper 30 x 40 cm 2015


79


80


81

103 MISTAKES

Solo exhibition Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia 2012


82

LEGS

- Legs? exclaimed Dany the junkie when opening in a public square at night a stolen suitcase and finding inside a pair of freshly cut woman’s legs. (from “Junky Christmas” in “Spare Ass Annie and other tales” by William Burroughs)

Once upon a time there was a pair of legs. Or more precisely the sketch of them. Svetlana Mircheva had in mind to realize in her computer a short animated movie where these legs would walk, jump and dance. The sketch was in a jpg file. When the artist pressed the enter key, the machine hiccupped and delivered an image featuring dots, lines, plans, colors, totally unlike the model. OK! the artist said, OK! Error! mistake! She closed the session. Reopened, clicked. Same but a different image. She tried again and again. The machine would produce non repetitive motifs (an oxymoron). Mircheva saved them one by one. She found them intriguing, interesting, beautiful even. She got captured in what she envisioned as a work in progress. Only did she stop when she had accumulated about a hundred of them. At that time, she changed her computer: the updated system simply refused access to the file. Mircheva was, as Thomas Pynchon would put it “86”. She felt both relieved and slightly nostalgic. She was already thinking of the display. The screen alone was short to expose the subtlety of the images, not to mention their serial quality. A solution à la Nam June Paik (100 monitors?) was unrealistic. Mircheva had made tests against the reluctance of some printers (the operators, not the machines). They had proven conclusive. So she had her 103 mistakes finely printed.

There is a long and passionate relationship between man and the machine. Far beyond its sheer utility and function, the machine has steered men’s imagination, inspiring fascination and awe, optimism and fear. There had been automats and playful toys using ingenuous mechanisms. With the industrial revolution, the machine got dressed with anthropomorphic metaphors by writers, artists and later movie makers. The


83

machine as a creature would have a life of its own and run amok beyond the will of its creator. With the early Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the Surmâle by Alfred Jarry, Raymond Roussel’s Locus Solus or the Future Eve by Villiers de l’Isle Adam as precursors, science fiction became a literary genre of its own. Futurists used them as a symbol for the will of power. From Metropolis to Blade Runner, robots and androids were favorite characters for films offering a gloomy image of the future. Artists could not resist using the alternate movements of the machines to eroticize them as it was such an easy metaphor for copulation. Duchamp, Picabia and the Surrealists made the machine their favorite “feminine” subject, a trend epitomized in the famous exhibition “the Bachelor Machines” by Harald Szeemann in 1975. In entering the computer age, the machine has lost its body features. The focus has shifted to the brain. Artificial intelligence has been and still is much discussed. The topic is haunted by the question whether the computer can escape man’s control (with Stanley Kubrick’s Space Odyssey as a reference). Will a computerized Big Brother take over man’s destinies through a vast conspiracy (of dunces?) Fortunately, Big Brother has turned recently into a TV reality show. From tragedy to farce…

Svetlana Mircheva’s computer machine was obviously more innocent. Metamorphosing a drawing into a series of other drawings is certainly getting out of control but it remains peaceful and harmless. The questions it raises are thus out of pure curiosity. To a simple rational mind, it is puzzling that one cause would produce a number of such different effects. A computer expert might explain it in simple terms. To the ignoramus, it belongs to magic. What is a “corrupted file” anyway? Does the term imply a moral notion? At that point, there would be a temptation to view Mircheva as an apprentice sorcerer who trigged some mysterious instinct in the machine. The spirit that she called did wander randomly (freely?) and generated those chatoyant forms. Had the system taken over Mircheva’s intentions (Kunstwolle?) and interpreted her sketch in its own personal way? Is the viewer facing 103 versions of the computer’s idea of a pair of legs? Did the machine anticipate the walk/jump/dance initial idea to elaborate scenarios for a ballet, whether inspired by Swanlake, Gisele or Ballet Mecanique? Merce Cunningham, Pina Bausch, or Busby Berkeley? the duets of Astaire/Rogers or Kelly/Charisse? Who knows? (Coincidently Cyd Charisse’s surname was “The Legs”). In the end Mircheva reappropriated the images (and her Kunstwolle as well) and assembled them along her own terms. Here they are: 103 mistakes. To Svetlana Mircheva, it is a closed case. No doubt the ever growing sophistication and frailty of the machine will give way to further and fertile errors. Other artists will open Pandora’s box. Hopefully. A throw of the dice will never abolish chance.

Olivier Boissiere Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia


84

103 MISTAKES 103 color ink-jet prints on photo paper 40 x 50 cm each 2012


85


86

103 MISTAKES 103 color ink-jet prints on photo paper 40 x 50 cm each 2012 Archive of documented 103 different computer error visualizations of one and the same corrupted jpg file - digital drawing of two legs.


87


88

103 MISTAKES 103 color ink-jet prints on photo paper 40 x 50 cm each 2012 Archive of documented 103 different computer error visualizations of one and the same corrupted jpg file - digital drawing of two legs.


89


90

103 MISTAKES 103 color ink-jet prints on photo paper 40 x 50 cm each 2012


91


92

103 MISTAKES 103 color ink-jet prints on photo paper 40 x 50 cm each 2012


93


94

103 MISTAKES 103 color ink-jet prints on photo paper 40 x 50 cm each 2012


95


96

103 MISTAKES exhibition view


97


98

103 MISTAKES details


99


100

103 MISTAKES detail


101


102


103

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS

Solo exhibition NURTUREart Gallery, Brooklyn, New York

2012


104

INTERSTITIAL REALITIES

Notes on Svetlana Mircheva’s recent work

Such inter-generationally famous videogames as Donkey Kong, Pac Man and Dig Dug are among many golden age arcades to share a fascinating characteristic: an unavoidable dead end that comes in the form of a “kill screen.” Kill screens are regular game levels in which the obsolete code (and hardware) of the game simply could not technically deal with the required incremental data-checks, bringing the images on screen to crash or behave nonsensically. Located at impossibly high levels, the fabled kill screen is an autonomous zone, a technical glitch originating a momentary interruption to logic and order. It is also a moment to be remembered forever. We are often brought to think that computers and other such high-end toys are perfect machines. I remember a colleague in the design firm where I first landed an internship; PCs were his best friends because “If anything goes wrong, at least I know for a fact it’s my fault.” Reality is fortunately more interesting and surprising than that. A multitude of reasons can bring all sorts of technology (new and old) to develop nonsensical behavior and break the rules set for them by the engineers who projected them, the tools used to fabricate them and the behavior and choices of their final users. Considering how relevant and invasive a role technology plays in our daily lives, glitches, malfunctions and system crashes have been addressed by several artists who at different points and via different approaches, have tested the artistic potential of such interstitial events. One of Svetlana Mircheva’s early works, first presented in 2004 at ZKM in Karlsruhe, documents randomly generated screen-crashes. Triggered by faulty graphic files on her old computer, the screen-grabs presented in Mistakes are totally out of the artist’s control and yet resemble beautifully woven 8-bit tapestries suggestive of both Modernist and Vernacular art. The etymology of the word “Vernacular” comes from the name given to slaves that were born in their masters’ home; as an adjective, the word bears in its own roots an idea of dependence and submission. Computers are for Mircheva living beings, bent into total submission and therefore incline to unexpected forms of rebellion. Every screen grab in Mistakes is a window open into the subconscious of a supposedly passive instrument. These fascinatingly fragmented images suggest the presence a creative potential, a glimpse offered by a supposed “malfunction” that the artist sees as a positive, creative moment.


105

Mircheva’s interest in the grey zones between reality and imagination resurfaces in her recent project Saved Images, a collection of GIF files saved on an encrypted folder that she found to have been mysteriously copied on her hard disk. Printed large and small on various materials and displayed in different positions, the collection resembles a quirky, well-curated contemporary art exhibition. Their extreme visual diversity is unified by pixelation, a subtle hint to their provenance. Once again, unexpected events become repositories of treasured moments of total uncertainty and indetermination. The GIFs in Saved Images are projections of an invisible intelligence, liberated by the artist and ready to become part of the viewer’s own imagination. In a similar work titled Riverside, the artist collected discarded documents and photographs around Sofia. Presenting a carefully arranged selection of that material, Mircheva gently tests the viewer’s imagination, teasing it just enough to encourage participation in a creative process that is by definition incomplete and fragmentary. Imaginary narratives play an important role throughout Mircheva’s work. A combination of the artist’s and the viewer’s imaginations is required to connect the dots in her otherwise patchy repertoire of glitches, found objects, imperfections and twilight zones. More than any other work, the Possible Exhibitions series offers insight in the artist’s personal world and a gateway to interstitial realities hidden in the folds of her imagination. This series of diminutive, some quite simple, other slightly inscrutable dioramas form an ongoing collection of imaginary gallery-size installations. Possible Exhibitions showcases Mircheva’s signature sleek, highly-professionalized daydreaming at its most powerful. With their quiet and unassuming presence, the models lead both artist and viewer to imagine an infinity of possible scenarios, suspended between past, present and future. Did these exhibitions ever take place? Are we looking at documents, or rather maquettes for future shows? Are they just an exercise in formalism, or a form of soft-spoken institutional critique? The list of questions (and answers) could go on and on. It is a honor for NURTUREart to present a selection of Possible Exhibitions in Svetlana Mircheva’s first solo exhibition in the United States. This project was one of the winners of our yearly open call for artistic and curatorial projects and also marks the beginning of NURTUREart’s commitment to evaluating and presenting more and more projects by international artists. With Svetlana Mircheva’s Possible Exhibitions we are ready to transform our gallery in a temporary zone open to imagination, projection and reflection.

Marco Antonini NURTUREart Gallery, Brooklyn, New York


106

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS 10 dioramas of the gallery space plexiglas, pvc, glass, wood, rope, textile, stones 53 Ń… 29 Ń…14 cm each 2011/2012 Series of diminutive, some quite simple, other slightly inscrutable dioramas from an ongoing collection of imaginary gallery-size installations.


107


108

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS 10 dioramas of the gallery space plexiglas, pvc, glass, wood, rope, textile, stones 53 х 29 х14 cm each 2011/2012


109


110

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS 10 dioramas of the gallery space plexiglas, pvc, glass, wood, rope, textile, stones 53 х 29 х14 cm each 2011/2012


111


112

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS 10 dioramas of the gallery space plexiglas, pvc, glass, wood, rope, textile, stones 53 х 29 х14 cm each 2011/2012


113


114

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS 10 dioramas of the gallery space plexiglas, pvc, glass, wood, rope, textile, stones 53 х 29 х14 cm each 2011/2012


115


116

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS exhibition view


117


118

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS exhibition view


119


120


121

RANDOM SHOW

Solo exhibition Vaska Emanouilova Gallery, branch of Sofia City Art Gallery 2011


122


123

RANDOM SHOW

The works of Svetlana Mircheva often present the specific features and particularly the mistakes in the use and operation of various technologies. The author seems to be constantly wishing to shake our trust in the accuracy, clarity, and reality of our perceptions of the world that are formed by contemporary digital culture. For that purpose she often uses the tools of design. Her works include prints, models, short videos, photography, and various digital images, in all of which there is keen interest to the graphic symbol and the visual characteristics of the image. Random Show is once again related to the idea of uncertainty of perceptions, only this time referring to the random, accidental as a loss of frame, of context, and of the immediate environment of events and objects. The core words for the exhibition, TIME and PLACE, are represented as strange monuments that mark the space as a place of absence, but also of discovery, where the accidental is an open horizon of imagination. The four models of the gallery space represent undeveloped, unaccomplished ideas for exhibitions. In such a way Svetlana Mircheva overturns the very idea of how an exhibition is created, presenting the very action as random. The exhibition is an „open” space, which similar to a box serves as a receptacle for various „saved” images, found objects and symbols.

Vladiya Mihaylova Vaska Emanouilova Gallery, branch of Sofia City Art Gallery, Sofia


124

SAVED IMAGES gif files of unknown origin and date of creation printed on buckram 150 х 240 cm 2011 From the deepest void of the artificial memory, from the global web of our digital existence - a selection of mysteriously appeared images after recovering deleted data. With no origin or past, miraculously saved from the black hole of the machine’s oblivion.


125


126

SAVED IMAGES gif files of unknown origin and date of creation printed on buckram 150 Ñ… 240 cm 2011


127


128

SAVED IMAGES


129


130

TIME PLACE two transparent panels lases cut plexiglass 60 Ń… 130 cm each 2011 Meeting point between The Time and The Place. A corner monument of our transparent existence here and now.


131


132

TIME PLACE two transparent panels lases cut plexiglass 60 Ñ… 130 cm each 2011


133


134

RIVERSIDE found on the streets papers, collective and private memories, assembled in a storyline 2011


135


136

RANDOM SHOW exhibition view


137


138


139

SCREEN WORKS


140

MISTAKES interactive video documentation screen details 2004 Archive of documented 103 different computer error visualizations of one and the same corrupted jpg file - digital drawing of two legs.


141


142

LINEAR SELFPORTRAIT WITH COLORS AND NO SHAPES processing application, screen detail image color study 7:30 min 2013


143


144

DECONSTRUCTING IVAN MILEV’S “DRAGON’S BRIDE” animation, screen details image deconstruction 2:36 min 2009


145


146


147

INVISIBLE PLACES (right) animation, screen detail perceiving movement 01:46 min 2004

INVISIBLE PLACES (left) animation dissembled


148

WOODHOUSE BOWLING CLUB animation, screen details memory reconstruction 1:30 min 2005/2007


149


150

INSIDE STORY animation, screen detail image deconstruction 14:00 min 2002


151


152

REVERSE animation, screen details image deconstruction 1:00 min 2002


153


154

28 PIXEL PORTRAITS animation, screen details 28 portraits with personal face colors image color study 2:15 min 2003


155


156

ONE AND THE SAME VIEW animation, screen details image deconstruction 1:30 min 2001


157


158


159

DRAWINGS, COLLAGES


160

PARALLEL DRAWINGS drawings series pencil, guash color papers on paper 40 x 30 cm 2016 Cylinders dancing in the air. Are they moving or are they still? Are they tubes or are they filled? Is it a shadow or is it a trail? Are the on the ground or are they in the space? Is it all now or is it a time trace?


161


162

PARALLEL DRAWINGS


163


164

PARALLEL DRAWINGS


165


166

RED-HAIRED WOMAN HUGS YOU collage series color papers on paper 40 x 30 cm 2016


167


168


169

RESUME


170

Svetlana Mircheva www.svetlanamircheva.com svetlana.mircheva@gmail.com

Svetlana Mircheva was born in 1976 in Kazanlak, Bulgaria, lives and works in Sofia. She graduated from the National Academy of Arts in Sofia. In 2003 she took Olafur Eliasson’s summer class in IUAV, Venice, and in 2004 was awarded the International Media Art Award of SWR Baden Baden and ZKM, Karlsruhe, for her project Mistakes. In 2010 she was among the nominees for the BAZA award for young artists and in 2012 was the Bulgarian nomination for Henkel Art Award for East European Art. Her solo exhibitions are RANDOM SHOW at Vaska Emanouilova, branch of Sofia City Art Gallery (2011), POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS at NURTUREart, New York (2012), 103 MISTAKES at Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia (2012), IMAGES OF THE WORD at Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia (2014). She has participated in Radar Project, Extra 50, Venice (2003, 2004). Her works have been exhibited in Blind Date, Temporary Contemporary, London (2004), Viper, Kunsthalle, Basel (2004), invisible, Medienkunstpreis, ZKM | Museum fur Neue Kunst & Medienmuseum, Karlsruhe (2004), 18 Stuttgarter Filmwinter (2005), Infrastructure, Studio Voltaire, London (2005), Mobile Spaces, Goethe Institute Sofia (2006), Time Place, Artnewscafe, Plovdiv (2009), BAZA Award for Young Contemporary Art, Sofia City Gallery (2010), Broadcast Media Sculptures, WUK, Vienna (2010), Moscow International Biennial for Yong Art, MMOMA, (2010), There has been no future, there will be no past, ISCP, New York (2010), You fail!, Periscope, Salzburg (2010), RE_001: First Communion of Anemic Young Girls In The Snow and other works, Interstate Projects, New York (2013), Focus Bulgaria, Variofocis curated exhibition at Vienna Contemporary (2015).


171

EDUCATION 2003 Olafur Eliasson summer class at UIAV, Venice 1995-2000 National Academy of Arts, MA in industrial design, Sofia National Academy of Arts, Multimedia class, Sofia 1990-1995 Art and Design High School, Kazanlak, BG

SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2014 IMAGES OF THE WORD, Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia http://uncabinetdamateur.bg/exhibitions/past/item/134-images-of-the-word 2012

103 MISTAKES, Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia

2011

RANDOM SHOW, Vaska Emanouilova Gallery, branch of Sofia City Art Gallery

http://uncabinetdamateur.bg/exhibitions/past/item/9-103-mistakes

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS, NURTUREart Gallery, Brooklyn, New York http://nurtureart.org/?p=3469

http://veg.sghg.bg/site/?p=141#more-141

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2016 TOYPHILIA TOY PHOBIA |ICA-Sofia SUMMER SUMMARY |Credo Bonum Gallery, Sofia BLACK ON WHITE EXHIBITION |Red Dot Art Depot, Sofia THE #UNTAGGBLEXHIBITION |National Academy of Art, Sofia DRUNKEN BOAT Magazine, Issue 23 - Bulgarian Literature |New York SPACE AUDIENCE exhibition, Sofia Arsenal-Museum for Contemporary Art #LOW TECH LAB LONDON 2016, Saatchi Gallery, London, Education Center 2015 FOCUS BULGARIA, Variofocus, curated exhibition, Vienna Contemporary MIRCHEVA, SERAPIONOV, VASILEVA, Un Cabinet D’Amateur, Sofia Variations, 3D Printing, Plovediv gallery, One Design Week, Plovdiv 2014 UN CABINET D’AMATEUR. 2 YEARS AFTER, Un Cabinet D’Amateur, Sofia 2013 USUAL SUSPECTS, Un Cabinet D’Amateur, Sofia RICHARD: “First Communion of Anemic Young Girls In The Snow and other works”, Interstate Projects, New York 2012 WINTER GROUP SHOW, Un Cabinet D’Amateur, Sofia MAGNET AND ANTIMAGNET, ICA Gallery, Sofia WHO LEFT WHAT BEHIND, Pleven; Ankara A BEAUTIFUL SUMMER, Un Cabinet D’Amateur, Sofia ART UP!, Media Art in Bulgaria, Greece and Turkey, Geothe Institute project Possible Exhibitions, presentation, Placette, Berlin 2011 Sunday Matinees, Witzenhausen Gallery, Amsterdam 2010 YOU FAIL! periscope:project:space, Salzburg THERE HAS BEEN NO FUTURE, THERE WILL BE NO PAST, ISCP, New York BROADCAST MEDIA SCULPTURES, WUK, Vienna Moscow International Biennial for Young Art, MMOMA


172

2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003

BAZA AWARD for Young Contemporary Art Exhibition, Sofia DA FEST, National Academy of Art, Sofia TIME PLACE, artnewscafe, Night of Museums and Galleries, Plovdiv MASTERS REMASTERED, Goethe-Institut Bulgarien, Sofia Night of Museums and Galleries, Plovdiv Digital Games, Ivan Asen 22, Sofia Sofia Underground Festival Mobile Spaces, Goethe Institute, Sofia Mobile Studios, European nomadic multimedia platform INFRASTRUCTURE, Studio Voltaire, London 18 Stuttgarter Filmwinter, Stuttgart MEDIA ART AWARD, ZKM | Museum für Neue Kunst, Karlsruhe VIPER Basel Festival, Kunsthalle, Basel RADAR European Project, Venice, London BLIND DATE, temporary contemporary, London RADAR, Contemporary Art for European Cities, Extra 50, 50 Venice Biennale COSMOS, 11 Biennial of Young artists, Europe and Mediterranean, Athens

RESIDENCY 2003/4 RADAR Project, European Residency, Venice, London AWARDS 2012 Henkel Art Award for Contemporary Art / Bulgarian / Nomination 2011 NURTUREart, Brooklyn, Solo exhibition open call / Winner 2010 BAZA Award for Young Contemporary Art / Nomination 2004 International Media Art Award, ZKM Karlsruhe / Best 50 COLLECTIONS Collection Cyclone le studio, Paris Allianz Bulgaria Collection, Sofia Private collections in Paris and Sofia CATALOGS Svetlana Mircheva / WORKS, Catalog, texts by Olivier Boissiere, Marco Antonini, Vladyia Mihaylova, © 2015, published by Svetlana Mircheva, Sofia http://issuu.com/svetlanamircheva/docs/svetlana_mircheva-works-issuu Svetlana Mircheva / 103 MISTAKES, Exhibition catalog, text by Olivier Boissiere, © 2012, published by Un Cabinet D’Amateur Gallery, Sofia http://issuu.com/svetlanamircheva/docs/103mistakes?mode=window

Svetlana Mircheva / POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS, Exhibition catalog, text by Marco Antonini, © 2012, NURTUREart Galery, Brooklyn, NY http://issuu.com/NURTUREart/docs/svetlana_mircheva?mode=window

Svetlana Mircheva / RANDOM SHOW, Exhibition catalog, texts by Vladiya Mihaylova © 2011, Vaska Emanouilova Gallery, branch of Sofia City Art Gallery, Sofia http://issuu.com/svetlanamircheva/docs/randomshow_brochure_svetla?mode=window

WHO LEFT?WHAT BEHIND, Exhibition catalog, p. 142-145 © 2012 Pleven/Ankara, advisors - Beral Madra, Maria Vassileva, curators - Demna Dimitrova, Saliha Kasap


173

UNSICHTBARES. KUNST_WISSENSCHAFT. Algorithmen als Schnittstellen zwischen Kunst und Wissenschaft, Internationaler Medienkunstpreis 2004, Publikationstyp Sammelband Verfasser / Herausgeber Barbara Könches und Peter Weibel (Hg.); Verlag, Ort Benteli, Bern; Jahr 2005; Sprache deutsch; Beschreibung 431 S., zahlr. Ill.; ISBN 3-7165-1395-4 INVISIBLE. ART_SCIENCE / International Media Art Award 2004; Publikationstyp CDROM/DVD Jahr 2004; Sprache deutsch und englisch; Organisation / Institution ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie, Karlsruhe; Kooperationspartner SWR ; SF drs; arte RADAR Connecting Europe, RADAR project catalogue, Edited by Angela Vetesse © 2004 by Marsilio Editori s.p.a, Venezia - Italy ISBN 88-317-8706-3 DREAMS AND CONFLICTS, catalogue of 50th International Art Exhibition - Venice, EXTRA 50, presenting RADAR project, p. 644-645, © 2003 La Biennale di Venezia ISBN 88-3178236-3 PUBLICATIONS CAPITAL LIGHT / Details, about LOW TECH LAB London 2016, 22 January 2016, p.12 http://www.capital.bg/light/lica/2016/01/22/2689335_detaili_svetlana_mircheva/

BRAVA CASA / Associations, about Images of the word exhibition, December-January 2015, p.10 PROGRAMATA / Show me again, about Images of the word exhibition, # 687, 12-18 Dec. 2014, p.11 BRAVA CASA, Design in the sky, about arch. Radina Gesheva / Mistakes in interior, July 2013, p.86-87 RICHARD: The Readymade Made Available, By Eriola Pira, January 15, 2014, English, https://www.guernicamag.com/art/richard-the-readymade-made-available/

BRAVA CASA, Artists / One more possibility, text by Lidia Manolova about Possible Exhibitions show, March 2012, p.28-29, Bulgarian NEW YORK TIMES, Bushwick as the Next Gallery District / Published photo from Possible Exhibitions, 8 March 2012 NYT, English, http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2012/03/08/fashion/20120308BUSHWICK-2.html

SOFIA LIVE, Svetlana Mircheva, About the importance of being earnest, interview about Possible Exhibitions show, 29 Feb. 2012, Bulgarian, http://sofialive.bg/heroes/gradski-tip/205-svetlana-mircheva.html LIGHT MAGAZINE, Seven hours similarity / Svetlana Mircheva about her exhibition in NY,12 Jan. 2012, Bulgarian, http://www.capital.bg/light/neshta/2012/01/12/1743366_sedem_chasa_prilika/ FLAVORPILL, NY, NURTUREart presents Svetlana Mircheva: POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS, 26 Jan. 2012 SOFIA LIVE, Possible Worlds / Svetlana Mircheva opened his first solo exhibition in the US, 17 Jan. 2012, Bulgarian, http://sofialive.bg/day/nesto-novo/403-vuzmojni-svetove.html THE L MAGAZINE, Brooklyn, Editor’s Picks, January 18-31 2012/Vol.10/No. 2, p.45, Possible Exhibitions, English, http://www.thelmagazine.com/newyork/svetlana-mircheva-possible-exhibitions/ Event?oid=2210737

SOFIA WEEK MAGAZINE, You speak /article about Svetlana Mircheva and Random Show, #375/3-9, June 2011, p.21-22, Bulgarian, http://www.sofiaweek.com/article/22-%D0%B1%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B9-375.html AN ART NEWSPAPER, edited by Aaron Moulton, CLASSIFIED ADS, Special DECADE Issue/Vel.10/ Nul.23, p. 52, April 1 2011, Berlin, English, http://www.berlinartlink.com/2011/05/27/an-art-newspaper-the-noughties/ KULTURA, By chance, article by Svetlana Kuyumdzhieva about Random Show, Issue 20 (2638), 27 May 2011, Bulgarian, http://www.kultura.bg/bg/article/view/18434 KULTURA, BAZA awards for the third time, aricle by Boriana Rossa about BAZA nominated artists, Issue 28 (2601), 23 July 2010, Bulgarian, http://www.kultura.bg/bg/article/view/17297


SPACE DOGS p. 9 LOVE&PEACE PUZZLE p. 15 SOUNDSCAPES p. 21 Soundscape p. 22-27 Sound Green, Sound Pink p. 28-29

IMAGES OF THE WORD

p. 31

Random, chance, blind date, serendipity text by Olivier Boissiere p. 33-35 Ads for happy days: p. 36-45 You’ve got questions, We’ve got mountain. p. 36-37 How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Sun? p. 39 Speak the word strongly p. 41 Me, knowing the letters, I speak p. 43 Make believe p. 47-49 Make page 1-15 p. 51-57 For Laika with love p. 58-69 Rebus Collages: p. 70-73 Menuetto in G major p. 70-71 Cry me a river p. 70-71 At 11 o’clock put everything in the blue pot p. 72-73 Fly me to the moon p. 72-73 Object, Book p. 75 Good morning 1 & 2 p. 76-77 Untitled, Moose p. 79

103 MISTAKES p. 81 Legs text by Olivier Boissiere p. 82-83 103 Mistakes p. 84-101

POSSIBLE EXHIBITIONS p. 103 Interstitial Realities text by Marco Antonini p. 104-105

Possible Exhibitions p. 107-119

RANDOM SHOW p. 121 Random Show text by Vladiya Mihaylova p. 123 Saved Images p. 125-129 Time Place p. 131-133 Riverside p. 135 Possible Exhibitions p. 136-137

SCREEN WORKS p. 139

Mistakes p. 140-141 Linear selfportrait with colors and no shapes p. 143 Deconstructing Ivan Milev’s “Dragon’s Bride” p. 145 Invisible Places p. 146-147 Woodhouse Bowling Club p. 149 Inside Story p. 151 Reverse p. 153 28 Pixel Portraits p. 155

One and the same view

p. 157

DRAWINGS, COLLAGES p. 159

Parallel drawings

p. 160

Red-haired woman hugs you

p. 167

RESUME p. 169 Credits p. 174


SVETLANA MIRCHEVA

SPACE DOGS This catalogue presents the works of Svetlana Mircheva from her 4 solo exhibitions in the period 2011 - 2014, new works from 2014 - 2016, screen works and drawings. Printed in Sofia, 2017. Edited & designed by Svetlana Mircheva Texts by Olivier Boissiere Marco Antonini Vladyia Mihaylova

Photo credits © Tihomir Rachev Images of the word | pages 36-37, 39, 41, 43, 44-45, 47, 48-49, 39, 51, 53, 54, 55, 58-59, 63, 64-65, 67, 69, 70-71, 72-73 103 Mistakes | pages 84-85, 87, 89, 91, 93, 96-97 Possible Exhibitions | pages 107, 109, 111, 113, 115 © Kalin Ivanov Possible Exhibitions | pages 116-117, 118-119 © Boris Missirkov Random Show| pages 125, 127, 128, 129, 131, 133, 135, 136-137 © Svetlana Mircheva Space Dogs | pages 10-11, 13

Love&Peace Puzzle | pages 16-17, 19

Soundscapes | pages 22-23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 Images of the word | pages 61, 75 76, 77 79 103 Mistakes | pages 95, 98-99, 100-101 Cover Space Dogs, 2016 Printing Bulged, Sofia © 2017 Svetlana Mircheva svetlanamircheva.com


Svetlana Mircheva / SPACE DOGS  

© SM 2017